Episode 13 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 13

Antiques experts travel across the country, competing to make a profit at auction. At the halfway stage of their trip, Paul and Margie scour Scarborough for antiques.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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-What a job!

-With £200 each...

-You with me?

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-..a classic car...

-Buckle up.

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..and a goal, to scour Britain for antiques.

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Oh, sorry.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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-There will be worthy winners...

-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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Have a good trip!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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Look lively, you horrible lot.

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It's the third leg with sparkly road trippers Paul Laidlaw and

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-Margie Cooper.

-Well, there's one good thing about the rain.

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-What's that?

-The roof's up.

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-Indeed.

-It's cosy, isn't it?

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-Yeah.

-Dead cosy.

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Just me and thee.

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Paul's little mind digs this.

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-Positively.

-I've got three goes left.

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Yes, look,

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one mistake on my part, never going to happen.

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Does that ever happen?

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Well, I'm desperately trying to avoid it, Margie.

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You're not doing too badly, Paul.

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Margie's lagging behind.

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From her original £200, she has £213.70.

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Paul had the same amount but he has multiplied it to a wonderful

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£434.40.

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So, well done!

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They're in a Morris Minor which was first registered in 1963.

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-We're having fun.

-We're having fun, the Moggie's holding up.

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It's not raining on the inside.

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Goodness!

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Our pair's road trip kicked off in Hemswell Cliff

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in Lincolnshire, and they'll gallop across Yorkshire,

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and take a spin around the Midlands before concluding

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in Shrewsbury in Shropshire.

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Today, our adventure begins in the seaside resort of Scarborough,

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and we conclude with an auction at Rotherham in South Yorkshire.

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How lovely.

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It's fish and chip weather.

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It's not ice cream, but fish and chip weather.

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-What a shame.

-You fancy a wee poke of chips?

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No, thank you.

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I'm concentrating today.

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Now, there's a turn up for the books.

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Spillage in aisle three.

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Giggles galore with this pair, eh?

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Here we go.

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Ah, the joys of the great British weather, eh?

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Don't I take you to the nicest of places?

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Come on. Let's go shopping.

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Now, they're ready for Scarborough but is Scarborough ready for them?

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What's this, then? A romantic stroll?

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Do you know what, even in the rain this is gorgeous.

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I know. Victorian England.

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Like yourself, Margie.

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Oh, do you see what I did there?!

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-Oh!

-And yet, this is all about competition.

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-It is.

-Shops.

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Shops. I'll race you.

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All right, Paul. He's such a big kid, isn't he?

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Let's stick with Margie girl,

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Antiques And Collectors Centre is a family run affair

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and has been on the go since 1965.

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Way before her time.

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This looks quite an interesting corner.

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Feeling under pressure, Margie?

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Lots of catching up to do.

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So I fancy a little collection of something,

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which will hopefully make a profit.

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And then I can catch up. So, who says I won't?

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-I think I might.

-Well, we're rooting for you, Margie girl.

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Oh!

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What is it for a start?

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That's a lovely engraving on the... Oh!

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It's for cigarette cards.

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And it's never been used.

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Foldout... A complete set can go in there.

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And of course, the great York Minster.

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And how much is that?

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£65.

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Never seen one of those.

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She's spoiled for choice in here.

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Let's take a peek at Paul.

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The current champ is starting here, The Vintage Window.

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Nice name.

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-Hello there.

-Hello!

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-Welcome!

-I'm Paul, you are?

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I'm Faye, nice to meet you.

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Likewise. Nice to be out of the rain.

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Yes. Come inside into the dry.

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On this summer's day.

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He's chirpy.

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Very rummagey.

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You can get in, can't you?

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Oof!

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Faye, what's the story with the banknote?

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Oh, here you go. Have a look.

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-World War II.

-So...

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A French ten franc note.

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Dix francs. Dated 1941.

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Well, we know what was going on in France in 1941.

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They were thoroughly occupied.

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But what draws my attention

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are all these notes.

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So, we've got...

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5th of July, Bretteville, 16th of July, 25th of July,

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Bassin...

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-He's got around.

-Yeah, yeah.

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This is the story of one man's

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service post D-Day up to presumably VE Day.

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Isn't that a fascinating thing?

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Just had that folded away somewhere safe.

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Yeah. Yeah. And he'd come home and get the kids on his knee and go,

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there's where your dad...

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-Wow!

-And that gets you, doesn't it?

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-Yeah.

-Gets me.

-Yeah, gets me.

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-What?

-Superb find, Paul.

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It's a fantastic thing.

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You have got a World War II French banknote priced

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up at £15 there.

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Any... Do you haggle?

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Of course, yes.

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Get in. What are you going to charge me for that if I buy it?

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-£12?

-Ten?

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-11.

-I'm not going to haggle over a pound.

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-Faye.

-Wonderful.

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-Spot on.

-Thank you very much.

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Astonishing piece of World War II history, Paul.

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I like it.

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Now, is Margie having as much fun?

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These are always popular.

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These sweet little... Sweetheart brooches.

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Which is exactly what they are.

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They are silver, so they are

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nice quality. You give it to your loved one.

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Often when the war was on, too,

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they would buy a little gift for their beloved.

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There's also a lucky stick pin.

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-Anything else?

-This is a little cravat pin.

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With a little opal.

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Rose gold. I mean,

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you are just hoping that they've had it in stock for a while and

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maybe they will do me a deal.

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It says 65.

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It's rose gold, it's early part of the 20th century.

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It's quite pretty, isn't it? And then you've got this here.

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That's mother-of-pearl and some kind of...

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I don't know, that's some kind of agate stone.

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It looks as though it's gold.

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Yes, it says nine carat.

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You can't go wrong with gold and you can't go wrong with silver.

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Just got to buy it, get the price right.

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The agate pendant is priced at £25.

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The cravat pin is 65,

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and the sweetheart brooches are unpriced.

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Gird your loins, dealer Matt.

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She's on her way.

