Episode 24 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 24

David Barby and Philip Serrell's road trip continues. Philip makes a surprising purchase and David gets physical when an antique reminds him of his childhood.


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Transcript


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-The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge...

-Testing! Testing!

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-Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK.

-Lord, above.

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The aim is trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

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But it's not as easy as it sounds and there can only be one winner.

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-What a dilemma.

-So will it be the highway to success or the B-road to bankruptcy?

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If I wasn't in the same car as you I'd let your tyres down.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Our two experts this week are those two stalwarts of the antiques trade, Philip Serrell and David Barby.

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Get your hand off my knee!

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Look that's what you do. When you start criticising my driving.

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-I wasn't criticising your driving. Just keep your hand off my knee.

-I wouldn't want to touch it.

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Auctioneer Philip Serrell adores all periods of antiques,

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and particularly enjoys the social history aspect of his job.

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Well, you can clearly see it was a truncheon.

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-But these aren't for beating up your local antique dealer?

-No.

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David Barby was a precocious talent. His interest in antiques started when he was just 12.

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Ever since then, he's used that knowledge to his pecuniary advantage.

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# Money, money, money... #

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But it's hard to believe that they've had the time to buy any antiques at all.

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What with all this mucking about. Look at them. Dear oh, dear.

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I've got a small head...

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What do I look like aye?

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-Caesar Augustus.

-Thank goodness you can't see me.

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Do I look like Gladiator?

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Both experts started this week with £200.

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David surged into the lead early on.

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He did very well with his buttons and he's in the lead.

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Auctioneer One bidder on the counter at 150 and selling away.

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He starts this leg with a handsome £483.22.

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Philip also did splendidly. His £6 tyre spreader made a staggering £74 profit.

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£80, still at 80 on my right today.

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That's brilliant. Brilliant, brilliant...

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His spending money for the day is a very respectable £262.53.

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But David's still ahead by more than £200.

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And Philip's going to have to work hard to stay in the race.

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This week's road trip is a leisurely stroll from the east to the west of England

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from Lincoln to Wotton-Under-Edge.

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Today's leg kicks off in Brightlingsea

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and ends in St Ives for auction.

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Do you know what Barbs? I'm looking forward to today.

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Why's that, give me three good reasons.

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The sea. The side. That's two good reasons. I like the sea side.

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-Me too.

-I'm going to get a kiss-me-quick hat.

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What is it with you guys and your matching outfits?

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Brightlingsea was renowned for its shipbuilding and fishing industries - particularly oysters.

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These days, it's better known as a popular destination for tourists.

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Just the ticket for our day-trippers.

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Lovely pair, aren't they?

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Phil's first stop is Cellar Antiques And Clocks.

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Right, man on a mission. I'm going to be really mean because I've got to be mean.

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I'm not even going to look at prices. I'm just bidding.

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-I like them goats. How much is your goat?

-How much is it?

-Yeah.

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-Can I make you a silly offer on this?

-A silly offer?

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-Well, it's going to be ever so silly.

-He's 170.

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I'm going to insult you. I was going to offer you like 35-40 quid.

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That's why it was silly. He's quite fun, isn't he?

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Yes, he is, but he'd also take up most of you budget, you old goat!

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I keep looking at ship's wheels everywhere I go.

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Yes, you do, you bought one in the last show.

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What's that off?

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That's off a 28-foot river cruiser. Built on the River Thames, just before the turn of the century.

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And it costs a reasonable £52 if you like that sort of thing.

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I'm not sure what you could ever do with that. I suppose you could always scrap it.

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I think what people use those for are coat hangers.

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They put a shaft in the centre

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and you can hang your coats on it.

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What a man! Is £20 any good on that?

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Yeah. I might be having that then, let's put it down there for a minute.

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As Philip haggles, David leaves Brightlingsea and heads north to Colchester.

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This beautiful 15th century timber-framed house

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was built by William Gilberd, physician to Elizabeth I.

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Today, it houses Tymperley's Clock Museum.

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It's one of the largest collections of clocks in the country,

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which were bequeathed by local businessman and philanthropist Bernard Mason.

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David's guide is Catherine Newley.

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-Hello, very pleased to meet you.

-Hello, I'm Catherine.

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-Would you like to come in and see the collection?

-I can't wait.

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Bernard Mason began collecting Colchester-made clocks in 1927.

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Although Colchester was not one of the biggest manufacturers of clocks,

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the collection is interesting from a social history perspective.

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It shows the evolution of clock production in the town over a period of several hundred years.

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Are these the earliest clocks in the collection?

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These are the earliest and they're lantern clocks, mainly because they look like lanterns.

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They date from the middle of the 17th century?

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Some are, some are slightly later, beginning of the 18th century.

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Lantern clocks started going out of fashion with the introduction

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of long-case clocks in the 18th century.

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So here, we've got a clock that dates from the 1730s and you can see the lacquer work on it

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but what's interesting is on the clock face we've got different cities around the world

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that were presumably part of the trade route

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so we've got, Jerusalem, Boston Newfoundland, San Salvadore, Lisbon...

