Episode 1 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 1

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Anita Manning and Mark Stacey start their journey in Aberfeldy and head for auction glory in Dunblane.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge!

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I might need to declare war.

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Why?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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-£15?

-No!

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The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit,

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but it's not as easy as you might think and things don't always go to plan.

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Push!

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So, will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

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I'm going to go for it.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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This week, auctioneer Anita Manning, who's a proper Scot, and valuer Mark Stacey,

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who's quite fond of a bit of porridge but wouldn't know Robert Burns if he bit him,

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drive their delightful blue Morris Minor through some major Scottish scenery,

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a soft top, but hopefully not a soft touch.

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You're a local girl and I think you're going to have a very competitive advantage over me.

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-You've got to roll your Rs.

-Leave my Rs out of this!

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THEY LAUGH

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Anita, from Glasgow, has an in-depth knowledge of all things Scottish.

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A wee bit wibbly-wobbly.

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So will that give her the edge over Mark?

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-Could you take another couple of pounds off it?

-No, sorry.

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That's a Scotsman for you!

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Mark, who's also Celtic, having come from Wales via Brighton, is ambitious, to say the least.

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I want to hold the world in my hands.

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Although this isn't his home turf,

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he hopes that a sussed Southerner might grab a crafty Caledonian bargain too.

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If we could go 18...

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You naughty man!

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The mind games and friendly rivalry start here.

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Well, what else would you expect?

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-You could be Mary, Queen of Scots.

-Well, if I'm Mary, Queen of Scots, you will have to be Elizabeth I,

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the Virgin Queen!

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THEY LAUGH

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This week our journey begins in the heart of the Cairngorms

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and progresses via the beautiful cities of Edinburgh and Durham

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to Thirsk in North Yorkshire.

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Today's shows starts out in Aberfeldy and concludes with a tasty little auction in Dunblane.

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Mark and Anita are all set to turn their £200 each into a tidy profit,

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but who will triumph and who will have a tantrum?

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Well, I can't believe that! It's shocking!

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First stop en route is the little town of Killin at the western head of Loch Tay.

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-How many lochs are there in Scotland?

-Millions.

-Millions!

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Steady! They used to grow flax and weave an awful lot of linen in these parts,

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but nowadays Killin earns a living from tourism.

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Mark and Anita are here to visit Maureen Gauld Antiques.

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-That's our first stop. Shall we go in together, Mark?

-I think we should,

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but I don't want you rushing in without me. You wait for me.

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What I'd like you to do, Mark, is if you see any bargains, will you give me a shout?

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So what happens when a Scotswoman and a Welsh man walk into an antiques shop? This is not a joke!

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-Gosh, it's so exciting! It's like a treasure trove in here.

-Our first shop!

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Listen, Anita, I think...

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-I'll stay here.

-You stay here. I'll go and explore round the back.

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Gauld's is very much a traditional antique shop with a little bit of everything.

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Somewhere, though, there's a bargain to be found.

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This is a piece of Scottish pottery. Look at the motto.

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"Freens are like fiddlestrings. They maunna be screw'd owerticht."

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Which means, "Friends are like fiddle strings. Don't overstretch them."

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Of course I know what it means, but Mark may need a translation!

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That looks quite interesting.

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Now, this is a little Victorian, I would say, sort of pokerwork.

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Somebody would have carved all this pattern out by using hot pokers and then staining it.

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It was something that often Victorian-Edwardian ladies did at home.

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Mark's unearthed a late-Victorian example of pyrography

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or the art of decorating wood by burning with the tip of a heated poker.

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Barrels like these could be used to keep hats in.

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And actually what I quite like about it, of course, is Anita is Scottish,

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but this is an English rose on here.

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It's probably about 100 years old, but that Tudor rose might not impress a Scottish auction.

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It's in pretty original condition. It hasn't been tarted up, so it doesn't look all bright and shiny.

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But, of course, the crucial thing is the price.

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Victorian pokerwork barrel, £45.

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If we could get that down, that might be a possibility.

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Anita is always up for something a wee bit vernacular, don't you know?

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And in amongst the glassware she's spotted something that fits the bill.

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We've got this wonderful big piece of Monart.

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Now, Monart was made from the late '20s to the '60s

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in the factory of Moncrieff in Perth.

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This glass became wonderfully popular in the 1920s and 1930s,

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and it was sold in Liberty's.

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It's still collectable today, but it's a bit expensive.

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Quite! At almost £700 it's way beyond your budget!

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Mark, meanwhile, is already pondering another addition to his little horde.

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What we've really got here is a sort of decorative needlework panel, I suppose.

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I think it probably is 1920s or '30s, but the colours are still quite good in this.

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If you look at the pinks there and the greens,

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and the little blues there, it's rather an attractive thing.

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But it's quite a substantial piece really for £25.

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I think that's going to be another piece we're going to add with our bit there

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and see if we can get a good price on that.

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Anita, though, has found something with global appeal.

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Practical too.

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Now, terrestrial globes are quite collectable. People like this type of thing.

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But this little globe is also...

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..a biscuit tin! Isn't that sweet? I like that.

