Episode 8 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 8

Anita Manning and Charles Hanson are at the midway point of their trip and visit Keswick, Kendal, Cockermouth and Penrith, before heading to auction in Rosewell, Edinburgh.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-What a job.

-..with £200 each,

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a classic car...

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-Buckle up.

-..and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Oh, sorry.

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Ha-ha!

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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-There'll be worthy winners...

-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Have a good trip.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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-Charlie?

-Yes.

-Where do you think this wee lane is taking us to?

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I think it's taking us to, maybe, a manure heap,

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because that smell, Anita.

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Oh, Charlie.

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Have you passed wind?

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-Take me back to the city!

-I can't breathe!

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Pinch your noses.

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Anita Manning and Charles Hanson,

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our fragrant finders of antiques gold,

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are back on the road, hoping for the sweet smell of success.

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I'm not complacent, Charlie.

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-No.

-But I could be tempted to be a bit adventurous.

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If I was an antique, and you looked at me, what would you think of me?

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Would you buy me, for example?

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I think I'd say, I'd have him!

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THEY LAUGH

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He's caught my eye.

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A bit unusual. A wee bit quirky.

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And I'd say you're full of colour.

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In nice condition.

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Oh, Charlie, we're like a mutual admiration society.

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Mirror, mirror, on the wall...

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Charles made a small loss in the saleroom last time,

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and is still on the back foot with £217.34.

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Anita also had a wee hiccup at the last auction,

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but is still ahead with a healthy £317.38 to spend this time.

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Our 1972 Triumph Stag is looking good, and by their own admission,

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so are our experts.

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I love that suit there. Is that out of the movies?

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Do you like my suit, seriously?

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Charlie, I think you're absolutely lovely today.

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-Are you being serious?

-Your mammy would be proud of you.

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THEY LAUGH

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Aw, look at that, Charles and Anita were waved off from Kilbarchan,

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and are touring the byways of the Scottish Borders and Cumbria

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before a final auction in North Shields.

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Today, they are circling the Lakes,

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and skirting the Solway

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before heading north to auction in Rosewell,

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near Edinburgh. But the first port of call is Keswick,

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where Anita has dropped off Charles for his first shop of the day.

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Now, this Lakeland town

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is associated with romantic writers and artists.

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In the 19th century, this was the centre of pencil manufacturing.

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Hopefully, Charles will be drawing inspiration today,

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from his first shop,

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Keswick Collectables.

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-Good morning.

-Hello.

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-How are you?

-What a fine day.

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It's Keswick, it's always like this.

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Oh, the sun shines on the righteous, eh?

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What's the plan then, Charles?

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At the moment, I am feeling the pressure.

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Anita is ahead.

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And I've got to try and catch her.

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Am I feeling confident?

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It could happen like that.

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Suddenly, out of nowhere, can be that object,

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that can be very much a story of rags to riches.

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I'm hoping it might happen.

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Dreams do come true.

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They do.

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Mark, being in Keswick, of course,

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what Keswick is renowned for is things like this, isn't it?

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The Keswick School of Art, yeah.

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Keswick School of Art.

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The Keswick School of Art, I suppose, goes back to, what?

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The period of the Art Nouveau?

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-Oh, yeah, yeah.

-The 1890s, 1900s?

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Yeah, if you're wanting an expert

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you're probably not talking to quite the right chap,

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but I know quite a bit about it.

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The school itself was about, just a few hundred yards down the street.

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This was the sort of stuff they made.

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Copper being one of the more popular,

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slightly more popular than brass.

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It's lovely, but at £225, it's a tad expensive for Charles.

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Any other shiny things with his name on them?

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Mark, this old napkin ring here, I quite like.

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-Not a problem. I'll just get...

-May I just fish it out?

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And it's Birmingham, 1890 something.

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What happened in 1897, I'll test you?

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You're talking to...

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If I give you a clue, 60 years for Queen and country.

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Oh, is it sort of commemorative, by any chance?

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Well, Queen Victoria.

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-I should know these things, really.

-Are you an Englishman?

-Yes.

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Queen Victoria celebrated 60 years on the throne.

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Of course, I was just about to say that.

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The reason I like it is, we are going to Edinburgh,

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and I suspect these might be

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little Scottish cornelian and different agate stones.

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Inset onto silver.

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It may have been one of six,

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but the quality of this napkin ring is exquisite.

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It's hallmarked Birmingham, with the anchor, it's 1897.

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It is priced at £75.

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Again...

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Start to get a feel for where I am.

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What would be the best price on that, out of interest?

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Well, we've had Anita in before,

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so I don't know where my allegiances lie.

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But... As you're in with me this time,

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and I want you to have a good chance,

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you can have it for 35.

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And I'm going to have 90% of Scotland against me

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for saying that, but...

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Can I mental-note it? Yes, you can.

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Put it onto your desk?

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-I'll put it on my desk.

-For food for thought, that would be kind,

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thank you very much, Mark, I'll come back to you.

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Sterling work, eh?

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Now, what's the story with our Silver Darling out and about,

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soaking up the glorious scenery?

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I love the Lake District.

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Land of the Romantic poets and Beatrix Potter.

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And a wonderful landscape.

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The sun is shining, the sky is blue, the wee car is driving like a dream.

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You couldn't get much better than this.

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No, you couldn't. Anita's travelling south to Kendal.

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And her first stop today is The Antiques Emporium.

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Hello. I'm Anita.

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How nice to see you.

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This looks fabulous.

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-Thank you.

-You've got a bit of everything here.

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Oh, we hope so.

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And a little bit of what you fancy does you good, eh?

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Zut alors! How about a verse of The Marseillaise?

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Come on, now, let's get serious.

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I usually like men with a bit more meat on their bones,

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but I kind of like this guy.

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He's fun. Headless, unfortunately.

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This isn't a real skeleton, of course.

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And it would possibly have been a teaching aid at medical school.

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The sale of human skeletons is strictly prohibited these days,

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thank goodness.

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But as the science of osteology developed in the 17th century,

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there grew up a thriving trade.

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Gruesome.

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Wouldn't he make an interesting conversation piece

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at your dinner parties?

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I don't know what sort of dinner parties she goes to.

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He is priced

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at £125.

