Episode 29 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 29

David Harper and Anita Manning begin the fourth leg of their journey. They head from Wells in Somerset to Hele in Devon.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts,

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£200 each and one big challenge.

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Testing, testing!

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK.

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-You're a hard woman.

-I'm sorry!

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The aim is to trade up and turn a profit.

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But it's not as easy as it sounds and there can only be one winner!

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Will it be the highway to success or the B road to bankruptcy?

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You can do it!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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It's Round Four of this week's road trip with David Harper and Anita Manning.

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They're careering across the south of England

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in a 1971 Triumph Spitfire.

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Anita, I'm determined to keep the roof off.

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You know how I feel, David. I like the wind in my hair!

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You might be getting some rain in your hair! Very soon.

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No hair envy, David! He's the current champion,

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an antiques dealer who likes using a bit of muscle to get a bargain!

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Don't break the table!

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Anita Manning is a Glaswegian auctioneer.

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She's teaching her adversary the antiques lingo from north of the border.

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It's a wee bit wibbly-wobbly.

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Burst oot greeting.

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I've no idea what you just said!

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Both experts started the week with £200 each.

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After amassing antiques aplenty, they fought bravely at auction in Wells

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and Anita went all-out to beat David.

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Yes! Yes!

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But again it wasn't enough.

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-Oh, what a shame!

-Yeah.

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David has scored a hat trick of auction triumphs.

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His original £200 is now a fantabulous £451.06.

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Anita has some way to go to get one over on David.

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From her original £200, she starts today with £253.51.

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This week's route, a whizz bang zoom across England's south coast,

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from Dover to Bideford in north Devon.

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Today's leg begins with our duo leaving Wells in Somerset

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for an auction showdown in Newton Abbott, Devon.

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Their first port of call is Sherborne in Dorset.

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This is a lovely, lovely quintessential English town.

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-Look at this house.

-That's very Tudor, isn't it?

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Yes, Sherborne is arguably one of the most stunning towns in England.

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It boasts a breathtaking abbey and several independent schools.

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You want to go for the biggie today.

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-You've been holding yourself back.

-Right.

-You're frustrated.

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Very frustrated. What do I do?

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-Spend the lot today.

-Spend the lot! And what are you going to do?

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-I'll try and do the same.

-You little liar!

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I know you too well!

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David's heading to a new shop that's just opened.

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It's filled with David's first love, Georgian furniture.

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-I'm David Harper.

-Piers Pasani.

-Piers.

-Hi.

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Why don't you point me in the direction of something

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that stands you at the right money and we can do a deal.

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Give me a chance of a profit.

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That came in yesterday.

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It's an 18th-century oak English gate-leg table.

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What date? 1750? '70?

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Maybe even a bit earlier than that.

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-George II?

-Maybe early 18th.

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This table was lovingly made around 1730.

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George II was king, Britain still held the American colonies

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and the Industrial Revolution was just beginning.

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Life expectancy, though, was just 35.

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So here's hoping many a merry evening

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was spent round this fine piece of oak

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before it was too late!

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I bought this at five o'clock yesterday evening.

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Is it cheapy-cheapy?

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-It is cheapy-cheapy.

-Are we talking mega cheapy-cheapy or just cheapy-cheapy?

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Well, it depends what you're calling cheapy-cheapy!

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Give me your best price.

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Seven hundred quid.

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-It's not a fortune, is it?

-No.

-It's not a fortune.

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Come on, David, let's get down to brass tacks!

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-Would £100 buy it?

-No. I'd do 165.

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I can't do it.

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I can't sell it for less than I buy it for.

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-110.

-125.

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-I'll spin a coin with you.

-125.

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-I'm not interested...

-120.

-..whether it's heads or tails.

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It's 125. I'm sorry. You know when a line is drawn in the sand?

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-That's it.

-Make the line a bit wavy.

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A slight compromise. Give me a chance. At 120, I'll have it.

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It's going to make 350 in that auction!

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125.

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-Oi! Go on.

-125.

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-It's got to be. It's the line.

-We'll have to arm-wrestle over this!

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-OK.

-OK, go.

-Go.

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Don't break the table!

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120 it is!

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Gosh!

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The ploys to slash prices are just getting stranger and stranger!

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Question is, will Anita be as bullish?

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I'd love to get a whopper. It would be nice to get something really special.

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Perhaps Anita's first shop will bring her a spot of luck.

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Relocation sale. 50% off.

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This could be it!

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And it's a bit of fun that catches her eye first.

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Could I have a look at that baby's plate there?

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Yes, course you can. Certainly.

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-That's great.

-It's fun, isn't it?

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I'd love to buy this.

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The thing about it is, to reveal that to David Harper

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with this on it - "Pride goeth before a fall"!

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-You're on to a winner there.

-That would really be a great laugh. I'd love that.

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This baby plate bears the back stamp of Doulton

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which dates it between 1902 and 1922.

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Take one smug ice skater heading for a hole in the ice he can't see,

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two onlookers watching him knowingly and you have a fun cautionary tale.

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It's priced at £85,

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baby!

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-I would be estimating that 20 to £30.

-Ah.

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That is a very low estimate!

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-I'm afraid I couldn't possibly run to that.

-You couldn't go...

-I'd be paying you, you see!

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Could you go with 30-ish? In the 30-ish region?

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No, I can't... Look, I'll do it for 40.

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-That's...

-Is that the lowest?

-That is, honestly, otherwise I'll be paying you!

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-So £40.

-Yes.

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Let's go for it.

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-Go for it.

-Let's go for it. It's fun.

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It's fun. It's fun.

