Episode 9 Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 9

Anita Manning learns the difference between Scottish and English remembrance poppies at the factory where they are made, while Charles Hanson enjoys an 18th-century style tea.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 9. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

0:00:020:00:04

What a job!

0:00:040:00:05

-With £200 each...

-You with me?

0:00:050:00:06

..a classic car...

0:00:060:00:08

Buckle up.

0:00:080:00:09

..and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

0:00:090:00:12

Ooh, sorry!

0:00:120:00:13

Ha-ha!

0:00:130:00:14

The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

0:00:140:00:17

But it's no mean feat.

0:00:170:00:19

There'll be worthy winners...

0:00:190:00:20

Yes!

0:00:200:00:21

..and valiant losers.

0:00:210:00:23

So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

0:00:230:00:27

Have a good trip!

0:00:270:00:29

This is the Antiques Road Trip!

0:00:290:00:31

Yeah!

0:00:340:00:35

Hail Caledonia!

0:00:360:00:39

Our pair of professional auctioneers,

0:00:390:00:41

Charles Hansen and Anita Manning,

0:00:410:00:43

continue their capers, careering about the scenic capital

0:00:430:00:47

of Scotia in that 1972 Triumph Stag.

0:00:470:00:50

Edinburgh, like Rome, has seven hills.

0:00:510:00:54

Huh, that's a lot of ups and downs, just like the Antiques Road Trip...

0:00:540:00:57

But fun.

0:00:570:00:59

It can be a bit like snakes and ladders.

0:00:590:01:02

You can go up, and you can come down.

0:01:020:01:06

-Anita.

-A roller-coaster.

0:01:060:01:07

Anita, I'm feeling slippy.

0:01:070:01:09

Where's that clutch control gone?

0:01:100:01:11

I'm slipping a bit here.

0:01:110:01:14

Oh, no.

0:01:140:01:15

While it's true that Charles did indeed do some back-sliding

0:01:170:01:20

earlier in the trip, he actually climbed back into profit last time

0:01:200:01:23

and starts out today with £267.74.

0:01:230:01:28

While Anita has stayed steady on her feet and kept well ahead,

0:01:300:01:34

doubling her original stake to land her with £410.00 for this time.

0:01:340:01:39

I cannot believe that you have hit the £400 barrier

0:01:390:01:42

and a bit more, I'm languishing a long way back.

0:01:420:01:46

We're both courageous, we both take a chance.

0:01:460:01:49

Charles and Anita set forth from Kilbarchan,

0:01:510:01:53

and are touring the B-roads on both sides of the border

0:01:530:01:56

before a last auction in North Shields.

0:01:560:01:58

I go to auction burning brightly

0:01:590:02:02

to either fly high or collapse in your arms.

0:02:020:02:04

-Oh, Charlie!

-And that is the game, Anita!

0:02:040:02:07

My heart is full, my wee Scottish heart is full.

0:02:070:02:11

You have conquered Scotland, and you have conquered my heart.

0:02:110:02:14

This time, their journey will take them through the Scottish Borders

0:02:160:02:19

before auction at Kinbuck, Stirlingshire,

0:02:190:02:22

but first, Edinburgh.

0:02:220:02:24

Anita and Charles are driving through Holyrood Park this morning,

0:02:240:02:28

skirting the slopes, lochs and cliffs of Arthur's Seat.

0:02:280:02:32

There we go. On this gorgeous morning!

0:02:330:02:36

What a beautiful spot!

0:02:360:02:37

The sun is shining and you're looking mustard!

0:02:370:02:39

As keen as mustard!

0:02:390:02:42

OK, bye-bye, darling.

0:02:420:02:43

See you later, bye, have a good day!

0:02:430:02:45

While Charles heads to his first shop,

0:02:460:02:49

Anita's making her way on foot over the causeway to her first emporium

0:02:490:02:54

of the day, the Courtyard Antiques.

0:02:540:02:57

Hi, I'm Anita.

0:02:570:02:58

Pleased to meet you, Anita.

0:02:580:03:00

This is the most amazing, the most visually extraordinary shop

0:03:000:03:05

that I've been in for a long time, bless you.

0:03:050:03:09

Quite an eclectic array of the antique and vintage here.

0:03:090:03:13

This is like the biggest toy shop in the world.

0:03:150:03:18

It's all about fun.

0:03:180:03:20

Hey, Trigger!

0:03:200:03:21

Trot on, doll.

0:03:210:03:23

What's upstairs?

0:03:240:03:26

Planes, boats, a bit like boys' toys.

0:03:260:03:30

But I found this fabulous girls' tricycle.

0:03:300:03:34

It's called the Sky Princess and I think it's an American bike.

0:03:340:03:40

It's a bit like a kids' Cadillac.

0:03:400:03:43

It's a wee bit dear at £190 because I'm taking it to auction,

0:03:450:03:50

and this will have a very restricted market.

0:03:500:03:54

Time to summon Lewis.

0:03:540:03:56

I found a girlie toy with these marvellous mud guards here

0:03:560:04:02

which are a bit like, I suppose, a bit space-agey.

0:04:020:04:06

I thought it would be American, am I right there?

0:04:060:04:08

-It's American, yeah.

-What sort of period?

0:04:080:04:11

I think it could be anywhere from the '40s to the '60s, really.

0:04:110:04:14

I would like to be paying in the region of 80 to 100

0:04:140:04:17

because we've got some wee bits missing here.

0:04:170:04:21

Well, if we could agree on 100, I would be quite happy.

0:04:210:04:23

100, let's go for it.

0:04:230:04:25

I can't resist it.

0:04:250:04:27

Thank you so much.

0:04:270:04:28

I wonder, will it hold me?

0:04:280:04:30

I think it would, yeah.

0:04:300:04:32

I am absolutely delighted with this and I'm going to keep on looking.

0:04:320:04:35

Great, thank you so much.

0:04:350:04:37

With a lighter purse after that first buy,

0:04:370:04:40

we'll leave her to carry on trawling.

0:04:400:04:42

Time to catch up with Charles,

0:04:420:04:43

who's on his way across Edinburgh to Brunt's Field,

0:04:430:04:47

one-time home of Muriel Spark, who wrote The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.

0:04:470:04:51

He's expected at his first shop by owner Anna and her dog,

0:04:510:04:55

the eponymous Tippi. Good girl.

0:04:550:04:57

Hi, there.

0:04:570:04:58

Good morning. How are you on this fine morning in Edinburgh?

0:04:580:05:01

Very well, thank you.

0:05:010:05:02

What a lovely shop!

0:05:020:05:04

Thank you, this is Tippi.

0:05:040:05:05

Hello, Tippi, good to see you.

0:05:050:05:07

Maybe Tippi can tip the scales in my favour.

0:05:070:05:09

Yes!

0:05:090:05:10

There we go.

0:05:100:05:11

Go on, sniff out those bargains.

0:05:110:05:13

Dear, oh, dear.

0:05:170:05:18

Oh, what have we got there?

0:05:200:05:22

To the unassuming, it might be a sewing box with a lid to open up.

0:05:220:05:26

But would you believe it? It's true, isn't it, inside, look at that,

0:05:260:05:31

there's a vacuum cleaner.

