Episode 28 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 28

Antiques experts Anita Manning and David Harper are wheeling and dealing their way across Dorset. They stop off in Poole, Bournemouth and Weymouth.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge.

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Testing, testing.

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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I've got to make a profit.

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The aim is trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

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But it's not as easy as it sounds, and there can only be one winner.

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That could have done better.

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So, will it be the highway to success or the B-road to bankruptcy?

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-That's 100.

-Not 40 then?

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This is the Antiques Road Trip. Yeah.

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Our two antiques experts this week

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are David Harper, reigning Road Trip champion, and feisty auctioneer Anita Manning.

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I enjoy my blethers with you.

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-Blethers!

-And I quite enjoy this wee car as well.

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# On white horses, snowy white horses, let me ride away... #

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This is the New Forest, and its iconic ponies,

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which have roamed free for many hundreds of years.

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It's an area of outstanding natural beauty, which extends to about 580 square kilometres.

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Its landscape is unique - a living and working remnant of Medieval England,

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with an extraordinary diversity of plants and animals.

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Anita is known for her straight talking

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and yesterday David was on the receiving end.

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I'm not convinced about the age of it.

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I knew you were going to say that.

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Let's hope, though, they can stay friends.

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In the course of his 20 years in the business, David has perfected the art of bludgeoning

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the dealer into submission.

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How about this for a deal? Would 15 get it?

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Both experts started this week with £200.

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David consolidated his lead in yesterday's auction when his hand-painted moon flask

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almost doubled its money.

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-I made a profit anyway.

-He starts this leg with a whopping £407.97.

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Anita, sadly, didn't do particularly well with any of her items.

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If you're all done, fair warning. I sell online at £32.

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I'm disappointed with that one.

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Her day's spending money is a less substantial £226.18.

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I haven't disgraced myself.

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-You haven't at all.

-I haven't disgraced myself.

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-You're making money Anita.

-I've made...

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It's not going to keep the wolf from the door.

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No, it's not going to pay the mortgage, is it?

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This week's road trip is a fascinating drive from the south east

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to the south west of England, from Dover to Bideford.

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Today's leg kicks off in Bournemouth, and our two chaps

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end up in Wells for auction.

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Bournemouth is a prime tourist destination

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with its seven miles of sandy beaches,

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and rainfall at half the national average,

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it's the perfect place to relax.

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Oh, David let's stop here and have a look at the sea.

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Oh, isn't that just...?

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That is wonderful.

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-A traditional beach holiday.

-It is.

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According to a 2007 survey, it was also found to be the happiest place in the UK.

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Well, David this is the life. This is the life.

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Look at that. I would love to be in that water.

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-Well, I hope you don't get in too much deep water with your buying.

-Oooh!

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Um, guys, aren't you supposed to be...shopping?

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First stop for both our experts is dealer Bonnie Cook.

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Her shop's not very big. This is going to be interesting.

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These are the kind of thing I find fascinating when you're wandering around antique shops.

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It looks very dull and boring and obscure, really, just a plain black box.

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But it's made out of papier mache, very fashionable in the late 19th century.

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Probably around 1880 and it's a snuff box.

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But open this thing up and inside we find two pictures,

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obviously man and wife, and they've probably been there for possibly 100 years.

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These are the kind of thing that keep me going in the antique business.

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You find these items and they touch something

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and suddenly you've got a connection to people who lived a very long time ago.

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Across the shop, Anita also glimpses something that takes her fancy.

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Nice wee Greek key pattern there. It's like a silver overlay.

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There's a wee art deco look about it, quite nice. But glasses aren't all that popular.

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I don't want to buy these goblets. But they are nice.

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There's no time for window shopping.

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I love him.

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Yes, it's a little night light.

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He is a bit mad, isn't he?

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So he's a little glass owl, I mean, it's cheaply manufactured,

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but it's got a real charm, hasn't it?

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Yes, I should imagine it's '30s or '20s.

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I would have thought so and he'll be quite nice lit up.

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Is he incredibly cheap or not?

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-Yes.

-Is he?

-He can be.

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Keep your voice down cos Anita Manning's listening.

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I hope I'm not cramping your style, David.

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Well, not yet, but I think you might be.

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-Really, 20?

-Yeah.

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Could it be drastically cheaper? Could be absolutely horrendously, drastically cheaper?

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Well, it can be, I suppose, ten because I bought it with some other things.

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Could it be five? I mean, did he... I just think.

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That's a hoot.

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I mean, I know fiver's no money but...

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No, it's not, is it?

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I know but if he came in a house clearance he probably doesn't owe you anything.

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-Yes, OK.

-Shall we do that?

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Let's put him down but don't tell Anita.

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He's chatting up the dealer. He's chatting her up.

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I know what he's doing.

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Right, can I have a look at this? Of course.

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It's a Black Forest... As you probably know,

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he must have had a bowl of some sort.

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I wonder what he could have had. He's Black Forest, for sure.

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So dates... They were making these things prolifically, weren't they, in the early 20th century?

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Black Forest carvings were very much sought after in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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However, they're made in Switzerland,

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and not, as you'd think, Germany's Black Forest. How confusing!

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Is he cheap enough or...?

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Um...

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-I don't know how cheap you want to be but it can be ten.

-OK.

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Get a move on, David.

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Anita wants to do some buying, too!

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I think that's an artist's easel. This is my daughter's cabinet, actually.