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Those sweetheart brooches are going to have to be cheap.

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-There's millions of them around.

-Right.

-Yeah.

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£50 with the box.

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-Yeah. 30.

-40.

-25.

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Go on.

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-£30.

-OK.

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I will go to the rose gold cravat pin.

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And this little... Little incidental thing.

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How about I do the pair for £60?

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My thoughts for that little lot there was 45.

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Thank you, Margie. Good luck with those.

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£75 in her first shop.

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She is a girl on a mission.

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Now, how is the big fella getting on?

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That is a stunning vase.

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-You like it?

-Yeah. Stunning.

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I love it.

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Holmegaard, Danish glass, Danish studio glass,

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with its origins in the early 19th century but we know this is a '50s

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design. Per Lutken, famous Scandinavian glass designer.

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Per Lutken was the unsurpassed master of Danish glass design.

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You've got you've got a Holmegaard vase there, £35.

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-Back to haggling...

-I do love this one.

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OK. You're going to be hard, aren't you?

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Yeah, this is a beauty.

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OK. Give me a beauty of a price.

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-Or am I making you an offer?

-Make me an offer.

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-20 quid.

-20 quid?!

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That's a good reaction.

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That's sincere. How dare you!

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-Get out of the shop!

-Yeah!

-Not a penny less than...

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30. It is beautiful.

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It's sold, then.

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-Brilliant.

-Wasn't difficult.

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-Thank you.

-Paul is quick off the mark today.

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Along with the 1941 ten franc note, he has parted with a total of £41.

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-All the best.

-Take care. Bye.

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While he's been spending his gold doubloons...

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..Margie has journeyed to the maritime town of Whitby.

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The place is famed for many a seafaring legend,

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but back in the 18th century,

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it was the epicentre for whaling expeditions.

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Margie has come to Whitby Museum to learn how voyages to the Arctic

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resulted in crucial scientific discoveries.

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Curator Fiona Barnard is going to enlighten Margie further.

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So, when did whaling begin in Whitby?

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It began in the 1770s, '80s.

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Right. And it seems a very, very slightly barbaric and hard life.

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It was extremely barbaric.

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-And hard.

-Yeah.

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But it was...

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Fulfilled a vital role in the economy of the country.

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Sometimes as many as 16 ships with around 50 men per vessel would be

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Arctic-bound.

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Although this killing is abhorrent in today's society,

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for the Georgian whalers, it was the dawning of the Industrial Revolution

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and whale oil was a precious commodity.

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For the first time,

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weavers and spinners were moving away from their cottages and into

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factories, so they needed to be lit.

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So you couldn't just sit on your doorstep

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getting the last of the light,

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you would want to be working all hours of the day and night

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in a large building, so they desperately needed the oil

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for lighting. It was also the oil that oiled the machinery.

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If the ships were successful, they could make up to £3,000 per trip,

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which equates to £250,000 today.

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But the challenge of working in such a harsh environment required

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great ingenuity.

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Prompting father and son William Scoresby senior and William Scoresby

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junior, Whitby's most famous whaling ship captains,

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to create some rather clever inventions.

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The crow's nest was developed by the father and that did a huge job

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protecting whoever was in it.

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In the crow's nest, you will find a telescope for looking for whales,

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obviously, but also a speaking trumpet,

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so he could shout instructions to the crew as he directed the ship

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through the ice.

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And there would have been signal flags into signal to the whale

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boats that were way out at sea.

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Before that, the person on lookout navigating through the ice just had

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to tie themselves onto the rigging with maybe

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a little platform for their feet.

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So this meant they could stay up there longer.

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There's a seat inside.

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They can have their dinner sent up.

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They can have a brew sent up.

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They drank enormous amounts of tea.

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Really? While the boat is doing that?

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Gosh!

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Scoresby senior also developed

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different types of rigging for easier

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manoeuvrability in the ice.

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But his son became not only a brave captain

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but also a brilliant scientist.

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He did a lot of work on where to put a compass so that it wasn't affected

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by the ship's metal.

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So you mustn't put it beside the engine, for instance.

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-Right.

-Which seems logical to us but a lot of people did it then.

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Scoresby's research in magnetic navigation

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was critical to chart making.

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A skilled cartographer,

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his mapping of the East coast of Greenland

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contributed to the first real knowledge of this area.

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Something the Admiralty hadn't yet achieved.

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He was a fellow of the Royal Society and a founder member of

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the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

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He wrote about 200 publications.

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Both father and son had retired by the time declining numbers brought

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whaling to an end in Whitby in the 1830s.

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The town's whalers gave Britain so much more than the oil that lit and

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lubricated the Industrial Revolution.

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They also helped to advance the science of seafaring.

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Now, where art thou, Paul Laidlaw?

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I could relax now, could I not?

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£200 ahead.

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But do you know what? I wouldn't be me if I did.

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Because do you know what? It is not about the winning, is it?

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I'm as focused now as I was when we were even-stevens

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with £200 a piece to go out.

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Oh, I believe it.

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We're headed for the town of Pickering in North Yorkshire.

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There you go. Antiques and collectables. That'll do.

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JSC Collectables is next on Paul's radar.

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With almost £400, he's positively loaded.

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Now, this is a shop that could be right up Paul's Street.

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They are specialist in militaria but there's plenty of other stuff to

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recce too.

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Caroline, can I have a look in this cabinet?

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-Of course you can.

-Is it open?

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-Yeah, there you go.

-Thank you very much.

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It is a nice thing, that fob, isn't it?

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-It is nice, that.

-The enamelling and the doms...

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The dominoes that make it.

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I just put it out this afternoon.

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It's meant to be.

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WECC, sounds like cricket club, doesn't it?

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-It does, yeah.

-But what the doms have got to do with...

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One, two, three, four.

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Any ideas? I'm beat.

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I genuinely don't have a clue.

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-We didn't either.

-Have you got a set of scales?

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Everything down to numbers, shall we?

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So, we are not going to weigh this label.

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Priced at £72.

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Six grams...

