Episode 25 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 25

It is the last day of the middle England odyssey with antiques experts Philip Serrell and David Barby. They travel from Ampthill to Gloucester in search of profitable antiques.


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Transcript


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The nations favourite antiques experts, £200 each

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-and one big challenge.

-Testing, testing.

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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35, cash.

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The aim is trade up and hope each antique turns a profit,

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but its not as easy as it sounds and there can only be one winner.

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-Could you sell me two for a tenner?

-Two for a tenner?

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So will it be the highway to success or the B-road to bankruptcy?

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I'm on my knees already.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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All this week we've been out on the road with a pair of old pals.

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Antiques experts Philip Serrell and dear David Barby.

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-I cannot believe we're doing 60 in this car.

-Take it steady old love.

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Don't keep touching me!

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Philip Serrell is a successful auctioneer and former geography teacher.

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He's found his way round the antiques world easily enough,

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yet still struggles to find his way around...town.

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I'm going to head north up to east street,

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then go west across to east street and then south street...

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Actually this is the wrong way

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The trusted antiques valuer and the legend that is David Barby.

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He knows how to sniff out great deals.

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And he'll take anything he can from unsuspecting antiques dealers.

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Can I check my fingers when you're finished just in case you stole one as well!

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Philip and David started the week with £200 each

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and it's all been getting a bit heavy for them.

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Oh! What a weight!

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Lord above!

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Anyone for a fiver?

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Philip's been using a tough and often painful buying strategy.

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-I can feel one of my headaches coming on.

-Yeah, they're catching aren't they?

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So with some shrewd manoeuvres, Philip has home-grown his £200

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into a flowering £322.23 to begin his last show.

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David's been playing a risky game this week and it's really worked quite well for him.

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Anybody else at £125? And done then.

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From his flimsy £200, David has fully inflated

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to a big, bouncy £468.80 for his last shopping spree.

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Isn't he a lovely man?

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It's their last voyage together and they're still getting on famously.

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-Sort of!

-Go a little bit slower Philip we're doing...

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-Do shut up Barby.

-..20 miles an hour.

-Do shut up.

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Philip and David have thoroughly enjoyed their Middle England odyssey so far,

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from Lincoln to final auction in Gloucester.

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On today's show, the boys are leaving St Ives in Cambridgeshire.

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First pin in the map is the village of Ampthill in Bedfordshire.

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Here we are, Ampthill. Georgian market town. That sounds good doesn't it?

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They must have known we're coming Barby they've got the bunting out

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Gorgeous Ampthill began nearly 1,000 years ago as Anglo-Saxon settlement of Aemethyll,

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meaning, literally, ant-infested hill. Charming!

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Its famous today for the Alameda, a handsome avenue of lime trees

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planted in the 1820s to imitate Portuguese boulevards.

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The first antiques port of the day is this exciting, three-floored Emporium.

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Libby is here to welcome our two intrepid treasure hunters.

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-Morning chaps. Nice to see you.

-David Barby.

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I'll go upstairs because he wants to remain on the ground floor.

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He's got poorly legs. Right, thank you.

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This is the David Barby of the antique world.

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-An old fossil.

-Charming(!)

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Actually, despite his earlier sprint, our David is looking...

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Oh, I don't know, a bit peaky.

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I've got this dreadful cold it's suddenly come about me.

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They say I sound like Barry White but I'm not certain

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who Barry White is - probably some 50s pop star or something like that.

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Anyway, they say it sounds sexy. Just one of those things.

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MUSIC: "I'm Gonna Love You Just A Little Bit More" by Barry White

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A Greenwheat, an iconic design of the 1950s.

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In fact we used it at home until fairly recently.

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The best pieces should be signed.

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Glyn Colledge.

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Denby Greenwheat was created

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by Denby's stalwart designer Glyn Colledge in 1956.

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Glyn studied under the legendary design tutor Gordon Forsyth at the Burslem School of Art,

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the same man who moulded Stoke on Trent's finest,

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Susie Cooper, Clarice Cliff and Charlotte Rhead.

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Three, four, five...

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So basically you can say you've got a breakfast set there. £95 the lot.

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That's a possibility.

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They're a fairly good prospect and poorly David's still playing the game.

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But what of Philip?

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If you're going to buy a set of dominoes

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you need to know that you've got the complete set. Here goes.

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Dominoes derive from an ancient Chinese game

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and swept through Europe in the 18th century.

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These English 19th century sets were often used to settle disputes over grazing boundaries.

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Could they be used to settle a week-old, Serrell-Barby dispute?

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-Hey Barbs, how you doing?

-That's about the cheapest thing I've seen.

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-Go look in the mirror.

-He's so unkind, isn't he? Really!

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-I shall leave you to play games.

-There. Look at that.

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They're all there. That's brilliant, isn't it?

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I've got to put them all back now.

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These were £8, what's the best on these then?

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-I think the dealer said three.

-Two

-Three.

-There's a terrible echo in this place, isn't there?

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-Two?

-No, I can't do it because the dealer is in the building

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at the moment and he said he'd be prepared to take three for them.

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-Go on.

-OK, then, that's fine.

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Three whole pounds. Wow(!)

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And will David be joining the last of the big spenders?

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I'm going to sit in the car and sulk and wait for our Phil.