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How do you tell what the time is let's say in Jerusalem? Or Boston?

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-When the hour hand points towards the city in question that means it's noon in that city.

-Oh, right.

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It's very simple, isn't it?

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It's the early version of London, New York, Tokyo.

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What an advance in clock design and manufacture from lantern clocks to this.

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Ah, I was always told that that section there could be secured with a peg inside

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and that would stop the servants from taking the clock or anybody else round

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and they'd finish their labours, let say a quarter of an hour, half an hour, even an hour earlier.

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Simultaneously with the development of static, lantern

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and long-case clocks, travelling timepieces or watches developed.

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This is the inner sanctum, isn't it?

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This is a couple of the pocket watches from our collection.

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The one on the left is the 1725 one, and the one on the right is a later one, 1775.

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They're both pair cases?

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Pair case, as the name implies - two cases. The outer one was for protection.

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It's hard to believe now, but the pocket watch revolutionised the way we live.

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For the first time ever, a time-keeper was available,

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which was both accurate and portable.

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What I like about this

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is the actual movement itself...

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wonderful structure.

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Beautifully pierced.

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But time is of the essence, David, and you should start shopping.

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I've had an exciting day. Thank you very much indeed.

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Back in Brightlingsea, and still in Paul's shop, Philip spots something else to tickle his fancy.

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-Paul, can I have a look at this scribe?

-Most certainly.

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A scribe scores a fixed line in the timber,

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so that you have a straight line to cut. And this one costs £15.

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What you would do is adjust this here up and down here.

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Then you would run that down the timber

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and these little nails would score the timber.

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Early tools could be hugely collectable, and sought after.

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And with the maker's stamp on there.. and it's a beautifully made thing if you look at this it's rosewood.

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I think it's a really nice thing.

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-You want the ship's wheel?

-I'll give you 25 quid for the two.

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-26.

-25, and I'll take 'em done deal and walk away.

-Is it cash?

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-It'll be cash.

-All right done.

-I have been! Thank you ever so much.

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So that's £20 for the ship's wheel and £5 for the scribe.

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That's not dear. Well, more than nine pence.

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His sightseeing over,

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David leaves Colchester and heads towards Halstead. His next stop,

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Halstead Antiques Centre.

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Which looks to me as if it's stuffed with...stuff.

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Hello. David Barby.

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-Good to meet you. Ken Hewitt.

-I'm looking for silver.

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Unusual pieces, quirky...

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And I hope that we can negotiate on price in certain things.

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Yes, David, those magic words - "negotiate" and "price" your favourites.

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Who are you up against, Philip, Philip Serrell?

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Dear Philip. Yes, nice, nice, nice guy.

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We rag each other, but we're old friends.

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Till after the show.

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David soon sniffs out a cabinet full of silver.

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The dealer who owns the items has emigrated, leaving unpaid debts.

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And Ken is able to be flexible on price.

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Now, just give me an example.

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This is priced at £125,

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-what sort of price are we looking at on that?

-Everything in there I'll go half on.

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-50%.

-That really is quite encouraging.

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If you want to pick out the pieces you like, we'll put them on the desk and... Like that?

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This is a glass jar.

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I think somewhere along the line,

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it's had a new base to it because I can feel the putty inside.

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So I think that's a new base.

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So, that goes back in the cabinet!

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This is a Victorian silver sauce boat.

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It's by Charles Sunnock.

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This is London 1899.

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It started off life basically as a simple Georgian design,

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and then during the 19th century they put more embellishment in

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like all this sort of punchwork and Repousse decoration.

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But if they'd left it plain and simple, being an exact copy of the Georgian one

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it would have been worth more.

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David knows a bargain and he's not finished yet - saucy!

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A little quaich.

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A quaich is a shallow two handled drinking cup, which originated in Scotland.

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Good weight, isn't it.

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I like that.

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Right.

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Useful for the whiskey.

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-I think we may do some business on one or two pieces.

-Good, excellent.

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Philip's finished in Brightlingsea,

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and heads into Halstead, where David's also been buying antiques.

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On the way, he stumbles upon Old And Modern Furniture.

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Jo, the dealer behind the counter, is a bit camera shy,

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you won't see her, but you'll certainly hear her.

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I'm going to have a good look at this pine desk.

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The top doesn't lift up at all, it's got a drawer,

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looks fairly old,

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replacement wooden handles.

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It's priced up at £65.

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What's the very best you can do on this for me?

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£65.

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She's quite elderly.

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I don't quite think she's got the hang of this business really.

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Is that it? The price is what it is, is it?

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Steady!

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I can see why she doesn't want to be on camera.

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60.

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Yeah!

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-Do you want to have another think about that?

-No.

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There you go.

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Try harder! Get heavy with her!

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What of these weights? They're £20 is that all of the weights here, yeah?

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No, that's that one on it's own.

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-That one on it's own?

-Yeah.

-Cor!

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You'd better sit down, cos I'm going to be mean.

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I'm going to bid you a fiver for the weights.

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How much? Oh, no!

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SILENCE

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How much do you want for them?

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-15.

-Oh, come on Jo!

