Episode 7 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 7

On their second trip, Anita Manning and Charles Hanson tour Fife, and in the Scottish Borders, Charles goes on the trail of Hawick's motorcycle racing veteran Jimmie Guthrie.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-What a job.

-..with £200 each...

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-You with me?

-..a classic car...

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-Buckle up.

-..and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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-Ooh, sorry!

-Ha-ha!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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-There'll be worthy winners...

-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Have a good trip.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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CAR HORN BLARES

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Hark the sound of the noble Triumph Stag

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bearing our seasoned antiques hunters

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Charles Hanson and Anita Manning,

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and another day of rambunctious rivalry on the Caledonian roads.

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I'm now a stag next to my deer.

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Hello, DEER.

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Anita, like, you're stalking these lanes now,

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looking for my antique kill and hopefully, on the chosen two,

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it'll be our time.

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What is he on, eh?

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Charles set out with £200 and made a modest profit last time,

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giving him a new budget of £223.86.

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While Anita began with the same amount, but streaked ahead

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in the last saleroom and starts out in front today with £332.26.

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But who will wear the crown this time?

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Well, I'll tell you, Charlie, I love your bonnet!

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Well, Anita, you know, just, you know,

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I obviously admire your head dress

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and I thought I'll wear my hat today as well.

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Do you think we're the glam couple of the Antiques Road Trip?

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Yes, yes! Yes, you are.

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Our debonair duo began in Kilbarchan,

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and will zigzag north and south, crossing and re-crossing the border

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before a final auction in North Shields.

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-Onwards and upwards.

-Yes!

-Yes.

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Today, they're setting forth from the Kingdom of Fife

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before wending their way by the banks of the Tay

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and the Tweed, to auction in Dumfries.

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First, to Dunfermline.

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The local abbey and palace was once the favoured residence

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and last resting place of the medieval Scottish monarchs.

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Today, our king and queen of antiques

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are proceeding to Anita's first shop,

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the enigmatically named Secret Door.

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Have a great time. Bye!

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-Hello.

-Hi!

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-I'm Anita.

-Hi, Anita. My name's Stuart.

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-Oh, lovely, lovely, lovely to meet you.

-Pleased to meet you.

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-Welcome to The Secret Door.

-And to be in Dunfermline.

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-This is my very first time in this historic town.

-Oh, well,

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a lot of history here, a lot of history.

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-Yeah. Can I have a good look around?

-Absolutely.

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-A good rummage.

-I want you to.

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What treasures await our regal one here?

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I love these, it's a flutter of butterflies.

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Mid-20th century, Scandinavian, enamelled brooches.

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They're absolutely lovely. They're priced up at £35.

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Not dear, but I wouldn't want to buy just one,

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I'd want to buy the whole lot!

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A flutter for another day, eh?

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Moving on...

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I can't resist cabinets with jewellery and silver.

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And there's a bit of Oriental silver there.

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Now, Oriental items are hot in today's market.

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There's a set of spoons here.

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They are very, very light.

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They have a mark on the back, an Oriental mark.

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I can't read it.

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I don't know the date.

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I think that these are possibly not terribly old,

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but they do come from China.

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I've given it a wee bend and silver always has

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a little bit of give in it, so I know that they are silver.

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I know that they are Oriental.

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They're priced up at £55.

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I would need to get them reduced from that price,

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but I'm going to have a go at them.

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-That's the spirit.

-Stuart!

-Hello?

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Do you know anything about the background of them?

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I know that the person that they came from,

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his great-auntie was a missionary in China before the war.

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-Wow!

-So, she picked up little bits when she was out there,

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so they're definitely pre-war, I would say.

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I was wondering if I could buy them in the roundabout the £30 mark?

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Er, if we said 35, how's that?

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-35 would be absolutely fine with me.

-That OK with you?

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-You put them on the counter.

-Will do.

-I'm going to rummage further.

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-Keep going.

-Spoons which could surely grace a royal table, eh?

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Lovely. Meanwhile, His Lordship has made his way

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to the lovely seaside village of Aberdour,

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which faces south across the islands of the Firth of Forth.

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His first shopping destination is Blakes Vintage & Collectables.

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So, stand by.

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-Good morning.

-Hello, Charles.

-How are you?

-I'm very well.

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-How do you do? I'm Debbie.

-Hi, Debbie. What a lovely shop.

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What I'm looking for, Debbie,

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are the more interesting, sleepy objects.

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I'm a man who likes real antiques.

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So, anything with a big, capital A, I'm after.

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Well...

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that looks like balls with a capital B.

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Oh! For heaven's sake, Charles.

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-I lost a ball. Sorry!

-Oh, blimey! Moving swiftly on...

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Isn't he cute? This little bear.

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I say a small bear.

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Take his ribbon off.

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He's OK.

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I quite like this bear, he's got this slight hump

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on the back of his shoulder,

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which takes us back to the early teddy bears of...

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..maybe Chad Valley Chilton or, of course, German bears,

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which go back to Steiff.

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And you're looking a bit miserable,

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in that his button nose is slightly tired, but he's got character.

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He's early. This bear, I suspect, is certainly 1930s,

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probably feeling inside, he appears to be wood-shaven

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or even straw-filled.

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He's priced at...

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..£45.

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Time to talk to Debbie.

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I like him. What's the best you could do?

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-20?

-How much?

-20.

-£20?

-Yes.

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If you don't ask, you don't get.

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-Give him a kiss goodbye.

-Aw!

-There we go. He's off.

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Thanks, Debbie. If I can put him behind your counter,

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I'll let you take him away

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-and I'll keep on my little circuit around the shop.

-OK.

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And Teddy was very happy, because he was chosen to go to the auction.