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Poor old David! Let's hope Philip can keep the antiques turning over.

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It's a butter churn so your cream would go into here

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and that would keep turning the cream to turn it into butter.

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These nineteenth century butter churns are literally a barrel of fun.

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Especially if you like to make your own butter.

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Hand churning separates the fat from the cream

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and squeezes out the liquid

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leaving the lovely, globulous, buttery lump ready for patting.

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See the thing is, Libby, that's coming off there, look.

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But if it was in use that would stretch back out.

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Do you know, you've got a good sales pitch but see if you can do that for £30 for me.

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-I'll go and get him on the phone.

-Is he a nice lad?

-He's lovely.

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-How old is he?

-73.

-73!?

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That's lucky, Philip, you're used to giving the infirm a hard time!

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Right, now, Alex I've got £30 I'm doing this programme

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with David Barby and he's light years ahead of me and I need all the help

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I can get. You will probably go to heaven on this sale.

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You're an absolute star. Thank you.

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So that's £30 for Alex's butter churn

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and £3 for me dominoes, weren't they?

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£33 all together, sir.

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-Do I get it gift wrapped?

-I'm going to try for you.

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You're an angel. Thank you so much.

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Oh, Libby! He said gift-wrapped, not bubble-wrapped.

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David Barby will see right through that

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with one of his extra-hard stares.

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-Barby you're relaxed.

-I've been waiting for you.

-Don't you look at these.

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-That looks really interesting. I love your backward movement.

-Don't you look at these.

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Oh, is that my comb?

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Oh, for Heaven's sake! Let's just go, shall we?

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Back on the road, Philip and David are heading

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32 miles west from Ampthill to the ancient town of Brackley.

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DAVID BLOWS HIS NOSE That really is a dreadful noise.

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-Do you have to keep doing that?

-I'm only blowing my nose.

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Do you know, I'm not sure you're going to make the rest of this trip.

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Now, Philip, play fair today and remember poor Barby's not feeling well.

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Anyway may the best man...

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I'm not going to catch anything off there am I?

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Brackley has tried to hide its best-kept antiques secret under a supermarket.

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But our cunning boys still managed to find it.

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Good luck, old mate.

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-Jim, how are you?

-Hello, Philip, pleased to meet you.

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-You've got some interesting things here.

-He certainly has.

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How about this funny little thing for £28?

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This is called a go-to-bed

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and it's missing, on the bottom, there should be a bit of sand paper.

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And so you fill this, full of matches and you take your match out,

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strike it on there and you put the match in that little turret there and then you go to bed.

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I've got to be really mean on this. What would buy it?

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-I'll be honest I think the best we could do on that would be 15.

-15?

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-It would.

-How about 12?

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-OK, £12.

-You're a star. Thank you so much.

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Let's have a look at this.

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That's some sort of a perfume bottle isn't it?

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That is a really good thing.

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Now, Philip found a hobnail cut glass scent bottle for £120.

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-What's that one?

-That's £90.

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It's in good order. There's a little bit of a nibble just there,

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which might get it done to 85.

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85 done deal, home and host. wrap it, I'll take it.

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-You're an absolute gentleman. Thank you so much.

-Indeed!

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Now, where's that other absolute gentleman got to?

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This is the situation which I call panic.

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I'm just looking at anything to try and find a bargain.

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Oh, dear, someone's got themselves into a bit of a flap!

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Excuse me, could I have the key to cabinet 29?

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Vesta holder, you put your matches in there

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and you strike them on here,

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-and then you light your pipe

-Very nice.

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-Anything else?

-I want that one out, please.

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Well, this is a silver bottle, toilet water bottle, coaster

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and it would have been full of rose water or lavender

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and you'd sprinkle it on clothes. That is a possibility, I think.

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Anything else?

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Now this belongs to me. Someone said it could be Charter House because it's got..

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This is a college one, yes,

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Tygs are large English pottery mugs, with several handles for passing around for communal drinking.

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Royal Doulton made these commissioned varieties

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for colleges and Masonic lodges at the turn of the 20th century.

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-This one I really like actually.

-Another interesting prospect.

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-Anything else?

-I like that.

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Letter scale. Well, this is what, in the late Victorian period,

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you would have assessed how much postage you would pay, so you have

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a little scale and you have all the weights there.

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This is a nice one because it has a cast metal base.

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Well, a little panicking has dredged up a few potentials for Mr Barby.

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-Right. Gosh, did I choose all these?

-You did indeed.

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-What good taste I've got!

-And SO modest!

-Right the weight...

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I'm going to stick my neck out and say £60 on those.

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I think I'm going to say yes, to these. What about this unusual...?

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The best on that is 28.

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And that's the very best at 28.

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If you're pushing me, £20.

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OK, I'll have that one. This little piece I like,

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what's the very best you can do on this one, Debbie?

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Um, £45.

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Is that the very, very best you can do?

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How about 40?

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That is the bottom line, £40, I'm afraid.

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Poor Debbie, lucky David didn't ask for her very, very, very best!

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Right, I love this tyg and often you had soap dishes with coal tar soap in the bottom...

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ELECTRIC GUITAR MOBILE RINGTONE PLAYS

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Er, David, you appear to be rocking!

