Episode 10 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 10

Antiques experts travel across the country, competing to make a profit at auction. Charles reduces Anita to tears but it's still a happy ending for their Caledonian adventure.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-What a job!

-..with £200 each.

-Are you with me?

-..a classic car...

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-Buckle up.

-..and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-Ooh, sorry!

-Ha-ha!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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-There'll be worthy winners...

-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Have a good trip!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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For the last time on this trip,

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our proper Charlie and his darling are cavorting around Caledonia

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in the 1972 Triumph Stag, and it's been a bumpy ride.

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-I feel a bit of a flop.

-Oh, no, Charlie!

-Oh, I do!

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Never, never, never, never...

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I haven't quite taken any dizzy heights,

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so I hope to make this leg end my legend.

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Of a last day of a last shop, can I be your leg end?

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Yes! They're both on their last legs. Ha!

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And Charles needs to get back on his feet again

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after a small loss last time.

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He starts out today with £245.72 in his piggy...

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..while Anita is standing her ground,

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leading this time with a budget of £349.32.

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Right, let's get moving!

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If I was to say to you, "Are you a twister or a sticker?"

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I think you'll say...

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# Let's twist again like we did last summer. #

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Come on, give me a twist, Anita. Come on, give me a twist.

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-BOTH:

-# Let's twist again... #

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-Come on. It's the last time, Anita.

-# Like we did last summer

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# Like we did last summer... #

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THEY LAUGH

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Charles and Anita have twisted their way from Kilbarchan,

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through Scotland and the Lakes,

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heading for a final auction in North Shields.

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Hello, horses. Give me some hay.

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Before saying hello to North Shields,

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they're off to Dundee, birthplace of Desperate Dan

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and the desperate poetry of William McGonagall,

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who famously lamented the collapse of the ill-fated bridge

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of the silvery Tay in 1879.

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Anita is dropping Charles off in the rain at his first shop...

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-Bye.

-..Clepington Antiques and Collectables,

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presided over by Rosie. Hi, Rosie.

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It's wet and there is so much stuff to see.

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So, get looking.

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How do you fancy some Australian

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express gift food parcels plum pudding?

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And this plum pudding is "to serve right now",

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but I suspect this plum pudding went off a long time ago.

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In fact, I think that's a 1950s tin of plums

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with the original contents inside. It's amazing.

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Well, that's lunch sorted, then.

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-Anything else tasty?

-"Mechanical toy gramophone."

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Here, you've got this beautifully well-preserved case...

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..and inside... Wow!

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..are the original contents of the gramophone player

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and various records. There we go.

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This toy record player was made in Swansea in the early 1960s

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by American toy manufacturer Louis Marx & Co. A possible?

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Let's leave our 78 thinking about that

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and find out what's singing to Anita this morning.

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Her first port of call is 12 miles upriver

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at the village of Abernyte, and she's bound for

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the Scottish Antique & Arts Centre.

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Gosh, you could get lost in here.

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Keep your eyes peeled. You never know what's round the corner.

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Does that remind you of anyone?

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-His name's Charlie.

-And he speaks so highly of you.

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Right, something has caught her eye,

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and dealer Stephen is on hand to help.

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-Down here.

-OK.

-And you can maybe open it up for me.

-Certainly.

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-OK, thank you very much.

-There we are. Thank you.

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I love these Art Deco figures.

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-She looks a bit like a windmill girl.

-She does, yeah.

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But I think she might possibly be French.

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Now, there is a price on it of £85.

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What is the very best that you can do?

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-The best on that would be 77.

-77.

-Yeah.

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-Is that the very, very best?

-The best we'd do, yeah.

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-I'm going to take it.

-Oh. Well, thank you very much.

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Thank you very much. That's terrific. Could you put that behind the counter?

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-Because I'm going to keep on looking.

-OK. Thank you. Will do.

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Neat footwork, Anita.

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Now, back in Dundee, Charles seems to be stuck on that record player,

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and has summoned Rosie.

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-HE SINGS ALONG TO GRAMOPHONE

-You're so cool.

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-Isn't that wonderful?

-That's amazing.

-And that's it.

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What I like about it, Rosie, is it's so vibrant.

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It is all complete.

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-I love it.

-OK.

-To a humble man of a modern age...

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-Mm-hm.

-..how much could this be?

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Well, we've got this priced at 50. Erm, I could bring it down.

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-40?

-30.

-OK.

-It's your call.

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How about if we say 35?

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I like it, and I think, from my jazz hands to yours,

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-there we go. Give me your hand.

-Oh.

-Give me your hand.

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-I'm going to turn you around. There you go.

-Oh, wow!

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-I'll take it.

-Oh, deal!

-Sold!

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-Thank you very much. I love it.

-Good.

-It's got history. Play me out.

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See you later! Bye! Bye!

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Away he goes, pocket lightened to the tune of £35.

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Meanwhile, what's catching our magpie's beady eye?

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Ooh la la. I like this.

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It's an opalescent bowl,

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and it's very much in the style and manner of Rene Lalique.

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This would have been made in the early 1900s.

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The pattern is geometric.

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It's 100 miles away from the fussiness of Victorian decoration,

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and we can see on the back that it was made in France.

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It's priced up at £48.

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Now, if I can get a little bit off of that,

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I think I could make a small profit in the North Shields auction.

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You do that.

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Stephen, I've fallen in love with this French Art Deco bowl.

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Has a bit of style, has a bit of ooh la la.

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-Bit like yourself.

-SHE LAUGHS

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It's priced at £48. What's the best you can do for me?

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-The best would be £43.

-That's absolutely fine with me.

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-Lovely.

-What's my total for both of these?

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Right, so, 43, and we said 77, so £120.

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Lovely. Lovely. I'm happy at that.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you. Bye-bye.

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Two for the Auld Alliance. Vive la France!

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Meanwhile, Charles is on his way north,

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where the Angus Glens wind into the great mountain ranges beyond.

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He's bound for Kirriemuir,

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a town proud of its most famous son, JM Barrie, author of Peter Pan.

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But we're not on the trail of Lost Boys today.

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Charles is following the footsteps of another local hero,

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whose name lives in the very landscape of Scotland,

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mountaineer Sir Hugh Munro.

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Charles is meeting Stewart Logan, he president of the Munro Society,

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-to hear his story.