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Perhaps you'll have more luck with Jo's husband, Mike. Who we also don't see.

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How often do you leave her in charge of this shop?

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Oh, dear me! She's blooming like a dragon trying to deal with.

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I'm asking if you'll take a fiver for these weights. Good man.

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You've got to buy Mike a beer when you see him.

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-Have I got them?

-Buy him a beer next time.

-Thank you, my love.

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Hang on, off camera, this.

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< (Thank you so much, thank you. Mwah!)

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Oh, she's not so elderly.

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Moving swiftly on... Back to that half-price silverware in Halstead.

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This is quite a nice little copy

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of a Georgian helmet-shaped cream jug. If I turn it upside down,

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there's the helmet.

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With all this silver at half price, it's a snip at £62.50.

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This is quite a nice Scottish origin piece

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although it was made in Birmingham.

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it's a Scottish quaich, and it was intended for gruel, porridge, liquids...

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anything which you could sup out of a tin like this...

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So that would be £62.50.

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Finally, the sauce boat

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even at half price, it's still £122.50.

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The three items together would cost £247.50.

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I'm going to offer you £180 for the three.

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It's not enough, I'm afraid.

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£200 for the lot.

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-Can we split the difference at 190?

-200's good.

-190.

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200's good, come on.

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Would you do £190 for me, please, please?

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You're a very hard man.

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-But I like you. Go on. 190.

-Thank you very much.

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So, the sauce boat cost £90, and the other two items, £50 each.

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Now, can I have your name and address in case they don't sell?

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BOTH LAUGH

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Philip Serrell.

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-Is he coming tomorrow?

-You've taken all the good things. There'll be nothing left for him.

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Poor Philip...

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Their shopping for the day now over, it's time for our chaps to put their feet up.

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Let's hope they don't get too comfortable...

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It's the second leg of Philip and David's trip across Essex and Suffolk.

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And both our chaps are eager to spend, spend, spend.

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It's a pleasure to work with someone who's got so much experience.

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You mean "as old as I am" - is that what you're trying to get at?

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I don't know anyone who's been alive that long.

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So far, Philip's been cautious with his money, and has spent a mere £30 on three items.

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He's left with £232.53 to spend.

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David, on the other hand, has been a bit more extravagant.

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He spent £190 on three items of silver.

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His spending money for the day is £293.22.

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This morning, our two chaps are still in Halstead.

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It's a pretty little village in rural Essex,

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and regular competitor in annual flower shows. Blooming marvellous!

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Halstead is also where they used to film Lovejoy, so it's perfect hunting ground for our boys.

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First stop for Philip, Halstead Antiques Centre.

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That is, if David's left him anything.

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A ship's wheel! And as we know they're really rare things.

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-Can I buy three?

-No, you can't, Philip!

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But Ken has something you might be interested in - a Wedgwood dinner service.

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The trouble with that is, if you're going to buy a part service.

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It's difficult for people to know what to do with it and I think that you and I are of a certain age.

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Young people don't collect things that.

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I think these things are a bit like Black Forest gateau and Berni Inns. They've had their day.

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David, however, has exhausted Halstead,

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and is on his way to the delightful village of Steeple Bumpstead.

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Well, I think I spent quite a lot of money yesterday, so I'll be a little bit careful.

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First stop, Bumpstead Antiques and Interiors.

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-Good morning to you. Graham Hessel.

-Hello, Graham, pleased to meet you.

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Can I afford anything?

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It depends how hard you're going to bargain, but I'm sure we'll find something for you.

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-I hate bargaining.

-Well, that's OK then.

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Lying toad! Come along then.

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In particular, I noticed the card case.

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Ivory card case, 19th century. Quite a nice one. It has a little bit of damage to it.

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If you take that off you'll see the damage.

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That has to fit exactly as pagoda roof there,

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otherwise when people put it back and they've forced it down, it doesn't fit.

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Isn't that lovely? So what's the price?

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The price would be 550, so probably a little bit higher than you've got.

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You're quite correct. It's beyond my price range.

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Back in Halstead, Philip finds something that is within his price range.

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Ken, can I have a look at this truncheon, please?

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23000 keys.

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-You're the Halstead jailer, are you, Ken?

-There we go, help yourself.

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You can clearly see it's a truncheon.

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-But these aren't for beating up your local antique dealer.

-No.

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These are very much ceremonial.

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A Victorian period, decorated truncheon with hand painted crown. "VR"... Victoria Regina.

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That's Queen Victoria, there's the crown.

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Ken at £65 it's just too much money for me. It's a lovely thing.

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I'd like to buy it at £30/35. If I have to go to £40, I would.

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Let me give him a call, and see what he can do.

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But there's no reply from the dealer, so Ken does the negotiating himself.

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I wanna buy it off you for £30 that's what I really want to do.

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What's he got? 65 on it, that's more than half price.

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I know. Can I do £35? 35 and I'll have it here and now.

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I'll get my money out of my pocket, if that'll tempt you.

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-If you do £40, I'll shake hands.

-I'll have it. Thank you so much.

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Up the road in Bumpstead,

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David hones in on something for the suave man about town.