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That's a bit trendy, isn't it?

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Sorry about that, that was my Seattle fan club.

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Ah yes, how is Auntie Barbara?

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Or, rather, where were we?

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-And what's the best you can do on that?

-25.

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Is that the very best?

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-Very, very, very best.

-Ooh!

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£20.

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Proof of the pudding's in the eating.

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-Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

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Well, the Gods of Rock have helped David to buy four really, really great items there.

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And he only had to pay the very, very, very best prices. Gawd!

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-Can you just hold that for me?

-You...

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-What did you just do?

-Best place for it, come on.

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You're an absolute...

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Don't say it!

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Finally we're out of here.

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Fancying a break and some choice surroundings,

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Philip's heading 13 miles due west from Brackley, to gorgeous Broughton.

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What a wonderful place this is.

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First built as a manor house by artisans working for John de Broughton in 1300,

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the property was fortified in 1406 to form battle-ready walls,

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turning an Englishman's home into a castle.

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Broughton Castle is now home to Lord Saye and his family, the famous Fiennes.

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-Sir, good morning

-Good morning to you.

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-Philip Serrell.

-How do you do? Good to meet you.

-You've got a fabulous spot here haven't you?

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-We think it's pretty good, yes, we do.

-Can I ask you a question, Sir?

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When does a house become a castle?

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This is called a castle, I often think it's a misnomer. It's really a manor house, if you like,

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but it's got a moat and its got some battlements and the big gate house.

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-Can we have a look inside?

-Come on in.

-Thank you so much.

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From 1451 the house passed to its current hereditary line, the Fiennes family -

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as in explorer Sir Ranulph and actors Ralph and Joseph Fiennes.

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In fact, Broughton Castle appeared in Joseph's film Shakespeare In Love,

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as well as other triumphs of entertainment - The Madness Of King George

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and even Noel's House Party.

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-Wow, what a ceiling!

-Yes, this is the great hall of the original house.

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It would have been of these proportions but of course in the 1300s they would have had

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no glass, probably wooden shutters an earth floor and a timber ceiling.

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So this stonework is all of different ages?

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Yes, I think the last building work, if you like to call it that, was this...

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A film company covered up some ugly pipes and we thought it looked better than the ugly pipes.

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I don't think many of our visiting public would notice that as being plywood and not stone.

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Frederick Fiennes, the 16th Lord Saye, rescued this house from decay,

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employing the prominent Victorian architect Sir George Gilbert Scott,

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the man responsible for the much-loved gothic St Pancras station in London.

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The family have continued to restore and furnish this house with great beauty ever since.

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This is our library room here as you can see.

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Ah! What first takes the eye is these marvellous book cases.

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Well, again those are pyramid book cases dated about 1760 and they're very unusual aren't they?

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They are absolutely glorious. They're wonderful and incredibly rare.

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There was a book shop in Oxford which was demolished about 1946

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and my mother had always admired these in the book shop

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and she went in and the bulldozers were operating and she bought the pair for shall we say £10

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from in front of the bulldozer's nose and I think they're worth more than £10 now.

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I hope they'll never leave here is all I can say.

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I can give you 20 for them, cos I think, this would get me out of trouble, actually!

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Nice try, Philip.

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This fine pair at auction might just help you beat Barby.

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Right, isn't this wonderful panelling?

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It's fantastic when you touch something like that which is 500-years-old

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and you know this has not been done by computer, it's been done by some chap with a wooden mallet.

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Very primitive tools, yes.

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And the symmetry there is absolutely perfect, isn't it? It is perfect.

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The interiors of Broughton Castle mix the very old with the modern

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and even the brand spanking new, to great decorative effect.

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-That is clearly, I don't know, 20 or 30 years old.

-It was done by a man called Alan Peters.

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He designed that table for that position and I hope it will sit there

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for a few more hundred years because I think it's just right for that.

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It looks absolutely fabulous and houses like this shouldn't just live in the past.

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You've got to move on and that is, if you like, your mark for generations to come.

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Can I just say to you, Sir, that it's been a huge honour to look around your home

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-but it's also been a massive privilege to meet you.

-I've enjoyed it very much. Thank you for coming.

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-Thank you very much.

-What a treat! Phillip you are a very lucky man.

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As the rain lashes down, it's time for our experts to find their own fortified shelter for the night.

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Tomorrow is their last blast at the shops.

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Dawn breaks but their nerves hold true

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as Philip and David prepare for the final push forward.

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-Where are we, Barby?

-Well, I think we should go left, actually.

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-Well, I think we should go right.

-Go left.

-Are you sure?

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Yeah, my judgement's always sound.

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So far, Philip has spent £130 on four items - the dominoes,

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the butter churn, the go-to-bed and the rather expensive scent bottle.

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He's got £192.23 left to lose.

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I mean spend!

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-We are lost, aren't we?

-No, there's a main road just coming up.

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-No, we're definitely lost.

-Just go straight on.

-So which way do we go?

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David Barby, meanwhile, has spent £140, also on four items -

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the postal scales, the elaborate Vesta,

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the Doulton tyg and the toilet water bottle.

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David has £328.80 left to show us who's boss.

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Let shopping commence!

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-What's going to happen next?

-Two hands on the wheel please.