0:05:310:05:32

-I love it!

-Imagine how much room that could free up

0:05:320:05:35

-under your stairs.

-Every Saturday afternoon, I do the hoovering.

0:05:350:05:39

You can put Tim Wonnacott under the stairs if you've got one of those.

0:05:390:05:43

Put ME under the stairs?!

0:05:430:05:45

It's an amazing object but it's not for me.

0:05:450:05:48

I've never seen one before, it made my day. Thank you.

0:05:480:05:51

So, what might you hoover up?

0:05:510:05:53

Ah, a wooden vase, it looks Georgian.

0:05:530:05:56

I quite like this form,

0:05:560:05:59

it's of ovoid outline, with a cover,

0:05:590:06:02

on a circular pedestal.

0:06:020:06:04

How much could that be? Has it come from somewhere local?

0:06:040:06:07

It has, actually, it's a local house that I cleared.

0:06:070:06:12

What do you reckon, Tippi? £15?

0:06:130:06:16

-Yeah.

-The art of antiques is handling.

0:06:160:06:18

And sometimes, you're best to go into a shop,

0:06:180:06:21

go into an auction and just handle that tactile nature

0:06:210:06:25

of what the object gives off.

0:06:250:06:27

And this doesn't just have a great handle, it glows as well.

0:06:270:06:31

Your best price - £15?

0:06:310:06:33

-Yes.

-I'm going to tell you, Tippi, look at me!

0:06:330:06:35

I'm going to say, going, going, give me a paw...

0:06:350:06:39

..gone. Thank you very much.

0:06:400:06:41

Time to PAUSE now - haha, who writes this stuff? -

0:06:410:06:44

and catch up with Anita who's still on the hunt across town. Bless her.

0:06:440:06:48

Isn't this just absolutely fabulous!

0:06:480:06:52

It's a weighing machine that tells your fortune.

0:06:520:06:56

It was designed by Joseph Sinel,

0:06:560:06:59

an Australian architect who lived in America,

0:06:590:07:03

and he would have designed this type of machine

0:07:030:07:07

for a prestigious building

0:07:070:07:09

like the Empire State Building.

0:07:090:07:12

The shape is Art Deco, the materials are Art Deco,

0:07:120:07:18

I'm going to step on it...

0:07:180:07:20

..and see what happens.

0:07:220:07:24

"Not willing to take a risk if you see the slightest chance of losing."

0:07:300:07:36

Well, maybe that's true.

0:07:360:07:37

As for the weight? Well, can't find that.

0:07:370:07:41

Maybe just as well.

0:07:410:07:43

She is worth her weight in gold, that woman.

0:07:430:07:45

Now, anything else here?

0:07:450:07:47

I love Art Nouveau, and this spirit kettle here

0:07:470:07:52

is an example of probably Austrian Art Nouveau.

0:07:520:07:56

And I'm very fond of that period and that area.

0:07:560:08:00

Spirit kettles date back to the days of Queen Anne.

0:08:000:08:04

She used a burner to maintain a supply of hot water

0:08:040:08:07

for topping up the teapot at elaborate tea parties.

0:08:070:08:10

There's no price on this one, so, Lewis!

0:08:100:08:13

Lewis, I really like this spirit kettle.

0:08:150:08:17

I think that it's probably Austrian Art Nouveau.

0:08:170:08:20

Would you agree with me?

0:08:200:08:21

-Yes.

-What is the very, very, very best that you can do?

0:08:210:08:27

The very, very, very, very best is 120.

0:08:270:08:29

120.

0:08:290:08:30

I'm going to go for it.

0:08:320:08:34

Thank you very much.

0:08:340:08:35

So 120 for the kettle,

0:08:350:08:38

100 for the bike, £220.

0:08:380:08:41

OK, lovely.

0:08:410:08:42

-Thank you.

-Pleasure.

0:08:420:08:44

Come on, Princess.

0:08:440:08:45

Just don't ride it, eh?

0:08:450:08:47

Oh, no, here we go!

0:08:480:08:49

Charlie can keep the Stag!

0:08:490:08:51

On your bike, hen, as they say in Glasgow.

0:08:520:08:55

Now, any advance on the mahogany vase over at Bransfield?

0:08:560:09:00

I'm a man who likes classical ornament,

0:09:000:09:02

and here you've got the Greek key.

0:09:020:09:04

On this very nice, little, I suppose...

0:09:040:09:08

..perhaps it looks likely to be part of a sideboard.

0:09:090:09:12

And the quality of the mahogany, it says to me it's quite old.

0:09:120:09:16

-How much is it?

-For you, 75.

0:09:160:09:18

It's just a unit, isn't it?

0:09:210:09:23

Been here a while?

0:09:230:09:24

No.

0:09:240:09:26

I just think...

0:09:260:09:29

it's slightly out of my price range.

0:09:290:09:31

And that would be your best price?

0:09:310:09:33

50.

0:09:330:09:34

Really?

0:09:340:09:35

There's just something about it, that's all I'm going to say.

0:09:360:09:40

I almost need a close look at it, Anna, because I love the form.

0:09:400:09:44

We've got moulding all the way around

0:09:460:09:49

which shows to me neither side was within.

0:09:490:09:52

I feel like I'm Paul Daniels doing a little magic trick here.

0:09:520:09:57

This is a lovely, I think, 1820s, in the manner of Gillow,

0:09:570:10:01

in the manner of Thomas Hope, it's Grecian, it's Greek revival,

0:10:010:10:05

it's rich Regency,

0:10:050:10:07

it could be English but, my goodness me, it's small and has style.

0:10:070:10:11

I quite like it. And sometimes when you're a passionate

0:10:110:10:14

antique enthusiast, you can't say no.

0:10:140:10:16

As Miss Brodie said, for those who like that sort of thing,

0:10:180:10:21

that is the sort of thing they like.

0:10:210:10:23

So, it's a deal at £65 for the vase and the cabinet.

0:10:240:10:28

Is he going off with the dog?

0:10:290:10:31

Pleasure doing business.

0:10:310:10:32

-How much is she?

-Priceless.

0:10:320:10:34

I thought so. I'll put you down, there we go.

0:10:340:10:37

Have a good day, Tippi, look after your mum.

0:10:370:10:38

-Cheers.

-Thank you.

0:10:380:10:40

Bye-bye.

0:10:400:10:42

I love it, I'm really happy.

0:10:420:10:43

The next port of call for Anita is on the north side of Edinburgh

0:10:450:10:47

where the city stretches down to the River Forth

0:10:470:10:50

and the harbours of Leith, Newhaven and Granton.

0:10:500:10:53

She is bound for Lady Haig's factory, where 40 ex-service men,

0:10:530:10:57

many disabled, make the poppies for Armistice Day,

0:10:570:11:00

symbols of remembrance and hope.

0:11:000:11:02

She's meeting employee and former Scots Guard, Arthur Dyke.

0:11:020:11:06

Hello, I'm Anita.

0:11:060:11:07

I'm Arthur. Nice to meet too.

0:11:070:11:09

Lovely to meet you. So this is where millions of remembrance poppies,

0:11:090:11:14

Scottish remembrance poppies, are made every year.