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Stay tuned, boys and girls, to find out how Teddy gets on.

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And now, over to Auntie Anita in Dunfermline for the next story.

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A lovely pair of volumes of the works of Shakespeare.

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The outsides are just divine.

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They are bound in this wonderful tan leather,

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with gilded tool work on the front cover.

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In this volume, the title is "The Works Of Shakespeare,

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"With Notes By Charles Knight."

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Charles Knight was one of the most prestigious publishers

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in the 18th and 19th century.

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And we have a lovely selection of engravings.

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Macbeth, with Macbeth's dagger.

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And Lady Macbeth egging him on.

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The other volume contains comedies and stories.

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-Stuart. I'm not a book specialist.

-No.

-I've fallen in love with these.

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I was looking for sort of around about 150 for the pair.

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I could do them for about 100?

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How round about 100?

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I mean, just give me it straight, Stuart.

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-Give me it straight.

-90 would be the best that I can do on them.

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Let's go for it. Let's take a chance.

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I'm delighted with them and I hope they bring a smile to my face

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-and don't end in tragedy!

-No, no!

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Exit, Anita.

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All's well that ends well, eh?

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Now, wherefore art thou, Derbyshire man?

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I'm a long way away from home,

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I really am. And then, suddenly, you see a view of Tissington,

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which is near Ashbourne,

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about eight miles from where I live in Derbyshire.

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It's made at my local factory, Royal Crown Derby, there's the mark.

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Royal Crown Derby date code, probably about 1928.

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You've also got a small artist signature. WEJ Dean

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is for William Edward James Dean, a good local artist at Derby

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in the early 20th century. How nice.

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And quite simply, it's purely a decorative little picture,

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which is on this porcelain rocky outcropped back

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and I quite like it. Debbie.

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-I can see on the back here a small label, it says 30.

-Yes.

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-And the best price would be?

-22.

-Yeah, I think it's good.

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For £22, I can't say no. I'll take it.

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£22, thank you so much.

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Two items in the old bag and he's still hunting.

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There's some really interesting medals in here and mainly,

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they're all World War II.

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And you wonder what stories they could tell.

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What's quite interesting though is there is a very young-looking

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serviceman here and it says, on the exterior,

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"Kindest regards, Gordon. Cairo, 1942."

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And there he is. And in fact, with the small card of him

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is this interesting little brooch.

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It reads...

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"Gertrude, with love, from Gordon."

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It's quite simply a decorative brooch.

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On the inside of the star there, you've got to the date, 1941,

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and on the bottom, very indistinct,

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but on that yellow gilt tablet, it reads "Iraq".

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-Debbie? Sorry to be a pain again and bother you.

-Hi!

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There's perhaps a lovely story here, which you might tell me more about.

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There's an image here of a young man called Gordon.

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I think he was about 17.

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He made the brooch for his girlfriend

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and it's a sweetheart brooch.

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It's difficult, Debbie, to put a price on this.

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I'd probably want to pay,

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because it's purely decorative and the value is the emotion, £15?

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-I'm happy with that.

-So, I'll take this for £15.

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-Yes.

-I'll also, obviously, take the plaque, which is reserved,

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-and also the teddy bear.

-Monty.

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Which makes a grand total of £57

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and concludes a fruitful visit to Aberdour for Charles.

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Anita's next stop is ten miles up the Fife coast

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and the ancient borough of Kirkcaldy.

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Once a busy North Sea port thriving on industries like salt,

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whaling and linoleum. Into this muck and tar world of the 18th century

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came one of the most influential thinkers of his age,

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whose ideas are still hotly debated today.

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At Kirkcaldy Galleries, Anita is meeting Gavin Grant

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and a moral philosopher still very visible in everyday transactions.

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Gavin, I've got a £20 note in my pocket.

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On the back, there is an image of our Kirkcaldy man.

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Who was he and what did he do?

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Well, that's Adam Smith, who we can see on the note,

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and he's one of the greatest thinkers of all time.

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He was born here in Kirkcaldy in 1723,

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was educated at the local school here

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and went on to get further education at Glasgow and Oxford.

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And he really developed ideas about philosophy,

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economics and politics as well,

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that have influenced generations since the mid-18th century.

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The Scottish Enlightenment, with its flowering of scientific

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and intellectual thought, was part of a wider, European

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philosophical movement and Smith was a trailblazer.

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He wrote his most famous book, which was published in 1776,

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which is The Wealth Of Nations.

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It was published in London, in two volumes, and it sold, at the time,

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for £2 and two shillings.

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-That's a lot of money at that time.

-A lot of money then.

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There were 750 copies sold then,

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so we are fortunate to have one of them here.

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And it went on to become a bestseller.

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By the time that Smith died in 1790,

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it had gone through further editions and it was a bestseller.

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Are you telling me that a book on economics was a bestseller?

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-That's right.

-A sell-out!

-Doesn't happen very often,

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but it happened then.

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The Wealth Of Nations, ten years in the writing,

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analysed the creation and uses of wealth and capital within society

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for the first time,

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and gave birth to the social science of political economy.

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He really was against tariffs and a lot of taxation.

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He was more in favour of freer trade across countries,

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breaking down boundaries.

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He wasn't a total advocate of the free market.

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He was in favour of some government regulation.

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But he really argued to have deregulation, as far as possible.

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Smith's invisible hand theory,

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that self-interest frequently promotes the interests of society,

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is often used to paint him as the father of modern capitalism.

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But Smith was a moral philosopher,

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who also believed that no society could flourish

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in the face of widespread poverty.

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His ideas have influenced people

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across a whole range of political spectrums, from left to right.