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I'll make you an offer. 40 quid.

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Can you not do a bit more?

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I might be able to.

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See how far you can get that arm up there.

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-Another fiver.

-Silence.

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Think about that. £45 offer is there on the table.

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-I'll have a look upstairs.

-Right, OK, then. Thank you.

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Old laughing boy is not hanging around today.

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He's a bit of a flirty charmer too.

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Guess where he's returning.

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Don't see one of those every day.

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In amongst RAF tropical and British battle dress

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and Russian tunics...

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..Imperial Japan.

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This is an army officer's tunic in the Second World War.

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Highly uncommon.

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These are collectable. This is history.

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Make no bones about it.

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And the veterans...

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..our veterans that fought over there and were taken as prisoners of

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war were terribly, terribly treated.

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And felt...

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What can I say, difficult to find the words, passionately about it.

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Many of them to their dying day.

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And that's what makes these things so powerful, is it not?

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-This is real history.

-Stirring stuff, eh?

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Let's find Caroline to try and broker a deal.

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Right, then.

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From upstairs, one Imperial Japanese tunic.

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And that's priced up at 130.

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Is there a deal to be done on that?

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Yes, we can do something on that.

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What's the something?

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80?

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-Is that it?

-Yeah.

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If that's 80,

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can our dominoes fob be then the 45 that I offered?

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-Go on, then.

-We did it.

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Thank you very much.

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And that frisky little deal comes to a total of £125

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for the 9-carat gold watch fob and the Japanese military tunic.

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Those signal the end of shopping for today.

0:17:160:17:20

It's tipping down again.

0:17:210:17:23

-What do you fancy for tea?

-I've no idea.

0:17:230:17:25

-Are you going to join me for dinner?

-Fish and chips, Margie!

0:17:250:17:29

Plenty of salt and vinegar, nice.

0:17:300:17:32

Nighty night.

0:17:320:17:33

Good morning, sunshine.

0:17:380:17:40

Our antiques luvvies are up and at 'em.

0:17:410:17:43

Fixed the weather, Margie. This is...

0:17:430:17:46

What a difference a day makes, I think is the expression.

0:17:460:17:49

Absolutely. Are you comfortable?

0:17:490:17:52

Do you know? I like being driven.

0:17:520:17:55

And by you, Margie.

0:17:550:17:57

-Driven well.

-Driven crazy.

0:17:570:17:58

-One more word and you walk.

-Watch your step, Paul.

0:17:580:18:04

Let's remind ourselves of what our darlings have bought thus far.

0:18:050:18:09

Margie has two lots.

0:18:090:18:10

The sweetheart brooches and the horseshoe stick pin.

0:18:100:18:14

Plus the cravat pin and agate pendant.

0:18:140:18:17

Can't go wrong with gold and you can't go wrong with silver.

0:18:170:18:20

Margie has £138.70 left.

0:18:200:18:24

Paul is buying his kind of thing this leg of the road trip.

0:18:260:18:30

He has four lots.

0:18:300:18:32

The 1941 ten franc note.

0:18:320:18:34

The Holmegaard vase.

0:18:340:18:37

The gold watch fob and the Japanese military tunic.

0:18:370:18:41

He's been busy.

0:18:410:18:42

We could be on a roll here.

0:18:420:18:43

£268.40 is the sum total left in his wallet.

0:18:440:18:50

You're fairly getting on my nerves, Margie.

0:18:520:18:55

You sound like my husband!

0:18:550:18:57

I was on the phone to him last night.

0:18:580:19:00

We take great solace in one another's shared experience.

0:19:000:19:04

Hang on. Can I join that club?

0:19:060:19:08

Next stop is County Durham, the town of Stockton-on-Tees, to be precise.

0:19:080:19:12

Enjoy your day.

0:19:140:19:17

I wish I could say I'm going to miss you,

0:19:170:19:19

but frankly, looking at that...

0:19:190:19:21

Are you not going to miss me?

0:19:210:19:23

Of course I'm going to miss you. You have fun.

0:19:230:19:25

Just don't be buying any bargains.

0:19:250:19:26

What are those? What bargains?

0:19:260:19:28

All right, Margie.

0:19:300:19:31

Paul is getting the chance to indulge

0:19:310:19:34

in two of his great loves now.

0:19:340:19:36

Collecting and militaria.

0:19:360:19:38

He's come to Preston Park Museum to discover more about

0:19:380:19:41

Colonel Gilbert Spence,

0:19:410:19:43

a phenomenal collector of all things military.

0:19:430:19:46

This is exciting.

0:19:460:19:48

Stand to.

0:19:480:19:50

Museum development manager John Bealey is going to make Paul's day.

0:19:500:19:53

-Wow!

-That's Colonel Spence's own personal dress uniform.

0:19:540:19:59

So there's the man.

0:19:590:20:00

-He wore that.

-So we are standing here with him, in a sense.

0:20:000:20:03

Oh, my word!

0:20:030:20:05

Welcome to Paradise, Paul.

0:20:050:20:07

Spence was a shipyard owner in Stockton-on-Tees.

0:20:080:20:11

It gave him the means and the wealth to buy anything he really fancied.

0:20:120:20:16

And he fancied quite a lot.

0:20:160:20:18

A wide variety of things

0:20:180:20:20

but especially militaria, weapons, armour,

0:20:200:20:23

but you name it, he bought it.

0:20:230:20:26

Spence became a Lieutenant Colonel in the Territorial Army

0:20:260:20:30

and soon found himself leading his battalion,

0:20:300:20:33

the Fifth Durham Light Infantry,

0:20:330:20:35

on the Western Front during World War I.

0:20:350:20:37

They are shipped out to France in 1915.

0:20:390:20:42

They didn't get long to acclimatise.

0:20:420:20:44

They were only there a matter of days

0:20:440:20:46

when the Germans launched the second Battle of Ypres,

0:20:460:20:49

with gas for the first time in the First World War.

0:20:490:20:52

And they were rushed to the front.