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It's a hat box.

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Hawkes & Co. Piccadilly, London - it's got the right address.

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There's nothing inside it.

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But what a very nice decorative item.

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And a nice price too. £225.

0:21:150:21:19

It's got to be really, really, really cheap. £50.

0:21:190:21:25

Time to put your negotiating hat on, David.

0:21:250:21:28

What's the best you can do on that?

0:21:280:21:31

What would you like to offer me?

0:21:310:21:34

I don't want to be insulting, but I think it's got to be well under £100.

0:21:340:21:40

The very best I can do on that...

0:21:400:21:42

And it is the very, very best. £125, and you're getting it virtually at cost price.

0:21:420:21:50

But even at cost price, it's still too much for David, who leaves without buying anything.

0:21:500:21:58

Back at Ken's, Philip discovers the treasure trove of cut-price silver that David found earlier.

0:21:580:22:03

At least what's left of it.

0:22:030:22:04

That is a piece of silver, 1944, sort of, almost late Art Deco.

0:22:040:22:12

This is it looks a real plain Jane,

0:22:120:22:15

and it says here it's dated 1895 and it's a silver dipper,

0:22:150:22:21

or a little tumbler. I quite like that.

0:22:210:22:24

Hang on, isn't that the jar that David rejected?

0:22:240:22:29

Out of the three, that's very decorative and I like that one.

0:22:290:22:33

-What's she got on that?

-£85.

0:22:330:22:37

And as I said I'm keen to get something back on these to recover my cost

0:22:370:22:41

so knowing that you need to make some money last and final offer I'll do that for half price.

0:22:410:22:48

-That's very good is that 40 quid.

-£42.50.

-I don't do 50s.

-£43.

0:22:480:22:53

-40 quid. I'll have them both at £40.

-£40.

-Good man, you've got a deal.

0:22:530:22:58

Thank you very much. I'm really pleased with both of those.

0:22:580:23:02

So that's £40 for the truncheon,

0:23:020:23:04

and £40 for the silver jar.

0:23:040:23:08

And that's a result, Philip.

0:23:080:23:11

David's now finished in Steeple Bumpstead,

0:23:110:23:14

and is off to the quintessentially English town of Saffron Walden.

0:23:140:23:18

It's one of the best preserved examples of a medieval market town

0:23:180:23:23

with every style of architecture from the 12th to the 21st century.

0:23:230:23:28

Next stop, dealer Paul Lankester.

0:23:280:23:31

-Good afternoon.

-Very pleased to meet you.

0:23:310:23:34

-And you, welcome.

-I'm looking for the elusive bargain.

0:23:340:23:37

Well, I almost hope you don't find it.

0:23:370:23:39

That's a terrible thing to say.

0:23:390:23:41

-It means I've made a mistake somewhere.

-No! Not at all. There's always bargains to be had.

0:23:410:23:46

David's panicking because he's only got two hours left to shop.

0:23:460:23:51

I'm still looking.

0:23:510:23:52

I'm still looking. Getting more and more despondent.

0:23:520:23:57

But David's eagle eye soon swoops upon something glassy, but not classy.

0:23:570:24:02

This is a Murano glass...

0:24:020:24:06

dish, 1950s, '60s...

0:24:060:24:09

Tinted glass with gold fleck inclusions and this green band

0:24:090:24:16

is on the periphery of this glass which is spun by hand.

0:24:160:24:22

At £12.50, that's not a bad buy.

0:24:220:24:25

When you're looking at glass, you always look at the base

0:24:270:24:30

see the amount of wear, because if it's an old piece

0:24:300:24:34

it would have been put on a table and moved around

0:24:340:24:36

so you would have scratch marks on the bottom.

0:24:360:24:39

This has scratch marks that I don't think has been reproduced.

0:24:390:24:43

Somehow the colour appeals.

0:24:430:24:45

But can he buy at the right price?

0:24:450:24:48

Panic.

0:24:480:24:49

Panic. Don't panic, Mr Mainwearing!

0:24:490:24:53

I'm panicking. What's the best you can do on that?.

0:24:550:24:58

-Are you struggling at the moment to buy something that you need to buy.

-Yes, struggling.

0:24:580:25:03

If I'm very generous to you I'd let you have it for £10.

0:25:030:25:06

Could you go under £10? £8?

0:25:060:25:08

-£8...

-£8.

0:25:080:25:12

-Even I could make a profit on it for £8.

-It's still here.

0:25:120:25:16

But I like it.

0:25:160:25:17

But you don't have things in your shop that you don't want to sell.

0:25:170:25:21

I want to sell it, was rather hoping for a bit more

0:25:210:25:24

than the £8 you seem to be offering me.

0:25:240:25:27

£9 and we'll come to a gentleman's agreement.

0:25:270:25:30

I would like that for £8.

0:25:300:25:34

Against my better judgment, I will agree.

0:25:340:25:39

-Thank you very much.

-It's my pleasure.

0:25:390:25:43

Philip is taking a break from shopping, and is off to visit Layer Marney Tower.