0:11:140:11:17

We make 5.2 million poppies, but we make them all by hand.

0:11:170:11:20

The poppies we're making,

0:11:200:11:22

they're going to make money to help out service men and women

0:11:220:11:24

and their families. So we're all very proud to work here.

0:11:240:11:27

The first use of the poppy as a poignant war motif was in 1915

0:11:270:11:32

in words written by a Canadian Army doctor, John McCrae.

0:11:320:11:37

He wrote a very famous poem, In Flanders Fields.

0:11:370:11:39

And from that poem, we now have the poppy.

0:11:390:11:42

And this is the third verse from the poem.

0:11:420:11:45

-If you'd like to...

-Can I read it?

0:11:450:11:47

Certainly.

0:11:470:11:48

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

0:11:480:11:50

To you from failing hands we throw

0:11:500:11:53

The torch, be yours to hold it high

0:11:530:11:56

If ye break faith with us who die

0:11:560:11:59

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

0:11:590:12:02

In Flanders Fields.

0:12:020:12:05

-It's very moving.

-Very moving poem.

0:12:050:12:07

-So that was our first reference to the poppy?

-Yes.

0:12:070:12:10

This factory was set up in 1926 by Lady Haig,

0:12:100:12:15

five years after poppies were worn for the first time.

0:12:150:12:18

It was to produce poppies for Scotland

0:12:190:12:22

because the factory set up in England

0:12:220:12:24

to employ war veterans in 1922

0:12:240:12:26

couldn't keep up with the demand.

0:12:260:12:28

I believe the Scottish poppies are different from the English poppies,

0:12:290:12:34

-am I right there?

-Totally different, totally different.

0:12:340:12:36

Our poppy looked like a poppy.

0:12:360:12:39

It's got four petals.

0:12:390:12:40

The English poppy has got two petals and a green leaf,

0:12:400:12:43

but it all goes back to that time when they just wanted

0:12:430:12:45

-to do things differently.

-Wanted it done her way.

0:12:450:12:47

-The Scottish way.

-The Scottish way, yeah!

0:12:470:12:52

The poppy factory's mission is as important today as it was in 1926.

0:12:520:12:57

It's keeping the men in a job,

0:12:570:12:59

plus the poppies they make bring in about £2.5 million to help out

0:12:590:13:03

service men and women every year.

0:13:030:13:06

Arthur, could I have a go at making poppies?

0:13:060:13:08

You certainly can, come this way and we'll get you to make a poppy.

0:13:080:13:12

This is John.

0:13:120:13:13

John is a veteran who served in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps.

0:13:130:13:17

All you do is press it down.

0:13:170:13:19

-OK.

-That's it. And then pop your black stud on top.

0:13:190:13:23

That is it. And you've made your first poppy.

0:13:250:13:28

Tell me, John, how many poppies do you make a day?

0:13:280:13:31

On average, about 2,500.

0:13:320:13:35

That is absolutely wonderful.

0:13:350:13:37

And how long have you worked here?

0:13:370:13:40

A little over five years now.

0:13:400:13:42

The camaraderie in the factory is good, and it helps me,

0:13:420:13:47

I suffer with my nerves.

0:13:470:13:49

I think that's great. All the guys are nice.

0:13:490:13:52

Well, I'd hope so, we try to be.

0:13:520:13:54

I've been chatting everybody up.

0:13:540:13:56

Have you? That is wicked!

0:13:560:13:58

But to do 10,000 in a week, I don't think I would...

0:14:010:14:04

I'd need to do a lot of practice.

0:14:040:14:06

Yeah.

0:14:060:14:08

You bet!

0:14:080:14:09

Charles is on his way across the city now,

0:14:100:14:12

buoyed up with two purchases already under his belt.

0:14:120:14:16

I feel as though I've got a wand in my hand today,

0:14:160:14:19

and I'm going to land on something that will say,

0:14:190:14:22

"Look at me, I'm the gold

0:14:220:14:25

"that will turn into a huge profit,"

0:14:250:14:27

and finally see me leap over Miss Manning.

0:14:270:14:31

At the moment, that would be more of a high jump,

0:14:310:14:34

but we salute your optimism, sir.

0:14:340:14:36

Charles is steering northwards now to his second shop of the day.

0:14:370:14:41

Perfect.

0:14:410:14:42

Edinburgh Antiques Centre, owned by Campbell.

0:14:420:14:45

-Mr Campbell.

-Charles, nice to meet you.

0:14:460:14:48

Have you anything really early or really interesting

0:14:480:14:52

that may have just have landed?

0:14:520:14:54

Well, we have got a new dealer in here that does a lot

0:14:540:14:57

of ceramic tea bowls, especially early ones.

0:14:570:14:59

-Oh, really?

-1790s onwards.

0:14:590:15:02

Oh, really, are they nearby?

0:15:020:15:03

-They certainly are, just through here.

-Come and show me.

0:15:030:15:06

So this is basically the history of tea drinking

0:15:060:15:10

going back to around 1810?

0:15:100:15:12

Yeah, yeah, certainly is. I mean, there's earlier ones as well.

0:15:120:15:15

This is just basically his collection that he's looking

0:15:150:15:18

-to get rid of at the moment.

-Good for him.

0:15:180:15:20

Straight away, there's a tea bowl and saucer over here.

0:15:200:15:24

It's cracked, but what's interesting is actually,

0:15:240:15:28

an armorial tea bowl and saucer.

0:15:280:15:31

So rather than being middle-class 1830,

0:15:310:15:34

it's a Chinese tea bowl and saucer which carries a coat of arms

0:15:340:15:39

for an important British family,

0:15:390:15:42

and that puts it into a different league.

0:15:420:15:45

And amazingly, it's only £11.

0:15:450:15:49

For something from probably circa 1760.

0:15:490:15:55

Isn't that pretty?

0:15:560:15:58

So, sadly,

0:16:020:16:04

someone drank too much tea and tried to eat the tea bowl as well.

0:16:040:16:08

-Yeah.

-It's full of rich tea history.

0:16:080:16:11

-Certainly.

-And for me, it's good to brew.

0:16:110:16:14

-How much could it be?

-We can do it for you for nine.

0:16:140:16:17

Made 240 years ago.

0:16:170:16:19

For £9, it would be rude to say no.

0:16:190:16:21

Yes. Going, going, gone.

0:16:220:16:24

I'll take it. I'll put it on your counter.

0:16:240:16:26

-I shall take it.

-Thanks, Campbell.

0:16:260:16:28

It's like picking sweets, it's so easy.

0:16:280:16:30

It is.

0:16:300:16:32

You're in Edinburgh, you'll have had your tea.

0:16:320:16:34

Now, is it time for a dance?

0:16:350:16:38

What is Charles up to?

0:16:380:16:40

Perhaps a little lie down.

0:16:400:16:42

Why not?

0:16:420:16:44

Some lovely novelty silver, and just talking novelty silver,

0:16:440:16:47

I do like that.

0:16:470:16:49

It's almost a stoneware body.

0:16:490:16:51

But, of course, what do you call this sport?

0:16:510:16:53

-Curling.