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I think I would like to take him to the auction.

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But I've got to get the price down.

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Cue Chris.

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I'd like to pay...

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..in the region of £50 or £60.

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-Now, I know that's a big jump down.

-It is a big jump down.

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So you've got to...

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You've got to tell me.

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I'll have to go and ask the dealer.

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Right, can Anita secure the skeleton for half price from dealer Denise?

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I like him. I know that he isn't the real deal,

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that he hasn't been dug up by Burke and Hare.

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But I would like to pay between £50 and £60.

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Is that too far down?

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-TELEPHONE:

-It is a bit.

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I'll tell you what, Anita. You can have it at 65.

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65, Denise, you are wonderful.

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You're wonderful. And I'd love to meet you,

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because we've obviously got the same taste in men.

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What? I don't fancy yours much, love.

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Denise was lovely. £65.

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She is smashing.

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And I've got a new boyfriend!

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Looks like she's not done yet, though.

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What we have are a pair of little salt dishes.

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They are in the form of little oak tubs,

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and they are bound by silver plate.

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It would be lovely if it was silver.

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But I think they would be a lot more expensive

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if they were hallmarked silver.

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What makes them especially sweet, are the little spoons

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in the form of a shovel.

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They are probably late 19th, early 20th century.

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And we've got a pair, so that one can sit at each end of the table.

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Price ticket is £68.

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Maybe a wee bit dear.

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But if I can get a wee bit off, well...

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They are so unusual that, um,

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I might be in with a chance.

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Chris, I thought these were lovely.

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I noticed them earlier on.

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My eye was drawn to them.

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They are quite unusual.

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They are, they're sweet, aren't they?

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-They're very, very sweet.

-Yes.

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Is there anything we can do on the price?

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I have a little bit of movement on them.

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What about 60?

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Is 50 possible?

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I think that's a bit too far.

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Too far? 55.

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Mm, I would have liked 60, but, go on, as it's you.

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We'll do 55. They are so sweet, they're irresistible.

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-They are.

-So I'll collect my new boyfriend on the way out.

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OK, I'd treat him to a meal if I was you!

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-Thanks, Chris.

-He could do with fattening up.

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Anita's purse is now £120 lighter,

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and with her passenger safely strapped in...

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OK, darling, buckle up.

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..she's back off up north.

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Meanwhile, time to see

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how our other lean machine is getting on in Keswick.

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I quite like the little bowl.

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That's quite interesting, isn't it?

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You've got a good eye, there, Charles.

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Is it... Do you think so?

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I think it's a really nice piece, yeah.

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-Yeah.

-The reason I like this is, it's well-chiselled.

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And if you look at the depth of detail,

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we've got this almost design in relief,

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which is florid, it's organic.

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We've got these beautiful sprays on this fairly,

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what you might call matt-textured ground.

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Over the years, it's become quite dirty, and that's quite nice to see.

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I suspect this is probably Indian silver. It could be 1895,

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it could be as late as 1905.

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I would sell it to you for £40.

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-Would you really?

-Mm.

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Yeah, I like that.

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I will put him with my napkin ring...

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-Excellent.

-..as a maybe.

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-Thank you.

-No problem.

-Do you mind if I keep digging?

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-No, no.

-I'm digging for victory, quite literally.

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Finding my treasure.

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One thing, one thing, I quite like, Mark, is this here.

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I picked this out of the box, because this is probably Art Deco.

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-Yeah.

-1920s.

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Yeah.

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I'll tell you what. If you are taking those two for 35 and 40,

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I'll throw you that one in.

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Very generous! But what is it?

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You've got a thimble...

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end, like that, and, of course, inside,

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you've got the reel for your different cottons,

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although that is silver-plated.

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Ah, so a sewing kit?

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You'll see the engine-turned...

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..silver casing, and the enamel that, sadly, has dissipated.

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Although the remnants of the enamel are still on there.

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But just on the outer edge here, very indistinct,

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there's a silver hallmark.

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I feel now it's time to make some decisions.

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The best you said on the bowl was 40.

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40 on that one, yeah.

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The napkin ring, 35.

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And would you throw that one in, as well?

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-Yeah.

-Are you happy with that?

-75 for the three, yeah.

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So what I might do then, for auction, is make two lots.

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I might put the Scottish napkin ring together,

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and thread through my little sewing requisite lot.

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It is silver, so that's two lots at £75.

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-That's business.

-Smashing.

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-Going, going...

-Gone.

-Sold!

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That's great.

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Two silvery lots for auction for a bit of a song.

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Nice work.

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HE HUMS

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In the meanwhile, Anita has driven north to Penrith,

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a route trodden by Romans 2,000 years ago.

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The roads might not be so straight these days,

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but they are a lot less bumpy,

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as she heads to her next antiques emporium.

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The Brunswick Yard.

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-Hi, I'm Anita.

-Hi, there. I'm Adam.

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-Welcome.

-This is a fascinating antiques centre.

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There's plenty going on here.

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Everything from a few hundred, even thousand pounds, down to 50p.

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Something for 50p would be good.

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This is quite an interesting little child's chair.

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It's a nice wee thing. It is a child's potty chair.

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For potty training.

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This would date from the early part of the 20th century,

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late part of the 19th century.

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And look at this here.

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The poor wee soul was locked into the potty chair,

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until he or she performed.

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I don't know if I like that, but it's quite interesting.

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I wonder how many "p" that would be!

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Oh, she's moving on.

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I've spotted this pair of candlesticks.

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I think they are silver plate, could be aluminium.

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They are in that case, and they are very much in the modernist style.

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They are not to everyone's taste,

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but I think that they've got a lot of style.

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They are priced at £30, which is not a lot of money.

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We're going to have a look at them.

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Adam's your man.

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I thought that they might appeal to the younger set.

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Because they have that modernist look.

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But they could be from, maybe, the 1930s, '40s.

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They've got that kind of look about them, haven't they?

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They've got that kind of look. They've got that kind of look.

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Can these be bought...

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..for £18?

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The simple answer is no.

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27 would be dead best.

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I think I'm going to go for them.

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-27, thank you very much.

-Deal.

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Thank you.

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Well, they are not Liberace,

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but they might shine for you at auction.

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CAR SCREECHES

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Oh, that will be her off then!