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I'm trying to get her to do unusual jewellery.

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Anything that's a wee bit unusual, that's the thing that's selling.

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-That's right.

-I like buying jewellery.

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I think that's got a bit of style about it.

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And it's very reasonable at £12.

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You can't see a silver hallmark on it.

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No, I thought it did have one. Perhaps my daughter's stupidly put the ticket over it.

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It's maybe a wee bit hard for silver.

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-Yes, possibly.

-And precious metals seem to be what's attracting our two experts today.

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Let me show you this thing here, I don't know how much it is.

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It looks like it might be bronze, but it isn't. I think it's bronzed.

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And it's obviously quite modern but incredibly stylish.

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And just in case you were wondering, it's a candelabra.

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I'll tell you what that, if it's dead cheap in an auction,

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it might be a cheeky number because people might just think, wow, that is a design piece.

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When Anita's stopped gassing, I'll get a price.

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How rude, David.

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But I don't think Anita's going to let Bonnie go just yet.

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-Certainly silver.

-Yes.

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Judging by the hallmark, these earrings are continental rather than British.

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What sort of price are these?

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They can be ten for the pair.

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What I was thinking was...

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To put it in, that would make a nice wee a sort of lot comprising,

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so what could you do them for?

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I'll do them both for ten.

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-ANITA MOUTHS

-OK.

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Now that Anita's finished shopping, David finally has Bonnie to himself.

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It's nice quality, and there's no damage on it.

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It's a good shape.

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Well, it's gilded and it's sort of dimpled.

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-It's hand painted, isn't it?

-Um... It is Victorian anyway.

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-Yeah, it's got to be, hasn't it? Circa 1900.

-Yes.

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And used for what? I mean, it's throwing me a little bit.

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I should imagine it was for jam. It's got a slightly Japanese influence.

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It goes back to our fascination with anything oriental in the late 19th century.

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Although we know it's not Japanese, it was made either here or on the continent,

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but in the Japanese taste.

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-What sort of money is it?

-I'm afraid that's 45.

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Oh, you do right to be afraid, Bonnie! That is absolutely... You should be petrified, not afraid.

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Bonnie that couldn't be drastically cheaper, could it?

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-How about this for a deal?

-I don't like your deals.

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You'll like this one, you'll like it a lot, are you ready for it?

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-The owl.

-Yes.

-The bear.

-Yes.

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The glass thingamabob from the late 19th century, and the absolute stark raving mad

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-standing candelabra thing...

-Right. For a grand sum of...

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You say.

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I daren't say it. 30.

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-30.

-30?

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You are pushing it, David. The shop price for these four items is a staggering £115.

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Can we do £30?

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I suppose I'm going to have to.

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-Four items, 30, will you do it?

-Yes, I will.

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-You're a dreamboat. Thank you very much indeed.

-OK.

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Smoothie.

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So, that would be £5 for the bear, £5 for the glass owl lamp,

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£10 for the candelabra and £10 for the glass jar.

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Wish me luck.

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-Yes, I wish you all the best.

-Thank you very much.

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I hope you make a huge profit, unlike myself.

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You don't take any prisoners, David, do you?

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-Oh.

-Hello, you.

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David, you've been a long time.

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Just looking, haven't bought anything.

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OK, I loved listening to your patter.

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-Really? Did you learn anything?

-Yes.

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Anita's got some catching up to do if she wants to dent David's lead,

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so she's shopping again.

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This time at dealer Clare Midgley's, who's also in Bournemouth.

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Morning.

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There was a lovely wee settee in the window.

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-Yes, that's so sweet.

-Can I have a look?

-Yeah, sure, yeah.

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I think it's been made by a dad for his wee girl.

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-He hasn't been a cabinet maker.

-No, I'm afraid not.

-But it's been made with love.

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If you look at this, I mean it's quite roughly, toughly made.

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And he's stapled it. There's a staple gun at the back.

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Because it's a cheap plywood, so it's not...

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From a distance, it looks good though, doesn't it?

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I think even from here it looks quite nice.

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And this is the wee dolly, did the dolly come with it?

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-No.

-I quite like cloth dolls. Again, this is quite a simple thing.

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20th century, anyway. No great age. But appealing.

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The doll and settee cost £20.

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Now, I don't think they're dear, I don't think your prices are dear

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-but we have to go to auction.

-Of course.

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Would I be able to buy these both...for 12?

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Let's say 15.

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Could you do it for 14?

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Oooh.

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Oh, no, I hate doing this. Throw me out of your shop.

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-You've got to.

-Throw me out of your shop.

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-OK, um... Yeah, I'll do that for you.

-Could you do those for 14?

-That's fine. Yeah.

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That's one deal done and she's not finished yet.

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Claire, could I have a wee look at that bug brooch?

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Is that a wee hallmark I see?

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I don't know, it's so indistinct. I don't think it's gold.

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These are just glass. These are just paste glass.

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I find that people like bug brooches.

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Oh, yes.

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Bug heaven, eh, Anita?

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Could I have a wee look at that one?

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-That one?

-Uh-huh.

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That's quite an interesting piece.

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It's supposed to be an opera mirror, that's what I was told it was.

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-But what that means, I'm not quite sure.

-Right, OK.

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So you would have it as a pendant, and then put on your lipstick.

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Maybe even have a look at the chap behind you.

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Of course. It's quite interesting.