0:20:520:20:53

And so they saw pretty terrible fighting right from the off.

0:20:530:20:56

But throughout that time, he still collected,

0:20:560:20:59

so he is still purchasing some of the objects

0:20:590:21:02

while he's a serving officer.

0:21:020:21:04

-I think that shows...

-The passion.

0:21:060:21:08

And his addiction to collection.

0:21:080:21:10

That I understand.

0:21:100:21:12

Remarkably, Colonel Spence was receiving Sotheby catalogues and

0:21:120:21:16

ordering beautiful items to be delivered direct to his home.

0:21:160:21:19

He was calm under fire, as men say.

0:21:200:21:22

He was brave, he's been decorated.

0:21:220:21:25

And sadly, in 1918,

0:21:250:21:28

the Fifth DLI was just about annihilated and Spence was wounded.

0:21:280:21:31

And his war was over.

0:21:310:21:33

Tragically, after surviving the First World War,

0:21:350:21:38

Colonel Spence was killed in a road accident in 1925, aged just 46.

0:21:380:21:44

He bequeathed everything to the museum.

0:21:440:21:46

Due to the sheer number of artefacts, it can't all be displayed.

0:21:480:21:51

Paul is getting an exclusive peek behind the scenes.

0:21:510:21:54

There you go. There is a spectrum of material but I'll tell you what

0:21:540:22:00

really, really catches my eye.

0:22:000:22:02

I love the Fenton and Sons, dealers in arms and armour invoice.

0:22:030:22:10

-Yeah.

-So, there you have it.

0:22:100:22:12

Bought off Fenton and Sons, Colonel GO Spence.

0:22:120:22:17

Dated September 1915.

0:22:170:22:21

And what was he buying? My word!

0:22:210:22:22

That's a big, long list.

0:22:220:22:24

Including, "powder flask formed of pearl shell,

0:22:240:22:28

"engraved with silver enamelled rosettes, Persian, 18th century" -

0:22:280:22:31

and there it is.

0:22:310:22:34

There it is.

0:22:340:22:35

-Yeah.

-What a jewel.

0:22:350:22:38

Please, put some gloves on, because it is a precious jewel, as you say.

0:22:380:22:41

An Indo Persian object.

0:22:440:22:46

This is a martial piece, likely hunting, in all honesty.

0:22:460:22:50

-Absolutely.

-Sumptuous and fabulous object.

0:22:500:22:53

And again, this is reflected...

0:22:530:22:55

This is consistent through everything I see,

0:22:550:22:57

he is buying the best.

0:22:570:22:59

He does buy the best.

0:22:590:23:00

I'm tempted to say, if this was all one owned,

0:23:000:23:04

one could sit happily and say my work here is done.

0:23:040:23:08

That's right.

0:23:080:23:09

He's buying in a day what some people buy in a lifetime.

0:23:100:23:13

The entire Spence collection is an invaluable source

0:23:160:23:19

for British military history,

0:23:190:23:22

highlighting one man's passion for the extraordinary and

0:23:220:23:25

the role he and his comrades played in the Great War.

0:23:250:23:28

Meanwhile, our other warrior, Margie,

0:23:320:23:35

is making her way to the North Yorkshire town of Redcar.

0:23:350:23:38

Can't really plan this trip.

0:23:380:23:42

You just don't know what you're turning up to.

0:23:420:23:45

Be lovely to find something...

0:23:460:23:47

I want something that excites me a bit.

0:23:470:23:49

So here's hoping I do find that.

0:23:490:23:52

Well, I think she's talking about antiques.

0:23:520:23:54

Oh, fish and chips.

0:23:560:23:57

Paul will be jealous.

0:23:570:23:58

She's got a lot of catching up to do.

0:24:000:24:02

Let's see what she can find in here, at Redcar Antiques.

0:24:020:24:05

-Good morning.

-Good morning. Pleasure to meet you.

-And you too.

0:24:060:24:09

-You're James.

-Yes, yes.

0:24:090:24:10

With just under £140, she still has a bit of money to play with.

0:24:110:24:16

That looks quite sweet, on top there.

0:24:250:24:28

These little cold-painted pheasants,

0:24:280:24:30

on an onyx base.

0:24:300:24:32

Painted after they've been cast.

0:24:320:24:34

I quite like them. I don't think it's terribly old.

0:24:340:24:36

Maybe mid-20th century.

0:24:360:24:37

Might ask the price because I think it's maybe quite a saleable thing.

0:24:390:24:43

That's the name of the game, Margie.

0:24:450:24:47

Cold painting on bronze

0:24:470:24:48

was a technique made popular during the decadence

0:24:480:24:51

of the Art Deco period.

0:24:510:24:52

Oh, James?

0:24:540:24:55

I've got 60 on that but...

0:24:550:24:58

I think there's a bit of room there.

0:24:580:25:00

-A bit?

-Yeah. I mean, we could do...

0:25:000:25:02

40?

0:25:020:25:03

I'm never keen on onyx but...

0:25:040:25:06

No. No, that's the only thing.

0:25:060:25:07

It would be nicer on marble, wouldn't it?

0:25:070:25:09

Well, do 30, if you like.

0:25:090:25:12

Yeah. Resignation...

0:25:120:25:15

-Right, so 30 quid, yeah?

-Yeah, we can do that for you.

0:25:150:25:18

-I think it gives you a fair shout.

-It does, yeah. Thanks a lot.

0:25:180:25:20

-Best of luck.

-Thanks, James.

-No problem.

-I'll pay you. Do you want some money?

0:25:200:25:23

Now, the Margie technique is to have a good old moan and get

0:25:230:25:26

the half-price deal.

0:25:260:25:28

Thank you, James.

0:25:280:25:29

Paul has arrived in the sunny climes of Bishop Auckland

0:25:290:25:32

in County Durham.

0:25:320:25:33

He is visiting Something Different.

0:25:350:25:36

This family-run biz looks jam-packed with goodies.

0:25:360:25:40

Guess how much money he has.