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I'm dying to show this to David Harper!

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Look at this guy's face.

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He's very self-satisfied.

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Harper's a bit like that sometimes.

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Come to think of it, Anita, you might have a point!

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But beware! David's loitering just outside.

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Oi, you!

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-Oh, David!

-I've caught you coming out with a bag. What have you got? Let's have a look.

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Nothing, nothing.

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-One item.

-There are lovely things in there, David,

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-but I would forget it.

-Really?

-Yes.

-Really.

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No, I'm still going in!

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-Good luck, darling.

-You, too, sweet pea!

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Do you think that mean that? It's David's turn now to find a gem.

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I hope he's gentler with shop owner Fran Bryant than her previous customer! But it's unlikely!

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That's a bonny thing. It's a mystery object.

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The question is, what is it?

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I'd be grateful for some advice on that because I haven't got a clue.

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I assume it's a bottle stand.

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That's what I thought, but we've got a dip here and a flat bit there.

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I can't work out why.

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Has it got much age to it?

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I think it's late Victorian. It's got no marks underneath,

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-which is a good sign.

-Where did it come from?

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A lady brought it in.

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She said, "I don't know if this is any good."

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I thought, "Neither do I, but I'll have a go."

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Give me an idea what that might be.

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That MIGHT be £30.

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MIGHT it? Might it be 15?

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-I think it definitely might not be 15.

-Really?

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-Let me see if there's something else I could buy.

-OK.

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-You might just throw that in as a sweetener.

-We'll see.

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Anita is back on the road, taking a break.

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She's commandeered the little red devil for an educational detour.

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She's left Sherborne for a 23-mile trip to Stoke St Gregory.

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Anita's dropping in on the home of Somerset's historic willow industry.

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Jonathan, I'm Anita.

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Jonathan Coates's great-great grandfather

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founded P.H.Coate and Sons in 1819.

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They've been making everything from governesses' carts

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to berry-picking baskets for over 190 years. Today,

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this is the only company in Britain that grows, harvests and manufactures willow products

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on a large scale.

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It dates back hundreds and hundreds of years,

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but it really took off in the early 1800s.

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Why did they use willow as a material

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rather than oak or beech or whatever?

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Its lightness and its durability.

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It's light in weight and was very easy to put together.

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Here's a wonderful old picnic hamper.

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When did these date from?

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Well, the picnic hamper was supposedly invented by Scotts of London

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and was shown at the Great Exhibition in 1851.

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It reminds me of Enid Blyton, the Famous Five, the Secret Seven,

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and wonderful picnics in the countryside during the summer.

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Absolutely lovely.

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We have traditional seats, but this looks a rather odd one.

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-Tell me what this is, Jonathan.

-This was used

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-in the early fighter aircraft during the First World War!

-Really?

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Again for its lightness and durability.

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The hole in the seat is for the straps to come up through.

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-Right.

-Not for very scared pilots!

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Jonathan is keeping the family tradition alive.

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He supplies baskets and signage to some of the UK's biggest supermarkets.

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He's even made props for movie director Steven Spielberg.

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The company also makes willow coffins for those of us wanting to reduce our carbon footprint

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even after we've gone.

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Lordy!

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Willow is grown on the Somerset levels.

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After harvesting, the rods are stripped ready for weaving.

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This was actually done one rod at a time up until the mid 1920s,

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usually by the women and children in a break like this one here.

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If you'd just like to stand back a bit.

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That will take the bark off.

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-That's what was called stripping the willow.

-Yes.

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There's one job still very much done by hand, and that's weaving.

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One of the company's most skilled basket makers is Mary Nash.

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-That looks quite complicated.

-No, it's quite simple, really.

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-How many of these do you make a day, Mary?

-On average about three.

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This is a round sewing basket but it can be used for whatever anybody wants to use it for.

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Would you like to have a go? Finish this off?

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You can be my teacher, Mary.

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-So I go over the top.

-Over the top.

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I've got it!

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Got it.

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I'm getting into a wee rhythm now.

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-Right. There?

-That's it.

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I'll speed up now.

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-In there.

-That's it. You've got it.

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I've got it. Yours is beautiful, but mine's a bit scraggly.

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-No, it's fine.

-How long have you been doing it?

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-54 years.

-54 years?

-I started when I was 18.

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-Are you the best in the world at it?

-Yes!

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I've got to say that, haven't I?

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From the best in the world...

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to David Harper! Ha!

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He's got his mitts on another possibility in Sherborne.

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A Victorian needle-point teapot or kettle stand from 1870.

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It's tagged at £55.

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That should just pop out.

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-Look at that border.

-Lovely, isn't it?

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If somebody really wanted to, they could replace that.

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-But you wouldn't want to do that, would you?

-It would be a shame.

-It would.

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-That could probably be 30, I should think.

-Really?

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-Oh, dear, you're such a hard woman, Fran!

-I'm a tough person to deal with.

-You are.

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-You are very nice, though.

-Thank you.

-Very nice.

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-Just not THAT nice.

-No! Not that nice!

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Ooh, he's cheeky, that David.

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He's also interested in the bottle holder which Fran offered at £30.

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But now, of course, he wants both items cheapy-cheap.

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How about 30 quid for those two items?

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-I can't do it.

-Really?

-I'm so sorry. If I could, I would.

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-But I can't.

-You can't.

-I can't.

-Really?

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-I really...

-35 for the two?

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-I really...

-I almost got you. You almost said yes.

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You almost said yes. I can sense it.

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Go on, 35 for the two.

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-No.

-Oh.

-I can do 40 for the two.