-Curling, curling.

0:16:530:16:56

I like this because obviously, number one,

0:16:560:17:00

it's got some age. We can see on the foot rim here,

0:17:000:17:02

good signs of honest wear.

0:17:020:17:05

More than that, it's decorative,

0:17:050:17:07

serving the interests of a sporting collector.

0:17:070:17:11

But of course, it's got the dual purpose

0:17:110:17:13

-of not just being decorative, also being an inkwell.

-It is.

0:17:130:17:16

And on the inside, maybe it's missing its glass liner.

0:17:160:17:20

But what's nice is you've got hints of the old ink

0:17:200:17:24

and just general wear and tear.

0:17:240:17:26

Campbell, I quite like this.

0:17:260:17:27

How much could that be? It's priced at 39.

0:17:270:17:29

39, we could do that for...

0:17:290:17:33

..say...

0:17:340:17:35

We'll do it for 30.

0:17:370:17:39

-Really?

-We could do that for 30.

0:17:390:17:40

I'm going to say to you, Campbell, it's a definite maybe.

0:17:430:17:46

-Certainly.

-So if you can look after it.

0:17:460:17:48

-I will.

-And I will then report back to you shortly.

0:17:480:17:50

-Certainly.

-Thank you very much.

-No problem.

0:17:500:17:52

Thank you. Like that.

0:17:520:17:54

It looks like somebody has been antiquing far too long.

0:17:560:18:00

I'm doing OK.

0:18:030:18:04

Quite like that.

0:18:070:18:09

250. A bit out of my price range.

0:18:110:18:15

Time is marching on, Charles.

0:18:160:18:19

Make your mind up.

0:18:190:18:20

To curl or not to curl?

0:18:210:18:23

-That would be the question.

-It is now.

0:18:230:18:26

My thought is, for £30...

0:18:260:18:30

-..I'll play the game.

-Perfect.

-I'll take it as well.

0:18:310:18:33

That's nine for the tea cup and saucer

0:18:330:18:35

and 30 for the curling stone inkwell.

0:18:350:18:38

-There you are, sir.

-It's amazing what you can buy for £39.

0:18:380:18:41

I'm so grateful for my...

0:18:410:18:44

I hope so.

0:18:440:18:46

-Thank you.

-No problem.

0:18:460:18:47

-See you later.

-Bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

0:18:470:18:49

Job done. Time to call it a day and collect Anita.

0:18:490:18:54

And get some supper.

0:18:540:18:55

How about some haggis?

0:18:560:18:58

I fancy a haggis, Anita.

0:18:580:19:00

What exactly is a haggis?

0:19:000:19:02

Well, it's a lot of sort of stuff all jumbled up in a sheep's stomach.

0:19:020:19:07

Well, maybe not so much, Anita.

0:19:090:19:11

Chips all round, then?

0:19:110:19:13

Bon appetit and a nighty-night.

0:19:130:19:15

No time for slumbering on the Antiques Road Trip.

0:19:190:19:22

Our experts are up at the crack of dawn

0:19:220:19:24

and are off roving the beautiful roads of the Borders.

0:19:240:19:28

Charlie, let's stop, there's a lovely wee burn down there.

0:19:290:19:33

Pull in here, quick.

0:19:330:19:34

Take in this wonderful wilderness.

0:19:340:19:39

Shall we go and see if there's some trout?

0:19:390:19:41

Little stream.

0:19:410:19:42

Some old trout.

0:19:420:19:44

Anyway, Anita yesterday found a few of her favourite things.

0:19:440:19:46

A pink trike.

0:19:460:19:48

Charlie can keep the stag!

0:19:480:19:50

And a bright copper kettle,

0:19:500:19:52

which leaves her £190 in her warm woollen mittens.

0:19:520:19:55

While Charles's brown paper packages contain a pier cabinet,

0:19:560:20:00

a mahogany vase...

0:20:000:20:01

I love it, I'm really happy.

0:20:010:20:03

..a Chinese tea bowl and saucer and a curling stone inkwell.

0:20:030:20:07

Like that.

0:20:070:20:08

Which means he has £163.74 left.

0:20:080:20:13

But will there be the sound of beautiful music

0:20:130:20:16

at the end of the day?

0:20:160:20:17

Oh, Charlie, I've had enough of this wilderness.

0:20:170:20:20

Let's get back into the car.

0:20:200:20:21

Quick, let's go!

0:20:210:20:23

Oh, that's better.

0:20:230:20:25

Oh, it's a good life.

0:20:250:20:26

Dry cleaning bills notwithstanding.

0:20:260:20:29

I'm a chancer.

0:20:290:20:30

I'm a go-getter.

0:20:300:20:32

I hope you've learned, I'm quite a wild guy.

0:20:320:20:35

And I think you're quite a wild lady.

0:20:350:20:37

Let's just go for it.

0:20:370:20:38

We will spend the money, we will take a gamble.

0:20:380:20:41

This is the same, we just love this stuff.

0:20:410:20:44

Exactly!

0:20:440:20:45

And so they do.

0:20:450:20:47

Time now to part company but only for a while.

0:20:470:20:49

Anita is bound for Kelso,

0:20:510:20:53

home to one of the area's most famous abbeys

0:20:530:20:55

and deemed by Sir Walter Scott the most beautiful village in Scotland.

0:20:550:20:59

The first destination today for our Grand Dame of Scottish antiques

0:20:590:21:04

is Eptas, where Tricia is keeping shop.

0:21:040:21:07

-Good morning.

-Hello, I'm Anita.

0:21:070:21:10

Lovely to meet you, welcome, welcome.

0:21:100:21:13

It's lovely to be here.

0:21:130:21:15

Your shop looks so colourful and beautiful.

0:21:150:21:17

-Oh, thank you.

-I can't wait to have a look around.

0:21:170:21:19

Sure, please do, and if there's anything I can help you with,

0:21:190:21:22

-just give me a yell.

-Terrific.

0:21:220:21:24

All right, thank you.

0:21:240:21:26

Amongst the gifts, curios, antiques and collectables,

0:21:260:21:29

there's bound to be something to catch Anita's eye.

0:21:290:21:31

I love these jewellery cabinets

0:21:360:21:38

and I haven't bought any jewellery up until this point.

0:21:380:21:41

And this might be my first jewellery buy.

0:21:430:21:46

It's a rather pretty little pendant with a heart-shaped amethyst

0:21:460:21:52

or amethyst glass stone.

0:21:520:21:54

Nice wee thing.

0:21:540:21:56

I'd like to think that it was gold, but I'd have to check it out.

0:21:560:21:59

She's a canny one.

0:22:010:22:03

The clasp is marked with the numbers 375,

0:22:030:22:06

which means it is nine carat gold.

0:22:060:22:09

There are no marks on the pendant

0:22:090:22:12

so the pendant and the chain might not have started off life together.

0:22:120:22:17

I think that the mount is very pretty.

0:22:170:22:21

It's like a little crown.

0:22:210:22:23

Sounds promising. Anything else?

0:22:250:22:27

Ah, more copper.

0:22:300:22:31

I like this Art Nouveau plate.

0:22:330:22:36

It has been handmade and hand-beaten and hand-embossed.