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You're going to go into a shop and do this, "Is that your very, very best?"

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Now then, girls!

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The Road Trip is moving us on once more,

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leaving Broughton in the dust and burning 30 miles west to the village of Deddington.

0:20:300:20:37

Over three jam-packed floors, Deddington's Antiques Centre

0:20:370:20:40

is the scene for our final shopping showdown of the week.

0:20:400:20:44

Front runner, and poor sickly fellow David Barby gets first dibs.

0:20:470:20:54

-Hello, David Barby.

-Hello, pleased to meet you.

0:20:560:20:58

-And your name's...?

-Jenny.

-Hello, Jenny.

0:20:580:21:00

Smooth! David finds his way into the antiques labyrinth,

0:21:000:21:05

but will he find his way out?

0:21:050:21:06

Just so much, just so much.

0:21:060:21:09

Did I look in here?

0:21:090:21:12

Well, it's a nice coffee can and saucer.

0:21:120:21:15

Copeland & Garrett, late Spode.

0:21:150:21:17

On the bottom here, Copeland, late Spode.

0:21:170:21:20

The way to check whether it's porcelain or not is by holding it up to the light.

0:21:200:21:25

Regular Road Trip viewers will know all about this.

0:21:250:21:28

Europe waited 800 years to perfect

0:21:280:21:31

its fragile Chinese ceramic using a fine white-stone paste

0:21:310:21:36

to give true porcelain its translucence over simple pottery.

0:21:360:21:40

If I do the same to the saucer however, there's no light coming through.

0:21:400:21:45

That's quite nice actually but at £48 a bit too much.

0:21:450:21:50

What have you found?

0:21:500:21:53

Well, I was after porcelain

0:21:530:21:55

-and I found this Spode coffee can but the saucer is pottery.

-Ah!

0:21:550:22:01

And at £48 I think it's a little bit heavy.

0:22:010:22:05

What's the best you could do on that?

0:22:050:22:07

Probably 35.

0:22:070:22:10

I'd like to see it at 20.

0:22:100:22:12

-Hmm.

-They're not matching.

0:22:120:22:14

No, I think I couldn't go that low.

0:22:150:22:17

What's the very, very best you can do?

0:22:170:22:21

-Very best?

-25.

0:22:210:22:23

I'm going to say 22 which is more than I anticipated to pay.

0:22:290:22:34

I'm going to stick to the 25.

0:22:340:22:36

-22.

-25.

0:22:360:22:40

22? 25?

0:22:400:22:43

Looks like we got ourselves a stand-off here.

0:22:430:22:45

Or maybe a stare-out!

0:22:450:22:48

HE SIGHS

0:22:540:22:55

22.50 that's my max.

0:23:000:23:02

Right, well I think seeing as you said they're not a matching pair

0:23:040:23:08

I think we can agree on 22.50.

0:23:080:23:10

-What have I done?

-SHE LAUGHS

0:23:100:23:14

Phew! And breathe.

0:23:140:23:15

David's done it again and the chilling Barby stare

0:23:170:23:21

had only to relent an additional 50p!

0:23:210:23:25

And with David at a century, the field is finally clear

0:23:260:23:29

for second place Serrell to make what he can from the final shopping minutes of the day.

0:23:290:23:34

I've got two alternatives. There's a plan A and a plan B.

0:23:340:23:37

Plan A is that I spend very little money, perhaps £5 or £10,

0:23:370:23:42

and hope the other things I bought might catch David up.

0:23:420:23:44

Or Plan B, is to go out in a blaze of glory.

0:23:440:23:50

Sounds exciting, Philip, but maybe just ask for help first!

0:23:500:23:54

-Jenny, can I look at this little butter pat.

-Sure, yes.

0:23:540:23:57

That's quite sweet, isn't it?

0:23:570:23:59

It's shortbread, not butter. And how much is that?

0:23:590:24:03

Well, it says ten - seven?

0:24:030:24:07

Four?

0:24:070:24:09

Six.

0:24:090:24:12

-Five.

-Six, I'm not shaking.

0:24:120:24:14

I'm not shaking either. SHE LAUGHS

0:24:140:24:17

I've got it and possession is nine tenths of the law. £5.

0:24:170:24:20

-£5.50.

-Oh, get out of here! £5. SHE LAUGHS

0:24:200:24:25

-I'll do that for five.

-OK, I'll have that for a fiver then

0:24:250:24:28

Well, so much for the Blaze of Glory, Philip.

0:24:280:24:31

But that is a sweet little thing for five whole pounds!

0:24:310:24:36

If Barby wins, I am going to buy a one way ticket to somewhere as far away as possible.

0:24:360:24:42

It doesn't matter if its inhabited or not because he will be on the phone to me every five minutes,

0:24:420:24:46

"Do you remember how that Road Trip went, I've forgotten, did I win?"

0:24:460:24:50

-"Yeah, Barbs, you did."

-Cheer up!

0:24:500:24:53

You might still beat David. Might!

0:24:530:24:56

Their final shopping complete, the Road Trip is now heading south,

0:24:590:25:03

travelling 12 miles from Deddington and delivering a very lucky Mr Barby

0:25:030:25:08

into the sumptuous grounds of Blenheim Palace, near Woodstock.

0:25:080:25:13

It's an absolutely incredible building.