0:25:420:25:44

Nearly £270.

0:25:440:25:46

He's definitely got the big bucks.

0:25:460:25:48

I'm digging tatties.

0:25:580:26:00

I'm getting my hands dirty here.

0:26:000:26:02

Well, then. What am I playing with?

0:26:030:26:06

Lawn edging tiles.

0:26:060:26:07

You've seen the type before in the formal gardens.

0:26:070:26:10

Let's have a wee look-see. We've got a variety of styles here.

0:26:100:26:13

There is the most commonly encountered.

0:26:130:26:15

Yeah. Salt-glazed fireclay.

0:26:150:26:18

And you bury these...

0:26:180:26:19

..in your garden in lines to define your borders.

0:26:210:26:24

Keep the garden nice and tidy.

0:26:240:26:25

I love them. And these have some age to them.

0:26:250:26:29

All right, Percy Thrower.

0:26:290:26:31

They're quite nice, actually.

0:26:330:26:35

Now, wither Margie?

0:26:350:26:36

Absolutely lovely here.

0:26:380:26:40

Gosh. Just keep looking at the beautiful rolling countryside.

0:26:410:26:47

It's lovely.

0:26:470:26:49

And keep your eye on the road!

0:26:490:26:51

She's eventually arrived at the wonderful Yorkshire town of Thirsk.

0:26:510:26:54

Watch out, Three Tons Antiques.

0:26:550:26:57

Here she comes.

0:26:570:26:58

The pennies are dwindling, Margie.

0:26:590:27:02

You've got less than £110 left.

0:27:020:27:04

I like drums.

0:27:100:27:12

Are you musical, Margie?

0:27:120:27:14

You've got to, haven't you?

0:27:140:27:16

-Anybody listening?

-Loud and clear.

0:27:160:27:17

RATTLING THUD

0:27:170:27:18

Oh, God, that didn't sound too good, did it?

0:27:180:27:21

Nope.

0:27:210:27:22

-Make it stop.

-I like drums.

0:27:240:27:26

I wonder where that's come from, the local band?

0:27:260:27:29

They make little tables, don't they?

0:27:300:27:32

They look like little side tables, but they've got a glass top on.

0:27:320:27:37

£150.

0:27:370:27:39

Out of my league.

0:27:400:27:41

My poor ears!

0:27:420:27:43

That's clever.

0:27:500:27:51

Tell us what you've found, Margie.

0:27:550:27:57

Compacts. A variety of compacts.

0:27:570:28:01

Let's have a look at this one.

0:28:010:28:02

Paul did very well the other day with one.

0:28:020:28:04

Right, but this is a bit different, isn't it?

0:28:050:28:07

Yes. What's she put on it?

0:28:100:28:11

And it is a watch powder sifter.

0:28:110:28:15

What is that?

0:28:170:28:18

Well, Margie, I'll tell you.

0:28:180:28:21

This nifty little compact has a watch-like mechanism

0:28:210:28:23

that delivers just the right amount of powder

0:28:230:28:26

every time you want to freshen up your hooter.

0:28:260:28:29

Sadly, it doesn't tell the time, though.

0:28:290:28:31

That's nice, £50, though.

0:28:340:28:36

It's a lot.

0:28:360:28:37

And it's not silver.

0:28:370:28:40

It's quite nice. Quite like that.

0:28:400:28:41

It's different.

0:28:410:28:43

Lovely. Now, let's zip back to Paul in Bishop Auckland.

0:28:430:28:46

Thistle, rose, shamrock.

0:28:480:28:51

Fantastic. Rather smart.

0:28:510:28:53

Now, we've got a few of them,

0:28:530:28:56

we've got white and salt-glazed and they would make quite a striking

0:28:560:29:01

border if we went for the chequerboard-type effect.

0:29:010:29:04

Just trying to work out how many of each we've got.

0:29:040:29:06

Well, they are priced at £2 apiece.

0:29:070:29:09

Make sure I've got my numbers right.

0:29:090:29:11

Two, four, six, eight, ten, 12, 14, 16, 18, leave the dull ones.

0:29:110:29:18

Let's get dealer Yvonne in to see if we can strike a deal.

0:29:180:29:21

Yvonne, I've gone and sifted and sorted all the edging tiles.

0:29:210:29:25

Well done.

0:29:250:29:27

And I've got ten of the white cabled, eight of the others...

0:29:270:29:32

-OK.

-18, a couple of quid apiece?

0:29:320:29:34

-36 quid?

-Yeah, done.

0:29:340:29:36

We are in business.

0:29:360:29:37

-Pleasure.

-Pleasure, Paul.

0:29:370:29:40

That was one swift deal, Paul.

0:29:400:29:42

Nice work. Now, has Margie bought anything yet?

0:29:420:29:47

Ah, there's manager Victoria.

0:29:470:29:49

Victoria, stand by.

0:29:490:29:51

Isn't this a curiosity?

0:29:510:29:53

-Yes.

-Have you ever seen one before?

0:29:530:29:55

It's a watch powder compact.

0:29:550:29:58

And it's priced up at £50.

0:29:580:30:00

I wouldn't mind buying it but it's just...

0:30:000:30:02

There's just no way, Jose.

0:30:020:30:06

-£30?

-I just don't...

0:30:060:30:08

I think, what it will fetch at auction in this particular situation

0:30:080:30:13

would be 20 to 25.

0:30:130:30:14

So what are you looking at, around about...?

0:30:140:30:16

I'm looking at 15.

0:30:160:30:18

Yeah, we can do it.

0:30:180:30:19

-Yeah. Are you happy to do that?

-Yeah, I'll do it for 15.

0:30:190:30:22

-Yeah. OK.

-You can make some money on it.

0:30:220:30:23

-Well, I hope so.

-Blimey, Margie.

0:30:230:30:26

And thank you, Victoria.

0:30:260:30:27

That drum keeps catching my eye.

0:30:290:30:31

Oh, don't play it again!