-Come on in with me.

-Thank you.

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Hugh Munro was born in London in 1856,

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but was brought up on the family estate near Kirriemuir,

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where his lifelong love of the Scottish hills began.

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He was a founder member

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of the Scottish Mountaineering Club in 1889.

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-Right.

-And one of the first things the club decided was

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they would get a formal list of the Scottish hills over 3,000ft.

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And because Hugh Munro, earlier in the century,

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and up to that point,

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had climbed many of these Scottish hills himself,

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they reckoned he was the ideal person with the knowledge

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to start listing the hills. He did an extremely accurate job.

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How did he do that?

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He made extensive use of maps, which were around,

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but not nearly as accurate as the ones today,

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and he used an aneroid barometer.

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And that is a device where,

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if you set the height at a known height

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and then go up a mountain to the top,

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the change in pressure is recorded by the aneroid barometer,

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and that gives you the height of the top of the mountain

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relative to where you set it down at the base.

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-How many Munros are there?

-He listed 283.

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The figure now is 282,

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which sounds as though, "Oh, he was accurate within one hill,"

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but, in fact, there have been a few adjustments

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because of new maps.

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Many Scottish mountains are far from any roads,

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and unpredictable weather can make them treacherous,

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but Munro took just two years to produce his list,

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and the tables were published in 1891.

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His list is now really the Bible

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for people climbing the Scottish hills.

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Surprisingly, before the Second World War,

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only eight people had finished his list.

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When I finished, in 1981,

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about 300 people had recorded as having finished them.

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It is now 6,500.

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Sir Hugh himself climbed all but two of the Munros,

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as they came to be known,

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but Stewart has bagged all 282 of them, ten times.

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He has a very precious and personal possession of Sir Hugh's.

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Does that mean anything to you?

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It looks to be a small pocket aneroid barometer.

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It is Monro's aneroid barometer.

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This is the one that he measured all the hills with.

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-It's amazing.

-It really is quite amazing to handle this.

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All the Scottish Munros can be bagged by walkers except one -

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the Inaccessible Pinnacle on the Isle of Skye.

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It requires rock climbing skills,

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and which Munro himself never climbed.

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To give Charles a taste of Munro bagging,

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Stewart has arranged for a trip to a local quarry

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with instructor Graeme Morrison.

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-OK, wish me luck.

-Good luck, Charles.

-I'm going up.

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-OK, now get your right hand in there.

-Yeah.

-Good.

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Now bring your right foot to your left foot on the same ledge for me.

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-That's it.

-Ah! Pathetic, aren't I?

-No, you're not. It's hard.

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It's so embarrassing. I can't get off the ground!

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It's terrible. Can I start higher up?

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-Come on! You can do it!

-HE LAUGHS

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-Come on, Stewart! I can't hear you!

-On you go, on you go!

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What would Munro have said?

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"I think he should just stick to antiques."

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-HE LAUGHS

-There. Ooh.

-I can't. Sorry, guys.

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I can't beat the Scottish rock face.

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The Englishman clearly has come back down to earth.

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What do you mean you've come down to earth?

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-You never left it!

-THEY LAUGH

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Listen, how much is your sporran? How much is it?

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-How much is it?

-What would you take for it?

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-How much?

-You don't want it. I mean, this is a tatty old thing.

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-You can buy a perfectly good one.

-Yeah, but it's got your pedigree.

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-OK, I'll give you a tenner for it.

-If you're desperate for it.

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-I will happily. Are you sure?

-Yes.

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I haven't conquered the rock face, but I'm very, very delighted

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if I can go away wearing your sporran.

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-And the kilt, as well?

-You're not having that!

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Certainly not.

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-Where's my tenner, then?

-There you go.

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-I'm very grateful, Stewart.

-OK.

-Thanks a lot.

-Right, OK.

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Well, that's one of the cheekiest deals

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we've ever seen on the Antiques Road Trip.

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I'm glad Stewart was at least left with his kilt!

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So, what's Anita got to say?

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Charlie's nuts. He's just a marvellous guy.

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A marvellous guy.

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You likened him to a crocodile earlier this morning.

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Now, Anita's headed further up the Tay to the village of Rait,

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where she'll be hoping to pick up something precious at her next shop,

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a lovely former farm now housing Rait Antique Centre.

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-Hi, Val.

-Good to see you.

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This looks absolutely fabulous in here.

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-Well, there's something for everybody.

-There is.

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Take your time and have a good look round.

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I'm going to enjoy myself.

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Time to cast her eyes over the wares.

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Ha-ha-ha! Look, shiny things.

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I've been drawn to the sparkly cabinets,

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and this ring has caught my eye.

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It's Art Deco style,

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and it's the type of ring, or the style of ring,

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which may have been worn by a gal like my little Art Deco figure.

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It's unfortunately not a diamond.

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If it was a diamond, it would be worth a lot of money,

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but it's got the look.

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It's priced at £39.

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Now, yes, it doesn't have precious stones in it,

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but it has the look,

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and I think a stylish lady at the North Shields auction

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might fancy that for herself.

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-I quite like this ring. It's priced at £39.

-Mm-hm.

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-Is there anything you can do on that?

-Erm, I could do 35.

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-35?

-Yeah.

-I'm going to take it.

-OK.

-That's terrific.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

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Now, if you could find a wee box for it, it would be fabulous.

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-Let's do that.

-If we can put that over there,

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I want to continue looking.

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-OK?

-Fabulous. OK.

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Yes, what might madame fancy next?

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This box contains a lovely set comprising a silver paper knife

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with pink marble handle and a little seal - again, silver.

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On the end of the seal, we have initials.

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And, again, with that lovely pink marble.

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It's in its original box

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with the retailer's address there, and I like to see that.

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On the label, it says that it's circa 1860.

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Now, is this of any use in today's world?

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I don't know. Probably not,

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but it's a beautiful item, and it's a thing of quality.

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Val, I've found something that I've fallen in love with.

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It's priced at £195.

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-Now, that would completely blow my budget.

-Right.

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-What can you do for me on that?

-We could do it for 160.

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I'm going to shake your hand before you change your mind.

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So, for my two items, what is my total?

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Well, the ring was 39, which we'll reduce to 35.

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160. It would be 195 in total.

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195. I'm spending money today.