0:22:360:22:41

On the bowl of the plate, we can see the little marks which indicate

0:22:430:22:49

handwork, and this is where the craftsman has beaten out

0:22:490:22:54

these circles with a tiny little hammer.

0:22:540:22:57

And I think that it's very pretty.

0:22:570:22:59

It's £32.

0:22:590:23:01

I wonder if Tricia will be able to give me a discount

0:23:010:23:05

if I buy two items in the shop?

0:23:050:23:07

Well, you can but ask.

0:23:070:23:09

Tricia, I like both of these items,

0:23:090:23:11

-I think they're feminine items, don't you?

-Yes.

0:23:110:23:16

35 on that, 32 on that.

0:23:160:23:19

Would it be possible, if we put them both together,

0:23:190:23:23

to buy them for £40?

0:23:230:23:25

I don't think I could go as low as that.

0:23:250:23:28

How about 55 for the two?

0:23:280:23:30

55?

0:23:300:23:32

Can you shave another little off of it and make it 50 for both?

0:23:320:23:38

So, £25 each?

0:23:380:23:39

-That's right.

-Deal.

0:23:390:23:41

Lovely. Oh, thank you very much.

0:23:410:23:42

-You're welcome.

-£50.

0:23:420:23:44

-Thank you very much.

-Bye-bye.

0:23:440:23:46

And away she goes with £140 left in her pocket.

0:23:460:23:51

Meanwhile, Charles is off 19 miles westward

0:23:540:23:57

to one of the oldest royal boroughs in Scotland, Selkirk.

0:23:570:24:01

A Borders town built on the wool trade,

0:24:010:24:03

and that's what's attracting Charles today

0:24:030:24:06

as he makes his way to the world's only mill entirely dedicated

0:24:060:24:11

to tartan weaving, to meet tartan maker Nick Fiddes.

0:24:110:24:15

-Charles, you made it.

-Nick, you're in the tartan.

0:24:150:24:17

-Come in.

-I'm in the right place.

-Welcome.

0:24:170:24:19

Tartan colours and patterns, or sets, as they're known,

0:24:190:24:22

developed in Scotland from the 16th century and were created with

0:24:220:24:26

the natural dyes of the area that they were woven in,

0:24:260:24:29

but they may also have had associations with particular clans.

0:24:290:24:34

Nobody really knows where it started as a crisscross pattern,

0:24:350:24:38

which goes back thousands of years.

0:24:380:24:40

And for the best part of 100 years,

0:24:400:24:41

Scots weren't allowed to wear it.

0:24:410:24:44

Why was it banned?

0:24:440:24:45

Because it was such a powerful symbol of identity, of rebellion,

0:24:450:24:49

which is I think partly where its modern identity comes from too,

0:24:490:24:53

because we're a feisty lot in Scotland.

0:24:530:24:55

Three quarters of a century

0:24:550:24:57

after the Jacobites were crushed at Culloden,

0:24:570:24:59

tartan was rehabilitated when George IV wore it on a visit

0:24:590:25:03

to Edinburgh in 1822.

0:25:030:25:06

He was mocked because his kilt was too short

0:25:060:25:08

but tartan was taken up with enthusiasm by the Victorians.

0:25:080:25:12

We basically kept a sample of every single different fabric

0:25:140:25:17

that's been woven here since 1947.

0:25:170:25:19

So I've never managed to count them,

0:25:190:25:21

I think it's probably 7,000-8000, so it's probably

0:25:210:25:23

the largest collection of tartan samples in the world.

0:25:230:25:25

That brown there, in tartan terminology, we call ancient green.

0:25:250:25:29

-Why?

-Because it's as if it's been sort of buried in a bog

0:25:290:25:32

-for a few hundred years and dug up and gone dark and mouldy.

-Yes, yes!

0:25:320:25:36

It's actually based on a sample that was dug up

0:25:360:25:39

-from the Battle of Culloden.

-Really?

0:25:390:25:42

Which Dalgliesh analysed and tried to recreate the sorts of colours

0:25:420:25:46

-using the same sorts of dyes, so we call this reproduction.

-Amazing.

0:25:460:25:50

Conventions about colours have developed over the years.

0:25:500:25:53

-So, modern colours are sort of strong and bold.

-Yes.

0:25:530:25:56

They're called modern because they're Victorian,

0:25:560:25:58

when chemical dyes came out.

0:25:580:25:59

What's in the frame over here? It looks quite muted.

0:25:590:26:02

This is the Balmoral tartan,

0:26:020:26:05

woven exclusively for the Queen and her immediate family,

0:26:050:26:07

and I believe her Royal Pipers are allowed to wear it but no-one else.

0:26:070:26:11

I think it was actually designed by Prince Albert.

0:26:110:26:14

Perennially popular everywhere, from weddings to rugby matches,

0:26:140:26:18

new tartans are being designed all the time.

0:26:180:26:21

This one over here, I need my sunglasses on.

0:26:210:26:23

It's almost like a rainbow of colours.

0:26:230:26:25

It's actually called the Rainbow tartan because it's basically

0:26:250:26:28

for gay and lesbian communities.

0:26:280:26:30

It's a good example of how tartan has moved on

0:26:300:26:32

from its traditional roots

0:26:320:26:34

to being something for literally any community.

0:26:340:26:36

There is no other fabric like tartan, in that,

0:26:360:26:39

the way it can identify you, who you feel you are, who you belong to,

0:26:390:26:42

who you love, from 20 paces.

0:26:420:26:44

Everything in this mill is made by hand using traditional looms.

0:26:450:26:50

Time for our very own Sassenach to get weaving now,

0:26:500:26:53

as Carol shows him her job, tying on.

0:26:530:26:56

First of all, you have to tie this on, round your waist.

0:26:560:26:59

-Carol.

-Hook that through.

0:26:590:27:00

Yeah, OK, yeah, I'm on.

0:27:000:27:02

Yarn is joined together, thread by thread, in a special knot

0:27:020:27:06

that will pass through the loom.

0:27:060:27:07

But there's, how many threads are there?

0:27:070:27:09

1,200.

0:27:090:27:11

Done it. I've done it, haven't I?

0:27:130:27:15

-Is that right?

-Yes.

-Yes!

0:27:150:27:17

-Six out of ten.

-Oh, six out of ten.

0:27:170:27:19

While Charles has been at the loom,

0:27:190:27:21

Anita has been weaving her way through Roxburghshire to Melrose,

0:27:210:27:26

at the foot of the Eildon Hills, which gave the Romans the name

0:27:260:27:30

Trimontium, three hills, for the fort they built here.

0:27:300:27:34

And there's something of a Roman holiday going on today.

0:27:340:27:37

This car is of Italian design, and I quite like that,

0:27:370:27:42

because the Italians always had fabulous design.

0:27:420:27:46

And you know,

0:27:460:27:48

driving this car makes me feel a bit like Sophia Loren

0:27:480:27:52

or Gina Lollobrigida.

0:27:520:27:54

Oh, la dolce vita, eh?

0:27:540:27:56

Our leading lady is off to our last shop,

0:27:580:28:01

Old Melrose Antiques and tearoom.