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Meanwhile, Charles has also made his way to Penrith,

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where he's about to get to grips with a sport

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people in these parts take great pride in -

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Cumberland, or Westmorland wrestling.

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In Victorian times,

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this form of combat became a hugely popular alternative

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to bare knuckle fighting and boxing.

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At Penrith and Eden Museum our very own Big Daddy

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is going to get the lowdown from curator Corinna Leenen.

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What was unique about this form of wrestling?

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It was always played on grass.

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And then the opponents would face each other,

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and then hold each other around the waist, like this.

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-OK.

-Interlock their hands

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-around the back.

-Yes.

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And then try and topple each other.

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So I would, literally, try and do that, and try and push you over?

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Yes. Yes, you want a nice, tight grip,

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because that was one of the rules,

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you would lose if your hand slips and your grip opens.

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The other way you could lose during the match

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was if any of your body parts, other than your feet, touched the ground.

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The real Big Daddy of this wrestling was local man William Jameson,

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a Penrith joiner by trade,

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who reigned supreme from the 1850s to the 1870s,

0:16:000:16:04

when betting on big-prize bouts attracted huge crowds.

0:16:040:16:07

He was very tall. He weighed about 17st, so a very heavy guy.

0:16:090:16:16

Newspaper articles commented on his size a lot,

0:16:160:16:19

saying he looked like a polar bear

0:16:190:16:21

standing up on his hind legs.

0:16:210:16:23

He won loads of trophies.

0:16:230:16:25

Loads of belts, so

0:16:250:16:28

traditionally a belt would be awarded

0:16:280:16:30

for winning the wrestling match.

0:16:300:16:33

And it was custom that people would wear it to church on Sundays

0:16:330:16:37

to show they had won.

0:16:370:16:39

Jameson won this fine belt in 1860.

0:16:390:16:42

Gosh, that's amazing.

0:16:420:16:44

It is quite heavy, as well.

0:16:440:16:46

And it's in this beautiful condition, isn't it?

0:16:460:16:49

Patinated, polished, and just cherished over the years.

0:16:490:16:54

I feel quite inspired by Jameson.

0:16:540:16:56

I feel, you know, quite beefed up now.

0:16:560:17:00

Well, that's a good thing, because we actually booked you in

0:17:000:17:02

for a wrestling match later on, in Hesket.

0:17:020:17:05

-So...

-I'd love to watch one.

0:17:050:17:08

No, you are actually competing.

0:17:080:17:10

So... I hope you've been listening.

0:17:100:17:12

Get ready to place your bets.

0:17:120:17:14

They are waiting for Charles at Hesket Newmarket Agricultural Show,

0:17:140:17:18

where he's going to take on

0:17:180:17:19

local wrestling hero John Harrington.

0:17:190:17:22

-Is it John?

-Yes.

0:17:220:17:23

Now, John, I understand

0:17:230:17:24

you're eight-times wrestling world champion.

0:17:240:17:28

-Yes, that's right.

-And you're a local lad.

0:17:280:17:30

-Yeah.

-Born and bred.

0:17:300:17:32

-How should I feel?

-Nervous.

0:17:320:17:34

Scared. Very, very scared.

0:17:340:17:36

-I've got this for you to put on.

-What's this?

0:17:360:17:38

This is the costume to put on.

0:17:380:17:40

A pair of stockings, a pair of...

0:17:400:17:42

What are they? Shorts.

0:17:420:17:45

-They are pants, aren't they?

-Yeah.

0:17:450:17:46

-We'll wear those as well?

-That's what you call the centrepiece.

0:17:460:17:49

THEY LAUGH

0:17:490:17:51

This is the centrepiece.

0:17:510:17:53

OK, be careful.

0:17:530:17:55

And then I've obviously got here, what's that?

0:17:550:17:57

-A vest?

-Some long johns and a vest.

0:17:570:17:59

Oh, my goodness me.

0:17:590:18:00

Yeah, OK. I'm all set.

0:18:020:18:04

I can't wait to see Charles in that get-up.

0:18:040:18:06

And look, Anita's arrived to cheer him on.

0:18:060:18:09

Are you angry? I want to see you angry.

0:18:090:18:11

-OK, I'm angry, Anita.

-Are you angry?

0:18:110:18:13

-Yeah, I'm angry.

-Come on! Angrier.

0:18:130:18:15

OK, this is it.

0:18:150:18:17

-ANNOUNCER:

-We've got in the ring

0:18:170:18:18

two very well-matched wrestlers.

0:18:180:18:20

Oh, no. We're not at all.

0:18:200:18:22

On the one hand, our local expert, John Harrington,

0:18:220:18:26

reigning champion from Bewaldeth.

0:18:260:18:28

APPLAUSE

0:18:280:18:30

-And against him...

-Come on!

-..an aspiring wrestler, Charles Hanson,

0:18:300:18:35

from the Antiques Road Trip.

0:18:350:18:38

Go on, Charlie. Charlie! Charlie!

0:18:380:18:41

Oh, nice! He knows how to take hold.

0:18:410:18:45

Charlie, you're doing wonderful.

0:18:450:18:48

OK, Charlie. Ooh! Come on, Charles, atta boy.

0:18:480:18:51

I felt that!

0:18:550:18:56

-Well done, Charles.

-Ah!

0:18:580:19:01

He is so good, then he falls on his back.

0:19:010:19:04

He's a good man. I can't beat the world champion.

0:19:040:19:06

But it was a good try, you are a good sport.

0:19:060:19:09

-You're my hero.

-Oh, Anita, don't say that.

0:19:090:19:12

I'm now weak at the knees in more ways than one.

0:19:120:19:15

Hey, time to retire.

0:19:150:19:17

Dignity intact.

0:19:170:19:19

Nighty-night.

0:19:190:19:20

The sun is up and our Stag is off and running.

0:19:240:19:27

Our experts are rested, and reflecting on the trip so far.

0:19:270:19:31

Have you bought any more broken plates?

0:19:310:19:34

Anita, you know, my heart grows fond for the battered and bruised,

0:19:340:19:38

because we are survivors.

0:19:380:19:40

We are, Charlie.

0:19:400:19:42

-Together!

-We are.

0:19:420:19:44

How was your day? Did you get lucky?