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I've never actually come across an opera mirror before.

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But it's a lovely story.

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As Anita haggles, David finishes his shopping for the day.

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He's leaving Bournemouth and is heading towards Weymouth.

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The town has had a long history as a fishing and trading port.

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It was also one of the first modern tourist destinations

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after George III started spending his summers here.

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Now it's hosting the Olympics sailing events in 2012.

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I've left Anita because she's hardly bought anything.

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I bought four items and here I am in Weymouth.

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David's next destination is another antiques shop but he's not here to buy.

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-Ah. You must be David.

-Yep.

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-Hello, David. David Harper, I've heard a lot about you.

-Oh, great.

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The Nautical Antiques Centre is as much a museum as a shop.

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Owner David Warrick is an ex-seafarer, with a passion for all things maritime.

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He joined the Merchant Navy when he was just 16

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and travelled all over the world in the course of his career.

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Is that a real stuffed parrot?

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That's not real, I'm glad to say. That was a souvenir from one of the voyages into the Baltic.

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Oh, he's fantastic!

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It has taken him more than 50 years to build such an impressive collection.

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His passion has become a business.

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and he wants to show David his treasures.

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Well, this is the bane of my life. That is woodworm.

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Ship's woodworm.

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Ship's woodworm, I take it, are bigger than normal woodworm.

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That's the actual thickness of a ship's hull, so you can see that the worm

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going through there would eventually sink a ship.

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This was one of the clipper ships - this was actually the Lightning.

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They made these ships as light as possible to cross the ocean as quickly as possible.

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The Lightning was built in 1854 from soft pine wood,

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which made it fast but vulnerable to worm and often timbers had to be replaced.

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What were the clipper ships doing? What was their job?

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They were mainly to collect tea from China.

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-Tea in those days was, as you know, was like gold dust.

-Absolutely right.

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One of my favourite items in the antique business are tea caddies.

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When you look at very early tea caddies, they're tiny because tea was so expensive.

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As we get into the 19th century, we see tea caddies getting bigger

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as tea becomes cheaper, because all these clippers were booming all around the world,

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bringing the stuff back in huge quantities.

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One of the things when I was at sea as a cadet,

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we used to have to sweep out the holds and after a tea cargo had been discharged in London,

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we used to take our pillow cases,

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and fill a pillow case full of tea sweepings and take home.

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It kept my mother in tea for a year.

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And there are still more treasures to discover.

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Tell me about what you've got down here.

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This actually here is a cannonball.

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Cannonball...wahay! My goodness me.

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You wouldn't like that around your neck.

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Oh, my gosh.

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The whole principle of this is that these were fired

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to slow a ship down

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when you were chasing it to try and catch it.

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That would take the mast?

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Take some of the rigging out and take some of the sails.

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That was a shock, you gave me a shock there, David.

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I tell you what, if you were a sailor on the receiving end of that,

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you probably wouldn't know about it, to be honest.

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-Bearing in mind most sailors couldn't swim.

-No, that's true.

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-Why couldn't they swim?

-Didn't think it was necessary.

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Why not? What if they fell overboard?

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Confidence. Uh...

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They very often preferred to drown

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because their ship could never turn round quick enough to pick them up.

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Oh.

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Just before you go, there's one final thing I'd like to show you.

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-You can imagine fishing, can't you?

-Yeah.

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-In the middle of the ocean miles from anywhere.

-So what's that?

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-And you get attacked.

-By what?

-By a saw tooth.

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Oh, it's a sword fish.

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And this fish has just gone straight through it like that.

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And the fish has attacked the boat and it's lost the end of its sword?

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-Correct.

-"Was struck by a sword fish in July 1859."

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You're kidding.

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They've actually sunk boats and drowned sailors.

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It's been a fascinating visit.

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Absolute delight.

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I'm so glad you came and it was a fine day, and you saw some of my treasures.

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But it's time now for David to head back to Bournemouth,

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where his partner in crime is sniffing out her own little piece of nautical history.

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This is an interesting wee lot here.

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What we have is a jigsaw puzzle and it's off the Queen Mary,

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Clyde built, just like me, but we have the box here.

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Now this would have been sold or given away to passengers on the Queen Mary.

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And shipping memorabilia, especially Cunard shipping memorabilia, is very desirable.

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White Star is best known as the shipping company which commissioned the Titanic.

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By 1934, when the Queen Mary was being built, it had merged with its rival, Cunard.

0:18:560:19:02

The box is in perfect condition and that's important when you're buying toys.

0:19:030:19:09

And all the pieces are there.

0:19:090:19:11

It's priced at £40. But Anita makes a cheeky offer of £20.

0:19:140:19:19

Is it possible to buy it at that price?

0:19:190:19:22

You can't... What about £25? Is that not...?

0:19:220:19:26

I wonder if I could do a deal on a couple of items?

0:19:260:19:29

I like this. Bug brooches, always interesting.

0:19:300:19:34

What I'm looking for is round about £50.

0:19:340:19:39

And that's me taking a wee bit off of everything.

0:19:390:19:42

You certainly have, Anita. The combined cost of these items is £85.

0:19:440:19:48

But you want to pay £10 for the brooch, £20 for the silver mirror pendant and £20 for the jigsaw.

0:19:480:19:55

So, really in my head, you are going to get that for £20 now which is what you wanted.

0:19:560:20:00

Uh-huh, yeah, but what I'm doing is I'm buying two more things.