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And I think you've got an absolute bargain there.

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-You're so lovely, I'll have to say yes to 40.

-Thank you.

-For the two items. Thank you.

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Anita's re-hit the Sherborne shopping trail

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and is in the capable hands of arm-wrestler Piers Pisani

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who sold David the table.

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He's leading her to something that might just pack a punch!

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I use them primarily for decoration. They don't have a price ticket.

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-But if you would like them, they'd be...

-Don't tell me.

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Let me look at them first. It's not a sport I did at school.

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-Neither did I.

-What sort of period would they be?

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I reckon they're early 20th century.

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Boxing gloves were first invented in 1743

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by English prize fighter Jack Broughton.

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He called them mufflers

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and modelled them on Ancient Greek fighting gauntlets called cestus.

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Do you think I could whack David Harper with them?

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I'm not offering my chin to practise!

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I feel as though I should be bandaging your hands

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and talking to you, saying, "Come on! You can do it!"

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You can do it.

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What I like is the fun of buying a pair of boxing gloves

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to fight my way back to the top!

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Could I buy these for £20?

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No. They should be £80 the pair.

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-Could you come to 40 with me?

-Come on. 45.

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I think.

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Oh, 40, cos you look at me so sweetly.

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Ah!

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Thank you!

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I think we'll have great fun with them and I kind of love them to bits.

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Slogger Manning!

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Sherborne has spelt success for both Anita and David.

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Time to skip town.

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This is the bit I like!

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Antiques in the boot, a beautiful woman, a classic car.

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No, she's coming later. About three o'clock!

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Get on with it!

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-Right.

-Onwards!

-Come on, lady.

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They're motoring from Sherborne to Ilchester,

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just ten miles north.

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David will continue shopping here,

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while Anita heads further afield.

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There you go, madam!

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-Can I assist in any way?

-Watch it, Harper!

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-Go on, then!

-I'm not going with the handbrake!

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-The handbrake is off.

-Go!

-I'm going to watch you go! Go on!

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I'll have a good laugh! Go on!

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That's it, Anita. Straighten up now, sweetie. There you go.

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Oh, my Lord!

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She's driving five miles on from Ilchester to the town of Somerton.

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That is a lot of nonsense we have.

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He just wants to drive all the time.

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He doesn't like being a passenger.

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He likes to be in control all the time.

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Sherborne was lovely, but I may have a better chance of a bargain

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in a smaller village.

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Let's hope so, anyway!

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With an infectious old-world charm, Somerton is an ancient Saxon town in Somerset.

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It sits on the River Cary and boasts some cracking 15th-century churches

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and a mix of good country pubs.

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Anita's making her way round an antiques centre where 30 dealers

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showcase their wares.

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I'm going to try not to buy something because it's amusing.

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What, like boxing gloves?

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Anita soon spies something decorative at £38.

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There's quite a sweet little spinning chair here.

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It would have been used. It was a functional item.

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But it's been decorated and that makes it so much nicer.

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Someone's loved it.

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It is probably turn of the century.

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There is a wee, wee hint of Art Nouveau about it,

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The decoration is nice. It's pen work. And it adds to the charm of it.

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David, I was looking at this wee spinning chair here.

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Am I able to buy that for £15?

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I think you're wanting to give me £18 for it?

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-Will you do it at £18?

-I will.

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It's a deal!

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Up the road in Ilchester,

0:18:290:18:31

David's spotted a late 19th-century Chinese picture frame for £50.

0:18:310:18:36

It's another chance to do what he loves best.

0:18:360:18:39

Haggling for a knock-down price!

0:18:390:18:41

Ah, yes. Couldn't be 21, could it?

0:18:410:18:44

It can't be 20.

0:18:440:18:46

-Sure?

-I'm sure, yes!

0:18:460:18:50

-£40 is the absolute...

-OK.

0:18:500:18:53

Let's see what else there is.

0:18:530:18:55

Roy Gilbert specialises in furniture,

0:18:550:18:58

so most items are on the big and pricey side.

0:18:580:19:01

But he does have another piece that might tempt David.

0:19:010:19:05

George III oak hall chair.

0:19:050:19:09

-OK.

-Good colour. Good patination.

0:19:090:19:11

-Yep. Nice shield at the back.

-Yeah.

0:19:110:19:15

Wonderful shape at the front. Very Georgian.

0:19:150:19:18

-What date do you put on it?

-1800?

0:19:180:19:20

-Slightly before.

-1770.

0:19:200:19:23

-1770 to 1800.

-What do you call that oak? Quarter-cut oak?

-Yeah.

0:19:230:19:29

The quarter cut is when you get that fossilised grain.

0:19:290:19:33

But they cut it at a certain angle to get that fossilised finish.

0:19:330:19:36

It's the most expensive way to cut oak, but it's worthwhile.

0:19:360:19:40

They put it on the seat and it's a piece of art, isn't it?

0:19:400:19:44

-My very best has got to be £60.

-Yeah.

0:19:440:19:47

Well, it's not a fortune, but, um...

0:19:470:19:52

Would I be very cruel if I said to you, "How about this?"

0:19:520:19:56

The Chinese picture frame and the Georgian chair,

0:19:560:20:00

-50 quid the pair?

-No!

0:20:000:20:02

No, definitely not! No!

0:20:020:20:03

OK, Roy, I'm trying my best here.

0:20:030:20:08

I don't know what else I can do. Do you want blood?

0:20:080:20:11

Money would be better!

0:20:110:20:14

I'd prefer that.

0:20:140:20:16

What would be the absolute death

0:20:160:20:18

on the picture frame?