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Indeed, Mrs Thatcher and Kirkcaldy's own Gordon Brown

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are two Prime Ministers

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who have each claimed Smith as an inspiration.

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Today, the hand of the great man

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can quite literally be seen in this book,

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part of the museum's collection.

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It's by John Locke, the philosopher. Adam Smith owned it

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and inside the book, on page 15, I can show you especially

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where there are handwritten notes.

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Now, it's only in the last couple of years that we found out

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that these notes were actually written by Adam Smith himself.

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So, he would have been sitting at his desk, with his inkwell, his pen,

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and his writing paraphernalia, studying that book

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and writing The Wealth Of Nations.

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And still earning a place in politics and economics

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more than two centuries later.

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I'll never look at a £20 note in the same way again!

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Meanwhile, Charles is travelling north through Fife,

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turning eastwards at Perth,

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alongside the banks of the silvery Tay.

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This road runs through the Carse of Gowrie.

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In the summertime, a land of strawberries and raspberries,

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but it's a fine crop of antiques at Michael Young's shop in Glencarse

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that Charles is hoping for today.

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-Hello, sir.

-Hello. You must be Charles.

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-I am, your name is?

-Michael.

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Established, I see outside, since 1887.

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We were established in Aberdeen in 1887.

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-You deal in real antiques?

-We try to.

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-What they called the proper stuff.

-Thank you.

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I can't wait to go for a wander around.

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-I'll report back to you, sir.

-Excellent. Feel free to look around.

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-Thank you.

-Well, here's those antiques with a capital A.

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Just under the chandelier here - I'm often called Hawk-Eye Hanson

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and these might be eagles, in fact, but goodness me!

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They are so substantial. I suspect these eagles are probably late 18th,

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if not early 19th century.

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Very much made for a grand tourist.

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A pair of eagles, probably Italian, price...

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To you, £18,000.

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-I'd better fly away and keep dreaming!

-Wakey, wakey!

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There must be something with your name on it.

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On this top shelf is a very attractive pendant, 15 carats,

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almost got a suffragette feel to it,

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because you've got the seed pearls,

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the opals and the amethyst.

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And this would date to around 1910. It's very organic,

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it's very Art Nouveau

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and I think it's a beautiful pendant,

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which, you can see, has also been converted,

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so it can be a pendant worn like that, for a lady,

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but also, it's been mounted, perhaps with a later bar,

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to form a bar brooch as well.

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It's not labelled. There's no ticket price to it.

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But it's 15-carat gold.

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I'm going to find Michael

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and find out just how much his Art Nouveau brooch might be.

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Michael, hello.

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I saw earlier on, I've gone back to it, this very,

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very nice Art Nouveau...pendant-cum-brooch.

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I like it because it's got the Art Nouveau whiplash form.

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-How much is it, please?

-I'm wanting £95 for it.

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Yes. Fine. I'll take it.

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Thank you very much. That's very kind of you.

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£95. I think it's a beauty

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and quality has to rule the mind,

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and this is an object of great quality.

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Now, don't go without your hat,

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because that's, I'm sure, a treasure for you.

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-Here you are, sir.

-That's very kind.

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-Well caught! Take care.

-Goodbye now.

-Bye.

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Somewhere over the rainbow, Anita's waiting.

0:18:120:18:15

So, how has it been so far?

0:18:160:18:18

It's a journey, you know, it's the right place, right time

0:18:180:18:21

-and hopefully you find that pot of gold.

-Yes.

0:18:210:18:24

And you still have tomorrow to find that treasure.

0:18:240:18:27

See you in the morning, munchkins. Nighty-night.

0:18:270:18:31

The sun is up and our early birds have flown the coop,

0:18:330:18:37

landing in the rolling hills of the Scottish Borders.

0:18:370:18:39

Look at that, it's just awe-inspiring.

0:18:400:18:43

It's wonderful.

0:18:430:18:44

Talk about being lost in the most beautiful and poetic landscapes,

0:18:440:18:49

this is it.

0:18:490:18:50

Oh, Charlie, you're inspired to poetry!

0:18:500:18:53

Will you be inspired to make profit today?

0:18:530:18:57

All I will say is that my heart is beating more and more.

0:18:570:19:00

Yesterday, Anita was swept away by two leather-bound volumes

0:19:010:19:05

of Shakespeare and a set of Chinese silver spoons...

0:19:050:19:08

I hope they bring a smile to my face.

0:19:080:19:10

..leaving her with £207.27 to spend.

0:19:100:19:14

While Charles sailed off on a tide of nostalgia, for a teddy bear,

0:19:140:19:18

a Crown Derby easel plaque, a wartime sweetheart brooch

0:19:180:19:23

and an Art Nouveau pendant.

0:19:230:19:25

-Give him a kiss goodbye.

-Aw!

-There we go. He's off.

0:19:250:19:27

Ah!

0:19:270:19:29

And that leaves £71.86 in his piggy.

0:19:290:19:32

The Borders is famed for its fishing, Charlie.

0:19:330:19:36

And we've got the marvellous River Tweed,

0:19:360:19:39

where you can fish for salmon and trout.

0:19:390:19:42

Are you a fisherman yourself?

0:19:420:19:44

Anita, I'm not a fisherman, but I must say, you're a good catch.

0:19:440:19:47

Charlie, have you ever tickled a trout?

0:19:490:19:51

And I don't mean an old trout!

0:19:510:19:52

Ahem! Moving on...

0:19:530:19:56

Today, our pair are wending their way to Hawick,

0:19:560:19:59

a town built on textiles.

0:19:590:20:01

The first knitting machine arrived in 1771

0:20:010:20:04

and the town still produces luxury cashmere and Merino wool goods

0:20:040:20:09

for export around the world.