0:15:190:15:21

-Right.

-THEY LAUGH

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-95.

-That's brilliant, thank you.

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Having parted with £315 in two shops,

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it's time for Anita to collect Charles and call it a day.

0:15:300:15:33

I almost could do with an orange.

0:15:360:15:37

-An orange, Charles? What are you talking about?

-Yeah, yeah. Not a juice, an orange.

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It's like half-time, and I need an orange to chew

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and to think about my performance today.

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It's been a good day.

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Yes, tomorrow's another day.

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Before it's all gone with the wind, nighty-night.

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Going, going, going...gone!

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The sun has got his hat on.

0:16:020:16:04

So do our two dashing experts,

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duly rejuvenated this morning by the North Sea air

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and ready to seize a last chance to make a splash at auction.

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You're still looking for that biggie, Charlie, aren't you?

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-They call me Hanson the Hunter.

-SHE LAUGHS

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Anita, you are the hunted. I hunted you down again.

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But now it's my time to become the hunter.

0:16:230:16:27

-Well, good luck to you, Charlie.

-Thanks, Anita.

0:16:270:16:29

He definitely needs it. Yesterday, Charles got in the groove

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with a vintage toy record player,

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before some jiggery-pokery with a sporran.

0:16:350:16:38

-I'll give you a tenner for it.

-And he starts today with £200.72.

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Dear, oh, dear.

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While Anita came over all Francophile

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-with an opalescent bowl...

-Ooh la la!

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..an Art Deco figurine, a gem-set ring,

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and a tres cher French silver and marble paper knife and seal,

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leaving her a petite £34.32.

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But it's a new day and we're off to Aberdeen,

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and the impressive granite pinnacles of Marischal College

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are glinting in the sunshine.

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The city's motto, Bon Accord, is French for good agreement.

0:17:100:17:15

Hopefully, we'll be seeing a few of those in our antiques shops today.

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First, though, Charles is dropping Anita at Aberdeen Beach.

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-Oh, Charlie!

-Look at that!

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Well, have a good day, and bye, bye, bye, Charlie.

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While Charles shoots off in the Stag to start his shopping,

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Anita's navigating her way to Aberdeen Maritime Museum

0:17:350:17:38

on Shiprow, near the city's harbour,

0:17:380:17:41

to hear about a 19th-century seafaring local

0:17:410:17:44

who made big waves in Japan.

0:17:440:17:46

-Hello.

-Jason Finch has the story of Thomas Blake Glover,

0:17:460:17:50

the man they call the Scottish Samurai.

0:17:500:17:53

Jason, what was his background?

0:17:530:17:55

He's an Aberdeenshire-born man, born in Fraserburgh.

0:17:550:17:58

He's a merchant. He's an entrepreneur.

0:17:580:18:00

He goes out to Japan,

0:18:000:18:02

he introduces a whole new range of technologies out there.

0:18:020:18:05

He helps create the modern Japan we know today.

0:18:050:18:07

Thomas Blake Glover was employed by a Scottish merchant firm

0:18:070:18:11

and sailed to the Far East as a tea trader, aged 18, in 1857.

0:18:110:18:16

Just four years later, he was running his own company in Nagasaki,

0:18:160:18:20

in a society far removed

0:18:200:18:22

from the one he'd left behind in Aberdeenshire.

0:18:220:18:25

Japan had been closed for about 200 years.

0:18:270:18:30

When Glover arrives, it's just starting to open up

0:18:300:18:33

to the rest of the world, but it would be very much

0:18:330:18:36

what Thomas would have considered to be a medieval society.

0:18:360:18:39

From 1641, the military dictatorship of the shoguns

0:18:390:18:43

prohibited contact with most foreign countries

0:18:430:18:46

in order to secure their own cultural,

0:18:460:18:48

political and economic power.

0:18:480:18:51

Negotiating this Japanese society was a risky business.

0:18:510:18:55

Blake Glover learned Japanese and befriended the fearsome samurai

0:18:550:18:59

of powerful clans like the Satsuma,

0:18:590:19:02

who were keen to overthrow the old order.

0:19:020:19:05

-He was playing a very dangerous game.

-Definitely.

0:19:050:19:08

He becomes involved in their revolution.

0:19:080:19:10

They trust him. They respect him.

0:19:100:19:12

He puts himself on the line for them.

0:19:120:19:14

They honour that, they respect that,

0:19:140:19:15

and that's why he becomes known as the Scottish Samurai.

0:19:150:19:18

Blake Glover helped arm the rebels, and in 1868,

0:19:210:19:24

when the military rule of the shogun was overthrown,

0:19:240:19:26

he set about working with the new regime

0:19:260:19:28

on a programme of modernisation.

0:19:280:19:31

If you look out the window behind us,

0:19:310:19:33

you will see Aberdeen Harbour.

0:19:330:19:35

Back in Thomas's time, this was a ship building centre,

0:19:350:19:38

and he had a whole series of vessels built for the Japanese -

0:19:380:19:41

warships and merchant ships.

0:19:410:19:43

He was also involved in introducing other technologies

0:19:430:19:46

and industries to Japan.

0:19:460:19:47

He helped get the first coalmine going in Japan.

0:19:470:19:51

He also helped set up Kirin,

0:19:510:19:52

the first successful Western-style brewery in Japan.

0:19:520:19:55

And he was happy in Japan because he made his home there.

0:19:550:19:59

Thomas Blake Glover lived the rest of his life in Japan,

0:19:590:20:03

introducing railways and co-founding the Mitsubishi company.

0:20:030:20:07

In 1908, he was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun,

0:20:070:20:11

acknowledged as a key figure in the speed and scale

0:20:110:20:13

of Japan's industrial revolution.

0:20:130:20:16

I think you can say he created the modern Japan we know today.

0:20:160:20:19

Many Japanese tourists come to Scotland

0:20:190:20:21

because it's where Thomas Blake Glover came from.

0:20:210:20:24

They want to visit his homeland.

0:20:240:20:26

-They're making a pilgrimage.

-Exactly.

0:20:260:20:28

Jason, it has been a fascinating story.

0:20:280:20:32

-Thank you so much for sharing it with me.

-It's been a pleasure.

0:20:320:20:35

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:20:350:20:36

Time to follow Charles now,

0:20:390:20:41

as he makes his way ten miles north to Newmachar.