0:20:180:20:20

-Would 20...

-No, 25.

0:20:200:20:22

25.

0:20:220:20:24

And the Georgian chair?

0:20:240:20:27

-It's got to be £60.

-You're a hard man. You're sticking there.

0:20:270:20:30

I'm trying to help!

0:20:300:20:32

70 for the pair.

0:20:320:20:34

-70 for the pair? No!

-I had you for two seconds. You were going to say yes.

0:20:340:20:40

I was adding up! It takes me ages!

0:20:400:20:43

-I'll do the two for £80.

-We're almost there, Roy.

0:20:430:20:47

-We are there.

-There, or almost there?

0:20:470:20:50

We're definitely there.

0:20:500:20:52

You're absolutely right.

0:20:520:20:54

Thank you very much. Cracking buys.

0:20:540:20:57

In Somerton, Anita's head has been turned by two watercolours from 1896,

0:20:570:21:04

priced at £40 each.

0:21:040:21:06

I was looking at this pair here.

0:21:060:21:08

Do you know anything about the artist?

0:21:080:21:11

No, I don't, no. I imagine a good amateur.

0:21:110:21:14

Where are these scenes of?

0:21:140:21:16

-They strike me as a London scene.

-A London scene?

-That's St Paul's in the background.

0:21:160:21:21

I think this is Fleet Street. There's the News of the World office.

0:21:210:21:25

-Right. OK. Maybe it's just made up.

-Yeah.

0:21:250:21:29

What about the two of them for £50?

0:21:290:21:32

-I think that's still too much.

-Is it?

-Mmm.

0:21:350:21:38

Am I able to buy these for £30?

0:21:380:21:42

-For the pair?

-No, the very best I could do is 40 for the pair.

0:21:420:21:47

-The best you could do?

-Half price.

-Could you consider coming down a wee bit?

0:21:470:21:52

Could you consider coming down maybe to 35?

0:21:520:21:57

Go on, then. You're a hard woman!

0:21:570:21:59

-I'm sorry! Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

0:21:590:22:02

So, with cash thrown at all sorts of goodies,

0:22:020:22:07

let's sign off for the day. Rest well, me pretties!

0:22:070:22:10

Another day. Another chance to spend, spend, spend.

0:22:140:22:18

Before that, our two experts are enjoying a bit of country scenery.

0:22:180:22:23

Look at those lovely cows. They're gorgeous.

0:22:230:22:27

-They're Friesian.

-What, they're cold?

0:22:270:22:30

Actually, Anita, they're Belted Galloways!

0:22:310:22:34

So far, David's gone large, forking out £240 on five items.

0:22:370:22:43

That leaves him with a purse of £211.06.

0:22:430:22:47

Thanks very much. Cracking buys.

0:22:470:22:49

While Anita bought just four items at £133,

0:22:490:22:54

giving her a pot of £120.51 to play with.

0:22:540:22:58

Lovely. Thank you very much. Smashing.

0:22:580:23:02

With five lots already bought, David has left Anita and shopping behind.

0:23:030:23:09

He's stopping off in Montacute, 11 miles from Somerton.

0:23:090:23:14

David's taking a very special trip down Memory Lane

0:23:140:23:17

to Montacute TV, Radio and Toy Museum.

0:23:170:23:21

-Ah, you must be Alan.

-And you must be David.

0:23:210:23:24

-I am David Harper. Good to meet you.

-And you!

0:23:240:23:27

For the last 20 years, curator Alan Hicken has collected anything and everything

0:23:280:23:34

to do with our best-loved TV and radio shows,

0:23:340:23:38

including Doctor Who, The Wombles and Dad's Army.

0:23:380:23:42

This is one of my favourite items.

0:23:430:23:46

This is an original puppet from the series Hank the Cowboy.

0:23:460:23:51

-I recognise him. That dates to when, the '50s?

-The '50s. 1950s.

-Gosh.

0:23:510:23:56

-That's quite rare.

-Very rare. Well, it's unique.

0:23:560:23:59

-That's one of the original puppets from the series.

-No.

0:23:590:24:03

The opening credits used to run down and he'd be bobbing up and down.

0:24:030:24:09

-There's a little handle here, if I just show you.

-Does it work?

0:24:090:24:14

Oh, he's off.

0:24:140:24:15

He's galloping now.

0:24:150:24:18

He wouldn't win the Grand National!

0:24:180:24:20

He's having a good go, though!

0:24:210:24:24

Like the antiques business, there's quite a bit of money to be made out of collectables like these.

0:24:260:24:33

Alan has looked out a couple of toys that are worth a few bob.

0:24:330:24:37

What have we here, then?

0:24:370:24:39

-Can I handle?

-Yeah, carry on, David.

-The Avengers.

0:24:390:24:44

Yeah.

0:24:440:24:45

Oh, gosh, we've got the Lotus Elan.

0:24:450:24:48

-Yes.

-And a cracking vintage Bentley.

0:24:480:24:52

-It is.

-Two wonderful cars.

0:24:520:24:55

-Date-wise, this will be what?

-'67, will it be?

-'67.

0:24:550:24:59

Now, you've got the box. Late '60s.

0:24:590:25:02

What's this worth, then?

0:25:020:25:06

Between 400 and £500.

0:25:060:25:08

Even in used condition?

0:25:080:25:09

-Even in used condition.

-And if it was absolutely mint?

0:25:090:25:13

700. 750.

0:25:130:25:14

This collection is probably the largest of its kind in the UK.

0:25:140:25:20

Although Alan hasn't counted every item, it's running into the thousands.