0:25:180:25:21

It's like some magical landscape in a painting.

0:25:210:25:25

You don't think it exists until you arrive here.

0:25:250:25:28

Building began in 1705 on land gifted to General John Churchill,

0:25:300:25:36

1st Duke of Marlborough, for his battalion's victory at the Battle of Blenheim.

0:25:360:25:41

Christopher Columbus!

0:25:440:25:46

Just look at that! Wow!

0:25:460:25:50

Causing huge controversy, untrained architect John Vanbrugh

0:25:530:25:58

designed Blenheim Palace in the short-lived English Baroque style.

0:25:580:26:02

David finally arrives to meet John Forster,

0:26:050:26:08

archivist to the 11th Duke of Marlborough for the past 20 years.

0:26:080:26:13

-John, how very nice to meet you.

-Hello, David, welcome to Blenheim Palace.

0:26:150:26:19

-Let's have a look inside.

-Thank you very much.

0:26:190:26:21

We've got some absolutely marvellous pieces to show you.

0:26:210:26:24

-Oh, my word!

-Isn't it amazing?

0:26:240:26:27

-Isn't it superb?

-Yes.

0:26:270:26:29

-Very theatrical.

-Yes, just the word for it.

0:26:290:26:33

A unique hybrid of family home and national monument,

0:26:330:26:38

Blenheim is famed as the birthplace of the war-time Prime Minister, Winston Churchill.

0:26:380:26:43

The Palace's greatest treasure tells the amazing story of this family home.

0:26:430:26:50

So this is the most magnificent sculpture, is it not?

0:26:520:26:57

What I find so spectacular about this is, first of all,

0:26:570:27:01

it was designed by a sculptor called Cotterell

0:27:010:27:04

and then Robert Garrard was commissioned to make this wonderful edifice.

0:27:040:27:09

This beautiful centre piece was crafted by royal silversmiths Garrard & Co in the 19th century.

0:27:110:27:19

It is massive and weighs over 1600 troy ounces

0:27:190:27:24

or 110 pounds or 50 kilos

0:27:240:27:29

and commemorates the first Duke's victory, over the French army in 1704.

0:27:290:27:36

-This symbolises the beginning of Blenheim, does it not?

-Yes.

0:27:430:27:47

It shows the Duke on horseback just as he's won the seminal battle of Blenheim,

0:27:470:27:52

writing the actual message to the Queen, via his wife, to say he's won his favoured victory.

0:27:520:27:58

And why it's so important because of where we are and everything around us follows this.

0:27:580:28:02

So here you look at it and visually you can think of that moment of victory, can't you?

0:28:020:28:07

Yes, Winston Churchill said it changed the political axis of the world.

0:28:070:28:11

Louis the 14th in France had dominated Europe for 50 years,

0:28:110:28:16

we hadn't beaten them militarily since Agincourt over 300 years earlier

0:28:160:28:20

and suddenly at the battle of Blenheim 1704, Louis was completely vanquished.

0:28:200:28:26

England became the emergence as a major power

0:28:260:28:29

which produced our dominance as a great power over 200 years.

0:28:290:28:32

It all starts at that moment.

0:28:320:28:35

At that particular moment.

0:28:350:28:37

Many treasures were commissioned whilst the palace was being built during the 1710s and 1720s.

0:28:370:28:44

And throughout the centuries, great artists and designers have added to its glory,

0:28:440:28:50

including Jacob Epstein's stunning bronze bust of the ninth Duke of Marlborough.

0:28:500:28:56

This is the most extraordinary piece of work.

0:28:560:28:59

Is it greatly admired by the general public?

0:28:590:29:01

It's certainly greatly responded to. I think they find it a dramatic piece.

0:29:010:29:06

There was a debate between Epstein and His Grace the 9th Duke about how it should be.

0:29:060:29:11

I think Epstein was all for, use a word, humanising him.

0:29:110:29:17

Moving to Britain in 1905, American sculptor Jacob Epstein

0:29:180:29:23

jointly pioneered the practise of direct carving on to stone,

0:29:230:29:29

without copying clay models,

0:29:290:29:31

and was critically lambasted that his work deliberately lacked beauty.

0:29:310:29:35

Epstein retorted that everything is beautiful.

0:29:350:29:40

You can't argue with that!

0:29:400:29:42

I think it's extraordinary how that hand hangs over the plinth and I find that so dramatic.

0:29:420:29:47

I like the sculptural technique. You imagine the clay

0:29:470:29:51

as he presses his fingers in to create this sort of drapery image.

0:29:510:29:55

-Yes.

-That is superb.

-The people here in their 20s and 30s, literally they've never heard of him,

0:29:550:30:00

-the greatest English sculptor of the first part of the 20th century.

-That's perfectly true.

0:30:000:30:05

-Well, what a wonderful experience.

-I hope you've enjoyed it.

0:30:050:30:08

-I have indeed. Thank you very much indeed.

-Bye bye.

0:30:080:30:11

David's final indulgence of the week

0:30:110:30:14

also brings this shopping trip to a suitable, stately end.

0:30:140:30:19

Our chaps are now ready for auction departure.

0:30:210:30:25

Anything to declare?

0:30:250:30:27

My first lot.