0:19:440:19:47

I had a great time.

0:19:470:19:48

I got a bit lonely, yesterday, Charlie, without you in the car.

0:19:480:19:52

Thanks, Anita.

0:19:520:19:53

So I bought a little travelling companion.

0:19:530:19:57

-Did you?

-Yes, I did.

-Did you?

0:19:570:20:00

It's true. Yesterday Anita met the man of her dreams.

0:20:000:20:04

Or nightmares...

0:20:040:20:05

I usually like men with a bit more meat on their bones.

0:20:050:20:10

..and picked up two candlesticks, and two salt dishes.

0:20:100:20:13

Leaving her with £170.38 still in her purse.

0:20:130:20:18

While Charles rummaged around in Keswick,

0:20:190:20:21

and turned up a hoard of silver,

0:20:210:20:23

a napkin ring, a bowl, and a sewing case...

0:20:230:20:25

-Going, going...

-Gone.

-Sold!

0:20:250:20:27

..which means he has a budget today of £142.34.

0:20:270:20:33

I think what we've got, Anita, with you and I, with this motor,

0:20:330:20:37

is reliability.

0:20:370:20:38

And beauty and glamour!

0:20:390:20:41

-And beauty and glamour.

-Exactly, yeah.

0:20:410:20:44

Is there no end to this mutual admiration?

0:20:440:20:47

Next stop is Cockermouth,

0:20:490:20:50

birthplace of William Wordsworth and of Fletcher Christian,

0:20:500:20:54

who led the mutiny on the Bounty.

0:20:540:20:56

Hopefully, no mutineering,

0:20:570:21:00

but plenty of bounty at Colin Graham Antiques.

0:21:000:21:02

-Good luck, Charlie.

-You too.

0:21:020:21:04

-Which way are you going?

-I'll keep my eye on you.

0:21:040:21:06

-I'll keep my eye on you, as well.

-You go that way.

-OK.

0:21:060:21:09

I love jewellery cabinets like this.

0:21:150:21:18

It's all a jumble.

0:21:180:21:21

And you always think that you can find something

0:21:210:21:23

which is absolutely perfect to buy.

0:21:230:21:26

We're going to Edinburgh, so I have to be mindful of that.

0:21:260:21:29

And I found this lovely Scottish pebble brooch.

0:21:290:21:34

Now, these brooches would have been made in Edinburgh, in the 1800s.

0:21:340:21:40

Queen Victoria loved Scotland,

0:21:400:21:43

and she made this type of jewellery very, very popular.

0:21:430:21:47

Now, these stones here...

0:21:470:21:49

..are made from pebbles

0:21:510:21:53

which have been found on the beaches and the burns of Scotland.

0:21:530:21:58

But it's got 65 on it.

0:21:580:22:01

Although I like it a lot, I don't know though if I like it for £65.

0:22:010:22:06

Keep looking then. Now, what's Charles up to?

0:22:060:22:09

Look out.

0:22:090:22:10

HE BLOWS

0:22:100:22:12

Charles, should you really be standing on that chair?

0:22:120:22:15

It's a lovely tea caddy.

0:22:160:22:18

It's what you call Egg and Dart moulding.

0:22:180:22:20

And Egg and Dart moulding was wonderful,

0:22:200:22:23

neoclassical ornamentation,

0:22:230:22:25

which then went into the Regency period as well.

0:22:250:22:27

And this tea caddy...

0:22:270:22:28

..in its... Sorry.

0:22:300:22:32

In its sarcophagus form, on the bun feet, would date to around 1820.

0:22:320:22:37

By 1820, we first saw Indian tea coming into the UK,

0:22:370:22:42

so tea caddies became bigger,

0:22:420:22:44

as drinking tea became more of a middle-class commodity.

0:22:440:22:48

I like it. But it's £85.

0:22:480:22:51

It's too much money.

0:22:510:22:52

Meanwhile, time waits for no man.

0:22:520:22:55

-Or woman.

-I love this clock.

0:22:550:22:57

When I saw it, I fell in love with it.

0:22:570:23:00

But I know... I'm a Glasgow girl, I'm a Glasgow girl.

0:23:000:23:04

This was made by a Glasgow girl.

0:23:040:23:07

It's a stunning clock, Anita.

0:23:070:23:09

Hear that chime.

0:23:090:23:10

-CLOCK CHIMES

-Look. Silence.

0:23:100:23:12

It's that one, the other one chiming!

0:23:120:23:13

But that facade, Anita.

0:23:130:23:15

I mean, it looks at you, and I think,

0:23:150:23:17

"What two amazing-looking Scottish faces together."

0:23:170:23:20

-Shut up!

-Sorry, sorry, but don't you agree?

0:23:200:23:23

Colin, ignore Charlie.

0:23:240:23:27

When I walked into the shop, this was the first thing that I saw.

0:23:270:23:32

This clock is typical of the style of Art Nouveau design,

0:23:320:23:35

which flourished in Glasgow at the turn of the 20th century,

0:23:350:23:39

and which often incorporated Celtic motifs.

0:23:390:23:42

These artworks are highly prized, and likely to do well at auction

0:23:420:23:46

-according to Anita.

-I'm frightened to ask how much it costs.

0:23:460:23:51

I've got 285 on it.

0:23:510:23:52

I would give you all the money that I have to spend, £170.38.

0:23:520:23:58

And if you left me 38p,

0:24:000:24:03

I would buy that clock, and that's me blowing my whole budget.

0:24:030:24:08

And I've never done that before.

0:24:080:24:10

But it would be a lovely thing for me to buy.

0:24:100:24:13

I'd sell it to her, quick.

0:24:130:24:14

It's singing at me.

0:24:140:24:15

Oh, thank you, very much.

0:24:180:24:19

I'm so pleased. Thank you, Colin.

0:24:190:24:22

Aw. Thank you, very much.

0:24:220:24:24

There you go.

0:24:240:24:25

Thank you very much. Oh, that's lovely.

0:24:250:24:28

I hope you do well with it.

0:24:280:24:29

Well, it sure had your name on it, Anita.

0:24:290:24:32

Lovely, thank you very much.

0:24:320:24:33

Excellent. It was terrific.

0:24:330:24:35

But I've still got this 38p.