0:20:090:20:11

Anita and Charles will hunt for their particular golden fleece

0:20:110:20:14

at the Borders Antiques Centre.

0:20:140:20:17

I'll take the high road and you take the low road.

0:20:170:20:21

Sounds fine to me. Good luck.

0:20:210:20:23

-I'll see you later.

-OK.

0:20:230:20:25

Deer, deer!

0:20:320:20:33

Time for some serious browsing.

0:20:340:20:36

I like buying pictures.

0:20:430:20:44

This pair of late 19th, early 20th-century pictures...

0:20:460:20:52

..they've grabbed my attention.

0:20:530:20:55

Now, they're presented very well, but the actual work,

0:20:550:21:00

the actual painting is not of any quality.

0:21:000:21:05

But at that time, we had what was called itinerant artists

0:21:050:21:10

or painters, who would travel about the country, painting local scenes

0:21:100:21:15

to be sold to the local people.

0:21:150:21:17

They were people who had some facility in painting,

0:21:170:21:21

but they weren't trained artists.

0:21:210:21:23

They're priced up at £65.

0:21:230:21:26

If I can get a reasonable chunk off of that,

0:21:260:21:30

this might be my lot in the Border Antiques.

0:21:300:21:34

Well, that sounds promising. Now, where did Mr Hanson go?

0:21:340:21:37

On tiptoes.

0:21:370:21:38

-It's all right, it's all right! Sorry, sorry.

-Charlie.

-Yes, Anita.

0:21:400:21:44

-I was lucky with my picture before.

-Oh, yes?

0:21:440:21:46

So, I've been kind of drawn to pictures again.

0:21:460:21:49

Yeah. Looking at the companion on the wall,

0:21:490:21:52

I thought we could maybe buy one each?

0:21:520:21:54

Go in halves, I'll have one, you have the other one.

0:21:540:21:56

Nope! You're companions, but no companion pieces allowed.

0:21:560:22:00

Yes, go find your own antiques.

0:22:030:22:05

These are nice, I quite like these Chinese bowls

0:22:090:22:12

because, in fact, they're early.

0:22:120:22:13

This Chinese bowl is completely beaten,

0:22:130:22:16

but it was clearly admired in its heyday,

0:22:160:22:19

because back in the 1920s or '30s,

0:22:190:22:21

somebody has put these rivet staples into the body of the bowl

0:22:210:22:27

to keep it secure and to keep it alive.

0:22:270:22:30

On the exterior of the bowl, you've got this predominant green,

0:22:300:22:35

which is what we know as being famille-verte.

0:22:350:22:38

And that was a palette of Chinese colour

0:22:380:22:41

introduced at the end of the Kangxi period.

0:22:410:22:44

So, we know it's about 1700, 1720.

0:22:440:22:47

The other one, that's attractive,

0:22:470:22:49

this is what we call Chinese export market porcelain.

0:22:490:22:53

This is Qianlong in period and would date to around 1770.

0:22:530:22:57

So, this one is later, but they're quite nice.

0:22:570:23:00

The ticket price for both is £60.

0:23:010:23:03

Time for a word with shop owner, Morris.

0:23:030:23:06

-I've spotted these bowls.

-OK.

0:23:060:23:09

They are beaten, they are a bit bashed.

0:23:090:23:12

How much could they be for the pair?

0:23:120:23:14

The very best price would be 35.

0:23:140:23:17

Is that your very best?

0:23:170:23:18

-Cash?

-It'll be cash.

0:23:180:23:20

-Oh, yes...

-£30.

-Really?

0:23:200:23:23

I mean, they just are survivors, aren't they?

0:23:230:23:26

Like you and me, Morris! They're alive still.

0:23:260:23:28

Morris, I'll take them for £30.

0:23:280:23:30

And with that gentleman's agreement, Charles' shopping is concluded.

0:23:300:23:34

But has Anita made a decision?

0:23:350:23:37

You have wonderful furniture in here

0:23:380:23:41

and I have fallen in love with at least half a dozen pieces.

0:23:410:23:45

-Very good.

-But I don't think I can get them

0:23:450:23:47

-in the back-seat of the Stag.

-OK.

0:23:470:23:50

But these two pictures have caught my eye.

0:23:500:23:53

These are not what I would call works of art,

0:23:530:23:57

they are decorative pictures.

0:23:570:23:59

I would be looking to buy them, say, in the region of £30?

0:23:590:24:03

Is there a possibility that you could come near there?

0:24:030:24:06

-Can we get a bit nearer 40?

-How near?

0:24:060:24:09

-35?

-Let's go for 35.

0:24:110:24:13

Bravo!

0:24:130:24:15

And while Anita puts her booty in the boot...

0:24:150:24:17

..Charles is off down the road now to Hawick Museum,

0:24:200:24:23

for the story of Jimmy Guthrie,

0:24:230:24:25

a local man turned legendary sportsman.

0:24:250:24:28

This is a recording of his voice from 1937,

0:24:280:24:31

when he shares the thrill of his success.

0:24:310:24:34

Charles is flagging down Richard White,

0:24:450:24:47

to tell us about this Borderer

0:24:470:24:50

who was once the fastest man in the world on two wheels.

0:24:500:24:53

Who was Jimmy Guthrie?

0:24:530:24:55

Jimmy Guthrie was a local guy, born in 1897,

0:24:550:24:59

who went on to become a classic motorcycling legend

0:24:590:25:03

in the '20s and '30s.

0:25:030:25:05

His father was a famous pedal cyclist who also had motorcycles

0:25:050:25:09

and Jimmy became a dispatch rider in the trenches

0:25:090:25:12

in the Western Front in the First World War.