0:30:290:30:30

Oh, that's sweet, isn't it?

0:30:300:30:31

Victorian piece it's 1900-1901 so this would have had lavender water, rose water

0:30:310:30:38

-and then you'd sprinkle the lavender water or the rose over your ironing.

-How much was that Barbs?

-That's £40.

0:30:380:30:44

It's more profit for the old Barby machine!

0:30:440:30:46

I sincerely hope so. Let's have a look at yours.

0:30:460:30:48

Oh, that's a little sweetie pops, isn't it?

0:30:480:30:51

Around about 1950s/60s, isn't it?

0:30:510:30:53

When kitchenalia was really popular.

0:30:530:30:55

Yeah, it cost me a fiver, Barbs.

0:30:550:30:57

-That's a real cool thing, isn't it?

-I think so.

0:30:590:31:01

Vesta case. I love these little bits here.

0:31:010:31:04

-So do I. £20.

-Well, you're home and host with that, aren't you?

0:31:040:31:08

I bought these from dear old Libby.

0:31:080:31:12

What I like about them is that they've been used

0:31:120:31:14

and they've got sort of cigarette fingers.

0:31:140:31:17

-They cost £3.

-Well, that's a bargain.

0:31:170:31:20

So I'm pleased with those.

0:31:200:31:21

Well, there we are.

0:31:210:31:23

Oh, that's nice.

0:31:230:31:25

This is a tyg.

0:31:250:31:27

-Doulton.

-Was that £20 knowing you?

-Yes.

0:31:270:31:30

Was it? That's nothing, is it?

0:31:300:31:33

Oh, my life. I thought this was really cool.

0:31:330:31:36

J & A Macfarlane.

0:31:360:31:38

Yes, I think just that little inscription there for me adds 20 quid to it.

0:31:380:31:43

Let's hope we've got some people from Glasgow in the room.

0:31:430:31:46

-In Gloucestershire.

-In Gloucestershire.

-I hadn't thought of that.

0:31:460:31:49

That's got DJ Barby written all over it, hasn't it?

0:31:490:31:52

Is that a hair crack?

0:31:520:31:55

# There may be trouble ahead... #

0:31:550:31:58

I just wiped it off.

0:31:580:32:00

This is a little go-to-bed. It's absolutely lovely and you'd just light that like that,

0:32:000:32:06

put that on there and then off you go to bed.

0:32:060:32:10

-And I can see that making...

-£40 or £50?

-Yeah.

0:32:100:32:12

I paid £12 for it So it's for nothing, isn't it?

0:32:120:32:15

This is my final object. It is a nice object, it's 1888.

0:32:150:32:20

I think here not exceeding one ounce, one penny would refer possibly to the penny black.

0:32:200:32:25

I'd put it in at £60-£90. What have I got next?

0:32:250:32:29

-Barbs, this is my best thing I've bought all the time I've been here, I think.

-That is very nice indeed.

0:32:290:32:34

-So what's that going to make at auction, Barbs?

-I think that's going to be about £60-£70.

0:32:340:32:39

-Really?

-Yeah, why?

-I'll lose money then, won't I?

0:32:390:32:42

-How much did you pay for it?

-85.

0:32:420:32:44

I think you stand a chance of getting your money back.

0:32:440:32:46

-On to the auction then.

-Yes, may the best man win.

0:32:460:32:49

I'm sure you will, Barbs.

0:32:490:32:51

Nice words, gentlemen,

0:32:510:32:54

but what do you really think?

0:32:540:32:56

I think that phallic root thing of David's might do quite well. He's got high hopes for his scales

0:32:560:33:00

but it's the joy of it, we're in the lap of the gods now.

0:33:000:33:03

Wasn't so keen on the butter churn or the pats and I think the large bottle he bought, it's very plain.

0:33:030:33:10

-Winning's not that important.

-Really?

0:33:100:33:12

-Really...um...

-Really?

-Really.

-Really?

0:33:120:33:16

-Really.

-Really?

0:33:160:33:17

Well, I hope so, for your sake! Really!

0:33:200:33:23

A nervous excitement hits the Road Trip as the inevitable final journey switches wildly.

0:33:230:33:29

48 miles from Blenheim to the handsome city of Gloucester

0:33:290:33:33

Wotton Auction Rooms have been selling antiques and fine furnishings for about 150 years.

0:33:360:33:43

Give me £20 for the lot. Will you bid me 15?

0:33:430:33:46

Today's auctioneer, Philip Taubenheim, has a word or two to say.

0:33:460:33:51

We have the Doulton Lambeth tyg.

0:33:510:33:54

Perhaps it's slightly limited in the number of people who would buy it.

0:33:540:33:58

There's some dominoes, for instance, there's always a cut off point for those.

0:33:580:34:02

And finally we have a little 19th century, treenware go-to-bed.

0:34:020:34:06

Whenever you find one they're always in really good condition

0:34:060:34:09

because I don't think anyone ever really used them so they always survive very well.

0:34:090:34:13

Philip started this last leg of the Road Trip with £322.23

0:34:130:34:20

and spent £135 on five auction lots.

0:34:200:34:23

David began with £468.80

0:34:270:34:30

and eventually spent £162.50, also on five auction lots

0:34:300:34:35

It's their last sale together so let's pay our respects

0:34:380:34:43

to the uncertain fortunes of Mr Serrell and Mr Barby.