0:20:000:20:04

I can do that, yeah, I hope you make some money on it,

0:20:040:20:07

and I hope you beat the other chap.

0:20:070:20:09

So do I. So do I, Claire.

0:20:090:20:11

-So that's 50 and 14 is 64.

-64, lovely, thank you very much.

0:20:110:20:18

It's been an absolute pleasure.

0:20:180:20:20

Both our chaps have shopped until they've dropped.

0:20:220:20:25

So let's leave them to put their feet up, and have a rest.

0:20:250:20:29

I just hope they don't get too comfortable.

0:20:290:20:32

It's the second leg of David and Anita's journey across Dorset and Somerset.

0:20:460:20:50

So far, David has bargained hard.

0:20:520:20:56

And spent just £30 on four items.

0:20:560:20:58

His spending money for the day is £377.97.

0:20:580:21:04

Anita has been rather more of a spendthrift and spent £74 on five items.

0:21:040:21:11

She's left with £152.18 to spend.

0:21:110:21:15

David, I'm going through to Poole today.

0:21:150:21:18

I know you are, you're a very lucky girl.

0:21:180:21:21

-Are you going to go and visit the pottery?

-Yes, yes.

0:21:210:21:24

And you are actually going to drive the motor vehicle, aren't you?

0:21:240:21:28

SHE STARTS CAR

0:21:280:21:30

Yes!

0:21:300:21:31

-Bye bye!

-Bye bye!

0:21:360:21:37

This morning, Anita's leaving Bournemouth

0:21:400:21:43

and heading west to Poole.

0:21:430:21:45

It emerged as an important port in the 12th century because of the wool trade.

0:21:450:21:49

And by the 18th century, it was one of the busiest ports in Britain.

0:21:490:21:55

But before Anita sees the sights, there's shopping to do.

0:21:550:21:59

First stop, dealer Brian Neale.

0:22:000:22:04

This is an interesting item.

0:22:040:22:06

And I always love this type of thing.

0:22:060:22:08

-It's a Victorian home entertainment system.

-It is, yeah.

0:22:080:22:13

This is a particularly nice example.

0:22:130:22:14

It's a graphoscope.

0:22:140:22:16

Otherwise known as a stereoscopic viewer, a 19th-century parlour instrument

0:22:160:22:20

used to magnify images.

0:22:200:22:23

You put the cards in there, and you get a 3D effect.

0:22:230:22:26

-And these cards are perhaps of...

-Grand Tour.

0:22:260:22:30

-The Grand Tour. So, it's what you would show your pals.

-That's right, yeah.

0:22:300:22:36

How much do we have on that?

0:22:360:22:39

Well, that, I'm afraid, would be about £280.

0:22:390:22:43

It's a wee bit rich... for my budget.

0:22:430:22:46

Back in Bournemouth, David's at Lionel Geneen Antiques.

0:22:490:22:53

And on the hunt for something that won't break his budget.

0:22:530:22:56

Let me just have a grab of these.

0:22:580:23:00

So, we've got the Xixi dogs again, haven't we, lion dogs.

0:23:000:23:04

Yeah, a pair of soapstone dogs, Chinese, sort of, turn of the century.

0:23:040:23:11

Last century, 1900-ish, maybe between the wars, little bit later.

0:23:110:23:15

-I think so, probably more so, but good decorator pieces.

-Absolutely.

0:23:150:23:19

I love these dogs. You've always got a male and a female.

0:23:190:23:22

People think they're nasty looking things, but they're actually warding off evil spirits.

0:23:220:23:27

So if you own them, you're in luck.

0:23:270:23:29

I mean, they're decorative things.

0:23:290:23:32

I can do those for £40 the pair.

0:23:320:23:35

They're cheap enough but...yeah.

0:23:350:23:37

You still don't think there's a profit?

0:23:370:23:39

I don't, I think 20 quid we might have a chance.

0:23:390:23:42

I admire your optimism!

0:23:420:23:44

Do you?

0:23:440:23:46

As David bargains hard, Anita's still in Poole, admiring another impressive creature.

0:23:460:23:53

That's a beauty.

0:23:540:23:55

Yeah, it's the largest rocking horse that's ever been in the shop, and I actually think it's for adults.

0:23:550:24:01

Another parlour game?

0:24:010:24:02

Yeah, another parlour game.

0:24:020:24:04

The horse costs a rather steep £1,500. Wow.

0:24:040:24:09

He's obviously won some sort of competition, he's got his rosette.

0:24:090:24:14

-Did you put that on him?

-Yeah, I did. Yeah.

0:24:140:24:18

Back in Bournemouth, David's still hunting for antiques.

0:24:210:24:24

Can I have a look at this?

0:24:240:24:26

Yes, that I think is actually very interesting.

0:24:260:24:29

I mean, it's obviously just some sort of loving cup or...

0:24:290:24:33

-A tyg they call them.

-A tyg, yes.

0:24:330:24:35

But if you look at it closely,

0:24:350:24:38

it's got a huntsman on horseback with dogs and a hare.

0:24:380:24:44

It's not got a factory mark. Obviously, English stoneware.

0:24:440:24:48

About 1860ish, a little bit before Dalton.

0:24:480:24:52

Look at the dog handles, I mean, aren't they great?

0:24:520:24:55

And, of course, a tyg would be to pass to you, pass to you,

0:24:550:24:58

all have a swig of it.