0:25:120:25:14

Their job was to take written information

0:25:140:25:17

between officers and commanders, possibly under shell fire.

0:25:170:25:21

And the bikes they had, although they were built lighter,

0:25:210:25:25

were still heavy to pick up and get out of a trench or whatever.

0:25:250:25:28

You had to learn how to handle those bikes to be a good dispatch rider.

0:25:280:25:32

Guthrie survived the war

0:25:320:25:34

and returned home to a family business in motor engineering.

0:25:340:25:37

But he was hooked on two wheels and joined the Hawick Motorcycle Club.

0:25:380:25:43

A teetotaller, he kept himself very fit

0:25:430:25:45

and developed his own style of riding,

0:25:450:25:48

bent far forward for maximum velocity.

0:25:480:25:51

He bought a motorbike and started sand racing.

0:25:510:25:55

-Sand racing?

-Yeah. Well, on the east coast of Britain,

0:25:550:25:59

there are some famous sand racing tracks -

0:25:590:26:01

Redcar, St Andrews, Aberdeenshire -

0:26:010:26:04

and he made his name there first.

0:26:040:26:06

Was he a daredevil?

0:26:060:26:07

Well, I think he was. He was famous for his handling of Norton bikes

0:26:070:26:12

and he took corners at amazing speed.

0:26:120:26:14

He used to ride with his spanner in his boot,

0:26:140:26:16

-which was quite dangerous if you came off.

-A spanner in his boot?

0:26:160:26:19

-Why?

-There's photographs of him.

0:26:190:26:20

I suppose in case he had to stop and adjust the bike, I don't know.

0:26:200:26:24

But it's a dangerous thing to do.

0:26:240:26:26

In 1928, Jimmy became part of the Norton motorcycle team

0:26:260:26:30

and in 1930, won his first Isle Of Man TT,

0:26:300:26:34

which stands for Tourist Trophy, with an average speed of 64mph.

0:26:340:26:38

I can see in this room there's a tremendous number of trophies.

0:26:400:26:43

Statuettes of mercury, TT trophies won by Jimmy Guthrie

0:26:430:26:47

and two from the Spanish TT in 1933.

0:26:470:26:51

And a pewter flagon and cups from the Swiss Grand Prix in 1936.

0:26:510:26:56

We're seeing the trophies and, of course, just behind me

0:26:560:26:59

-is an actual bike...

-Owned by...

0:26:590:27:02

-Owned by Guthrie.

-And ridden by him. Tuned up by his brother, Archie.

0:27:020:27:06

So, this bike is probably the bike that led him into the big time.

0:27:060:27:10

A family affair, with his brother, tuned up,

0:27:100:27:12

"There you go, brother, off you go.

0:27:120:27:14

"Your fortune, your legacy, your fame awaits."

0:27:140:27:19

Guthrie was king of the race tracks through the 1930s.

0:27:190:27:22

An unassuming man, he even became the poster boy for cocoa!

0:27:220:27:27

In 1936, his success at the German Grand Prix

0:27:270:27:30

brought him perhaps his most dubious admirer.

0:27:300:27:33

The cup we have here was presented to him by Adolf Hitler,

0:27:340:27:37

the German leader at the time,

0:27:370:27:39

who we assume had wanted to give it to a German rider,

0:27:390:27:42

but that wasn't to be.

0:27:420:27:43

Adolf Hitler was a fan?

0:27:430:27:45

-I would have said so.

-And, obviously, in '37,

0:27:450:27:48

that was only two years before the outbreak of another war,

0:27:480:27:51

-which of course he never saw.

-No.

0:27:510:27:53

Well, in the last race, his bike crashed into trees.

0:27:530:27:58

They think it ran out of oil and he had severe injuries,

0:27:580:28:01

including a head injury.

0:28:010:28:03

Had he been leading the race?

0:28:030:28:04

He was expected to win and he was lapping a slow rider.

0:28:040:28:09

And after he died...

0:28:090:28:11

..a uniformed guard was arranged to take him to the German border,

0:28:130:28:17

escort him to the German border,

0:28:170:28:18

such was the regard that they had for him.

0:28:180:28:20

-And the esteem and honour they held him in.

-Yeah.

-Amazing.

0:28:200:28:24

And at home in Hawick,

0:28:240:28:26

a three-mile funeral procession paid its own tribute

0:28:260:28:29

to the town's sporting superstar.

0:28:290:28:31

Back on the road now, and stomachs are rumbling.

0:28:350:28:38

There's only one dish to eat in this countryside.

0:28:380:28:43

-Let me guess, hold on... Salmon.

-Yes, that's right!

0:28:430:28:46

Or trout, Charlie!

0:28:480:28:49

So, we'll have a lovely fish to eat tonight.

0:28:510:28:54

Anita is off to her last shop of the day

0:28:560:28:58

and Charles has made a request stop by the River Tweed.

0:28:580:29:01

Anita told me she'd really like fish for dinner tonight

0:29:030:29:06

and she wants some salmon.

0:29:060:29:08

OK, I'm going in!

0:29:080:29:10

Oh, I do like to be beside the river.

0:29:100:29:14

Fishy, fishy, fishy!

0:29:150:29:16

That is not how you guddle a fish, Charles.

0:29:160:29:19

I can't see any fish. The water is so clear,

0:29:190:29:22

I can't even see a tiddler let alone a minnow.

0:29:220:29:26

It might be boring old crumpet tonight for Anita.

0:29:280:29:32

I'm sorry, Anita.

0:29:320:29:33

We'll leave Charles looking for supper, then.

0:29:350:29:37

Where's Anita got to and what's her plan?

0:29:370:29:40

I bought three items, I'm happy with all three of them.