0:20:410:20:45

I like to believe

0:20:450:20:47

in the sapphire-jewelled seas and the glint of gold up above.

0:20:470:20:54

It certainly sets up that feeling that treasure is lurking.

0:20:540:20:59

And who knows what might well be lurking inside his first shop today,

0:20:590:21:04

the poetically named Collecting The World?

0:21:040:21:07

-How are you?

-Good to meet you, Charles.

0:21:070:21:09

-Your name, sir, is...?

-Brian.

0:21:090:21:10

Brian, what a lovely, traditional shop you've got here.

0:21:100:21:13

Has much been washed in by the waves?

0:21:130:21:16

Any buried treasure which could be Pirate Hanson's?

0:21:160:21:20

Well, a couple of things. I don't know if you're a gambler.

0:21:200:21:24

-I'm a gambler.

-Greyhound racing.

-Oh, amazing.

-Just a wee quirky game.

0:21:240:21:30

Isn't that lovely? Of course, actually, greyhound racing

0:21:300:21:33

in and around Geordie land, that might go down quite well.

0:21:330:21:37

-How much is it, out of interest, Brian?

-20, 25.

0:21:370:21:40

If it's of interest, yours for 15.

0:21:400:21:43

Wow. I'll tell you what, you're warming me up,

0:21:430:21:46

-so I'll mental-note that.

-Yeah, have a think about that one.

0:21:460:21:48

-I'll put the lid back on.

-Yeah, sure.

-I'm almost out of the block.

0:21:480:21:51

I'm a greyhound, and I feel here, I'm at the races.

0:21:510:21:55

Get on with the search then, speedy.

0:21:550:21:58

-Brian?

-What have you found, Charles?

0:22:010:22:03

I think you've put down here very good quality

0:22:030:22:05

hand-carved nutcrackers,

0:22:050:22:09

and I would have thought...

0:22:090:22:11

What are they made of, do you know?

0:22:110:22:13

No. I wondered maybe a lime wood of some kind.

0:22:130:22:17

-So, fruit wood.

-Fruit wood, yeah.

0:22:170:22:19

So, I think it's probably an apple wood or a pear wood,

0:22:190:22:22

and hence their likeness to treen collectors,

0:22:220:22:25

which is that generic term for wooden works of art.

0:22:250:22:29

I think it's got an appeal. How old are they, do you think?

0:22:290:22:32

Well, that's what I'm not sure of.

0:22:320:22:34

I think they're either late 19th or early 20th, I would say.

0:22:340:22:41

-How much could that be?

-The price is the price.

0:22:410:22:43

If it's 20 or less... So, Charles, it's 18.

0:22:430:22:46

-£18 is the bottom?

-Yeah, I would say so.

-Fine.

0:22:460:22:51

"Give us a kiss, though." Sorry.

0:22:510:22:53

I'll take it, Brian. I'll say going, going, gone.

0:22:530:22:56

-Good stuff.

-Thanks, Brian. Take it over there.

0:22:560:22:59

Cheers. Thanks, lad.

0:22:590:23:01

One down!

0:23:010:23:03

Very good, but winning will still be a hard nut to crack.

0:23:030:23:07

What I love up here are these football figures.

0:23:070:23:11

As Anita might say, "They're wee bonny lads, aren't they?"

0:23:120:23:15

Oh, yes, she'd like them.

0:23:150:23:17

Anything footballing, collectable, prewar,

0:23:170:23:21

is sought after, and I think they're probably 1920s.

0:23:210:23:24

Yeah, I wondered about maybe even pre-First World War

0:23:240:23:27

-or just post, yeah.

-How much could they be?

0:23:270:23:29

-I'd need £90 for them.

-Would you really?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:23:320:23:35

-For the pair?

-Yeah.

0:23:350:23:37

And that's... I mean, they could fly, couldn't they?

0:23:370:23:39

-On the top deck.

-Yeah.

0:23:390:23:42

Playing a 4-4-2. Thanks, but I'll keep on wandering, thanks.

0:23:420:23:46

Yes, there may be cash in that attic.

0:23:460:23:50

Oh, wow.

0:23:500:23:51

It's a big old room.

0:23:530:23:55

I'm looking for a smaller camera,

0:23:580:24:00

which might have the echoes of Paul Laidlaw,

0:24:000:24:04

and the riches of antique finds.

0:24:040:24:08

And long live Paul Laidlaw.

0:24:080:24:11

Catch him if you can, Charles. Now, time and tide wait for no man.

0:24:110:24:16

-Can we pull out the greyhound racing game again?

-Sure.

0:24:160:24:20

So, I think, for £15, it's fun, it's fairly complete.

0:24:210:24:27

-I'll take it. £15 for that one, as well.

-Good.

-OK?

0:24:290:24:32

Now, is there one more item here I'd like to buy, Brian?

0:24:320:24:36

I think, at £90, I shall take those two figures and have a go.

0:24:360:24:43

-Good.

-Thank you.

-Good stuff.

0:24:430:24:45

Great. So, what's the final score?

0:24:450:24:47

18, 15 and 90, which comes to 123.

0:24:470:24:53

Here we go.

0:24:530:24:55

-Good stuff. Cheers. All the best.

-Bye-bye.

0:24:560:24:58

All right, boy. How you doing? Away the lads.

0:24:580:25:00

Look, Anita can go in the back, OK? You can sit in the front with me.

0:25:000:25:04

Away the lads, indeed.

0:25:040:25:06

Let's see if they can top the league at auction.

0:25:060:25:09

Meanwhile, Anita has made her way further northwards,

0:25:090:25:13

through rural Aberdeenshire, to Ellon,

0:25:130:25:16

on the banks of the River Ythan.

0:25:160:25:18

And Ellon Indoor Market is the last shop of this trip.

0:25:180:25:21

SHE PLAYS BADLY

0:25:220:25:25

A piano is clearly not her forte.

0:25:250:25:28

As well as antiques, this store sells all manner of household goods,

0:25:300:25:34

hardware and pet supplies.

0:25:340:25:37

Ah, worms!

0:25:370:25:39

Never mind. There'll be a wee scone for you soon,

0:25:390:25:43

but you have to buy something first.

0:25:430:25:46

Hark, is that the sound of a Stag?