0:28:010:28:03

Where she can enjoy two of her favourite things.

0:28:040:28:07

Hi, I'm Anita.

0:28:070:28:08

Hi, Anita, I'm Greg.

0:28:080:28:09

Welcome to Old Melrose.

0:28:090:28:11

Oh, yeah. This is wonderful.

0:28:110:28:13

What was this before?

0:28:130:28:14

It's been a farm, it's been a dairy, it's been a timber mill.

0:28:140:28:18

And now it's an antique dealer.

0:28:180:28:19

Yeah, so there's a lot of history here.

0:28:190:28:21

There's a lot of history here.

0:28:210:28:22

Oh, right, well, there's a lot of antiques as well.

0:28:220:28:25

And I can't wait to whizz round and have a look at them.

0:28:250:28:28

Certainly, feel free to look around and if you need me,

0:28:280:28:30

-I'll be in the workshop.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:28:300:28:34

These old agricultural buildings are surely bursting

0:28:340:28:37

with possibilities, so crack on, Anita.

0:28:370:28:39

I like this.

0:28:450:28:46

This is a bar billiards table.

0:28:460:28:50

Now, this is probably a Victorian one.

0:28:500:28:53

It's made of mahogany with this lovely inlay...

0:28:530:28:58

It's some sort of satinwood and ebonised wood.

0:28:580:29:01

And there's lots of little rows of holes

0:29:010:29:05

and I think these would have been used for scoring.

0:29:050:29:10

I love these wooden pockets for the balls.

0:29:110:29:14

I'd love to see a maker's name.

0:29:140:29:17

And there is one here.

0:29:180:29:20

Piggott Brothers, Bishopgate, London.

0:29:200:29:23

I don't know how to play billiards or snooker.

0:29:230:29:26

But it looks like great fun.

0:29:260:29:30

CUE purchase?

0:29:300:29:33

Perhaps.

0:29:330:29:34

Meanwhile, Charles has arrived, and if he's to catch up with Anita,

0:29:360:29:39

he'll need to get a move on.

0:29:390:29:41

There's me, the cock, and there's Anita, the pheasant.

0:29:430:29:46

More of a hen bird, really.

0:29:460:29:48

Quite rare.

0:29:480:29:50

At the moment pondering a cup of tea.

0:29:500:29:53

Lovely.

0:29:530:29:55

-Anita!

-Charles, stop rushing about!

0:29:550:29:59

Calm down.

0:29:590:30:01

Play it cool, man.

0:30:010:30:02

I know, this is the penultimate hour of our penultimate leg.

0:30:020:30:07

-To dig deep.

-Have you dug deep?

0:30:070:30:10

No, not yet.

0:30:100:30:11

I'm scavenging.

0:30:110:30:13

And, by the way, just be careful, don't put any crumbs on the floor.

0:30:130:30:17

-There's a big mouse.

-A mouse, Charlie, a mouse!

0:30:170:30:20

Relax! I'll see you later!

0:30:200:30:21

Wee, sleekit, cow'rin, tim'rous beastie!

0:30:230:30:26

That got them moving.

0:30:260:30:29

Time to call in Tim and get down to some business.

0:30:290:30:31

Could I kindly have a look in this cabinet here?

0:30:310:30:34

Certainly, yeah.

0:30:340:30:36

I like the pair of... sugar nips. Are they silver?

0:30:360:30:40

-Yeah.

-Quite lucky, aren't they?

0:30:400:30:42

-They call this a wishbone.

-Wishbones, yeah.

0:30:420:30:45

This is hallmarked Sheffield, 1905.

0:30:450:30:48

I quite like them. I'll make a wish.

0:30:480:30:50

-Best price?

-£20.

0:30:500:30:52

Bigger wish?

0:30:520:30:54

-To a humble man?

-18.

0:30:540:30:56

£18, that's a really good discount, so I'm going to think about them.

0:30:560:31:00

-OK.

-That's quite nice, Tim, I like that.

0:31:000:31:02

It's a small little Vesta stand, so what you would do

0:31:020:31:04

is put your matches in this, and of course,

0:31:040:31:08

you would strike your match down.

0:31:080:31:09

Birmingham, 1915.

0:31:090:31:11

It's priced at 25.

0:31:110:31:13

What's your best on that, do you think?

0:31:130:31:16

I could probably do £20 on that.

0:31:160:31:17

Could you really?

0:31:170:31:19

That's quite nice.

0:31:190:31:20

The only issue is the hallmarks are rubbed.

0:31:200:31:23

And that will affect value, but to me,

0:31:230:31:25

you can see where it's been used, where matches have come out,

0:31:250:31:29

and it just has a glow.

0:31:290:31:30

I'm almost torn between whether,

0:31:320:31:34

I can almost put some sugar in here and take the two together

0:31:340:31:39

and nip, literally, out a price for the two of them.

0:31:390:31:42

If I bought the two together, what could be your very best?

0:31:420:31:47

-How about 32?

-That's good.

0:31:470:31:49

And I think, Tim, for £32, I will say, I can't say no.

0:31:490:31:53

-Great.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:31:530:31:55

Yes, that's Charles done and dusted

0:31:550:31:57

and Anita is taking Greg to the bar billiards board,

0:31:570:32:00

which has no price ticket.

0:32:000:32:02

That's lovely, isn't it?

0:32:020:32:03

Lovely piece of mahogany.

0:32:030:32:05

Do you know how to play this game?

0:32:050:32:07

Don't know the official rules, Anita,

0:32:070:32:08

but we generally just roll the balls up and see what we can score.

0:32:080:32:11

Can I have a go? I want to have a go.

0:32:110:32:14

Right, I'll do two at the same time.

0:32:140:32:16

-Yay!

-Well done, Anita.

0:32:190:32:22

Now, I'd love to buy it.

0:32:220:32:24

-OK.

-I'd like to pay £140 for it.

0:32:240:32:28

What do you think?

0:32:280:32:30

As its you, Anita, go on, then.

0:32:300:32:32

Oh, thank you very much.

0:32:320:32:34

You're welcome. You'll do well with it.

0:32:340:32:36

Well, I'm going to give you £140, which is every cent that I've got.

0:32:360:32:41

-OK.

-Let's have another go.

0:32:410:32:43

Sure.

0:32:430:32:44

Game on.

0:32:440:32:45

And that's Anita spending every penny.

0:32:450:32:48

-Wow!

-Well done.

0:32:480:32:49

Her piggy is empty.

0:32:490:32:52

-OK, Charlie.

-Is there...

0:32:520:32:53

ENGINE CHOKES

0:32:530:32:55

Uh-oh.

0:32:550:32:56

You OK?

0:32:560:32:57

ENGINE STARTS

0:32:590:33:00

Well done, Anita! Have my hat. I'll have yours.

0:33:000:33:04

Let's hit the road.

0:33:040:33:06

Hold on to your hats, son, time to head for some shuteye.

0:33:060:33:09

What a lovely view.

0:33:090:33:11

Pistols at dawn now, as we head to auction at Kinbuck in Stirlingshire.