0:29:400:29:45

I've got plenty of dosh in my pocket and I want to spend big!

0:29:450:29:51

Our big spender is headed for Innerleithen,

0:29:510:29:55

a town nestled close to the mighty River Tweed,

0:29:550:29:58

which is Walter Scott country

0:29:580:30:00

and the 19th-century writer was a frequent visitor to the spa here

0:30:000:30:03

at St Ronan's well.

0:30:030:30:05

He even used the name as the title of one of his novels.

0:30:050:30:08

No spa time for Anita though, her destination is Lulu's emporium.

0:30:080:30:12

-Hello, are you Lulu?

-Hello, Anita!

0:30:140:30:16

Hi! It's lovely to meet you.

0:30:160:30:18

-And it's lovely to be back in Innerleithen.

-Good.

0:30:180:30:22

Time is marching on.

0:30:220:30:24

Anita has £172 and 26p left in her purse,

0:30:240:30:29

and she needs to find auction gold.

0:30:290:30:31

Do you know, Lulu, when I was a wee girl, I had a budgie called Joey

0:30:340:30:37

and it was the spitting image of that one there.

0:30:370:30:40

This is quite interesting. This is made by the same factory,

0:30:400:30:44

the same German factory, as little Hummel figures.

0:30:440:30:48

-Oh, really? I didn't know that.

-Yeah.

0:30:480:30:51

They produced the Hummel figures in 1930

0:30:510:30:54

and it was a nun who designed,

0:30:540:30:58

who drew and designed all these little figures,

0:30:580:31:01

-and they became hugely collectable.

-OK.

0:31:010:31:04

This is much later.

0:31:040:31:06

But, you know, I like it.

0:31:060:31:08

And the pretty boy is priced at £25.

0:31:080:31:12

If I was looking to buy it,

0:31:120:31:16

£25 is a bit expensive

0:31:160:31:18

and I would really be looking, you know, to maybe go about...

0:31:180:31:22

..halfway there, which would be about £12.

0:31:230:31:27

-OK.

-Is that at all possible?

0:31:270:31:30

Yes, he's been sitting on his shelf for a little while,

0:31:300:31:33

so I think he can fly off to a new home.

0:31:330:31:36

-In Dumfries?

-Yes!

0:31:360:31:38

-Is that OK with you, Joey?

-SHE SQUAWKS

0:31:380:31:40

-Yeah, sure it is. OK, thank you very much.

-Thank you!

0:31:400:31:44

This little birdie still needs one more shiny thing.

0:31:440:31:47

Happily, she can cast her beady eyes around Keepsakes Antiques,

0:31:470:31:52

just a few doors down.

0:31:520:31:54

-Margaret. Lovely to see you again.

-Great to see you again!

0:31:540:31:57

Lovely to see you!

0:31:570:31:59

-I love this shop.

-Aw, it's nice to have you back.

0:31:590:32:03

Can I look around and give you a wee shout?

0:32:030:32:05

-Absolutely.

-Terrific.

-Have a good look.

0:32:050:32:07

Margaret, I love this cabinet of silver.

0:32:120:32:16

You've got good Victorian pieces,

0:32:170:32:21

you've got a beautiful Art Nouveau dressing table set,

0:32:210:32:25

you have the first electric kettle,

0:32:250:32:28

so there's a wide range of things here.

0:32:280:32:31

But do you know what caught my eye?

0:32:310:32:33

This little photo frame.

0:32:340:32:36

When I saw it, I thought of modernist design,

0:32:360:32:40

I thought of abstract art.

0:32:400:32:43

-It is, yeah.

-What is the very best that you can do?

0:32:430:32:48

-Well, will we say 25?

-25?

0:32:500:32:54

Is there a wee tiny more movement on that?

0:32:550:32:58

-About 20.

-20 would be absolutely fabulous.

0:32:580:33:04

That's fine.

0:33:040:33:05

It's closing time and that's our auction lots all gathered in.

0:33:050:33:09

I think she might have the budgie in her bonnet!

0:33:090:33:13

Are you exhausted, my darling?

0:33:140:33:17

I think it's all that mental energy,

0:33:170:33:18

looking at all those wonderful objects and taking it all in.

0:33:180:33:22

And they'll all be off to auction

0:33:220:33:25

and we've got that to look forward to.

0:33:250:33:27

After that catch of the day, eh?

0:33:270:33:29

And some shut-eye.

0:33:300:33:32

Robert Burns' old stamping ground of Dumfries

0:33:350:33:38

is the next stop on our road trip.

0:33:380:33:41

Charlie, our second auction.

0:33:410:33:43

I can't believe it. I know!

0:33:430:33:46

-Are you feeling excited?

-Yeah, I'm always excited at an auction.

0:33:460:33:50

Anita and Charles went forth from Dunfermline, through Fife,

0:33:510:33:55

and north to Tayside,

0:33:550:33:56

before heading southwards through the Scottish Borders.

0:33:560:34:00

But will the best-laid plans for Charles and Anita

0:34:000:34:02

go awry at Dumfries auction hall today?

0:34:020:34:05

Well, Anita splashed out a total of £192 on five auction lots.

0:34:050:34:10

And Charles shelled out a wee bit less on his five lots, £182.

0:34:120:34:17

So, how do they like each other's buys? Anita?

0:34:170:34:21

This teddy bear's a darling, just like Charlie.

0:34:210:34:25

Just as cuddly.

0:34:250:34:26

At £20, he's got to make a profit on that.

0:34:260:34:31

This is Anita's silver photo frame

0:34:310:34:33

and it actually gives me the heebie-greebies.

0:34:330:34:36

The monogram concerns me, it might be something quite important

0:34:360:34:41

and might make some serious money.