0:25:460:25:49

HE HUMS Crikey!

0:25:490:25:51

He's a big kid, really, you know.

0:25:560:25:59

And without further ado, he's roped in a grown-up.

0:26:010:26:05

What have we got, Kerry? I'm in my 11th hour.

0:26:050:26:08

I love that sort of thing.

0:26:080:26:10

-What are they?

-I have no idea. We've never had them in before.

0:26:100:26:12

I thought they were footstools, but I don't know.

0:26:120:26:14

-They're for praying, aren't they?

-For kneeling?

-You might kneel.

0:26:140:26:17

-So, basically, I'll show you.

-Are you going to kneel?

0:26:170:26:20

Have a kneel. So, what you do,

0:26:200:26:22

when the going gets tough - come round here -

0:26:220:26:24

on the Antiques Road Trip, you kneel down like that.

0:26:240:26:27

-I might not be able to get back up again.

-And you pray for one man.

0:26:270:26:30

-OK.

-OK, who do you pray for?

0:26:300:26:32

-You!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:26:320:26:34

-Pray for Hanson, OK?

-Pray for Hanson.

0:26:340:26:36

We pray, at the 11th hour, that I can find something amazing in here.

0:26:360:26:39

Yes, we'll pray for that.

0:26:390:26:40

And I can light up and illuminate the room and make some money.

0:26:400:26:43

-OK? Because somewhere, Miss Manning is about, OK?

-Yes.

0:26:430:26:47

Hello.

0:26:470:26:49

I was praying, praying for the week we've had, the enjoyment.

0:26:490:26:53

You're on your knees to another woman, Charlie.

0:26:530:26:57

Sorry, Anita. It's been a wonderful week.

0:26:570:27:00

-You're a Lothario!

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:000:27:03

I've had a wonderful week, Anita, with you, but time moves on.

0:27:030:27:07

-Don't listen to a word he says.

-OK.

0:27:070:27:09

-He's a blether.

-OK. OK.

-What's that? What's a bletherer?

0:27:090:27:12

A blether is one who talks a lot without making much sense. Hm.

0:27:120:27:17

OK then, moving on.

0:27:170:27:19

-Let me see that green box, please.

-I'll let you open those.

0:27:200:27:24

Well, I know that the military guys are always looking out for buttons,

0:27:240:27:28

you know, on uniforms that the buttons are missing.

0:27:280:27:31

And we seem to have really quite a quantity there.

0:27:310:27:35

I wonder what regiment these came from.

0:27:390:27:43

From Birmingham, and it's a name I'm not familiar with.

0:27:450:27:49

-It is a nice little group.

-Yeah.

0:27:490:27:52

It's priced at £22...

0:27:520:27:54

..which might be a wee bit dear for me to put into auction at.

0:27:560:28:00

Erm, can you do a bit better on that for me, Danny?

0:28:000:28:05

-How about 18?

-18?

0:28:050:28:08

-That's not bad, but I'll tell you, 15 would be even better.

-Erm...

0:28:080:28:13

-How about 16?

-16? Put it there.

-Happy?

-Yeah.

0:28:140:28:18

Meet in the middle. Thank you so much.

0:28:180:28:20

I haven't got much money left.

0:28:200:28:22

And with those military buttons,

0:28:220:28:24

Anita is marching to the end of this trip's manoeuvres.

0:28:240:28:27

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-Bye-bye.

-Thanks.

0:28:270:28:30

But is Private Hanson keeping up?

0:28:300:28:32

This is a really interesting chair.

0:28:320:28:34

I don't know where it's from.

0:28:360:28:39

Could be Ashanti, could be African.

0:28:400:28:43

It's been here a while because it was priced at 120.

0:28:440:28:48

Now it's 80. My budget is 77.

0:28:480:28:52

Maybe it's something I could buy for a bit less

0:28:520:28:56

and just go to North Shields on the beat.

0:28:560:29:01

-There's a chair down here.

-Mm-hm. OK.

-It's priced at £80.

0:29:040:29:09

-Mm-hm.

-It was 120.

-Mm-hm.

0:29:090:29:11

I'm wondering if, today, we can drop another £40, and go to 40?

0:29:110:29:15

-40, 80, 120 - what do you think?

-60.

0:29:150:29:18

-Going, going, the week is...

-60.

-..gone.

0:29:180:29:22

-Thank you.

-Perfect, thank you.

0:29:220:29:24

-There's 60.

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks for this. I'm very grateful.

0:29:240:29:27

-Cheers. Bye.

-Bye.

0:29:270:29:29

And that, as they say, is that. Job's done.

0:29:290:29:33

-It's over!

-Go south, young man!

-Go south!

0:29:330:29:37

# You shall have a fishy in the little dishy

0:29:370:29:40

# You shall have a fishy when the boats come in. #

0:29:400:29:44

And we'll see who's boat is coming in at auction,

0:29:440:29:47

after some shut-eye. Night-night.

0:29:470:29:50

The stage is set on Tyneside for the last act of our antiques drama

0:29:530:29:57

and our characters are assembling downriver at North Shields.

0:29:570:30:02

Our star in cars premiered in Dundee,

0:30:020:30:05

and toured Tayside, Angus, and Aberdeenshire,

0:30:050:30:08

before the curtain comes down on the banks of the Tyne.

0:30:080:30:12

-It's our last sale.

-I know!

-I can't believe it.

0:30:120:30:15

It almost feels like a last date, Anita.

0:30:150:30:17

Good luck. After you. I'm nervous.

0:30:170:30:21

We're at Featonby's,

0:30:210:30:22

who've been auctioneering hereabouts since the 1920s,

0:30:220:30:25

when, unlike today, there was no internet bidding.

0:30:250:30:29

Anita was almost cleaned out again,

0:30:290:30:31

parting with £331 for her five lots, bless her,

0:30:310:30:36

while Charles put his record player and greyhound game together

0:30:360:30:40

to make one lot, and his total of five lots cost him £228.

0:30:400:30:45

But what do they each think of what the other bought?

0:30:450:30:48

This sporran has been up all the highest hills in Scotland,

0:30:480:30:54

and I'm sure that this sporran is going to be climbing

0:30:540:31:00

into profit in this auction today.

0:31:000:31:03

Anita likes to pull a pose, like this lady.