0:30:310:30:32

But I think it's...

0:30:340:30:35

I'm always pleading poverty.

0:30:350:30:38

-I know you are.

-And remember, it's priced at £150.

0:30:380:30:42

What sort of price are you looking at?

0:30:440:30:46

Yeah. I was thinking...

0:30:470:30:49

Yeah...

0:30:490:30:51

-It's got to be...

-Go on.

0:30:510:30:52

I saw a bit of dust on it.

0:30:520:30:55

You don't see any dust at all in this shop.

0:30:550:30:58

-Oops!

-You're looking around 50 quid, aren't you?

0:30:580:31:01

Oh, she's gritting her teeth.

0:31:040:31:06

Yes. I'll let you have it for 50.

0:31:060:31:09

-You're fed up with me now, aren't you?

-Yes.

-Funny that.

0:31:090:31:13

No, because I think I might have a chance.

0:31:130:31:15

That's one heck of a deal.

0:31:150:31:17

The drum and the watch powder compact bought for just £65.

0:31:170:31:21

Wow!

0:31:210:31:23

You're not going to believe this, it's the end of the shopping

0:31:230:31:26

for our road trippers.

0:31:260:31:27

So, how far is Rotherham from here?

0:31:270:31:29

If I knew where here was, I would tell you, Margie.

0:31:290:31:32

And I'll buy you a nice big Rotherham fish supper.

0:31:320:31:35

That Paul loves his food.

0:31:350:31:37

Enjoy your din dins.

0:31:370:31:38

Then some much-needed shuteye, you two.

0:31:380:31:41

We are off to South Yorkshire and the town of Rotherham,

0:31:440:31:47

the showdown for the next auction.

0:31:470:31:49

Very exciting.

0:31:490:31:50

Today's matinee performance is being held at Paul Beighton auctioneers.

0:31:520:31:56

It used to be a 1920s cinema, don't you know?

0:31:560:31:59

Taking you to the pictures, Margie.

0:32:010:32:03

Oh, another auction.

0:32:050:32:06

Margie has nearly exhausted her entire budget,

0:32:100:32:13

spending £170 exactly on five lots.

0:32:130:32:16

Paul is doing his usual, keeping a stash in reserve.

0:32:180:32:21

He's spent £202, also on five lots.

0:32:210:32:24

Spill the beans on each other's buys, please.

0:32:250:32:28

Doesn't look very old, does it?

0:32:300:32:31

It's not very old, is it?

0:32:310:32:33

Absolutely not a clue.

0:32:360:32:38

Not a clue. But if Paul thinks it's worth £80,

0:32:400:32:43

I would be very surprised if he gets his money back on this.

0:32:430:32:46

Very surprised indeed.

0:32:460:32:48

It's charming. OK?

0:32:480:32:49

1950s...

0:32:490:32:50

..cold-painted pheasants...

0:32:510:32:54

..nicely modelled.

0:32:540:32:56

Onyx base, for once, isn't all chipped and cracked.

0:32:560:33:01

I'd love to be able to pick holes in this and, confound her, I cannot.

0:33:010:33:06

But mind you, it's fragile this, and if somebody puts it down too hard...

0:33:060:33:11

Avert your gaze.

0:33:110:33:12

Behave yourself, Paul.

0:33:150:33:16

Jody Beighton is today's auctioneer.

0:33:180:33:20

Now, what are your thoughts on their offerings?

0:33:200:33:22

The Holmegaard vase, I mean,

0:33:240:33:25

that sort of a period item is really on trend now.

0:33:250:33:29

So I think that'll do really well.

0:33:290:33:31

The cold-painted pheasants, they are my favourite lot.

0:33:320:33:35

If somebody brought that in to put into one of our antique sales,

0:33:350:33:38

I certainly wouldn't turn my nose up.

0:33:380:33:40

I think they are a really good lot.

0:33:400:33:41

-Thanks, Jody.

-It's definitely a picture house, isn't it?

0:33:410:33:45

Yeah.

0:33:450:33:46

The auction is about to begin.

0:33:460:33:48

Today, we're also open to internet bidders.

0:33:480:33:50

-Here we go.

-Right in the...

0:33:500:33:54

Cinema seats.

0:33:540:33:55

Isn't this nice? Look at that over there, isn't that nice?

0:33:550:33:58

-Margie!

-It's not the back row, it's the front row.

0:33:590:34:02

Keep your hands to yourself, Paul.

0:34:020:34:04

We begin with the Japanese military tunic.

0:34:060:34:09

Did I introduce you to the Japanese Army Collectors Society?

0:34:090:34:14

I phoned them up. They're at the back.

0:34:140:34:15

-They want to meet you.

-It wouldn't surprise me.

0:34:150:34:18

-£20, start.

-Uh-oh.

0:34:190:34:22

At £20. Any interest for 20?

0:34:220:34:24

-Ten then, if you must.

-That's not possible.

0:34:240:34:26

-That's not possible.

-Ten bid online, looking for 12.

0:34:260:34:28

Any advance? The bid is at 12 online.

0:34:280:34:30

-That's not possible.

-14, 16.

0:34:300:34:32

Bid's at 14 on the internet.

0:34:320:34:34

Looking for 16. Any interest in the room?

0:34:340:34:36

At £14 only.

0:34:360:34:37

16 bid. 18.

0:34:370:34:39

In the room at 16.

0:34:390:34:40

18, we are looking for. 18 bid online.

0:34:400:34:42

20. The bid is at 18 on the internet.

0:34:420:34:45

20 with you. At £18.

0:34:450:34:47

-Below estimate.

-You're joking.

-At 18 and selling...

0:34:470:34:49

Hold the front page.

0:34:510:34:52

Laidlaw just lost a packet on militaria.

0:34:520:34:56

I wouldn't believe it possible.

0:34:570:34:59

Ouch.

0:34:590:35:00

Mum, a big boy hit me in the playground!

0:35:010:35:03

I've just been done over, Margie, and you're laughing.