0:24:580:25:00

It was probably used for a drink either before or after they went out hunting the hare.

0:25:000:25:06

What sort of trade would he be?

0:25:060:25:07

£30.

0:25:070:25:09

-£15 wouldn't get it?

-No, it wouldn't!

0:25:090:25:11

I thought it wouldn't, I'm just asking!

0:25:110:25:13

What would be the absolute death trade?

0:25:130:25:15

-It's marked £50.

-It isn't marked £50!

0:25:150:25:17

I said 30.

0:25:170:25:19

25 quid.

0:25:190:25:20

Do it for 20 and I'll have it.

0:25:200:25:22

All right. It's yours for £20.

0:25:220:25:24

-Good man!

-You're just...

0:25:240:25:28

And David fights to the death.

0:25:280:25:31

Anita heads for Poole Museum.

0:25:350:25:37

She's here to see its collection of ceramics from the town's eponymous pottery manufacturer.

0:25:370:25:43

And Poole Pottery is a bit of a Road Trip favourite.

0:25:460:25:49

Her guide is Museum Manager, Michael Spender.

0:25:490:25:52

Michael, it's absolutely lovely to meet you.

0:25:520:25:55

And it's wonderful to be here.

0:25:550:25:57

I'm a great fan of Poole Pottery.

0:25:570:25:59

Jesse Carter, a builder's merchant and ironmonger, founded the company in 1873.

0:26:010:26:07

It started out by manufacturing tiles.

0:26:070:26:10

What a great display here, Michael. Which were the earliest ones?

0:26:120:26:18

Well, these lustre tiles are very, very early, and then moving into the art nouveau here.

0:26:180:26:24

Isn't that absolutely exquisite?

0:26:240:26:27

I love the colours.

0:26:270:26:30

The colours are singing to me.

0:26:300:26:32

And I love the almost stylised pattern of the peacock.

0:26:320:26:38

All these lines here are done by hand and then it's all hand coloured in,

0:26:380:26:42

so it's an incredible hand made piece.

0:26:420:26:44

By the early 20th century, the company had begun to produce pottery.

0:26:440:26:48

And Poole Museum has the largest collection on display anywhere in the world.

0:26:480:26:53

Poole Pottery has always had a strong design ethos.

0:26:530:26:58

From the art deco pieces of the '20s and '30s,

0:26:580:27:01

to the clean modernist lines of the '50s,

0:27:010:27:04

it has always reflected the spirit of the age.

0:27:040:27:08

Michael, in this case, we're moving on to the psychedelic insanity of late '60s and '70s.

0:27:080:27:18

And these wonderful colours and patterns reflect that age.

0:27:180:27:23

This inventiveness came at a price.

0:27:230:27:27

The retail cost of one plate was more than a week's wages for the artist.

0:27:270:27:31

This is a perfect example with these loud oranges, blues and yellows.

0:27:320:27:40

And I love this piece, I think it's great. It cheers me up.

0:27:400:27:43

There's just time for Michael to show Anita one final piece.

0:27:430:27:47

This is a coat of arms of Poole, of the town of Poole,

0:27:480:27:52

made by Poole Pottery in the mid-'60s.

0:27:520:27:55

The lady up there is reputed to be Miss World of 1964

0:27:550:28:00

Ann Sydney, who came from Poole.

0:28:000:28:03

She's a good looking bird!

0:28:040:28:06

She's lost her top!

0:28:080:28:10

Steady!

0:28:120:28:14

Anita's been so inspired, she can't resist a visit to the company's studio

0:28:150:28:20

to have her very own piece of original art made.

0:28:200:28:24

Master potter Alan White is on hand to help her out should it all go wrong.

0:28:240:28:30

Throw it on really firm and get as close to the centre as you can.

0:28:310:28:34

That's lovely. Now this is where you get messy.

0:28:340:28:37

Hands in the water.

0:28:370:28:39

You can still see my nail varnish.

0:28:390:28:41

Don't worry about that, by the time you finish this, you won't have nails.

0:28:410:28:45

Just get that hand inside there.

0:28:450:28:48

Don't like the look of that!

0:28:500:28:52

-We're going to make a smaller pot than we anticipated!

-OK!

0:28:520:28:56

Now lift and both hands come up together.

0:28:560:28:59

-God. I'm making a pot.

-Look at that, there we are.

0:28:590:29:02

That's beautiful.

0:29:020:29:03

It's a wee bit wibbly wobbly, but Alan's keeping me straight, aren't ya?

0:29:030:29:08

I think we'll leave it at that because it's a bit on the point of collapse.

0:29:080:29:12

That's not on the point of collapse, that's a work of art, Alan.

0:29:120:29:16

I think that's great, thank you so much.

0:29:160:29:19

It's been wonderful being your wee apprentice.

0:29:190:29:22

Well, we'll get that one decorated in the style of Poole,

0:29:220:29:25

-and we'll make sure you get it.

-That's great, I love it.

0:29:250:29:29

What fun.

0:29:320:29:33

It's the end of the day, and Anita meets up with David for the all important show and tell.

0:29:330:29:39

Now my first purchase, a wee bit wee, David, but...

0:29:400:29:44

-A wee bit what?

-Wee.

-Wee.

0:29:440:29:47

Small? I just need to translate.

0:29:470:29:50

-Now, I love jewellery.

-I know.