0:34:410:34:43

What does today's auctioneer, David Hill,

0:34:430:34:46

think of what they bought?

0:34:460:34:47

The Chinese spoons are my particular favourite item.

0:34:470:34:51

Clearly silver, so they should sell quite well.

0:34:520:34:56

The 15-carat gold Art Nouveau brooch, that's a popular item

0:34:560:35:00

and has been looked at by a number of people.

0:35:000:35:03

I estimate that that should fetch between £50 and £100.

0:35:030:35:08

So, park yourselves and off we go.

0:35:090:35:12

OK, Charlie, here we are! A packed room.

0:35:120:35:15

This is the moment, isn't it? Hold tight, enjoy the ride, OK?

0:35:150:35:18

First up, Anita's 19th-century rural landscapes.

0:35:200:35:24

Any interest at 11, 12?

0:35:240:35:25

-Yes!

-12, 13, 14, 15, 16.

0:35:250:35:30

-Is that a profit?

-No.

0:35:300:35:32

-Sorry!

-19, 20.

0:35:320:35:34

£20. 22?

0:35:340:35:38

-24, at the very back.

-Yes.

0:35:380:35:40

He's doing well.

0:35:400:35:42

28 at the back. 29.

0:35:420:35:43

-Yes, yes, yes!

-Selling for £29 only.

0:35:430:35:46

There's no further interest.

0:35:460:35:48

The oils slipped away. £6 lost there.

0:35:500:35:54

In your bag, I think that was your weakest lot

0:35:540:35:56

and I think that's not bad.

0:35:560:35:58

-Well, onwards and upwards, Charlie.

-Exactly, Anita.

0:35:580:36:01

Who will enlist for Charles' wartime sweetheart brooch

0:36:010:36:05

and photograph?

0:36:050:36:06

Do we have 13? 13. 14, 14.

0:36:060:36:09

15, 15.

0:36:090:36:10

16, 17.

0:36:100:36:12

Do we have a 17? Going at 17.

0:36:120:36:14

-Go on.

-18? 18.

0:36:140:36:16

-19, 19.

-One for the road, sir.

0:36:160:36:18

Do we have 20? No, no. 19.

0:36:180:36:21

Selling for £19 only, on my left.

0:36:210:36:24

True love always triumphs, forever.

0:36:260:36:28

-That's life.

-Well done, Charlie.

0:36:280:36:30

-Quite happy about that.

-And a wee profit.

-Exactly.

0:36:300:36:33

Who's a pretty boy, then?

0:36:330:36:35

What do we bid for Joey?

0:36:350:36:37

11 anywhere? 11, 11.

0:36:370:36:39

New bid at 12, 13, 14, 15,

0:36:390:36:42

16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 24, 26.

0:36:420:36:48

28, 30, 32.

0:36:480:36:50

-Selling for 32, at the back of the hall.

-What do I know about birds?

0:36:510:36:55

Oh, for the wings of a budgie!

0:36:550:36:57

£20 profit for Anita, well done.

0:36:570:36:59

Well, there you are, Charlie.

0:36:590:37:01

Anita, I kid you not, that bird was not cheap, cheap!

0:37:010:37:04

Cheeps to chips.

0:37:050:37:06

It's Charles' 18th-century Chinese bowls now.

0:37:060:37:09

Any interest at 32?

0:37:090:37:11

-Hello.

-32. 35 with me.

-Go on!

0:37:110:37:14

36, anyone? 36 at the back.

0:37:140:37:17

38. 40. Do we have 40?

0:37:170:37:19

41. 42, 42. 43. Would you bid 43?

0:37:190:37:24

-42.

-Oh, it's tough, Anita.

0:37:240:37:26

I'm happy, I can't grumble with that.

0:37:260:37:28

No further bidders.

0:37:280:37:30

No, you can't. £12 to you, sir.

0:37:300:37:33

-Well done, Charlie. Well done.

-Anita, it's one big...

0:37:330:37:36

-You bought with your heart and it paid off.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:37:360:37:39

Will there be much ado about Anita's

0:37:390:37:42

leather-bound volumes of Shakespeare now?

0:37:420:37:44

Looking for 35 anywhere. 35. 38.

0:37:440:37:48

-Go on.

-40, do we have 40?

-That's OK.

0:37:480:37:50

45. 50. Do we have 50?

0:37:500:37:52

50, 55, 60, 65.

0:37:520:37:57

Selling for £65, at the very back.

0:37:570:38:00

Love's labour's lost Anita £25, methinks.

0:38:000:38:04

Well, again, I've made a loss, but it could have been a lot worse.

0:38:040:38:10

A lot worse!

0:38:100:38:11

Next up, will the Crown Derby plaque,

0:38:110:38:14

which reminded Charles of home, appeal in Dumfries?

0:38:140:38:17

Start the bidding at £10. Any interest at 10?

0:38:170:38:20

A bid at 10. 11, anyone? 11.

0:38:200:38:22

-Let's go!

-12, 13, 14, 15, 16.

0:38:220:38:25

No? 15 at the back.

0:38:250:38:28

Looking for 16 anywhere.

0:38:280:38:30

New bidder, 16.

0:38:300:38:31

-17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 24.

-Come on!

0:38:310:38:35

A bid at 24.

0:38:350:38:38

-26, 28.

-Here we go, we're moving a bit now.

0:38:380:38:41

-30. 32. 35, 35.

-Go on!

0:38:410:38:45

-38, 40.

-Go on.

-45, 50.

0:38:450:38:49

45.

0:38:490:38:51

Selling for £45 only.

0:38:510:38:53

He's doubled his money! There's no place like home.