0:24:350:24:38

And I couldn't find anything for 38p.

0:24:380:24:41

I'll tell you what, put your money in there.

0:24:410:24:43

Right.

0:24:430:24:44

That's it. 38p.

0:24:440:24:46

Don't say I didn't give you owt.

0:24:460:24:49

Thank you very much.

0:24:490:24:50

-That's great.

-Well, that was generous, Colin.

0:24:500:24:54

It's a bucket-shaped match striker and ashtray,

0:24:540:24:58

dating from around 1910.

0:24:580:25:00

So Anita now has five lots for auction.

0:25:000:25:02

Success, then, for Anita.

0:25:050:25:07

But what about our man who seems to have got behind Colin's counter?

0:25:070:25:10

I've just picked up, literally, in the corner,

0:25:110:25:14

in between these two books,

0:25:140:25:15

quite a nice little silver, what appears to be a scent bottle,

0:25:150:25:19

hallmarked late Victorian.

0:25:190:25:22

Out of interest, there's no price on it.

0:25:220:25:24

-How much is that?

-25 quid.

0:25:240:25:26

-How much?

-25.

0:25:260:25:27

Your very best?

0:25:270:25:28

-Give us a 20.

-I've found a little, late Victorian, silver scent bottle,

0:25:300:25:35

we're all happy, put it there.

0:25:350:25:36

-Good man.

-Fancy a wrestle?

0:25:360:25:38

I'm not kissing you!

0:25:390:25:40

Ha-ha-ha!

0:25:400:25:41

And that concludes our very amicable business here.

0:25:410:25:44

-Safe travelling!

-Thank you.

-Bye.

-See you, bye.

-See you, bud!

0:25:440:25:47

Today, the Borders are a place of tranquillity,

0:25:490:25:53

a landscape of rolling hills and farmland, dotted with cattle,

0:25:530:25:57

sheep and antique shops.

0:25:570:25:59

But these lands were once lawless and deadly.

0:25:590:26:02

Anita's in Carlisle, a city buffeted by history,

0:26:020:26:06

because of its position on the border,

0:26:060:26:08

its mighty castle besieged more than any other in Britain.

0:26:080:26:12

Into this chaos rode the border reivers,

0:26:120:26:15

in a reign of terror lasting three centuries.

0:26:150:26:18

David Gopsill at Tullie House Museum

0:26:190:26:22

describes life here in the 13th to 16th centuries.

0:26:220:26:26

For the rich, obviously, it would have been quite comfortable.

0:26:260:26:31

And, unfortunately, for the poor, it was a very difficult time.

0:26:310:26:36

It was a war zone.

0:26:360:26:37

The whole area was just trodden down by passing armies,

0:26:370:26:41

and, of course, if England invaded Scotland,

0:26:410:26:44

or Scotland invaded England,

0:26:440:26:46

the first areas that would be hit would be the Borders.

0:26:460:26:48

The reivers came from both sides of the border,

0:26:480:26:51

families with names like Armstrong, Johnson, Hetherington and Graham.

0:26:510:26:56

Taking advantage of political chaos,

0:26:560:26:58

they donned their steel bonnets and plundered,

0:26:580:27:01

and feuded to the death with their neighbours.

0:27:010:27:03

They also would hold protection rackets against people, or places.

0:27:030:27:08

And the reivers are actually where we get the term blackmail from.

0:27:080:27:13

So in those days,

0:27:130:27:14

the green mail was the rent you would pay to your land owner,

0:27:140:27:17

and the blackmail would be paid to the people

0:27:170:27:19

you were trying to protect yourself from.

0:27:190:27:22

The rugged terrain of this war zone

0:27:220:27:25

provided a training ground for these expert cattle-rustling bandits.

0:27:250:27:28

They were excellent horsemen, incredibly skilled.

0:27:290:27:32

They were actually called the finest light cavalry in all of Europe,

0:27:320:27:36

for their time, which is incredible.

0:27:360:27:39

They would obviously have a rapier,

0:27:390:27:42

a lance would be quite popular in those days,

0:27:420:27:46

and they would use this, and a very small horse,

0:27:460:27:49

to pick their way across the Fells, and appear in the cover of darkness,

0:27:490:27:55

murder, pillage, and disappear back into the darkness.

0:27:550:28:00

Borderers lived, year in, year out, with the threat of being reived,

0:28:000:28:04

and that's where our word "bereaved" comes from.

0:28:040:28:07

Those who had most to lose were the best able to defend themselves.

0:28:070:28:12

If you had a bit of wealth,

0:28:120:28:13

you might have what's called a bastle house.

0:28:130:28:15

That would be a fortified house.

0:28:150:28:17

The walls would be quite thick, and they'd be up to seven metres tall.

0:28:170:28:21

You'd have a large basement underneath, to hide your cattle.

0:28:210:28:25

That sounds almost like a castle.

0:28:250:28:27

It does. But it doesn't even hold a torch up

0:28:270:28:30

to the peel towers of the day.

0:28:300:28:32

So a peel tower is a large, fortified tower that had a barmekin,

0:28:320:28:37

which is an outside wall that would protect a small area,

0:28:370:28:40

like a courtyard. And then there would be the tower,

0:28:400:28:43

which would be up to 19 metres tall.

0:28:430:28:45

Walls about three metres thick.

0:28:450:28:47

That would really protect you against any reiving attacks.

0:28:470:28:50

It sounds like dreadful times.

0:28:500:28:53

Was there nothing put in place to stop this lawlessness?

0:28:530:28:57

The monarchs of both England and Scotland tried to stop it

0:28:570:29:00

using Wardens of the Marches,

0:29:000:29:02

and these wardens were a bit like the police of the time.

0:29:020:29:05

Unfortunately, a lot of these wardens were locals,

0:29:050:29:08

so a lot of them either had ties to the reiving families,

0:29:080:29:11

or were in fact reivers themselves.

0:29:110:29:13

So it didn't really help much,

0:29:130:29:15

because you were giving a lot more power to a border reiving family,

0:29:150:29:19

and they could use that to their own gain.

0:29:190:29:21

In 1603, when James VI of Scotland inherited the throne of England,

0:29:210:29:26

this union of the crowns brought some peace

0:29:260:29:29

to Anglo-Scottish relations.