0:31:030:31:07

The base is in period, in keeping to 1920s,

0:31:070:31:11

and I think, for £77, she might be lucky in love at auction,

0:31:110:31:16

and make a small profit.

0:31:160:31:18

And what does auctioneer Darren Riach think?

0:31:180:31:21

The pair of footballers - Victorian.

0:31:210:31:25

Probably made in the Staffordshire region,

0:31:250:31:27

I think maybe the wrong colours for this particular area.

0:31:270:31:31

My favourite would probably be the Art Deco letter seal

0:31:310:31:35

and the letter opener.

0:31:350:31:37

It's a nice item, and it's in a lovely presentation case,

0:31:370:31:41

and I think it may do well in the auction.

0:31:410:31:44

Let's hope so, since it cost such a lot.

0:31:440:31:48

Now, this is your one-minute call, Ms Manning and Mr Hanson.

0:31:480:31:52

-Showtime!

-Here we are, darling.

-It's very busy.

-Yeah.

0:31:520:31:55

Nice atmosphere.

0:31:550:31:57

First up, a duet of vintage toys -

0:31:570:32:00

Charles's record player and greyhound racing game.

0:32:000:32:02

And they're off!

0:32:020:32:04

I would have loved one of those when I was a wee girl.

0:32:040:32:06

Start the bidding straight in at ten, 12, 15, and away!

0:32:060:32:09

£15 have gone. 15 bid. 18. 20. 22. Five, on the left.

0:32:090:32:12

28 bid now. And in the room at 30.

0:32:120:32:14

-And two. 35.

-Come on!

-Go on!

0:32:140:32:17

40? Can we make it 40?

0:32:170:32:19

42. 45. Internet bidder at 45. 48 with the lady.

0:32:190:32:23

-Yes!

-Thank you. I'm in business. One for the road.

0:32:230:32:26

50. 52. At 52.

0:32:260:32:29

-All done, finished? Selling at £52.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:32:290:32:33

-Yay!

-Yeah!

0:32:330:32:35

Hey, that's a lot of excitement for £2.

0:32:350:32:37

-Good start.

-I'm very lucky, very lucky.

0:32:370:32:40

Must be the method acting kicking in.

0:32:400:32:43

And will Anita's Art Deco figure dance into the spotlight?

0:32:430:32:46

The only difference between you and her is she's Art Deco.

0:32:460:32:50

Start me at 30. It's a nice period figure there.

0:32:500:32:52

-Oh, no, darling!

-Start me at 20, surely?

0:32:520:32:55

-£20.

-In at 20.

-22 on the internet. 22.

0:32:550:32:58

25. 20 at the back of the room. At 28. 30 bid.

0:32:580:33:02

32. 35. Internet bidder. At 35. 38, sir?

0:33:020:33:05

38 bid at the back.

0:33:050:33:07

-40 bid.

-Oh, Charlie!

-At £40.

0:33:070:33:09

42. 45. Back in.

0:33:090:33:12

-Good.

-50.

0:33:120:33:13

At £50. Any advance on 50? Are we all done now?

0:33:130:33:17

-At £50.

-One more, one more.

0:33:170:33:18

Last chance for the Art Deco figure. All done and finished at £50?

0:33:180:33:22

-Oh, there we are, Charlie.

-I think...

-There we are.

0:33:220:33:24

Yes, she paid "tutu" much for it and lost £27.

0:33:240:33:29

I knew that I was taking a wee chance, Charlie,

0:33:290:33:32

but I was willing to do it.

0:33:320:33:34

Next is the sporran Charles paid Stewart a tenner for.

0:33:340:33:37

Have all those Munros added to its value?

0:33:370:33:40

A man in a sporran is like no other, is that right?

0:33:400:33:43

Well, a man in a sporran is...

0:33:430:33:45

Well, it means that he's got a couple of quid.

0:33:450:33:47

THEY LAUGH

0:33:470:33:49

Start me at £50 for it. Someone straight in at 50 for it?

0:33:490:33:51

Surely? Nobody fancy a fling? A Highland fling?

0:33:510:33:54

-A Highland fling!

-£50, surely?

0:33:540:33:56

£30? Start the bidding at 30, surely? I've got a bid at £20.

0:33:560:34:00

We're away, we're away, we're away.

0:34:000:34:02

Two. Five. At the back of the room, at £28. Is there 30?

0:34:020:34:04

-30 on the internet.

-Well, here we go.

0:34:040:34:06

32. 35. Internet bidder at 35.

0:34:060:34:10

-38 bid from you, sir.

-Wow!

-At 38 bid now.

-Good man.

0:34:100:34:13

Can't wait any longer. All done. Bid's in the room at £38.

0:34:130:34:17

-Yes! Well done, Charlie.

-Anita, that's very good.

0:34:170:34:19

I'm very happy, Anita.

0:34:190:34:20

I should think so, with a £28 profit to put in your hairy purse.

0:34:200:34:24

Could I have worn a sporran, do you think, in my attire in England?

0:34:240:34:28

Yeah, why not? You can do whatever you want, Charlie.

0:34:280:34:30

Ha! That, I would like to see.

0:34:300:34:32

Time now for Anita's French bowl.

0:34:320:34:35

It glows. I love the geometric design.

0:34:350:34:39

And we start the bidding at 42. Five. At 45 bid now. 45 bid now.

0:34:390:34:42

-God!

-48. 50 bid.

0:34:420:34:44

At 50. 52. 55.

0:34:440:34:46

58. 60 bid.

0:34:460:34:48

And five. 65 bid over here on my left.

0:34:480:34:50

-Anita, you're brilliant.

-At 65. 70 bid. Internet bid.

0:34:500:34:53

Nobody does it better.

0:34:530:34:56

At £70, very reasonable.

0:34:560:34:57

Last chance, selling at £70.

0:34:570:35:00

-Yes, yes, yes!

-Anita, nobody does it better.

0:35:000:35:03

Bravo, mon petit chou!

0:35:030:35:05

£27 profit, eh? Not bad.

0:35:050:35:07

And bingo!

0:35:070:35:08

Yeah, Charles's carved wooden nutcracker's next.

0:35:080:35:12

What are the biggest nuts you get?

0:35:120:35:14

The biggest nuts, which you can chew?