0:25:440:25:50

At 80 feet, it's England's tallest Tudor gatehouse.

0:25:500:25:55

His guide is current owner Nick Charrington.

0:25:550:25:59

-Nick, how are you?

-Very well, Philip.

0:25:590:26:01

-Good to see you.

-This is just wonderful.

-It is, it's great.

0:26:010:26:04

Nick's parents paid a mere £8,750 for the house.

0:26:040:26:09

They bought it on a whim back in 1959, when nobody wanted to buy old properties like these.

0:26:090:26:16

Although the house is open to the public for six months a year, it's still very much a family home.

0:26:160:26:21

It's sort of a mad Tudor building.

0:26:230:26:25

They were very competitive in those days about who could build the tallest, the biggest

0:26:250:26:30

I think Henry Marney quite keen to do his stuff.

0:26:300:26:33

Let's go and have a look.

0:26:330:26:35

Lord Henry Marney, as Lord Privy Seal and Captain of the Bodyguard,

0:26:350:26:40

was one of Henry VIII's most important and influential courtiers.

0:26:400:26:45

Although the house was never completed, it still has over 100 rooms and 400 windows.

0:26:450:26:52

It was built around 1518-1520 that sort of time.

0:26:520:26:57

Did you two decide the dress code beforehand?

0:26:570:27:00

It was a time when all the courtiers were building like crazy.

0:27:000:27:04

They were encouraged by Henry VIII.

0:27:040:27:06

He believed that if you were a significant person, you had to have a significant building.

0:27:060:27:11

And as the king, of course he had the most of them

0:27:110:27:13

and he inherited the throne and took over 24 royal palaces

0:27:130:27:17

and when he died, he left 67.

0:27:170:27:20

In fact, one of the very first visitors to the house

0:27:200:27:24

was Henry VIII, who stayed for a couple of nights in 1522.

0:27:240:27:29

So your records show that Henry VIII stopped here and the probability is that this was his room.

0:27:310:27:38

Yes, either this room, or possibly the one below.

0:27:380:27:41

The idea was you had the King's set of apartments.

0:27:410:27:45

Then on the floor below, the Queen's set of apartments.

0:27:450:27:48

A visit from the King and his wife, Catherine of Aragon, was a great honour.

0:27:480:27:53

It was his way of thanking Lord Marney for a lifetime of service to the Crown.

0:27:530:27:59

And the tour's not over quite yet. Next, a visit to the roof.

0:27:590:28:04

This is the original staircase we're on now

0:28:040:28:07

and so you've got the original oak posts and then the oak treads.

0:28:070:28:11

-I love those boards there.

-It's terrific. Lovely big gaps to look through.

0:28:110:28:15

They're not lovely to look through. I don't have a head for heights.

0:28:150:28:19

OK, we're now on the roof. We're about 70 or so feet up.

0:28:210:28:26

-Sorry that was not very clever.

-Thanks very much indeed.

0:28:260:28:30

-DIRECTOR:

-Are you all right, Phil?

-Yeah, terrific(!)

0:28:300:28:33

You might not want to take in the stupendous views, Philip, but we do.

0:28:330:28:40

Drinking wine and eating sweetmeats on the roof was a favourite Tudor pastime.

0:28:400:28:46

But it's clearly not one of Philip's.

0:28:460:28:48

I'm going back down now. Thank you very much indeed.

0:28:480:28:53

As Philip recovers from his dizzy spell, back in Saffron Walden, David works up a sweat -

0:28:530:28:59

not a pretty sight.

0:28:590:29:01

They're very butch, aren't they?

0:29:140:29:16

I remember when I was in the Boys' Brigade,

0:29:160:29:20

we had such equipment like this and they were heavy then,

0:29:200:29:23

although I can't remember them being as heavy as they are now.

0:29:230:29:27

I think these are Victorian dumbbells.

0:29:280:29:32

And they're cast iron and they're £15.

0:29:330:29:37

Let me have a word with Paul and I'll see if I can get them reduced.

0:29:370:29:41

Ah yes, David. It wouldn't do to pay the price on the label.

0:29:430:29:47

Interestingly, I was looking through a book,

0:29:470:29:50

the other day, and I discovered a picture of the Boys' Brigade.

0:29:500:29:53

-I was in the Boys' Brigade.

-Were you?

0:29:530:29:55

Boys' Brigade were exercising using these exact dumbbells.

0:29:550:29:59

-Rugby Baptist Church.

-Would you like to have a look? "Boys' Brigade at drill."

0:29:590:30:03

1890 and look they're all holding the dumbbells.

0:30:030:30:08

That's not you, is it?

0:30:080:30:10

1890. Thank you very much(!) That is extraordinary and yes, those are the actual dumbbells.

0:30:100:30:17

But at £15, they're more than David wants to pay. Let's dumb 'em down.

0:30:170:30:21

-I tell you what I'll do, ten quid.

-What about eight.

0:30:210:30:25

-No, no...

-You let me have the other one for eight.

0:30:250:30:28

I know, but these, look...

0:30:280:30:30

Look these are 15 and I think they're worth £10.