0:29:290:29:31

Reivers were outlawed, and banished,

0:29:310:29:34

leaving behind stories sung in border ballads,

0:29:340:29:37

and the towers they attacked and defended in those violent times.

0:29:370:29:41

Charles is wending his way now to Maryport, on the Solway Firth,

0:29:440:29:48

where a fort once guarded the Roman sea defences west of Hadrian's wall.

0:29:480:29:53

It's Charles's last shop, so what's he after?

0:29:530:29:57

I'm looking for that next big thing in antiquing terms, it's that rare,

0:29:570:30:03

Ming vase, or important undiscovered Faberge.

0:30:030:30:07

It's out there.

0:30:070:30:08

-I just need some luck.

-Faberge and Ming, eh?

0:30:080:30:12

That might require more of a miracle than just luck!

0:30:120:30:15

But maybe miracles are the order of the day at Maryport Antiques.

0:30:150:30:20

Good day.

0:30:200:30:22

How are you? Is it your shop?

0:30:220:30:23

-Yes.

-Your name is?

0:30:230:30:25

-Ben.

-What a lovely shop.

0:30:250:30:27

Now for that Ming vase, Charles?

0:30:270:30:29

-Oh!

-Butterfingers.

0:30:320:30:35

Come on, man, focus!

0:30:350:30:37

-What's this?

-That's just a pot.

0:30:370:30:41

It's peculiar.

0:30:410:30:42

We're trying to identify it.

0:30:420:30:45

-How much could it be? How much could it be?

-£100.

0:30:450:30:49

-OK.

-We've got this, incise, what we might call grafito decoration

0:30:490:30:53

which, in style, is quite difficult to date.

0:30:530:30:57

It could be oriental.

0:30:570:30:59

Could be African.

0:30:590:31:00

The lid, almost when one picks it up, you think,

0:31:000:31:05

"Is it lead?" It looks like lead, but it's not.

0:31:050:31:08

Again, it's just a really coarse earthenware...

0:31:080:31:11

..body.

0:31:130:31:14

This pot could date from as far back as the 16th century.

0:31:140:31:19

And its geometric pattern suggests

0:31:190:31:21

it's probably of South American origin.

0:31:210:31:23

Best price would be?

0:31:230:31:24

-100?

-I think best price would be 100 on that, yeah.

0:31:260:31:30

And that's what you call the death, isn't it?

0:31:300:31:31

Yeah, I'm afraid so.

0:31:310:31:33

That's OK. Yeah.

0:31:330:31:35

Well, it might kill me.

0:31:350:31:36

-I'll take it.

-OK, fantastic.

0:31:410:31:43

Very decisive.

0:31:440:31:46

-Anything else?

-I quite like...

0:31:460:31:48

..this little small dog.

0:31:510:31:53

It's just sitting, isn't it, Ben, lurking?

0:31:530:31:56

Your little guard dog.

0:31:560:31:58

It's a very little guard dog.

0:31:580:32:00

On your top deck, it's quite a sweet, what we call a toy.

0:32:000:32:04

Staffordshire porcelain toy.

0:32:040:32:06

Probably 19th century. How much is that?

0:32:070:32:09

I think I could probably do that for £15?

0:32:090:32:13

-15?

-If you found anything else I could maybe do a little bit.

0:32:130:32:16

There's one thing I've seen when I walked into the front,

0:32:160:32:18

so if I put him down there.

0:32:180:32:20

If I go and get it, maybe we can do a deal.

0:32:200:32:22

Yeah, of course.

0:32:220:32:24

What is it? A Faberge egg?

0:32:240:32:27

It's not quite lights out yet.

0:32:270:32:29

But, of course, back in the Victorian times,

0:32:290:32:31

you had a chamber stick.

0:32:310:32:33

-Yes.

-I just quite like this, because it's only £5.

0:32:330:32:38

Age-wise, we're talking 1860.

0:32:380:32:40

And what's lovely, it's all hand-painted.

0:32:400:32:43

All hand-painted.

0:32:430:32:44

These wonderful, busy, vibrant sprays of flowers.

0:32:440:32:48

What we call a dentil gilt rim.

0:32:480:32:51

Yes, it's got a crack.

0:32:510:32:53

It's a shame, just on the sconce there, there's a small crack.

0:32:530:32:56

I'm an... I like buying objects, because, to me, it's a survivor.

0:32:560:33:01

So, Ben, If I bought the chamber stick in porcelain Staffordshire,

0:33:010:33:05

and I bought the King Charles spaniel with it as well,

0:33:050:33:10

what could be the best price?

0:33:100:33:11

-I'd do it for 12.

-Are you sure?

0:33:120:33:14

-I'll do it for 12.

-Is there money in it for you, though, on that?

0:33:140:33:16

-Yes.

-That's five for the chamber stick, and 12 for the dog,

0:33:160:33:21

and with the pot, Charles is handing over £117.

0:33:210:33:25

And that's him done.

0:33:260:33:29

-Take care.

-Until next time.

-And you.

0:33:290:33:30

Bye-bye.

0:33:300:33:32

Bye-bye, Maryport.

0:33:320:33:34

Time to collect our other priceless prize, Anita, and hit the trail.

0:33:340:33:39

What's the direction of travel?

0:33:390:33:41

Let's get to the end of this road,

0:33:410:33:42

and see if we can see a signpost that says, "To the north."

0:33:420:33:46

Exactly, Anita.

0:33:460:33:48

It's that simple.

0:33:480:33:49

The North, here we come.

0:33:490:33:51

Back over the border soon enough, after some shut-eye, eh?

0:33:510:33:54

Auction Day has dawned, and the stage is set at Rosewell,

0:33:570:34:01

a former mining village south of Edinburgh,

0:34:010:34:03

where our irrepressible pair are leading us

0:34:030:34:06

a merry Scottish country dance.

0:34:060:34:09

-BOTH:

-Heel, toe, heel, toe, gallop, gallop, gallop.

0:34:090:34:12

We're here, Charlie.

0:34:120:34:14

As if by magic, Anita and Charles took the B road

0:34:140:34:17

from Keswick on a scenic tour of the lakes,

0:34:170:34:19

before crossing the Scottish border and heading for Rosewell.