0:34:430:34:46

Quiet, please!

0:34:460:34:47

First to get a handle on a purchase is David's Doulton tyg.

0:34:500:34:55

30 I'll take, 30 if you will? 20 If you must, 20 bid.

0:34:550:34:59

Thank you, madam. 20 I'm bid. Bid lies there, right in the middle.

0:34:590:35:02

22, at the back. 25, 28, 30 I'm bid.

0:35:020:35:05

32 I'm bid. 34 I'm bid.

0:35:050:35:10

-At 34.

-More, more.

-Get over it, what's all this...?

0:35:100:35:13

£34, sold.

0:35:130:35:16

A profit to start us off!

0:35:160:35:20

-I'm really pleased for you, really pleased.

-Thank you.

0:35:200:35:22

Let's press on with Philip's little shortbread mould.

0:35:220:35:26

Quite a sweet little thing.

0:35:270:35:29

Just on its own, simple as that. Five to start?

0:35:290:35:32

Thank you. Five I'm bid, to start.

0:35:320:35:35

At five, you want it now. £6, £8, 14 I'm bid.

0:35:350:35:40

With you, madam, at £14.

0:35:400:35:42

-Goodness me!

-Any advance on that?

0:35:420:35:45

-You're happy with that at £14.

-Absolutely brilliant.

0:35:450:35:49

Next up is David's coffee cup and saucer.

0:35:510:35:55

£30 for it? 30 I'll take. 20 I'll take.

0:35:570:36:00

At £10 start? Ten I'm bid. 12 I'm bid, the bid's here.

0:36:000:36:03

14, 16, 18, 20, 22.

0:36:030:36:08

-Five anywhere, at 22 I'm bid.

-That's all right, isn't it?

0:36:080:36:11

-It's worth more than that.

-What, with a crack?

0:36:110:36:14

-£22 this time, at 22.

-Ah! £22.50...minus £22, is...

0:36:140:36:21

not a profit!

0:36:210:36:23

The Barby wounded look again!

0:36:230:36:25

Now let's improve Philip's turn-over.

0:36:260:36:30

If it doesn't sell well drop it on his head.

0:36:300:36:34

30 to start? 20 I'm bid, thank you.

0:36:340:36:35

22 I'm bid, 24, 26, 28,

0:36:350:36:39

30, 32, 34, 36, 38,

0:36:390:36:43

-40, 42, 44, 42 it is then.

-That's good.

0:36:430:36:48

That's good. That's £12 profit that's excellent.

0:36:480:36:51

-It's yours, Madame.

-Nice work, Philip,

0:36:510:36:53

but can you over-take David today?

0:36:530:36:55

Can I see that smile? Oh, my God.

0:36:550:36:57

Well, let's see. It's the match striker, vesta stand up next!

0:36:570:37:03

Gosh, that's unusual.

0:37:030:37:05

£20 to start, 20? Ten if you like.

0:37:050:37:07

-Come on!

-Ten I'm bid, 12? 12 I'm bid. Bid's at the back there.

0:37:070:37:12

14, will you? Thank you. 16, 20 I'm bid.

0:37:120:37:15

-22 I'm bid, 25 I'm bid. At 25 I'm bid.

-Come on!

0:37:150:37:19

At 28 I'm bid, 30 anywhere now? 28 this time then, at 28.

0:37:190:37:23

I said all the way down the line that

0:37:230:37:26

I wouldn't have been at all surprised if that really did take off and fly,

0:37:260:37:30

-and it didn't, did it?

-No.

0:37:300:37:32

So let's go to bed,

0:37:350:37:36

as Philip's nocturnal companion faces the bidders

0:37:360:37:40

£20 for it? 20 I'll take.

0:37:400:37:42

£10, if you like? Ten bid, at ten bid,

0:37:420:37:45

12, 14, 16, 18, 20,

0:37:450:37:50

25, at 30 I'm bid for it. Anyone coming back in then?

0:37:500:37:52

Bid remains there at £30 then.

0:37:520:37:56

-Well, Philip will sleep easy tonight.

-That was disappointing.

0:37:560:38:00

Not for you, Barbs.

0:38:000:38:02

And now the toilet water bottle gets to powder its nose.

0:38:020:38:07

£100 for it, 100?

0:38:070:38:08

50, 30 I'm bid for it, 35.

0:38:080:38:11

40 I'm bid, 45.

0:38:110:38:13

And 50. Any advance on it? Sold and done then at £50.

0:38:130:38:18

Goodness.

0:38:180:38:19

This last sale is really going rather well so far. What's next?

0:38:190:38:23

Dominoes box. £20 for the dominoes.

0:38:230:38:27

20? Ten if you like? At ten bid. Ten I'm only bid, ten.

0:38:270:38:31

-12, 14, 16, 18...

-Come on, 20.

-£20.

0:38:310:38:35

-And two? 22 I'm bid. 24 anywhere?

-That's all right, Barbs

0:38:350:38:39

The dominoes at £22 have I missed anybody, at £22 this time then.

0:38:390:38:43

-Philip, you're on fire.

-That is incredible.

0:38:430:38:47

Your cheapest things have made the biggest profits.