0:35:140:35:16

-Cashew nuts?

-Coconuts.

-Coconuts!

0:35:160:35:19

22 bid now. At 22. 25, is there? At 22. 25, the lady's bid.

0:35:190:35:22

-It's good, Anita.

-They like them, Charlie.

0:35:220:35:25

At £28 bid now. At 28. 30 bid now. At 30.

0:35:250:35:27

-Go on!

-Lady's bid at £30. £30 bid now. At 30.

0:35:270:35:29

At 32. 35? 35 in the room.

0:35:290:35:32

-Go on.

-At £35 bid now. At £35. Do I see 38? 38, back in.

0:35:320:35:35

-I'll tell you what, Anita, my nuts...

-I'll hold your hand.

0:35:350:35:38

40 bid. At £40, are we all done now?

0:35:380:35:41

I'm going to sell it, fair warning,

0:35:410:35:43

-at £40.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:35:430:35:44

-Very good, Anita.

-Charlie, that's 100% profit.

0:35:440:35:48

So it is. You cracked that one, Charles.

0:35:480:35:51

I might just, later, as a celebration,

0:35:510:35:53

buy you a packet of nuts.

0:35:530:35:55

-Peanuts OK?

-Peanuts are fine.

0:35:550:35:57

Peanuts are fine.

0:35:570:35:59

Anita's French silver and marble paper knife and seal set next.

0:35:590:36:04

-Pull the jackpot. Here we go.

-Here we are.

-At £20. 22.

0:36:040:36:07

-Come here. Hold tight. Hold tight.

-25. 28.

0:36:070:36:10

30. 30 bid. I had £30 bid on my left.

0:36:100:36:12

At £30, the bid's here on my left at 30. 32, fresh bid.

0:36:120:36:14

32. And five? 38? 38.

0:36:140:36:17

40. 42, sir?

0:36:170:36:19

42. 45. 45. 48.

0:36:190:36:22

At £45. It's worth more. At 45.

0:36:220:36:25

48, is there? At £45.

0:36:250:36:27

-Oh, he's trying. He's trying hard.

-He's trying.

-50 bid, sir.

0:36:270:36:30

52? Thought not. 55? 55?

0:36:300:36:34

At £55. Look at it. Beautiful lot, that.

0:36:340:36:36

Last chance, fair warning, at £55.

0:36:360:36:39

-He did his best, Charlie...

-He did.

-..but I've just lost over £100.

0:36:390:36:44

105, to be precise. Quelle catastrophe!

0:36:440:36:48

SHE CHUCKLES

0:36:480:36:51

-I don't know what to say.

-I know. Don't say anything.

0:36:510:36:53

Do you want a coffee just as a half-time refreshment?

0:36:530:36:56

Let's think of the next lot. What's the next lot?

0:36:560:36:58

Exactly, Anita. The next lot, what is it?

0:36:580:37:01

It's your football figures, ready for kick-off.

0:37:010:37:04

Balancing a football on my shoulders.

0:37:060:37:08

Oh, I thought you were dancing wildly, Charlie.

0:37:080:37:11

-Or twitching.

-No, no, they do that.

0:37:110:37:15

-Start me at £40 for the pair.

-Come on.

-£40.

0:37:150:37:17

-It's your big-ticket item.

-They are.

0:37:170:37:19

Come on, surely?

0:37:190:37:20

Shearer! Gazza! Shearer! Gazza!

0:37:210:37:26

-Sorry.

-I think you're ten years too late - Shearer and Gazza.

0:37:260:37:29

-Sorry.

-LAUGHTER

0:37:290:37:31

-No interest?

-Uh-oh.

0:37:310:37:33

Surely? £10 to start the bidding, the lot there.

0:37:330:37:36

£10 for the lot there?

0:37:360:37:37

I don't believe that, actually. £10, I'm bid.

0:37:370:37:39

£10 bid. 12 at the back there. £12 bid. 15 bid now. £15 bid now.

0:37:390:37:42

15. 18 on that now? At £18.

0:37:420:37:44

-They're so good.

-I think they might be just teasing you, Charlie.

0:37:440:37:47

25 bid. Standing up at 25. Standing at 25. 28. At 30.

0:37:470:37:50

At £30. Surely they're worth more?

0:37:500:37:52

Yes, they are. 32. At 32. Internet interest at 32.

0:37:520:37:56

Is there 35? Last chance and fair warning. The hammer's up.

0:37:560:37:59

Bid's on the internet.

0:37:590:38:00

-All done at £32?

-GAVEL BANGS

0:38:000:38:02

32.

0:38:020:38:04

And that own goal's just cost him £58. Wow!

0:38:040:38:08

-I've been given the red card.

-Yeah!

0:38:080:38:10

You're into injury time now, Charles.

0:38:100:38:13

Next, Anita's gem-set ring.

0:38:130:38:15

Where are we going to start? Start me at £50 with the ring there.

0:38:150:38:17

£50 for the ring there. Beautiful ring there. Art Deco.

0:38:170:38:20

-£20, then. £20, I'm bid.

-Oh, there we are.

0:38:200:38:23

28, I've got. 30? 30, bid. At £30, I've got now.

0:38:230:38:26

At £30. Somebody go 32?

0:38:260:38:28

32, fresh bid. 35? 35, internet. 35 bid now.

0:38:280:38:32

38? At 38. 40 bid.

0:38:320:38:35

40 bid in the front row. £40, I've got.

0:38:350:38:37

At £40. Is there 42 anywhere? Surely?

0:38:370:38:40

-42.

-Yes!

-Good lad.

-45. 48. 50 bid.

0:38:400:38:45

At 50. Bid's here now at 50.

0:38:450:38:47

-Get in.

-At £50. Lady's bid. She wants it.

0:38:470:38:49

The lady gets what the lady wants.

0:38:490:38:51

At £50. That's usually the case, the way it goes, isn't it?

0:38:510:38:54

-At £50.

-He's good. He's good.

-At £50.

0:38:540:38:55

The lady's bid. All done, selling at £50.

0:38:550:38:59

-Yes!

-Well done, Anita. Enjoy it.

-It's lovely.

0:38:590:39:03

So it is, and £15 back in your piggy.

0:39:030:39:07

That'll help with my minus 105.

0:39:070:39:11

Well, a little bit, anyway.