0:30:300:30:37

I can't let them go for less than that.

0:30:370:30:40

-That's your very best?

-Very, very best.

-OK, £10.

0:30:410:30:45

That's a deal. I can't shake.

0:30:450:30:47

Will you gift-wrap them for me?

0:30:470:30:49

DAVID LAUGHS

0:30:490:30:52

Ha ha ha, blooming ha-ha(!)

0:30:520:30:54

The shops are shut, and it's time for Philip and David to reveal what they've bought.

0:30:540:30:58

But what will be good enough to win at the auction?

0:30:580:31:01

Let's lean over, shall we?

0:31:010:31:03

-Oh, that's lovely.

-Good weight.

-What you me or it?

0:31:050:31:09

Both of us. It's Birmingham, 1938. That was £50.

0:31:090:31:14

-Oh, that's cheap, isn't it?

-That's reasonable.

0:31:140:31:17

Secondly, it's the ship's wheel.

0:31:170:31:20

-This is rather like deja vu, but everything's reduced.

-It's a bit of a recurring theme!

0:31:200:31:25

Oh, I think this is better than the last one.

0:31:250:31:27

Do you? Well, it's 1898, River Thames.

0:31:270:31:33

-Well, I think it's fantastic.

-It was £20.

-This is quality.

0:31:330:31:37

Oh, those are good.

0:31:380:31:40

Have you got the other one?

0:31:400:31:42

I quite like these dumbbells.

0:31:440:31:46

I remember using similar ones when I was in Boys' Brigade.

0:31:460:31:50

-£10.

-Those are all right aren't they?

0:31:500:31:52

-I think they're OK.

-I bought this.

-Ah! I know where you got that from.

0:31:520:31:57

I gave him £40 and I thought I've never seen anything like that before

0:31:570:32:01

and there's a reason why I've never seen anything like it. It's got all this new plaster.

0:32:010:32:07

That's good value. It's worth it for the silver, isn't it?

0:32:070:32:11

Now, for David's next item, the Murano dish.

0:32:110:32:14

Well, I like this because of its colour. It looks to be Murano.

0:32:140:32:19

I think we're looking at probably 1950s-'60s.

0:32:190:32:23

This was probably one of my more expensive items actually.

0:32:230:32:27

-This was a fiver was it?

-Ah £8.

0:32:270:32:29

Next up, the weights.

0:32:290:32:31

Oooh, that is heavy, isn't it?

0:32:310:32:33

Yours were a lot heavier.

0:32:330:32:36

-Do you like that?

-Yeah.

0:32:360:32:39

-I bought them for a fiver, the lot.

-That I think is worth £20 on its own.

0:32:390:32:43

That is lovely I like that a lot.

0:32:430:32:44

More silverware from David - his helmet-shaped jug.

0:32:440:32:49

I tend to go for a lot of silver.

0:32:490:32:51

That's a nice thing, isn't it?

0:32:510:32:53

It's 1911,

0:32:530:32:56

London hallmark. I just thought it was so, so beautiful. For £50 I couldn't resist it.

0:32:560:33:01

-I just think it's a lovely thing.

-I think so.

0:33:010:33:03

I really like this because this is simplicity in itself.

0:33:030:33:07

Rosewood. You turn it, look.

0:33:070:33:11

We've got a maker's stamp just there and it's for marking timber, isn't it?

0:33:110:33:18

-That is very elegant, I love that. You didn't pay a lot for that did you?

-No, a fiver.

0:33:180:33:22

-That is cheap for something beautiful.

-It is. Let me guess. Another bit of silver.

0:33:220:33:27

Yes, Philip, you're right,

0:33:270:33:29

another item of silverware from Ken's cut-price cabinet in Halstead.

0:33:290:33:34

-And you got there before me, correct?

-Oh, dear oh, dear! Yes.

0:33:340:33:41

And I don't blame you at all. What did you pay for that? A hundred and what?

0:33:410:33:45

-No, no. I paid 90.

-I think that's a very, very, well-made thing.

0:33:450:33:51

-Would you honestly have bought that?

-I would have.

0:33:510:33:54

I'm awfully tempted to use the next one that I've bought.

0:33:540:33:58

I just thought it was a really nice, Victorian ceremonial truncheon and I think it's a bit of fun.

0:33:580:34:03

-Yes, lovely old chap.

-And I think that was cheap.

0:34:030:34:06

-How much?

-40 quid.

0:34:060:34:08

-Oh, that is cheap.

-And I think there might be £50 profit in that.

-It's worn at the top there.

0:34:080:34:14

It might be worn a bit more in a minute!

0:34:140:34:16

I wouldn't do that to you, Barbs.

0:34:160:34:18

I think your cream jug is just the best by a distance.

0:34:180:34:23

-Sauce boat.

-What did I say?

-"Cream jug".

0:34:230:34:27

See brain's going now.

0:34:270:34:28

It's age, don't worry. It'll happen to me eventually.

0:34:280:34:32

It's all very good humoured now.

0:34:360:34:39

But what do they really think about their rival's purchases?

0:34:390:34:43

His best bit's undoubtedly the silver sauce boat.