0:35:050:35:08

Well, sorry. I'm not laughing.

0:35:080:35:10

I feel very sorry for you.

0:35:100:35:12

Hey, it's looking good.

0:35:130:35:14

You might be in here with a chance, Margie.

0:35:160:35:19

Your turn with the unusual watch powder compact.

0:35:190:35:23

Watch this space. It'll go for 18.

0:35:230:35:26

Egg, meet face.

0:35:260:35:28

Never seen one of those before.

0:35:290:35:30

Ten, I'm bid. Take 12.

0:35:300:35:32

12, internet. 14, sir.

0:35:320:35:33

16. 18.

0:35:330:35:35

20. The bid is at 18 in the room.

0:35:350:35:37

-20, we are looking for.

-That's enough.

0:35:370:35:39

26, 28.

0:35:390:35:41

The bid is at 26. 28, let's see.

0:35:410:35:43

Any advance? Bid at 26 and done.

0:35:430:35:46

That'll do.

0:35:460:35:47

Do you know, I much prefer it when I'm winning.

0:35:490:35:51

I'll bet you do. Good result, Margie.

0:35:520:35:54

Hey, I got that wrong and hats off, you were spot-on.

0:35:560:36:00

Let's see if you are on the money

0:36:020:36:03

with the Victorian border tiles, Paul.

0:36:030:36:05

£10, bid in the room.

0:36:050:36:07

-12 bid. 14.

-There you go.

0:36:070:36:08

-It's going up.

-16.

0:36:080:36:10

-18.

-A long way to go.

0:36:100:36:12

-20.

-Keep going.

-22.

0:36:120:36:13

The bid is at £20, back of the room, take two now.

0:36:130:36:17

Any advance. 22, 24.

0:36:170:36:19

-26.

-Getting there.

-At 28, sir?

0:36:190:36:23

30. 35. At £30.

0:36:230:36:26

The bid is at £30. Selling in the room for 30.

0:36:260:36:31

I frankly think that's a result.

0:36:310:36:33

Cause for a celebration.

0:36:330:36:35

-Whoop-de-do.

-Well, at least he's cheery.

0:36:360:36:38

And it's not a huge loss.

0:36:380:36:39

Can you believe I'm so happy over a loss?

0:36:410:36:44

No, I can't!

0:36:440:36:45

Margie's collection of sweetheart brooches and stick pin are up next.

0:36:470:36:50

I'd wish you luck but in all sincerity

0:36:500:36:53

with every fibre of my being,

0:36:530:36:54

I want you to make colossal losses right now.

0:36:540:36:57

Let's see your bids. 15, 16, bid online.

0:36:580:37:00

18 online. 20.

0:37:000:37:01

22. Let's see.

0:37:010:37:03

Bid is at 22. 24. 26. 28.

0:37:030:37:06

Here we go.

0:37:060:37:07

Bid is at 26 in the room.

0:37:070:37:09

28, we are looking for. Any advance?

0:37:090:37:10

28, new bidder. 30. 35.

0:37:100:37:12

40. 45. At £40 now, looking for 45.

0:37:120:37:17

Any advance?

0:37:170:37:18

-Thanks.

-At £40, Selling if you are all through.

0:37:180:37:20

Margie is on a roll here.

0:37:220:37:24

Tidy profits thus far.

0:37:240:37:25

I'm a bit up.

0:37:260:37:27

-You're doing all right.

-She certainly is.

0:37:290:37:31

Paul, can your gold watch fob bring you back into the game?

0:37:310:37:36

On the book at 30. 40.

0:37:360:37:37

-Five.

-There you go.

0:37:370:37:38

50. Five. I'm out.

0:37:380:37:41

60. The bids at 55 in the room.

0:37:410:37:42

60. 60 online.

0:37:420:37:44

-65.

-Online.

0:37:440:37:46

70. Room bid at 65.

0:37:460:37:48

70 we need. 75.

0:37:480:37:50

-80.

-It's a lovely thing.

0:37:500:37:53

85. The bid is at £80 online.

0:37:530:37:57

Looking for 85. Any advance?

0:37:570:37:59

At £80, then, if you are all done and sure...

0:37:590:38:01

£80 online...

0:38:010:38:02

That's more like it.

0:38:030:38:05

Finally, a profit for Paul.

0:38:050:38:07

I don't mind you making a profit.

0:38:070:38:09

You... You...

0:38:100:38:12

-You do.

-Little liar.

0:38:120:38:13

Your combo lot of the Edwardian brooch and cravat pin

0:38:160:38:20

are next, Margie.

0:38:200:38:21

30 we are bid. Online.

0:38:210:38:22

35. 35. 40. 45 online.

0:38:220:38:25

50 with you. the internet bid is at 45.

0:38:250:38:27

Any advance for 50?

0:38:270:38:29

Seems to have settled at 45.

0:38:290:38:30

No further interest. At 45 and away.

0:38:300:38:32

How irritating is that?

0:38:350:38:36

Stopped in your tracks.

0:38:360:38:39

You hope, Paul.

0:38:390:38:41

Here's hoping you've not peaked

0:38:410:38:43

and you've had your moment.

0:38:430:38:45

Wishful thinking, Paul.

0:38:450:38:47

Your turn now with the 1941 ten franc note.

0:38:470:38:51

£10. Ten, I am bid.

0:38:510:38:53

12. 14. 16.

0:38:530:38:55

Bid at 16, sir?

0:38:550:38:56

18. 20.

0:38:560:38:57

20 online.

0:38:590:39:01

In the room 22.

0:39:010:39:03

Take four, any advance?

0:39:030:39:04

Double my money.

0:39:040:39:06

26, 28.

0:39:060:39:07

I thought the internet would pick it up.

0:39:070:39:09

-How would you put a price on it?

-30? 35.

0:39:090:39:11

Are you going again, sir?

0:39:110:39:12

35? At £30.

0:39:120:39:14

35 on the net.

0:39:140:39:16

-40. 45.

-The net wants it.