0:33:140:33:18

In 1715, during the first Jacobite rebellion,

0:33:200:33:22

this quiet hamlet resounded to the steps of 6,000 troops

0:33:220:33:26

crossing the River Allan on their way to fight the Hanoverians.

0:33:260:33:31

Anita and Charles had a capital day in Edinburgh before wending through

0:33:310:33:35

the Borders and north to Kinbuck,

0:33:350:33:37

disturbing the peace again with a different battle cry.

0:33:370:33:40

Profit, here we come!

0:33:400:33:42

Come on! There we go, hop off.

0:33:420:33:45

There we go, hop off.

0:33:450:33:48

Our saleroom today is Robertson's,

0:33:480:33:50

a family business which has clocked up 40 years in the auction trade.

0:33:500:33:54

Charles spent just over half his available cash, £136, on five lots.

0:33:560:34:01

While Anita emptied her pockets completely,

0:34:030:34:06

gambling every penny of her £410 on her five lots.

0:34:060:34:11

Time to size up each other's purchases.

0:34:110:34:14

I love this kettle on a stand.

0:34:140:34:16

It's Art Nouveau, it's organic, and Anita, this, I think,

0:34:160:34:20

is a prized find.

0:34:200:34:21

But could reach boiling point, it could fizzle away,

0:34:210:34:25

it could make £40.

0:34:250:34:27

I'm hoping it might be very cold.

0:34:270:34:29

And what are you saying, Anita?

0:34:290:34:30

Curling has been played in Scotland since the 1500s.

0:34:300:34:34

And Charlie has bought tactically when he bought this little inkwell.

0:34:340:34:39

The buyers are going to love it in this saleroom.

0:34:390:34:42

He paid £30 for it.

0:34:420:34:44

He won't double his money, but he will make a profit.

0:34:440:34:48

But what does auctioneer Struan Robertson think?

0:34:480:34:51

The cabinet, now, it is Regency so it's got age on its side,

0:34:510:34:55

but brown furniture isn't doing great at the moment.

0:34:550:34:57

The pink tricycle, now, that's something I've not seen before.

0:34:570:35:00

It's a shame it's got the handlebars missing

0:35:000:35:02

and it's got the seat pad missing.

0:35:020:35:04

I think it will do quite well.

0:35:040:35:05

Settle down now for the off.

0:35:050:35:07

You've got to make some money on this auction, Charlie.

0:35:070:35:09

Here it goes.

0:35:090:35:11

And first up is Charles's mahogany ovoid vase and cover.

0:35:110:35:15

Charlie, you found it in the basement?

0:35:150:35:16

-Yes.

-You got it at a bargain basement price.

0:35:160:35:20

Lovely piece here, guys.

0:35:200:35:21

Who'll give me £40?

0:35:210:35:23

-It's such a good object.

-£20.

0:35:230:35:25

-Oh, 20.

-Such a good object.

0:35:250:35:26

22, 24, 26, 28.

0:35:260:35:30

-Come on.

-28, 30. 32.

0:35:300:35:32

34. 34, 36.

0:35:320:35:34

-Still in.

-38, 40, advance at 40.

0:35:340:35:37

-Still in, Charlie, still in.

-Advance at £45,

0:35:370:35:39

how much do you want it?

0:35:390:35:40

Advance at 45, 50.

0:35:400:35:42

55, advance at 55.

0:35:420:35:44

Advance at 55.

0:35:440:35:45

All out, then, at £55?

0:35:450:35:48

Charlie, you've made a great start.

0:35:480:35:51

He's nearly tripled his money there. Nice work.

0:35:510:35:54

I'm just now opening up, I'm at the end of my week,

0:35:540:35:58

I'm now just a bit more supple.

0:35:580:36:00

And I'm running, baby, after you.

0:36:000:36:03

But can he keep up?

0:36:030:36:04

Anita's gold and amethyst pendant is next.

0:36:040:36:07

Heart-shaped.

0:36:070:36:09

-There's love, there's love.

-Romantic.

-Oh, it gets better.

0:36:090:36:12

Is there love in the room?

0:36:120:36:14

I can smell it, yeah. I can smell it.

0:36:140:36:15

Who'll give me £50? 40, 30, £30?

0:36:150:36:18

-30 bid.

-Profit, profit.

0:36:180:36:20

So, we're into profit.

0:36:200:36:21

Advance at £30?

0:36:210:36:23

All out, then, at £30?

0:36:230:36:25

-Profit.

-£30.

0:36:260:36:27

£5 profit to Ms Manning.

0:36:270:36:30

-A profit is a profit, Charlie.

-Exactly.

0:36:300:36:33

Yes, it is.

0:36:330:36:35

Time now for Charles's Regency mahogany pier cabinet.

0:36:350:36:38

You're very brave, buying a piece of furniture.

0:36:380:36:41

-Anita, I'm a man.

-You're a man!

0:36:410:36:43

And a man likes to buy masculine big objects.

0:36:430:36:47

Lovely wee cabinet, there, who'll give me £100?

0:36:470:36:49

90, 80, £80?

0:36:490:36:52

-Come on!

-Come on.

-50, start me.

0:36:520:36:54

40, 30, 30 to go.

0:36:540:36:55

-Come on, guys.

-Oh, the shame.

0:36:550:36:57

-Come on!

-£30. 20, then.

0:36:570:37:00

-Advance at 20.

-Hallelujah.

-Advance at 20, 22.

0:37:000:37:02

22, 24. 26,

0:37:020:37:06

advance at 26.

0:37:060:37:08

-I'm a poor man!

-All out, then, at £26.

0:37:080:37:11

I'm a poor man. I am now.

0:37:110:37:13

They think it's all over.

0:37:130:37:15

Not yet, but it's a bit of an own goal.

0:37:150:37:18

A £24 loss.

0:37:180:37:19

I'm passionate for history, but that was history, it's gone.

0:37:190:37:22

Forget it.

0:37:220:37:24

Will Anita's Austrian copper spirit kettle sing for her next?

0:37:240:37:28

I'll bid 120, advance on 120?

0:37:280:37:31

-Yes!

-Looking good.

-Well played.

0:37:310:37:33

-Yes!

-Advance at 120, advance at £120?

0:37:330:37:36

All out then, at £120?

0:37:360:37:39

I'm so relieved that I didn't lose money on it.

0:37:390:37:44

Oh, well, it didn't quite hit the high notes.

0:37:440:37:48

Charles's armorial china teacup and saucer are under the hammer next.

0:37:480:37:53

You're always buying broken porcelain, Charlie.

0:37:530:37:56

Who'll give me £30. £30, 25, 20, £20?

0:37:560:37:59

-Come on, come on.

-15, then?

0:37:590:38:02

£15?

0:38:020:38:03

I'll bid ten, advance at ten?

0:38:030:38:05

Advance at 10, 12, I'm out, advance at 12?

0:38:050:38:06

-Come on, come on.

-Advance at £12?

0:38:060:38:08

-All out.

-Such good value.

0:38:080:38:11

You have now become part of its history.

0:38:110:38:14

£3 is better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick.

0:38:140:38:17

-Never mind.

-Exactly, the show goes on, Anita.

0:38:170:38:19

The show goes on.

0:38:190:38:21

Show time now for Anita's pink American-style tricycle.