0:29:500:29:53

-And I decided that I would buy these silver pieces.

-Can I handle?

0:29:530:29:57

I wouldn't say that it's terribly old but it has got bags of style.

0:29:570:30:02

-OK, so what sort of money?

-I paid £10 for the two things.

0:30:020:30:05

Oh, for goodness sake. Well, I think they're a very good buy.

0:30:050:30:08

-Quite a nice buy.

-Here's my first. Now then Anita, what can I say?

0:30:080:30:14

-I quite like it.

-Well, I love it.

0:30:140:30:16

I mean who knows who made it, where it was sold.

0:30:160:30:21

-It cost me a tenner.

-I think it's a cracking buy for a tenner.

-Thank you.

0:30:210:30:25

Now I know you're a furniture man, David.

0:30:250:30:28

I sense a test coming on, OK, give it to me, baby.

0:30:280:30:31

-Well, the auctioneer said that small furniture items go well in the auction.

-Oh.

0:30:310:30:36

Well, that's small.

0:30:380:30:40

This wee settee and you can't get much smaller than that.

0:30:400:30:44

Well, you can't. It's a copy of a Victorian double-ended chaise.

0:30:440:30:47

That is a monstrosity, but I think for me the doll is the star!

0:30:470:30:55

-Do you think so?

-I mean look. Hello. There's your twin sister!

0:30:550:30:59

Spooky... Next up the bear!

0:30:590:31:03

Oh, he's gorgeous.

0:31:030:31:05

-He's a little sweetie. Black forest, carved bear.

-How much?

0:31:050:31:09

-Fiver. There's got to be profit there, Anita?

-You cannae go wrong there.

0:31:090:31:14

Well, I'm a long way from Glasgow, David,

0:31:140:31:19

and when I saw this item,

0:31:190:31:21

it took me back. It's a jigsaw puzzle

0:31:210:31:25

-and it's of the Queen Mary.

-Oh, wow.

0:31:250:31:28

Which was Clyde-built, just like me.

0:31:280:31:32

Yes, well constructed, I've got to say.

0:31:320:31:36

-I love the box, what kind of price?

-Well, I got this to about £20.

-OK.

0:31:380:31:42

-What you think about that little sweetie.

-It's a wee lamp.

0:31:420:31:46

And it's a novelty one and it's got to date to the 1930s.

0:31:460:31:50

It's got a deco feel to it.

0:31:500:31:51

David, I do like that.

0:31:510:31:54

I'm pleased. That came as part of my job lot.

0:31:540:31:57

-How much?

-A fiver.

-Oh. David Harper!

0:31:570:32:01

Hm! Next up, Anita's bug brooch,

0:32:010:32:03

which is an even better buy than she first anticipated.

0:32:030:32:07

-Yeah.

-It's oriental, David.

0:32:070:32:10

Is that a real pearl or not?

0:32:100:32:12

Yeah the pearl's good, it's got a wee bit of jade there.

0:32:120:32:16

Can I just test the pearl, do you mind?

0:32:160:32:18

I think it's got a bit of grit there hasn't it?

0:32:180:32:22

-I think that's a real pearl.

-This thing, don't know what you're going to think about this...

0:32:220:32:26

It could be called a piece of jewellery.

0:32:260:32:28

-Well, it's silver Birmingham.

-It's silver and it's Birmingham 1908,

0:32:280:32:34

but I really don't know if it is an opera mirror,

0:32:340:32:37

-I've never heard of that before.

-I've never heard of that before.

0:32:370:32:41

Or it's just the lid of something.

0:32:410:32:44

THEY LAUGH

0:32:440:32:47

Well, I tell you what, if it is a lid of something,

0:32:470:32:51

-which is probably a very good chance.

-It's a nice lid.

0:32:510:32:54

-It's a blinking very good lid.

-So for the two of them I paid £30.

0:32:540:32:58

OK. Well.

0:32:580:33:00

Ahh. What a nice wee thing.

0:33:000:33:02

-It's quality. I think it's...

-Can I hold it?

0:33:020:33:05

Please do. I mean it's hand painted in the Japanese style

0:33:050:33:08

and I date that to late 19th century, possibly early 20th.

0:33:080:33:13

-Silver plated.

-How much did you pay for that?

-£10 note.

0:33:130:33:17

-Och, David. You've done really well this time.

-Do you think so?

-You're a bism.

0:33:170:33:21

A bism? You teach me so much what does bism mean?

0:33:210:33:25

-A wee devil.

-Eh, have you got any more?

-No, have you got any more?

0:33:250:33:29

-I've got one more, and this is my favourite item...

-Is it?

-..Of the trip.

0:33:290:33:34

Oh, right.

0:33:360:33:38

So it's English probably mid 19th century Tyg cup or loving cup.

0:33:380:33:43

-It's a good traditional antique thing.

-Proper thing.

0:33:430:33:46

Did you have to pay a lot of money for it?

0:33:460:33:49

I think it's also my best bargain. I really do.

0:33:490:33:51

-Tell me how much?

-£20.

-Yeah, that's great.

0:33:510:33:53

It's got to be, Anita.

0:33:530:33:56

They're all smiles now,

0:33:560:33:58

but what do they really think about each other's auction items?

0:33:580:34:01

Hand on heart, I can't honestly say that I would have bought any of these items...

0:34:010:34:05

I'm not being critical, I promise.