0:25:200:25:26

For those of you who don't remember programmes like Z Cars or The Sweeney,

0:25:260:25:30

you might remember this.

0:25:300:25:33

-The A Team!

-The A Team!

0:25:330:25:36

That armoured car, in a box, how much would that be worth?

0:25:360:25:40

-A couple of hundred quid.

-Couple of hundred.

0:25:400:25:42

For a plastic toy that kids were chucking away 20 years ago!

0:25:420:25:47

-Amazing, isn't it?

-It is.

0:25:470:25:49

You've got one cracking collection here, Alan!

0:25:490:25:52

-I love it when a plan comes together!

-Do you?

0:25:520:25:55

Before Show and Tell time, Anita's keen to grab another profit-making lot for the auction.

0:25:580:26:04

She's arrived in Hele in Devon, 40 miles from Somerton.

0:26:060:26:10

This is a pleasure indeed to meet you.

0:26:110:26:14

I can't believe it. This place is absolutely astonishing!

0:26:140:26:18

Makes you look petite, Anita!

0:26:180:26:20

There's 45,000 square feet of aged goodies to absorb,

0:26:200:26:24

including decorative items and collectables.

0:26:240:26:27

But despite the myriad choices, Anita still comes up trumps.

0:26:270:26:32

She's sniffed out a beautifully decorated notebook from the early 20th century.

0:26:320:26:36

That's an old writing pad. Lovely design on the front.

0:26:360:26:41

-It's in good condition inside.

-Yeah.

0:26:410:26:43

-Makes you wonder who owned it and everything.

-I know.

0:26:430:26:47

-What sort of price is that, Chris?

-Well, it's got 25 quid on it.

0:26:470:26:53

So I can do that for 22. £22.

0:26:530:26:57

-22?

-Mmm.

0:26:570:26:59

I like it

0:26:590:27:01

but I don't think I could make a profit on that at auction. What do you think?

0:27:010:27:06

You should get well over 20 for that. 25?

0:27:060:27:09

-Tell you what....

-It's a general sale that I'm putting it into.

0:27:090:27:14

15 quid.

0:27:140:27:16

-£15.

-It cost me 12, so don't hit me any more!

-Cost you 12?

0:27:160:27:20

Yeah.

0:27:200:27:22

Chris, would you take 12 for it?

0:27:220:27:25

-Nasty!

-Would you take 12 for it?

0:27:260:27:29

-All right.

-Would you?

-Yeah, I'll give in easy!

0:27:290:27:32

You are a darling!

0:27:320:27:33

Thank you very much, Chris.

0:27:330:27:36

Round Four has included arm wrestling and boxing

0:27:380:27:42

in the battle to buy bargains.

0:27:420:27:44

Now David and Anita go up against each other in a different arena.

0:27:440:27:48

Time to show off those wares!

0:27:480:27:51

-Show me your first item.

-This is the first item.

0:27:510:27:54

You might know it is a table!

0:27:540:27:57

George II. Circa 1730, 1750.

0:27:570:28:01

-Tell me how much you paid for it.

-120.

0:28:010:28:04

-Oh, that's for nothing!

-Do you think so?

-That is for nothing!

0:28:040:28:09

-I thought this was a lovely little bowl.

-What sort of money?

0:28:090:28:14

-I paid £40 for it.

-OK.

0:28:140:28:15

-I'd have been happier if I'd got it between 20 and 30.

-Yes.

0:28:150:28:20

-But, David, I couldn't resist it.

-Good girl.

-I just went with it.

-Good girl.

0:28:200:28:25

-I love it.

-£40. I might make a couple of quid on it.

0:28:250:28:28

It's a funny one, this one.

0:28:280:28:30

It's got to be a bottle stand of some sort, hasn't it?

0:28:300:28:34

Quite possibly, David. Quite possibly.

0:28:340:28:37

-How much did you pay for that?

-Get to the nitty-gritty.

0:28:370:28:40

£20.

0:28:400:28:42

If I brought that to your sale room, what estimate would you put on that?

0:28:420:28:45

I'd probably put it with a lot of other junk!

0:28:450:28:48

You horror! You're an absolute horror!

0:28:480:28:51

Now for David's teapot stand.

0:28:510:28:54

It's circa 1870. Certainly Victorian.

0:28:540:28:58

-20 quid.

-How did you get that for £20?

0:28:580:29:01

-Anita, it's called...

-Did that woman fancy you?

0:29:010:29:04

Anita's £35 watercolours are next.

0:29:040:29:07

There is some capability in the work.

0:29:070:29:11

They've got good colour and I love the carriages and people.

0:29:110:29:15

It's a snapshot of that time.

0:29:150:29:18

-And you've got a pair.

-A pair.

-A pair is always better than a single.

0:29:180:29:21

We've got a late 19th-century Chinese hardwood triple picture frame

0:29:210:29:27

-with that architectural design here.

-How much did you pay for that?

0:29:270:29:31

The magical figure, £20.

0:29:310:29:33

-It was a £20...

-A £20 winner!

0:29:330:29:35

-It can't be bad!

-I have to admit, David, that it might be a winner at £20.

0:29:370:29:42

I bought this little spinning chair

0:29:420:29:47

and I rather fancied that it was made by a young husband for his wife

0:29:470:29:52

because I love this heart-shaped cut-out here.

0:29:520:29:55

And I love this decoration.

0:29:550:29:59

-It's a good decorator. It could be used anywhere.

-I paid £18 for it.

0:29:590:30:04

It's George III. Circa 1800.

0:30:040:30:08

Oak hall chair.