0:34:430:34:46

If I'd got in the shop before him, I'd have bought it.

0:34:460:34:49

I didn't like the weights. Unless somebody wants a good doorstop.

0:34:490:34:53

I'm not quire sure that I can see David and dumbbells. Barby and dumbbells?

0:34:530:34:58

That jar, that blue jar, which I rejected...

0:34:580:35:01

There's an awful fear that it might go for about £80 and I rejected it.

0:35:010:35:06

You're laughing now, David. But you won't be if Philip beats you.

0:35:060:35:14

So far on this road trip, our two chaps started off in Brightlingsea,

0:35:140:35:18

and haggled their way to Saffron Walden via Colchester,

0:35:180:35:22

Halstead, and Steeple Bumpstead.

0:35:220:35:25

Today, they're heading into the ancient town of St Ives -

0:35:250:35:29

the one in Cambridgeshire, not Cornwall.

0:35:290:35:31

You talk about St Ives and I'm sure most people think of Cornwall.

0:35:310:35:35

I'm sure they do, I'm sure they do.

0:35:350:35:38

For the past thousand years, it has been home to some of the biggest markets in the country

0:35:380:35:44

held under the watchful eye of its most famous resident.

0:35:440:35:49

Oliver Cromwell.

0:35:490:35:51

-Are you a Roundhead or a Cavalier?

-A cavalier.

0:35:510:35:55

-I've always thought you took a fairly cavalier approach to things!

-Haha!

0:35:550:36:00

Hyperion Auctions was founded in 1995, and hold sales

0:36:000:36:04

every two weeks of antiques, furniture and collectables.

0:36:040:36:08

But how does auctioneer Lester Day think our chaps will do?

0:36:080:36:13

Now, what about our lots? Mine in particular.

0:36:160:36:19

This sauce boat,

0:36:190:36:21

I would say that we're probably going to be looking at around for one £140-150 mark.

0:36:210:36:26

And have you had any muscle-bound men coming into the sale room

0:36:260:36:33

as I bought those dumbbells.

0:36:330:36:35

We have had a lot of interest in them. Probably...

0:36:350:36:38

..£10-£20.

0:36:400:36:42

-I bought that lovely scribe, the woodworking tool in rosewood

-It's very nice. Nice condition.

0:36:420:36:48

-What do you think it'll make?

-I think £20/30.

0:36:480:36:52

The truncheon is fantastic. We're probably looking at around the around £100 mark.

0:36:520:36:57

Encouraging words indeed!

0:36:570:36:59

Especially as Philip has some catching up to do.

0:36:590:37:03

He started this leg with £262.53, and spent £110 on five items.

0:37:030:37:10

David, however, had £483.22 spending money,

0:37:100:37:14

and spent just £208, also on five items.

0:37:140:37:19

The auction is about to start and an expectant hush descends.

0:37:210:37:26

First up, David's dumbbells.

0:37:260:37:30

They brought back happy memories but will they pull their weight?

0:37:300:37:34

A pair of cast iron Boys' Brigade dumbbells. Showing here as modelled,

0:37:340:37:39

we'll leave him for a little while, might build his muscles up.

0:37:390:37:43

-I have commissions in at 15.

-Well done, Barbs.

0:37:430:37:47

Do I see 18? 18. Do I see 20?

0:37:470:37:51

At 18... GAVEL BANGS

0:37:510:37:53

At last that made a profit, eight pounds.

0:37:530:37:56

And that's one up for David!

0:37:560:37:59

Next up, Philips wheel.

0:37:590:38:01

It's the second he's bought, but will it help him to victory?

0:38:010:38:06

Little bit of interest in this,

0:38:060:38:09

I have 30, do I see 32?

0:38:090:38:12

30, do I see 32?

0:38:120:38:16

at 30 pounds. GAVEL BANGS

0:38:160:38:19

Start as you mean to go on! That's a £10 profit to you.

0:38:190:38:23

David paid £8 for his green glass dish.

0:38:230:38:28

But what will the bidders think?

0:38:280:38:29

Starting down at ten pounds. £12?

0:38:290:38:32

This is David Barby looking wounded again.

0:38:320:38:35

Do I see 18? 20, 22?

0:38:350:38:37

Selling at 22 pounds. GAVEL BANGS

0:38:370:38:40

-Well done, Barby.

0:38:400:38:41

And it's a decent little profit of £14, but David is not happy.

0:38:410:38:46

Barbs, you do make me laugh. You do wounded better than anybody I know.

0:38:460:38:51

Now Philip's brass bell weights. He paid a fiver for them.

0:38:510:38:56

I have, ten pounds bid do I see 12? I've got 12, 15,

0:38:560:39:01

18, do I see 20?

0:39:010:39:04

At 18 pounds. GAVEL BANGS

0:39:040:39:06

Well, they certainly helped you punch above your weight.

0:39:060:39:09

-I'm creeping in, Barbs, creeping in...

-That's brilliant.

0:39:090:39:13

At £90, the sauce boat is David's most expensive item.

0:39:130:39:18

But will it make the most profit?