0:38:210:38:25

How far can it go?

0:38:250:38:26

And...80, advance on 80?

0:38:260:38:28

-£80?

-Advance on 80? Look at the condition as well,

0:38:280:38:32

-being a children's toy?

-That's fantastic.

0:38:320:38:34

Advance on 90, 95, 100.

0:38:340:38:35

I salute you, Anita Manning.

0:38:350:38:37

Advance at £100?

0:38:370:38:38

All out, then, at £100.

0:38:380:38:41

Oh, Charlie.

0:38:410:38:43

All I can say, Anita, to speculate with that, I just salute you.

0:38:430:38:48

She speculated but didn't accumulate but will Charles's silver and glass

0:38:480:38:53

Vesta striker and sugar tongs light the room up now?

0:38:530:38:56

£30, 25, 20, £20, start me, let's go, come on.

0:38:560:38:59

£20, 15, then.

0:38:590:39:01

£15 bid, an advance on 15.

0:39:010:39:03

An advance on £15.

0:39:030:39:04

Advance at 15, 18, advance at 18, 20, advance at 20.

0:39:040:39:07

-Any more?

-Advance at £20?

0:39:070:39:09

All out, then, at £20?

0:39:090:39:12

-Oh, Charlie.

-Well, that fizzled out,

0:39:120:39:15

with a £12 loss.

0:39:150:39:16

The auction room can be so inviting, yet at the same time disappointing.

0:39:170:39:23

-I'm disappointed but that's life.

-Oh, never mind.

0:39:230:39:26

Next up is Anita's Arts and Crafts copperplate.

0:39:260:39:30

It's the Art Nouveau, it's defined by the femme fatale, isn't it?

0:39:300:39:33

-And you are the...

-Do you think I'm a bit of a femme fatale?

0:39:330:39:36

You are my femme fatale.

0:39:360:39:38

You're organic, fluid.

0:39:380:39:40

What's your old wife going to say about that?

0:39:400:39:43

£40, 35, 30, £30?

0:39:430:39:45

20, start me, let's go, 20 bit, advance at 20, advance at £20?

0:39:450:39:49

22, advance at 22?

0:39:490:39:50

-Come on, keep going.

-24, 26. 28, 30,

0:39:500:39:54

advance at 30, advance at 30, 32, 34.

0:39:540:39:57

Advance at 34, 36.

0:39:570:39:58

-Yes!

-Anita, I admire you.

0:39:580:39:59

Advance at 36, all out then, at £36?

0:39:590:40:03

36.

0:40:030:40:05

Yeah, £11 profit on the plate.

0:40:050:40:07

Anita, whenever you need a little Scottish dream, I fly beside you.

0:40:070:40:13

I sit next to you and I watch and I admire.

0:40:130:40:17

It's good.

0:40:170:40:19

Now, Charles's last item.

0:40:190:40:20

The curling stone inkwell.

0:40:200:40:23

I'll bid 12, advance at 12?

0:40:230:40:25

14, I need to go to 15, though.

0:40:250:40:27

16, advance at 16.

0:40:270:40:28

Advance at 16, 18, advance at 18, 20, advance at 20, 22.

0:40:280:40:31

Advance at 22.

0:40:310:40:33

-Keep going.

-Come on.

0:40:330:40:34

Advance at £22.

0:40:340:40:36

All out, then, at 22, 24...

0:40:360:40:38

-Yes!

-Go on, come on!

-Advance at £24, 26, advance at 26,

0:40:380:40:42

advance at £26.

0:40:420:40:44

-One more.

-£26?

0:40:440:40:46

Sorry, sorry.

0:40:460:40:49

Sorry. It's painful, Anita.

0:40:490:40:52

It's painful.

0:40:520:40:54

Oh, dear. £4 of loss.

0:40:540:40:56

Anita, what do I know about Scottish buyers?

0:40:560:40:59

Not a lot. I lost £4 but I bought something for the home market.

0:40:590:41:03

-Yeah.

-And I tried.

0:41:030:41:06

Yes, he sure did.

0:41:060:41:07

Now, cue the last item of the day.

0:41:070:41:10

Anita's mahogany table top billiards board.

0:41:100:41:13

The item that could lose me all this profit is coming up.

0:41:130:41:18

If you're having a party, this is exactly what you need.

0:41:180:41:20

-Exactly, Anita.

-It's party time.

0:41:200:41:23

£80. 80, advance at 80.

0:41:230:41:24

85. Advance at 85.

0:41:240:41:26

90, advance at 90, 95.

0:41:260:41:29

110, advance at 110, 120, advance at 120, advance at 130.

0:41:290:41:34

Oh, Anita Manning!

0:41:340:41:36

Advance at 130, all out, then...

0:41:360:41:39

-140.

-Rolling, rolling, rolling.

0:41:390:41:41

-You've done it.

-140.

0:41:410:41:42

At £140, last chance at 140.

0:41:420:41:46

There wasn't a price on that, and I had £140.

0:41:460:41:52

And I thought that's what it was worth.

0:41:520:41:54

Today, it just wasn't worth more.

0:41:560:41:59

That's her third lot to break even, and despite two small profits,

0:41:590:42:03

the commission is going to sting.

0:42:030:42:05

One more auction to go. I'm still in it, Anita.

0:42:050:42:08

-I'm still in it.

-Are you going to go for it, Charlie?

0:42:080:42:10

I'm going to go for it, baby.

0:42:100:42:12

-Let's go.

-Let's go.

0:42:120:42:13

Anita was riding high with £410

0:42:160:42:18

but those saleroom charges have landed her

0:42:180:42:22

with a net loss today of £60.68,

0:42:220:42:25

and her piggy now contains...

0:42:250:42:27

While Charles started out with £267.74,

0:42:310:42:36

but a mixed bag of profits and losses have cost him

0:42:360:42:40

£22.02 after auction fees.

0:42:400:42:43

However, that makes him our winner today,

0:42:430:42:46

with £245.72 for next time.

0:42:460:42:50

Charlie, there's still one more leg to go and it could all change again.

0:42:500:42:54

Never over till it's over.

0:42:540:42:56

The roller-coaster continues.

0:42:560:42:58

Next time, Anita channels the Auld Alliance.

0:42:580:43:02

Ooh-la-la! I like this.

0:43:020:43:05

Scotland goes to Charles's head.

0:43:050:43:08

Give you a tenner for it.

0:43:080:43:09

What a final fling.

0:43:090:43:11

"Burst oot greetin' " means burst into tears.

0:43:110:43:15

You won't know whether to laugh or cry.

0:43:150:43:18

Cheerio, chaps.

0:43:180:43:19

Leg four of this road trip, and it's all a bit of a gamble. While Charles Hanson plays it canny in Edinburgh, Anita Manning blows every penny of her budget. Exchanging four wheels for three, Anita splashes out on a vintage pink girls' trike, while Charles takes tea, 18th-century style, for under a tenner.

Anita learns the difference between Scottish and English remembrance poppies at the factory where they are made, and Charles gets a lesson in tartan weaving. But what are our experts made of when it comes to turning a profit? Will Anita hang on to her hat or will the young pretender pull off a comeback?