0:39:160:39:18

Yeah. It's a good thing.

0:39:180:39:20

45? At £40.

0:39:200:39:22

Still in the room, the original bidder at £40.

0:39:220:39:24

Good for them.

0:39:240:39:26

All done?

0:39:260:39:28

-There you go.

-That's all right.

-Well done.

0:39:280:39:31

Good return on a precious piece of World War II history.

0:39:310:39:35

Ah!

0:39:350:39:36

Margie's cold-painted bronze pheasants are next.

0:39:370:39:41

40, I am bid. Take 45.

0:39:410:39:43

Bid is at 40. Five.

0:39:430:39:44

50. Five.

0:39:440:39:45

60. Five.

0:39:450:39:47

70. Five.

0:39:470:39:48

-Margie...

-80.

0:39:480:39:49

Five.

0:39:490:39:50

90. Five.

0:39:510:39:52

Hey, things are looking up.

0:39:520:39:53

£90. Five with you.

0:39:530:39:55

95, new bidder. 100.

0:39:550:39:56

110. 120. 130.

0:39:560:39:59

At 120, then.

0:39:590:40:00

30 with you. The bid is at 120 in the room, then.

0:40:000:40:03

At 120 and selling.

0:40:030:40:04

Margie, I've got to say, well done.

0:40:060:40:09

Excellent, Margie.

0:40:090:40:10

This is a brilliant comeback.

0:40:100:40:12

Just got real, as they say.

0:40:120:40:14

Maybe a Danish vase can turn your fortunes, Paul?

0:40:170:40:21

Let's see your bids. 22 bid.

0:40:210:40:22

Take four. 24.

0:40:220:40:23

26. 28 we're looking for.

0:40:230:40:25

The bid's at £26.

0:40:250:40:26

-Eight, let's see.

-Keep going.

0:40:260:40:28

-35. 40.

-Yeah.

0:40:290:40:31

45. At £45 in the room.

0:40:310:40:34

-Don't stop.

-At £45.

0:40:340:40:36

All done and sure for 45.

0:40:360:40:38

-That is a wee profit.

-I'm impressed by your positivity, Paul.

0:40:390:40:43

That's all right. I'm no' disheartened by that.

0:40:430:40:45

Good.

0:40:450:40:47

-Pleased for you.

-Good.

0:40:470:40:50

Margie's big drum is the final lot for today.

0:40:500:40:53

If this goes down, I've lost my galloping lead.

0:40:540:40:58

Oh, no, no. Hush your mouth.

0:40:580:41:01

30 bid, back of the room.

0:41:010:41:02

-Take 35.

-Confound it, you've got a bid.

0:41:020:41:04

45. 50. Five. 60. Five. 70. Five. £70. 75 internet.

0:41:040:41:12

80. Five.

0:41:120:41:14

-I'm dreaming.

-90.

0:41:140:41:16

-Five.

-Hey, I'm going to buy drums from now on.

0:41:160:41:19

95 internet. 100, we are looking for.

0:41:190:41:21

110 on the internet. 120.

0:41:210:41:23

You make tables out of them.

0:41:240:41:26

Any advance? At 110 and selling...

0:41:260:41:29

Margie, I'm not worthy to be in your company.

0:41:290:41:32

Blooming heck, Margie!

0:41:340:41:36

You've played a blinder there.

0:41:360:41:38

Marvellous.

0:41:380:41:39

I'm really very thrilled.

0:41:390:41:41

-Really?

-Yeah, are you?

0:41:410:41:42

-Are you thrilled for me?

-Shocked.

0:41:420:41:44

I'm in shock.

0:41:440:41:45

Would you like me to buy you a little drinkie?

0:41:450:41:47

A little drinkie?

0:41:470:41:49

If you could up that to a very substantial drinkie...

0:41:490:41:53

Go on, then. I will.

0:41:530:41:54

While they go for a drinkie, let's work out the figures.

0:41:560:41:59

Paul began with £434.40.

0:42:010:42:04

And after auction costs, wait for it, he made a loss!

0:42:040:42:08

£27.34.

0:42:090:42:11

Paul has £407.06.

0:42:110:42:15

Marvellous Margie started the third leg with

0:42:170:42:21

£213.70.

0:42:210:42:23

After all sale room costs, she's made a fantastic profit of £109.62.

0:42:230:42:29

The first win for Margie, who now has £323.32 for the next leg.

0:42:290:42:37

Well done.

0:42:370:42:38

Let me open the door for you.

0:42:380:42:40

Margie, that's the least you can do.

0:42:400:42:42

I was starting to enjoy that.

0:42:420:42:44

-Coming after you.

-You've ruined everything.

0:42:440:42:46

I'll tell you what, from now on, no more Mr Nice Guy.

0:42:460:42:49

And he's not joking.

0:42:490:42:50

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, is there trouble in paradise?

0:42:510:42:56

-Twittering on.

-I can hear your booming, Scottish, bearded voice

0:42:560:43:01

from miles away.

0:43:010:43:03

Paul revisits his childhood...

0:43:030:43:05

Come on, let's play buses.

0:43:050:43:07

..while Margie takes a trip to the exotic.

0:43:070:43:10

I feel as though I'm in the jungles of Borneo here.

0:43:100:43:13

But will Paul end on a bum note?

0:43:140:43:16

HE PLAYS OUT OF TUNE

0:43:160:43:18

THEY CHEER

0:43:180:43:19

Paul Laidlaw and Margie Cooper have reached the half way point on their humdinger of a journey. The rain fails to dampen spirits in Scarborough but the roof on their convertible Morris Minor remains firmly shut.

On the way to an auction in Rotherham, Paul indulges his top two passions of militaria and collecting as he hears about a hero of the First World War who continued to spend a fortune on collectibles while under fire in the trenches. Margie heads to Whitby to find out about local sailors who went to sea in birds' nests.

A big drum, a little horseshoe and a World War Two tunic are amongst the interested lots going under the gavel. But has Paul gambled too much of his kitty?