0:30:080:30:10

I paid £60 for that.

0:30:100:30:12

In my mind I was thinking, "If he's got it for £80, he's got it cheap."

0:30:120:30:15

It's a little notebook.

0:30:150:30:19

-It has some decoration on the back.

-It's lovely.

0:30:190:30:22

That, for me, is my favourite piece.

0:30:220:30:25

-Do you like...

-I like it more than the chair.

0:30:250:30:28

-How much did you pay?

-£12.

0:30:280:30:29

-Really?

-Uh-huh.

-That's an absolute bargain.

0:30:290:30:33

Are you ready, David?

0:30:330:30:35

Do these knock you out?

0:30:350:30:38

Excellent!

0:30:380:30:39

Brilliant! We need one of those each!

0:30:420:30:44

Now, why on earth did you buy these?

0:30:440:30:48

When I came out, I thought, "Why did I buy them? And why did I pay £40 for them?"

0:30:480:30:54

-£40?!

-I know. Let's put them back!

-Please!

0:30:540:30:58

They're definitely interesting items,

0:30:580:31:01

but let's hear the real verdict.

0:31:010:31:03

That horrible bottle thing. What was that?

0:31:030:31:07

Was he throwing money away?

0:31:070:31:10

That was a piece of rubbish!

0:31:100:31:12

Anita's worst lot have got to be the boxing gloves. Got to be.

0:31:120:31:17

I can't see any profit at all.

0:31:170:31:20

So I'm hoping for a loss. Did I really say that? Yes, hoping for a loss.

0:31:200:31:25

Who's going to make the biggest profit?

0:31:250:31:28

You never know until the hammer falls on the auction day.

0:31:280:31:32

This leg of the journey has been a prize fight

0:31:350:31:38

between Anita and David to get ahead in the competition.

0:31:380:31:41

They've wheeled their way from Sherborne to Ilchester,

0:31:410:31:45

Somerton and Hele.

0:31:450:31:47

Now they're en-route to Newton Abbot in Devon.

0:31:470:31:50

Here, our duo will square up to one another

0:31:530:31:57

at the penultimate auction of the week.

0:31:570:31:59

The gloves are off and knuckles are bared.

0:31:590:32:01

Let's do it, Anita. Let's get professional.

0:32:010:32:05

Newton Abbot is in south Devon. It nestles the River Teign

0:32:100:32:16

and the awe-inspiring Dartmoor National Park.

0:32:160:32:19

Steady!

0:32:190:32:21

In 1688, William of Orange read his first declaration on English soil here

0:32:230:32:29

as he made his way to London to assume the throne.

0:32:290:32:32

Nowadays, the town is more famous for its annual cheese and onion fair.

0:32:320:32:36

Mmm!

0:32:360:32:37

Anita and David are stopping off at S.J.Hales Auctioneers.

0:32:370:32:41

Today is a general sale where glass, bronze and silver items do well

0:32:410:32:45

but ceramics are most popular here.

0:32:450:32:48

Mark Hales is the man with the gavel

0:32:480:32:51

and he's very keen on Anita's Edwardian baby plate.

0:32:510:32:54

If you go back ten years, 150 to £200, the American market. Everybody would jump on it.

0:32:540:32:59

In the ceramic world, it's a rare item.

0:32:590:33:02

It should really fetch 60 to £70, but that won't necessarily happen today.

0:33:020:33:08

On this leg of the journey, our experts have bought five lots each.

0:33:090:33:13

David has splashed £240 on the George II table,

0:33:130:33:19

the bottle stand, the teapot stand,

0:33:190:33:22

the George III hall chair and the Chinese picture frame.

0:33:220:33:26

Anita has spent £145 on the baby plate,

0:33:260:33:30

boxing gloves, the spinning chair,

0:33:300:33:34

the two watercolours and the Art Nouveau notebook holder.

0:33:340:33:39

Time to begin. It's Anita who's up first.

0:33:390:33:42

-First it's your boxing gloves.

-Boxing gloves.

0:33:420:33:45

My best item!

0:33:450:33:47

Can these wipe the smile off David Harper's face? Bang!

0:33:470:33:52

In superb condition. They don't come along every day.

0:33:520:33:55

£20, please. Come along. Bid £20.

0:33:550:33:58

Any interest at 20?

0:33:580:33:59

Ten, then? £10?

0:33:590:34:01

-I'm asking for £10.

-Please!

0:34:010:34:03

-Please!

-Ten I'm bid. Thank you.

-Yes!

0:34:030:34:06

With the lady at the back at ten.

0:34:060:34:08

-12 anywhere? 12 I'm bid. 14, madam?

-Yes!

0:34:080:34:12

16. 18?

0:34:120:34:14

-Are you sure? They might come in handy!

-OK, then.

0:34:140:34:18

18 at the back. Thank you, madam.

0:34:180:34:20

-Ridiculous!

-With the lady at £18.

0:34:200:34:22

-20 in front, sir? They're not expensive.

-No!

0:34:220:34:25

With the lady at the back, then, at £18.

0:34:250:34:29

-Thank you.

-Hooray!

-It should have been a quid.

0:34:290:34:32

I wouldn't be celebrating, Anita.

0:34:320:34:34

That's a disappointing loss!

0:34:340:34:37

I've just realised you've lost money. Brilliant!

0:34:370:34:40

David's George III hall chair takes the stage.

0:34:400:34:44

Start me at £30, please.

0:34:440:34:46

£30.

0:34:460:34:48

30 I'm bid. 32. 34?

0:34:480:34:50

36. 38?

0:34:500:34:52

38 on my right. 40 anywhere?