0:34:190:34:23

Our saleroom today is Thomson Roddick, a family firm,

0:34:230:34:27

which has been gavel-bashing hereabouts since 1880.

0:34:270:34:30

Anita blew her entire budget of £317.38 on five lots.

0:34:320:34:39

Charles, who is also very nearly cleaned out,

0:34:390:34:42

spending £212 on his five lots.

0:34:420:34:46

So, what do they think, honestly?

0:34:460:34:49

This is an old crackpot.

0:34:490:34:51

And Charlie loves his old crackpots.

0:34:510:34:54

But this pot could be something very special.

0:34:540:34:58

Over 300 years old, probably South American.

0:34:580:35:01

There will be buyers out there who are anxious to get a hold of that.

0:35:010:35:05

Crackpot indeed, eh?

0:35:050:35:07

This clock looked amazing in the shop,

0:35:070:35:09

and Anita, you've hit the jackpot.

0:35:090:35:11

It just captures everything you want from the organic, sinuous lines

0:35:110:35:15

of the Glaswegian School of handicraft, to the numerals.

0:35:150:35:20

I cannot believe it was under £200.

0:35:200:35:24

Time will tell, then.

0:35:240:35:26

Now, what does auctioneer Sybelle Thomson

0:35:260:35:28

think about what Charles and Anita have bought?

0:35:280:35:30

Lots of interest in the skeleton.

0:35:300:35:33

Just a shame it's headless.

0:35:330:35:34

But I think it will do really well here.

0:35:340:35:36

The napkin ring and the silver sewing case -

0:35:360:35:38

these are always popular.

0:35:380:35:40

And particularly will do well in Edinburgh,

0:35:400:35:42

as there's lots of collectors for pieces

0:35:420:35:44

set with Scottish hard stone.

0:35:440:35:46

Please be seated.

0:35:460:35:47

I'm looking forward to this, Charlie.

0:35:470:35:50

There's a really busy feeling of vibrancy.

0:35:500:35:55

First up, and standing to attention, is Anita's skeleton.

0:35:550:35:58

Don't lose your head here. Ooh!

0:35:580:36:00

Somebody did!

0:36:000:36:02

£35, 35, 35, 40, five.

0:36:020:36:06

-It's moving.

-50, five. 55.

-Slow down!

0:36:060:36:08

Anyone else? 60. five,

0:36:080:36:10

70. Five, 80.

0:36:100:36:12

I don't believe this!

0:36:120:36:14

Standing at 80.

0:36:140:36:15

Five, 90.

0:36:150:36:18

Five. £100?

0:36:180:36:19

Standing at the back, at £100.

0:36:190:36:21

Anyone else? Going on at £100.

0:36:210:36:25

A meaty £35 profit on the bones.

0:36:250:36:28

It doesn't seem a lot, that, to me.

0:36:280:36:29

-I can't believe that!

-Has it put me A HEAD?

0:36:290:36:32

CHARLES LAUGHS

0:36:320:36:35

Next up, Charles' Indian silver bowl.

0:36:350:36:38

20, five. 25? 30.

0:36:380:36:42

Going on the internet, 35.

0:36:420:36:44

-Come on, internet.

-35, 40.

0:36:440:36:46

£40. 45, on commission at 45.

0:36:460:36:50

You are all out on the internet?

0:36:500:36:52

At £45?

0:36:520:36:55

A profit of £5 sterling to you, sir.

0:36:550:36:57

It wasn't bad, Charlie.

0:36:580:37:00

Anita, I'm a happy man.

0:37:000:37:02

Anita's oak and silver-plated salt dishes now.

0:37:020:37:05

Can they serve up a profit?

0:37:050:37:06

We start straight in at 20 bid.

0:37:060:37:08

20 bid? Everywhere, 25?

0:37:080:37:11

-30, five, 40...

-Where's the American wave?

0:37:110:37:13

..five, 50, five, 55.

0:37:130:37:16

60?

0:37:160:37:17

-You're in business, girl.

-65?

0:37:170:37:20

The gentleman seated at 65.

0:37:200:37:22

70 online.

0:37:220:37:23

-Yes!

-70.

0:37:230:37:25

-70? 70?

-LAUGHTER

0:37:250:37:28

Would you like another, sir? Don't be put off.

0:37:280:37:31

75, in the room at 75.

0:37:310:37:33

At £75.

0:37:330:37:36

Another £20 profit in Anita's pocket.

0:37:360:37:40

That's what they call a good touch.

0:37:400:37:42

-Touch me.

-Thank you, very much.

0:37:420:37:44

Ha-ha! So will Lady Luck help Charles with his next lot,

0:37:440:37:47

the Scottish hard stone inset napkin ring,

0:37:470:37:50

and the silver-plated and enamel sewing case?

0:37:500:37:53

40, five, 50, five...

0:37:530:37:55

-Go on, girl.

-Yes! Yes!

-60, five.

0:37:550:37:57

65, 70.

0:37:570:38:00

-75? 80. Five. 90.

-Keep going, lass.

0:38:000:38:04

Five. At £95?

0:38:040:38:08

£60-worth of good fortune there.

0:38:080:38:11

Nice one, Charles.

0:38:110:38:12

-That's good, isn't it?

-Brilliant, Charlie, brilliant.

0:38:120:38:16

I feel a bit sweaty now! I'm excited. Sorry.

0:38:160:38:19

Time now for Anita's white metal modernist candlesticks.

0:38:190:38:23

20? I've got 20 bid.

0:38:230:38:24

20? 25.

0:38:240:38:26

25?

0:38:260:38:27

30, five, 40, five.

0:38:270:38:29

Here we go. We're rolling home.

0:38:290:38:31

-They're angry.

-Five, 55.

0:38:310:38:34

At £55? At £55.

0:38:340:38:38

Anita's done it again.

0:38:380:38:40

She's doubled her money. What a girl!

0:38:400:38:42

When you've got it, Anita, you've got it, girl.

0:38:420:38:44

Loving your work.

0:38:450:38:47

You're not doing too badly yourself, Charles.

0:38:470:38:50

Next up, it's his silver scent bottle.

0:38:500:38:53

20, five.

0:38:530:38:54

30, five.

0:38:540:38:55

40, five.