0:39:110:39:12

Next, Charles's last lot, the tribal chair.

0:39:120:39:16

You've got to believe.

0:39:160:39:17

HE HUMS

0:39:170:39:22

-I'm meditating.

-Oh, you're meditating, Charlie.

0:39:220:39:24

Start me at £50 for the chair there. Very unusual.

0:39:240:39:26

£50 for the chair. £50 for it.

0:39:260:39:28

When are you going to see another one? Think about it.

0:39:280:39:30

£50 for that beautiful chair there.

0:39:300:39:32

-Meditate!

-HE BREATHES DEEPLY

0:39:320:39:34

£30, we're going to start then.

0:39:340:39:36

£30. The bid's here now at £30. The bid's here now at 30.

0:39:360:39:39

Somebody go 32. 32, I've got.

0:39:390:39:41

And five. 40 bid.

0:39:410:39:43

42. And five. 48.

0:39:430:39:46

-Are we going to get 50?

-Go on!

0:39:460:39:48

-Go on!

-HE BREATHES DEEPLY

0:39:480:39:50

50 bid. 52.

0:39:500:39:52

At 52. 55, is there?

0:39:520:39:54

-At 52.

-Go on!

-Charlie, we're nearly there.

0:39:540:39:56

At £52. Any advance on 52?

0:39:560:39:58

-Go on!

-Come on!

-At £52. For 52.

-Come on!

-At 52.

0:39:580:40:02

-Last chance at 52.

-Go on!

-All done at £52.

0:40:020:40:06

-GAVEL BANGS

-Aw!

-Anita...

0:40:060:40:09

-Charlie, it could have been a lot worse.

-It could.

0:40:090:40:11

Or better. £8 down, then.

0:40:110:40:14

-I'm very happy.

-Maybe you didn't meditate hard enough.

0:40:170:40:20

Time for the finale now - Anita's military buttons.

0:40:200:40:23

-We salute them.

-Yeah.

-We'll start the bidding at ten.

0:40:230:40:26

12. 15. 18. 20. 20, I've got.

0:40:260:40:28

-Good.

-22 somewhere? At £20. Bid now at 20. At £20.

0:40:280:40:31

Bid now at 20. I've got a bid of 20.

0:40:310:40:33

-Profit.

-At 22. 25. Bid now at 25.

0:40:330:40:35

Bid now at 28. Bid on the net at 28. Bid now at 28.

0:40:350:40:37

Is there 30? At 28, still on the net.

0:40:370:40:40

-£28!

-At £28.

0:40:400:40:44

-That's good.

-I am a happy girl.

0:40:440:40:47

And £12 isn't buttons, or washers, or something.

0:40:470:40:51

That's my week over, Anita. Thank you for the memories.

0:40:510:40:53

The emotion, the moment, the timings, the passion, the love.

0:40:530:40:57

I'm going to burst oot greetin' in a minute.

0:40:570:40:59

-SHE LAUGHS

-Gretna Green, did you say?

0:40:590:41:02

-Greetin'.

-Gretna Green?

0:41:020:41:04

No, burst oot greetin'.

0:41:040:41:07

-What does that mean?

-It means burst into tears.

0:41:070:41:10

Burst oot greetin'?

0:41:100:41:11

-SHE LAUGHS

-Is that better? You're going to cry?

0:41:110:41:14

I am! I've burst oot greetin'!

0:41:160:41:18

I'm going to burst oot greetin' if this goes on any longer.

0:41:180:41:22

Uh-oh, they're off.

0:41:220:41:24

Now for the epilogue.

0:41:270:41:28

A mixed bag of profits and losses cost Charles £2.52,

0:41:280:41:34

leaving him with a final total of £193.20...

0:41:340:41:39

..while Anita's made quite a loss today of £123.54.

0:41:410:41:46

However, her final tally is £225.78.

0:41:460:41:51

So, we declare that she is our prima donna this time.

0:41:510:41:55

Bravo! All profits go to Children In Need.

0:41:550:41:58

-Charlie...

-Oh, Anita!

-..that was wonderful.

0:42:000:42:03

Oh, there they are. Look at the Geordie skies,

0:42:030:42:06

and the trials and tribulations, hey?

0:42:060:42:08

-What a week.

-The end of a wonderful trip.

0:42:080:42:10

It's been wonderful, Anita. You're going north. I'm going south.

0:42:100:42:13

There's one where I can take you now -

0:42:130:42:15

-over the threshold...

-Oh, Charlie!

-..for one last time.

0:42:150:42:19

-Let's go!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:42:190:42:22

# Love lift us up where we belong... #

0:42:220:42:25

Ah, yes, up there where they belong.

0:42:250:42:28

I do talk some rubbish, don't I?

0:42:280:42:30

We salute their talents...

0:42:300:42:32

-SMASHING

-Sorry, sorry, sorry.

0:42:320:42:34

Charlie can keep the stack!

0:42:340:42:36

-Fishy, fishy, fishy!

-HE WHISTLES

0:42:360:42:39

..their vitality...

0:42:390:42:41

OK, darling, buckle up.

0:42:420:42:45

..tender hearts...

0:42:450:42:46

# Up where the clear winds blow... #

0:42:460:42:50

-..and their tactics.

-Yay!

0:42:500:42:53

HE GROANS

0:42:530:42:57

God bless them, and all who sail with them.

0:42:570:43:00

Thank you, Anita and Charles.

0:43:000:43:03

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:030:43:05

a new pair of experts, Margie Cooper and Paul Laidlaw.

0:43:050:43:08

Pull over and give me a big hug.

0:43:080:43:11

There's going to be wheeling...

0:43:110:43:13

SHE LAUGHS ..and dealing.

0:43:130:43:16

Profit - that's what I want.

0:43:160:43:18

Hey, it's looking good.

0:43:180:43:20

But who will hit the right note on the next antique adventure? Ha-ha!

0:43:200:43:26

Charles Hanson goes native in Scotland and after an unorthodox bargain comes back with a sporran while Anita Manning revives the Auld Alliance with some expensive French transactions.

While Anita is reduced to tears by Charles's attempts to master the local lingo, his dancing to a vintage toy record player would make anyone weep.

It's a final fling on this Caledonian buying adventure but who will be on their last legs at the auction over the border in North Shields?