0:34:520:34:55

-On my right at £38. It deserves to make more.

-There's one!

0:34:550:35:00

-Thank you, madam.

-Thank God for that!

-40. 42.

0:35:000:35:02

-45.

-Go on!

-48.

0:35:020:35:05

50. It's still cheap.

0:35:050:35:07

No? I'll make it up to you later!

0:35:070:35:10

Are you sure? 50 in the room. 52.

0:35:100:35:13

-Go on!

-55? No?

0:35:130:35:15

On my right, then, at £52.

0:35:150:35:18

-Thank you, sir.

-Don't believe it.

0:35:190:35:22

I just can't believe it.

0:35:220:35:24

That is unfortunate.

0:35:240:35:26

It should have made a profit.

0:35:260:35:28

I find that really devastating.

0:35:280:35:31

You're going to burst into tears.

0:35:310:35:33

I don't think so! Now the auctioneer's favourite.

0:35:340:35:37

Anita's rare Edwardian plate.

0:35:370:35:39

I haven't seen one of these for over 20 years.

0:35:390:35:43

Start me at £20, please. £20 I'm bid.

0:35:430:35:47

Thank you. 22, sir?

0:35:470:35:49

25. 28. 30. 32. 35.

0:35:490:35:53

38. 40. 42.

0:35:530:35:56

45. 48.

0:35:560:35:59

50. 52.

0:35:590:36:00

-55.

-Yes!

0:36:000:36:03

It's still very cheap. 58.

0:36:030:36:05

60? No?

0:36:050:36:07

With the gentleman standing at £58.

0:36:070:36:09

Are you sure, madam? With the gentleman, then at 58. 60, sir. Thank you.

0:36:090:36:14

62? No?

0:36:140:36:16

Sure? On my left at £60.

0:36:160:36:19

Thank you.

0:36:190:36:20

-60. Yes!

-Well bought, Anita.

0:36:200:36:22

Well done, Anita. Permission to feel as smug as the chap on the plate!

0:36:220:36:27

I think I'm pleased for you!

0:36:270:36:30

Now for David's Victorian teapot stand.

0:36:310:36:34

Blink and this will be back to what it was ten years ago

0:36:340:36:38

which was 80 to 120.

0:36:380:36:40

I'm asking for £20.

0:36:400:36:42

Don't make me beg!

0:36:420:36:44

Go on. This is terrible, Anita! Terrible!

0:36:440:36:47

I'm asking for 20 and I get 15.

0:36:470:36:50

With the lady in the front row at 15. I'm selling.

0:36:500:36:54

-No, you're not!

-I'm selling at £15.

0:36:540:36:56

18. 20. 22.

0:36:560:36:59

Still for nothing. 24. 26, sir.

0:36:590:37:02

-28? No? On my left at 26.

-Come on! I need more than that!

0:37:020:37:07

Extremely reasonable.

0:37:070:37:09

On my left, then, at £26.

0:37:090:37:12

-Thank you, sir.

-It's still profit.

0:37:120:37:14

Tiny. A pound or two.

0:37:140:37:16

It's a profit, but nowhere near the size David's used to,

0:37:160:37:20

putting him right out of his comfort zone.

0:37:200:37:22

-Be happy!

-I'm not happy. I refuse to be happy.

0:37:230:37:26

Anita's Art Nouveau notebook holder makes an entrance.

0:37:260:37:30

It's a blooming beauty!

0:37:300:37:32

20 I'm bid. 22 anywhere?

0:37:320:37:34

24.

0:37:340:37:36

26. 28. 30. 32.

0:37:360:37:39

34? No?

0:37:390:37:40

In the room at £32.

0:37:400:37:43

Not bad. Not bad.

0:37:430:37:45

-Not bad.

-Good. It deserved it.

0:37:450:37:47

Yes, it did give Anita a much-needed gain.

0:37:470:37:51

That was a good thing.

0:37:510:37:52

-That was my favourite item of yours.

-Yeah.

0:37:520:37:55

David's Chinese picture frame is up next.

0:37:550:37:59

Start me at £20, please.

0:37:590:38:02

£20 I'm bid. Thank you. 22 anywhere?

0:38:020:38:04

22. 24?

0:38:040:38:06

26. 28?

0:38:060:38:08

28 in the middle. 30?

0:38:080:38:10

No? In the middle at 28.

0:38:100:38:13

This is not expensive, ladies and gentlemen.

0:38:130:38:15

It's very decorative. 30. Thank you. 32?

0:38:150:38:18

34. 36.

0:38:180:38:19

-Come on.

-38. 40? No? Are you sure?

0:38:190:38:23

-Come on!

-It's worth having.

0:38:230:38:24

Very pretty. No?

0:38:240:38:26

On my left, then, at £38.

0:38:260:38:29

-Yes.

-That's good. Well done.

0:38:300:38:32

-Are you happy now?

-No.

0:38:320:38:34

I'm feeling happier.

0:38:340:38:36

He's never happy!

0:38:360:38:38

No, Anita, he's not.

0:38:380:38:41

Come on, David. Buck up!

0:38:410:38:43

I'm feeling better, Anita.

0:38:430:38:45

It's Anita's romantically designed spinning chair.

0:38:450:38:49

Will it woo the bidders?

0:38:490:38:51

In superb condition.

0:38:510:38:53

£30. Start me at 30. I'm below estimate.

0:38:530:38:56

Don't be silly. £30?

0:38:560:38:58

Absolutely ludicrous!

0:38:580:39:01

No? £30. Come on!

0:39:020:39:04

£20. 20 I'm bid. On my left.