0:34:050:34:07

The loving cup is a wonderful item. £20. He's worked that old Harper magic again.

0:34:070:34:15

Anita's most quirky item has got to be

0:34:150:34:19

the opera mirror/lid. Who knows what it is.

0:34:190:34:24

If it is only a lid then I tell you what, that was the lid of a very fine item.

0:34:240:34:27

When I think of the big picture,

0:34:270:34:30

I think Harper might beat me once again, aargh!

0:34:300:34:34

But will he? Only time will tell, Anita. Don't despair, love!

0:34:360:34:40

On this leg of the road trip,

0:34:430:34:45

our two experts started off

0:34:450:34:47

in Bournemouth and bargained their way to Poole.

0:34:470:34:51

Today, they're heading into Wells for auction.

0:34:510:34:54

Wells is one of the smallest cities in England,

0:34:550:34:58

nestling under the Mendip Hills in Somerset.

0:34:580:35:02

Its most impressive building is its cathedral.

0:35:020:35:05

Built between 1175 and 1490.

0:35:050:35:09

It's been described as "the most poetic of all the English Cathedrals".

0:35:090:35:16

So we're going to our third auction.

0:35:170:35:19

-It should be interesting, David.

-Well, it's a good area this, have you noticed?

0:35:190:35:25

It's nicely spread out, good countryside, nice houses, so you never know.

0:35:250:35:30

But will they be wanting to spend money at the auction today?

0:35:300:35:33

Here we are.

0:35:330:35:35

Ooh, ooh, come on, baby!

0:35:350:35:37

Not you, Anita!

0:35:370:35:39

McCubbing & Redfern hold monthly sales of antiques and collectables,

0:35:390:35:44

and offer everything from model steam trains

0:35:440:35:46

to motorbikes and first editions of Winnie the Pooh.

0:35:460:35:49

How does auctioneer Alan Mechan reckon our chaps will fare?

0:35:490:35:54

I like the lid, very well made piece. Very pretty piece.

0:35:550:36:00

Should fly out. The Tyg, if we do get £40 or £60 on it,

0:36:000:36:07

we would have done very well.

0:36:070:36:09

The little sofa and the doll itself,

0:36:090:36:12

remarkable resemblance to Anita there.

0:36:120:36:16

I've not said that. The owl lantern. He's got a chance there.

0:36:160:36:20

But I don't think he's going to beat Anita.

0:36:200:36:23

And that's good news for Anita, who has some catching up to do if she wants to beat David.

0:36:230:36:28

She started this leg with £226.18

0:36:280:36:30

and spent £74 on five items.

0:36:300:36:35

David, however, had £407.97 and spent just £50 on five items.

0:36:360:36:43

So, there's the money.

0:36:430:36:45

The auction's about to start,

0:36:450:36:48

and our two experts can barely contain themselves.

0:36:480:36:52

You're starting to get excited now, I can tell the way you're shuffling about.

0:36:520:36:56

First up, David's candelabra.

0:36:560:36:59

It cost just £10, but David hopes it will make a lot more.

0:36:590:37:03

I'll start the bidding on this at £12,

0:37:030:37:06

14 anywhere?

0:37:060:37:07

£12, 14, 16. 18 with you, sir.

0:37:070:37:13

At 18 with the gentleman, do I hear 20, no?

0:37:130:37:16

£18.

0:37:160:37:17

And that's an £8 profit before commission.

0:37:170:37:21

But David's disappointed.

0:37:210:37:23

That, that...was all right.

0:37:230:37:25

It's bad!

0:37:250:37:27

Next up, Anita's jigsaw puzzle.

0:37:270:37:30

Her little piece of Clydebank at £20.

0:37:300:37:34

RMS Queen Mary for Cunard White Star Line.

0:37:340:37:38

Starting the bidding at £20.

0:37:380:37:42

20, 25, into the room. 28, 30.

0:37:420:37:47

£30 I've got, 35 anywhere?

0:37:470:37:50

At 30. Thought it might go for a little bit more.

0:37:500:37:53

-Are we all...? 35?

-Yes, yes.

0:37:530:37:56

At 40. 45. £40 to my left.

0:37:560:38:00

-Yes!

-Well, done. Well, done.

0:38:000:38:02

And you've doubled your money there, Anita. Splendido!

0:38:020:38:07

David fell in love with this little carved bear.

0:38:100:38:13

But will it appeal to the bidders?

0:38:130:38:16

£16 I'm starting on, 18 anywhere?

0:38:160:38:19

18, 20, 22, sir with you.

0:38:190:38:23

I'm out, 24 anywhere? At 22, 24 anywhere...

0:38:230:38:27

All done at £22.

0:38:270:38:30

A £17 profit for you.

0:38:300:38:33

It's not bad, but it's not quite enough for David.

0:38:330:38:37

-Are you OK?

-It's good. It's all right.

0:38:370:38:39

Next up, Anita's job lot of the child's settee and doll.

0:38:390:38:44

It cost her £14, but how much of a bargain was it?

0:38:440:38:48

Starting the bidding on this one at £10.

0:38:480:38:51

£10, £10. 15 anywhere, 15, no I will sell at 10...

0:38:510:38:56

All done at ten.

0:38:560:38:58

And that's a loss. Oh, dear, Anita.

0:38:590:39:02

-Awww.

-What a shame! What a shame.

-I know.

0:39:020:39:06

Now for David's novelty owl lamp.