0:38:550:38:57

45, 50 online. 55?

0:38:570:39:01

Anyone else going on at £55?

0:39:010:39:05

Another profit there, our duo definitely on a roll today.

0:39:050:39:10

Brilliant, Charlie, brilliant.

0:39:100:39:11

Breathe it in, Anita, breathe it in.

0:39:110:39:14

Breathe the sweet smell of success.

0:39:140:39:17

Exactly, Anita, exactly.

0:39:170:39:19

Easy for you to say.

0:39:190:39:20

Ha-ha!

0:39:200:39:21

Now one of the cheapest items ever bought on the Antiques Road Trip.

0:39:210:39:25

The brass bucket Anita bought for 38p.

0:39:250:39:30

£10. 15? 20. 20?

0:39:300:39:34

In the centre at 20?

0:39:340:39:35

Anyone else going on for the match striker at 20?

0:39:350:39:39

At £20?

0:39:390:39:42

£20, that's a profit of 5,263%.

0:39:420:39:47

Oh, yes, I calculated that in my head!

0:39:470:39:50

Liar.

0:39:500:39:51

If you could buy a few of those for 38p,

0:39:510:39:54

and then toss them in for a £20 note,

0:39:540:39:56

-incredible business, Anita Manning.

-I know.

0:39:560:39:59

Can the next lot,

0:39:590:40:01

the Staffordshire porcelain candlestick

0:40:010:40:02

and the King Charles spaniel top that?

0:40:020:40:05

£10?

0:40:050:40:06

I've got ten bid.

0:40:060:40:08

15? I5.

0:40:080:40:09

20?

0:40:090:40:10

25?

0:40:100:40:11

25, are you bidding?

0:40:110:40:13

-30.

-Thank you very much!

0:40:130:40:15

-Thank you!

-£30.

0:40:150:40:16

Thank you, thank you.

0:40:160:40:18

On the right at 30. Anyone else going on at £30?

0:40:180:40:23

Nice work, china!

0:40:230:40:25

That's great. Very happy.

0:40:250:40:27

Now, will time be kind to our Glasgow gal

0:40:270:40:30

and her brass-faced clock?

0:40:300:40:33

100 for the nice clock?

0:40:330:40:35

-At 100? 110.

-It's going to roll.

0:40:350:40:36

120. 130.

0:40:360:40:38

140. 150.

0:40:380:40:40

160, 170, 180.

0:40:400:40:44

190, 200. 210.

0:40:440:40:47

I have to have another, sir. 220.

0:40:470:40:49

230. 240. 250.

0:40:490:40:53

Anyone else going on at £250?

0:40:530:40:58

£80 profit for Anita.

0:40:580:41:01

There's no stopping her today.

0:41:010:41:03

That was exciting, though, wasn't it?

0:41:030:41:05

Anita, you're flying. You are flying high.

0:41:050:41:08

Charles' last lot now,

0:41:080:41:10

the earthenware jar and cover. Old and mysterious -

0:41:100:41:13

will it be auction gold?

0:41:130:41:16

Quite a lot of interest in this, and I can start straight in at 30 bid.

0:41:160:41:20

30 bid? 30 bid.

0:41:200:41:22

-30 bid.

-It's going to run off, or...

0:41:220:41:24

At 30, five.

0:41:240:41:26

40, five.

0:41:260:41:27

50, five. 60, five.

0:41:270:41:30

65.

0:41:300:41:32

Anyone else going on at 65?

0:41:320:41:34

70, five.

0:41:340:41:37

80, five.

0:41:370:41:39

90, five, 95.

0:41:390:41:42

Selling on commission at 95?

0:41:420:41:44

At £95?

0:41:440:41:47

So close!

0:41:470:41:49

But all their other items today HAVE turned a profit.

0:41:490:41:53

We had great results.

0:41:530:41:54

-Wonderful. Moments.

-We had great fun.

0:41:540:41:56

We're both exhausted with the excitement.

0:41:560:41:59

Now it's time to have a nice cup of tea.

0:41:590:42:01

-On you go.

-Give me a push.

0:42:010:42:03

You deserve refreshment, you two.

0:42:050:42:08

Charles started with £217.34 in his piggy,

0:42:080:42:12

and his success in the saleroom increased his tally,

0:42:120:42:15

after auction costs,

0:42:150:42:17

by £50.40 to £267.74.

0:42:170:42:22

So, well done, Carlos.

0:42:220:42:23

Anita began with £317.38

0:42:250:42:29

and she soared away in Rosewell with a profit,

0:42:290:42:33

after auction costs, of £92.62

0:42:330:42:36

so with a new total of £410,

0:42:360:42:40

she is leading the dance again.

0:42:400:42:42

That was brilliant.

0:42:430:42:45

-Absolutely brilliant.

-Over the moon.

-We both made money.

0:42:450:42:48

Exactly, now, listen, give me a Highland Fling.

0:42:480:42:50

Jig for joy.

0:42:500:42:51

-Jig for joy.

-Jig for joy?

0:42:510:42:53

Catch her if you can, Charles.

0:42:530:42:56

And they are still game next time on Antiques Road Trip.

0:42:560:42:59

-It can be a bit like Snakes and Ladders.

-Ssss.

0:43:000:43:04

You can go up, and you can come down.

0:43:040:43:08

Charles certainly gets down with some moves all of his own...

0:43:080:43:12

-Like that.

-..while Anita channels her inner Chris Hoy.

0:43:120:43:16

Oh, Charlie can keep the Stag!

0:43:160:43:19

SHE LAUGHS

0:43:190:43:21

Dear, oh, dear.

0:43:210:43:22

Cheerio, chaps.

0:43:240:43:26

This Lake District jaunt sees experts Anita Manning and Charles Hanson visit Keswick, Kendal, Cockermouth and Penrith, as they clock up the miles in their classic car.

Time is on Anita's side when she fancies a brass-faced Glasgow-style clock. And a brass neck also nets her a bargain for less than a pound. Anita also picks up an unlikely date in one antique shop, while Charles walks out with a King Charles spaniel.

Charles is beefed up when he takes on a champion wrestler in a fight. But who will strike the greatest blow at auction in Rosewell, Edinburgh, and will it be a fight to the death?