0:39:040:39:06

Very cheeky bid. 22.

0:39:060:39:09

24. 26, madam.

0:39:090:39:11

28? 26 with the lady standing.

0:39:110:39:14

She's buying it. 28. This is for nothing!

0:39:140:39:17

30. 32.

0:39:170:39:19

I should think so, too. 35.

0:39:190:39:22

38. You were teasing me earlier!

0:39:220:39:24

35 here. 38 at the back.

0:39:240:39:27

-Come on!

-We're selling.

0:39:270:39:29

Selling then at the back at £38.

0:39:290:39:32

-Yes!

-A profit again. You are doing it, baby. Another 20!

0:39:320:39:37

Anita's profits are creeping up.

0:39:370:39:39

Watch out, David!

0:39:390:39:41

I'm on next.

0:39:420:39:43

Yes, it's that bottle stand.

0:39:440:39:47

Anita hated it, but it could go either way.

0:39:470:39:51

£30 anywhere?

0:39:510:39:53

£30?

0:39:530:39:54

Start me at 30. Nobody want this at £30? Shame on you!

0:39:540:39:58

-£30 anywhere?

-Go on!

-20.

-Don't make me beg.

0:39:580:40:01

-20?!

-That hurt, madam.

0:40:010:40:03

-It hurt me!

-That hurt, but I'll take it. £20 in the room.

0:40:030:40:06

It's selling at 20. 22.

0:40:060:40:09

24. 26.

0:40:090:40:11

28.

0:40:110:40:12

30? No?

0:40:120:40:14

In the room at 28. This is ludicrously priced.

0:40:140:40:17

It's selling at a mere £28.

0:40:170:40:20

-Thank you.

-Well done. It's a great buy, that. Well done.

0:40:210:40:25

But Anita's not convinced despite the fact that it's made money.

0:40:250:40:30

That's for buying a lot of junk!

0:40:300:40:32

Time for David's George III table.

0:40:330:40:35

Start me at £60, please.

0:40:370:40:39

Nice to know. £60, anywhere?

0:40:390:40:41

Any interest? 60 I'm bid. Five. 70, sir?

0:40:410:40:44

Five. 80? And five. 90?

0:40:440:40:47

And five. 100, sir? 100 in the room.

0:40:470:40:50

110, anywhere? It's selling at this moment at £100.

0:40:500:40:54

-110?

-Go on!

-No?

0:40:540:40:56

In the room, then. £100.

0:40:560:40:58

With the gentleman standing at £100.

0:40:580:41:01

-Can't believe it.

-Oh.

0:41:010:41:03

A bad loss for David, but wait till he hears what the chap who bought it has to say!

0:41:030:41:09

I was happy to go to 200.

0:41:090:41:11

Oh, don't tell me!

0:41:110:41:13

Did you hear that?

0:41:130:41:15

Yes, I did. He would have paid £200 for that table

0:41:150:41:19

but he didn't have to.

0:41:190:41:21

There's just one lot to go.

0:41:220:41:25

Anita's watercolours.

0:41:250:41:27

They really are terribly underestimated, in my opinion.

0:41:270:41:30

Start me at £40, please for good pictures. Thank you. 42.

0:41:300:41:34

45. 48. 50.

0:41:340:41:36

And five. 60? 60 in the room.

0:41:360:41:38

65. Yes?

0:41:380:41:40

Thank you. 65. 70.

0:41:400:41:42

And five. 80. And five.

0:41:420:41:44

90? No?

0:41:440:41:46

With me, then, at £85.

0:41:460:41:49

-Yes!

-Well done.

0:41:490:41:52

Oh, dear! David isn't used to getting a thrashing.

0:41:520:41:56

-I'm happy.

-Are you?

0:41:560:41:58

I'm really happy.

0:41:580:42:00

After paying the auction costs,

0:42:060:42:08

David Harper has made his first ever overall loss on the Road Trip.

0:42:080:42:13

He's dropped £39,

0:42:130:42:15

leaving him with £412.06.

0:42:150:42:17

Anita Manning is the winner of the fourth leg of the competition.

0:42:190:42:24

After paying commission, she's made a profit of £46.94,

0:42:240:42:28

giving her a plump £300.45.

0:42:280:42:32

Nevertheless, there's still a long way to go to beat David.

0:42:320:42:36

But she can worry about that later.

0:42:360:42:38

Enjoy the glory, Anita!

0:42:380:42:40

-Get me out of here.

-David, that was great fun.

-Wonderful(!)

0:42:400:42:43

Great(!) Shall I take you for a victory drive around the countryside?

0:42:430:42:48

-Shall I?

-Yes, my man.

-Come on, then.

0:42:480:42:50

Take me some place nice.

0:42:500:42:53

-Somewhere pretty in Devon.

-Yes.

0:42:530:42:55

Off we go, baby.

0:42:550:42:57

Next time, David and Anita go all out to get the ladies of Devon onside...

0:42:570:43:03

It's girl power!

0:43:030:43:05

..as the competition between them reaches its finale.

0:43:050:43:08

-I'm almost on my hands and knees! Would it help?

-It may do, yes!

0:43:080:43:13

It may well do. I am married, however!

0:43:130:43:16

And who will be crowned our absolute champion?

0:43:160:43:20

It all ends here in Devon,

0:43:210:43:23

the final stop in our Antiques Road Trip.

0:43:230:43:26

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:530:43:56

David Harper and Anita Manning begin the fourth leg of their journey. Their mission: to see who can make the most money buying local antiques and selling them at auction as they head from Wells in Somerset to Hele in Devon.