0:38:470:38:50

Let's see if David can shift the balance in his favour.

0:38:500:38:55

Pretty little lot. What do we say, £50 to start? 40 it is.

0:38:550:38:58

45, 50, 55.

0:38:580:39:01

60 and five, 70 and five. 80 and five.

0:39:010:39:08

And 90 and five, 100. Five I'll take.

0:39:080:39:12

100 I'm bid, you're quite happy with that? At £100, then.

0:39:120:39:17

-I'm really pleased for you.

-Thank you very much.

0:39:170:39:22

Good luck with your last item, Philip.

0:39:220:39:25

This scent bottle, at £85, was, quite frankly, a bit of a risk.

0:39:250:39:32

What do we say £100 for it? 100 for the lot?

0:39:320:39:34

£50 I'm bid, 55, and 60 and five.

0:39:340:39:37

And 70 and five and 80 and 90 and five.

0:39:370:39:42

And 100 I'm bid there. Better, isn't it?

0:39:420:39:46

115 I'm bid, 120 I'm bid.

0:39:460:39:50

Five I'm bid. 125, then, bid lies there at £125 on the corner

0:39:500:39:56

Phew. Good work, but was it good enough?

0:39:560:39:59

Barby, well done, old mate.

0:39:590:40:01

-Congratulations, you've won this round.

-Come on, off we go.

0:40:010:40:05

Philip began his last voyage with £322.23 and won the day,

0:40:080:40:15

making a healthy profit, after commission, of £56.93

0:40:150:40:19

He ends his week with a mildly triumphant £379.16.

0:40:210:40:26

The legend that is David Barby started with £468.80

0:40:320:40:38

and made a reasonable profit of just £30.27.

0:40:380:40:42

But David still wins the week with a proud £499.07.

0:40:420:40:49

You've completely nailed me, haven't you?

0:40:490:40:52

I don't think completely nailed you.

0:40:520:40:54

So, let's slot this week's chaps into the Antiques Road Trip Leader Board.

0:40:540:41:01

Philip Serrell is now holding sixth place above Jonathan Pratt,

0:41:020:41:07

Charlie Ross, James Braxton and Thomas Plant.

0:41:070:41:10

New in at Number Four, the triumphant David Barby,

0:41:100:41:14

on top of Mark Stacey but beneath Charles Hanson.

0:41:140:41:18

However, there's no touching the top two

0:41:180:41:22

with Kate Bliss' admirable winnings

0:41:220:41:24

and the gargantuan total of James Lewis.

0:41:240:41:27

The outcome has been good, hasn't it?

0:41:270:41:30

-Absolutely fantastic.

-You tried hard to catch up.

0:41:300:41:34

Shut up, just shut up.

0:41:340:41:36

You'd never guess it from their words, but Philip and David are great friends.

0:41:370:41:41

# There may be trouble ahead...

0:41:410:41:44

Stop digging me in the ribs!

0:41:440:41:46

# But while there's moonlight and music and love and romance... #

0:41:460:41:50

And what a week they've had!

0:41:500:41:52

Since leaving Lincoln our experts have fought their way across Middle England.

0:41:520:41:56

Although, mostly fighting with each other.

0:41:560:41:59

Give me a kiss.

0:41:590:42:02

I'm pleased but I'm actually not that pleased for you.

0:42:020:42:05

David's used his signature, school-ma'am indignance

0:42:050:42:09

to crush prices and dealers alike.

0:42:090:42:11

-£20.

-£40 would be better.

-Who for?

0:42:110:42:16

Whilst Philip was more up front about being just plain mean!

0:42:160:42:21

What I'm trying to do now is start sewing the seed of doubt in my new best friend Richard's mind

0:42:210:42:27

as to how little this is really worth.

0:42:270:42:29

They've both loved their vintage Morris Minor.

0:42:290:42:32

Come on, Amy. God bless you my love.

0:42:320:42:36

And, struggling to admit it,

0:42:380:42:39

they've thoroughly enjoyed each other's company too!

0:42:390:42:42

Barbs, what's been the highlight of the whole trip for you?

0:42:420:42:45

Having a companion like yourself, one that's

0:42:450:42:47

so entertaining and chatty. It's been marvellous.

0:42:470:42:50

# Let's face the music

0:42:500:42:54

# And dance! #

0:42:540:42:58

Next week on the Antiques Road Trip, we're meeting a whole new pair of experts

0:42:580:43:06

The wonderful Anita Manning

0:43:060:43:09

and last year's Road Trip Champion, the mighty David Harper.

0:43:090:43:14

Painful!

0:43:160:43:18

Anita throws herself out...

0:43:180:43:21

Throw me out of the shop.

0:43:210:43:23

..David throws in the towel...

0:43:230:43:26

I might as well just go home now I've done everything I need to do

0:43:260:43:29

And they both throw themselves into the Road Trip fray.

0:43:290:43:33

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:520:43:55

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:550:43:58

It is the last day of the middle England odyssey with antiques experts Philip Serrell and David Barby. They travel from Ampthill to Gloucester in search of profitable antiques to sell at their last auction. Philip gets a privileged look inside Broughton Castle, whilst David fights off a cold at the Battle of Blenheim. But who will end the week triumphant?


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