0:38:540:38:57

I'm really happy because it was such quality, hand-painted by Dean,

0:38:570:39:03

I'm over the moon.

0:39:030:39:05

Time now for Anita's silver teaspoons to stir up some interest.

0:39:050:39:09

20, 22.

0:39:090:39:11

24.

0:39:110:39:13

26, 28. 30, 32.

0:39:130:39:17

-Well done.

-Come on, come on.

0:39:170:39:19

38, 40. Do we have 40 anywhere?

0:39:190:39:21

40. Selling for £40 only.

0:39:220:39:25

A modest £5 profit there.

0:39:270:39:29

Well, it's licked its face.

0:39:290:39:32

Well, the next lot is Charles's Art Nouveau pendant or brooch.

0:39:320:39:36

-Auction gold?

-Start the bidding with me at £5, looking for £6 anywhere.

0:39:360:39:40

-Six.

-Oh, it's tough.

-Seven, eight, nine, ten, 11, 12, 13, 14.

0:39:400:39:45

-Now with you, sir, for 14. 15.

-We've got a long way to go!

0:39:450:39:49

16, 17, 18, 19, 20.

0:39:490:39:53

22, 24.

0:39:530:39:54

-Keep going...

-26, 28.

0:39:540:39:57

New bidder, 30.

0:39:570:39:58

32, 35, 38, 40, 45,

0:39:580:40:04

50, 55, 60.

0:40:040:40:06

It's with you now, sir, for 60.

0:40:060:40:08

-New bidder.

-Come on, keep going!

-65, 70.

0:40:080:40:12

-Come on, Charlie.

-70, at the front here.

0:40:120:40:14

All done now, selling for £70 at the front.

0:40:140:40:17

It glittered, but not brightly enough.

0:40:190:40:21

Oh, Charlie, that was...

0:40:210:40:23

Frenetic.

0:40:230:40:25

That was very stressful.

0:40:260:40:28

I feel good! I feel as though I came out the other end in one piece

0:40:280:40:32

-and that's key. I'm alive still.

-Yeah.

0:40:320:40:35

Anita's photo frame is next under the gavel.

0:40:350:40:38

Any bids at £10?

0:40:380:40:40

-At 10.

-All these hands going up.

0:40:400:40:43

£11, 11 at the back.

0:40:430:40:44

12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20.

0:40:440:40:50

22, 24, 26, 28.

0:40:500:40:53

30, 32. 38, 38.

0:40:540:40:58

40, 45,

0:40:580:41:01

50, 55.

0:41:010:41:04

Selling for £50.

0:41:050:41:07

What a picture! £30 profit, eh?

0:41:070:41:11

-You've doubled up.

-Look at me!

0:41:110:41:13

I'm really impressed.

0:41:130:41:15

At last, it was teddy's turn.

0:41:150:41:17

He hoped that someone would think he was a very,

0:41:170:41:20

very valuable bear indeed.

0:41:200:41:21

-Honey, anyone?

-£10 for a teddy bear.

0:41:210:41:24

Give him a life, go on, he's over there.

0:41:240:41:26

13, 13. £13.

0:41:260:41:28

14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20.

0:41:280:41:32

New bidder, 22, 24.

0:41:320:41:34

-Go on!

-26, 28. 28, 30, 32, 35.

0:41:340:41:39

Go on. He's gorgeous!

0:41:390:41:40

Selling for £38 for the teddy bear.

0:41:400:41:43

Teddy looks solemn, but inside, he was a very, very happy bear.

0:41:440:41:49

Charlie, we've worked hard this morning.

0:41:490:41:52

-I'm hoping we've both come out smelling of roses.

-Yeah.

0:41:520:41:56

-HE SNIFFS

-It's a bit musty in here.

0:41:560:41:58

-Shall we go for a cup of tea? Come on!

-Let's go for a cup of tea.

0:41:580:42:02

Builder's strength with extra sugar, I think.

0:42:020:42:05

Anita started with £332.26,

0:42:050:42:09

but after fees, she made a loss today of £14.88.

0:42:090:42:13

This leaves her with £317.38.

0:42:130:42:17

While Charles set off with £223.86.

0:42:190:42:23

He lost the least today, ie £6.52 after auction costs.

0:42:230:42:30

We declare him the winner this time with £217.34.

0:42:300:42:35

-I think this was Charlie's auction.

-Get out of here.

-Pipped to the post.

0:42:350:42:39

Follow my lead. You're buying the tea.

0:42:390:42:41

Come on, Anita, a little skip and a hop.

0:42:410:42:44

A little twirl as well!

0:42:440:42:46

And the merry dance will continue on another antiques adventure.

0:42:460:42:50

Breathe in the smell of the countryside

0:42:510:42:54

as the journey continues.

0:42:540:42:55

-Oh!

-Have you passed wind?!

0:42:550:42:59

Take me back to the city.

0:42:590:43:00

I can't breathe!

0:43:000:43:02

Charles goes native in Lakeland.

0:43:020:43:04

Oh!

0:43:060:43:07

And Anita gets her hands on the man of her dreams...or nightmares.

0:43:070:43:12

I usually like men with a bit more meat on their bones.

0:43:120:43:16

But I kind of like this guy, he's fun!

0:43:160:43:19

Anita Manning and Charles Hanson tour the kingdom of Fife where Charles falls for an old teddy and Anita loses her heart to Shakespeare. All's well that ends well!

And in the Scottish Borders, Charles Hanson goes on the trail of Hawick's motorcycle racing legend Jimmie Guthrie, once the fastest man on two wheels in the world.

After all that, Anita fancies a fish tea and Charles can't resist the lure of the River Tweed. But who will land a good catch at auction in Dumfries?