0:39:060:39:09

But will it frighten off the bidders.

0:39:090:39:12

Starting the bidding on this one at £22.

0:39:120:39:15

24 into the room, at 22, 24.

0:39:150:39:18

24. 26, 28. Madame, yup, you've got it £28.

0:39:180:39:23

No, all done at 28... Sold at £28.

0:39:230:39:28

And there's nothing frightening about

0:39:280:39:30

a £23 profit before commission.

0:39:300:39:32

That's about 20 quid profit, isn't it?

0:39:320:39:35

-That's all right. Are you happy now?

-I'm getting happier.

0:39:350:39:39

Now for the opera mirror, the pendant...

0:39:390:39:41

or the lid? No-one seems quite sure.

0:39:410:39:45

I'm starting the bidding at £10,

0:39:450:39:47

15 anywhere? 15, I'm now out.

0:39:470:39:50

20, 25, 30, at £25.

0:39:500:39:53

Sold at 25.

0:39:530:39:56

And that's a tidy little fiver for Anita.

0:39:560:40:00

There's no harm in that.

0:40:000:40:02

I've made a profit. I'm happy.

0:40:020:40:06

Next up, David's Tyg,

0:40:060:40:07

and he's keeping his fingers crossed.

0:40:070:40:09

I'm starting the bidding at £30, 35 into the room.

0:40:090:40:12

Are we all finished at 30?

0:40:120:40:14

35, anywhere.

0:40:140:40:17

I'm selling at 30, last chance.

0:40:170:40:19

Sold at 30.

0:40:190:40:21

It's a £10 profit, but that's not enough for David.

0:40:210:40:25

I had such great predictions and such expectations.

0:40:250:40:29

Are you going to burst into floods of tears?

0:40:290:40:32

-Would you mind if I did?

-Or as they would say in Glasgow, burst oot greetin'.

0:40:320:40:37

HE LAUGHS

0:40:370:40:38

-I've no idea what you've just said.

-Now for Anita's bug brooch.

0:40:380:40:41

Her very own creepy crawlie.

0:40:410:40:43

Here we go, fingers crossed.

0:40:430:40:47

I'm starting the bidding at £20.

0:40:470:40:49

25 anywhere?

0:40:490:40:51

20 I've got.

0:40:510:40:53

25, 28. 30. 28 I've got here.

0:40:530:40:56

30 anywhere else?

0:40:560:40:58

At £28, are we all finished? Sold at 28.

0:40:580:41:01

-Well done.

-Yes, yes.

0:41:010:41:03

-Anita seems to be recovering her winning streak.

-Yes!

0:41:030:41:07

Now, David's glass jar.

0:41:090:41:12

I've got £10. 15 into the room.

0:41:120:41:14

At £10, 15 anywhere?

0:41:140:41:17

At £15. Sold at 15.

0:41:170:41:20

And that's another profit, David.

0:41:200:41:23

A trickle of profit.

0:41:230:41:25

But all these little profits are adding up!

0:41:250:41:27

Finally, it's Anita jewellery set.

0:41:270:41:30

Her earrings and brooch.

0:41:300:41:32

I'm starting at 20.

0:41:320:41:34

At 22 into the room at £20.

0:41:340:41:36

£20. 22 into the room.

0:41:360:41:39

I will sell at 20.

0:41:390:41:40

And it's another £10 profit before commission.

0:41:400:41:43

I'm really quite happy here.

0:41:450:41:47

I've doubled, double, doubled...

0:41:470:41:49

-I can't get my words out, I've doubled my money.

-Really?

0:41:490:41:52

Maybe I should give up auctioneering.

0:41:520:41:54

No, I don't think so.

0:41:540:41:56

But who actually did the best at today's auction?

0:41:580:42:00

Anita started the day with £226.18.

0:42:000:42:04

After paying auction costs and commission,

0:42:040:42:07

she made a profit of just £27.33

0:42:070:42:11

and takes £253.51

0:42:110:42:13

forward to tomorrow's show.

0:42:130:42:17

Despite being so gloomy throughout the auction,

0:42:170:42:20

David fared better than Anita.

0:42:200:42:23

He had £407.97 spending money.

0:42:230:42:27

After commission, he made a profit of £43.09.

0:42:270:42:31

He takes £451.06 forward to tomorrow's show.

0:42:310:42:36

I'm learning from you, Anita,

0:42:360:42:37

and be grateful for all small mercies, I suppose, which is no losses.

0:42:370:42:43

We can't make huge profits on everything.

0:42:430:42:47

We should be able to. That's what I want to do.

0:42:470:42:50

Anita and David are more than halfway through their road trip.

0:42:500:42:55

And David's still winning.

0:42:550:42:56

OK, David, on to stage four.

0:42:560:43:00

It will be a new adventure.

0:43:000:43:02

Well, it always is with you, Miss Manning.

0:43:020:43:05

Start first time, are you ready for this?

0:43:050:43:09

On we go.

0:43:090:43:12

In tomorrow's show, Anita and David get physical.

0:43:120:43:16

Do you think I could whack David Harper with them?

0:43:170:43:20

We'll have to have an arm wrestle over this.

0:43:200:43:22

OK, go.

0:43:220:43:23

But it all ends up in tears before bed time.

0:43:230:43:26

I'm really happy.

0:43:260:43:29

THEY LAUGH

0:43:290:43:31

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:540:43:56

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:560:43:57