0:39:180:39:21

We have 70 do I see 75?

0:39:210:39:23

75, 80, 85?

0:39:230:39:26

I've got 85, do I see 90? £85, do I see 90?

0:39:260:39:30

At 85 pounds. GAVEL BANGS

0:39:300:39:33

Oh, no! That's the first loss of the day of £5.

0:39:330:39:38

-Oh, David...

-I saw you smile.

0:39:380:39:41

Not at all.

0:39:410:39:43

I was so happy for you to make a profit.

0:39:430:39:46

At last!

0:39:460:39:47

You're such a rat.

0:39:490:39:50

Next up, Philip's rosewood scribe.

0:39:500:39:54

Let's hope it's not a write-off.

0:39:540:39:56

I start you down at 12 pounds, do I see 15?

0:39:560:39:59

Got 15, do I see 18?

0:39:590:40:02

Selling at 15 pounds. GAVEL BANGS

0:40:020:40:04

Philip hoped for more than a £10 profit,

0:40:040:40:07

but David seems more upset than he is!

0:40:070:40:10

Oh, that's disappointing. That really was disappointing...

0:40:100:40:13

-You look heart-broken I must say.

-Yes, I feel for you.

0:40:130:40:16

NOT! Can David redeem himself with his second piece of silver,

0:40:160:40:21

the George V quaich?

0:40:210:40:22

Right in on commissions at 50,

0:40:220:40:24

do I see 52? 50, at 52?

0:40:240:40:27

55, 58? We've got 58, do I see 60?

0:40:270:40:31

At 58 pounds? GAVEL BANGS

0:40:310:40:33

It's made a profit, but only £8.

0:40:330:40:36

Well, done, Barbs. That's put you back where you started.

0:40:360:40:41

Don't rub it in, Philip...

0:40:410:40:43

It's time for Philip's Victorian jar, which David saw first,

0:40:430:40:48

and rejected.

0:40:480:40:50

19th century, Bristol blue glass rouge or powder pot.

0:40:500:40:54

That's a lot of rouge!

0:40:540:40:56

I have commissions down at 30, do I see 32?

0:40:560:41:01

32, 35, 38? I've got 38, do I see 40?

0:41:010:41:05

40, 42, 45, 48?

0:41:050:41:08

-I'm staggered.

-At 48, do I see 50?

0:41:080:41:11

Selling at 48 pounds. GAVEL BANGS

0:41:110:41:15

It's another small profit, but a profit nonetheless.

0:41:150:41:19

Next up, David's final piece of silver - his £50 cream jug.

0:41:190:41:24

Silverware hasn't been selling well today can this do any better?

0:41:240:41:30

I have commission bids here at 40,

0:41:300:41:32

42, 45, 48, 50, 52.

0:41:320:41:35

At 52 pounds? GAVEL BANGS

0:41:350:41:39

And the profits just seem to be getting smaller.

0:41:390:41:42

Has your Midas touch deserted you?

0:41:420:41:46

The auctioneers had high hopes for Philip's ceremonial truncheon.

0:41:460:41:50

But can it live up to expectations?

0:41:500:41:53

50 do I see 55?, 55, 60, 65,

0:41:530:41:57

70, 75, 80, 85,

0:41:570:41:59

90, 95.

0:41:590:42:01

Selling at £95. GAVEL BANGS

0:42:010:42:03

-That was so good.

-That's all right!

0:42:030:42:05

You can be excited, Philip!

0:42:050:42:09

You've just made a profit of £55, the biggest of the day.

0:42:090:42:13

Shall I drive you down to the bridge?

0:42:130:42:16

-I will drive and throw myself over!

-Really, is it that bad?

0:42:160:42:19

Oh, terrible.

0:42:190:42:21

Cheer up, David! Philip may have won this leg's auction,

0:42:210:42:26

but let's see who's in the lead.

0:42:260:42:28

Philip started the day with £262.53.

0:42:280:42:31

After paying auction costs and commission, he made a profit

0:42:310:42:35

of £59.70 and takes £322.23 forward to tomorrow's show.

0:42:350:42:43

Do I see 20, got 22.

0:42:430:42:47

David did less well.

0:42:470:42:49

He had £483.22 spending money.

0:42:490:42:53

After commission, he made a loss of £14.42.

0:42:530:42:58

He takes £468.80 forward to tomorrow's show.

0:42:580:43:03

But with only one leg to go, he still has a commanding lead.

0:43:030:43:07

We all right for fuel, Barbs?

0:43:120:43:14

-Which one's the fuel tank?

-You do worry me.

0:43:140:43:17

-You never stop. Did you know you never stop talking?

-Well, you can't with you.

0:43:170:43:22

Even in your sleep, you never stop talking.

0:43:220:43:25

On tomorrow's show, Philip picks up tips from the master in an effort to catch up,

0:43:250:43:30

Is that your very, very best?

0:43:300:43:33

While David's had enough of antiques buying for one day.

0:43:330:43:37

I'm going to sit in the car and sulk.

0:43:370:43:39

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:530:43:56

E-mail us at [email protected]

0:43:560:43:59

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