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Crawford's Biscuits were founded by one William Crawford in Leith, near Edinburgh in 1813.

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Fancy tins came later, and curios like this from the '30s are now highly collectable.

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The price label, however, says £60.

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Wow! Tome to talk to canny shopkeeper Jimmy Gauld.

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-Good morning.

-Jimmy, good morning.

-Nice to meet you.

-I'm Anita.

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-When I looked at that at the beginning, I was trying to open that out.

-Yeah, it opens up.

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That's an awful lot of trouble to get a ginger snap.

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Are you sure you haven't got India on Africa there?

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-I think you might be right.

-No, no, you're fine! I'm kidding you on.

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-I wasn't sure whether I was coming or going.

-Jimmy,

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I think that...again, we're putting it into auction. It's going into a general auction.

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And we're trying to make just even a wee bit of profit on it.

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Can I have £30 on that?

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-Oh, no chance!

-Is there no chance on that?

-Not a hope in...

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-Could we come...?

-Nowhere even near it! I'll do it for 50.

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-That's the best I can do on that.

-Is that the best you can do?

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Mmm...that didn't go well! But already Anita's found something else to bargain with,

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an imitation Tiffany's vase for a tenner.

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I wondered if I could do the biscuit tin and this wee thing, which is not a thing of any great significance,

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if you could give me the two for £50?

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But Anita's reckoned without the very thin walls in this establishment!

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-Could you?

-I can hear Anita. I'm just going to earwig what she's saying.

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-I could do it for 5, make it 55 for the two of them.

-55 for the two?

-Two of them, yeah.

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She's not sure about something.

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-Could you come down?

-No.

-Every pound counts!

-I know.

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I'll just have a peek round the corner.

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-Could you come to maybe 53?

-I've got a wife and three publicans to keep, I need the money!

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-A wife and three publicans?

-Aye!

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That's a Scotsman for you!

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-Oi! Flower of Scotland! Can you hurry up, please? Cos I'm trying to do a deal here!

-All right, OK.

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-I don't want to interrupt you.

-You're not interrupting me.

-Are you sure?

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I've got to give the man some money, hopefully!

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While Anita heads off for another scout around, it's time for Mark to try his charms on our Jimmy.

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For some reason, I quite like this frame.

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And I rather find this rather charming.

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I mean, I don't know how flexible you can be with me...

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As I say, whatever price is on it, just double it and then we'll do a deal!

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Well, you see, I was thinking the other way, to halve it...

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No chance of that!

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So what would be the best on this one, then?

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-I'll do that for 20.

-That would be 20?

-Yeah.

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-And that one would be...?

-Make it 40.

-Listen, my friend, I really do like those two pieces.

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I know...I'm not here to slash the prices from you,

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-but I do have to try and negotiate as hard as I can.

-You are trying!

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I know, I'm very trying! Everybody says that to me!

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Is there any chance we could get to 50?

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-No.

-Please.

-Not a hope in hell!

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-55?

-No, it's got to be 60.

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-Oh, come on, Jimmy!

-I can't!

-Please!

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55 and we've got a deal, I promise you!

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-Er...

-Please!

-Anything to get rid of you!

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Oh, don't say that, Jimmy! Don't say that.

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-You've got a smile on your face.

-I've always got a smile on my face.

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It's not trapped wind?

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I hope not!

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Anita just can't drag herself away from the Scottish glass.

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And she's now discovered something which at £22 is an awful lot cheaper than the Monart.

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This is a piece of Strathearn glass. It's from about the '70s, '80s.

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It's still nice, I like it,

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and I might be able to get it for a reasonable price. I'll go and ask Jimmy.

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Worth a try, Anita, and adding it to the other items which you've bought may help.

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55 for the two of them and 22 is 77, so I'll make it 75.

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-Could you take another couple of pounds off it?

-No, no, sorry.

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-Two wee pounds!

-No!

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-No.

-Oh, you're a hard man!

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75!

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So while Anita deposits an awful lot of her budget inside Jimmy's ancient till,

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Mark's found time for a quick trip to one of Scotland's most impressive castles.

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Mark and his Morris are heading for Inveraray.

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Look, it's breathtaking. It's almost like a little fairy-tale castle, isn't it?

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Like a medieval French chateau!

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The house itself is very fine indeed,

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based on a sketch by Vanbrugh in the 18th century,

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although there's been a castle here beside Loch Fyne since the 1400s.

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This is the seat of the Dukes of Argyll,

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better known as the Campbells,

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a family that's played an important role in several key moments of Scottish history.

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Hello!

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-Mark!

-You must be Jane.

-Welcome to Inveraray Castle.

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-Thank you for having me.

-Delighted to meet you.

-Lovely to meet you too

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-on such a wonderful day.

-I know, it's stunning, isn't it?

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Jane Young is the manager at Inveraray

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and the best possible guide to the castle.

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So as you enter into the armoury hall, you'll see a lot of the armaments.

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The castle contains several reminders of the family's early fighting years,

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as well as a priceless object that once belonged to a Scottish folk hero.

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So this is Rob Roy's sporran.

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-And this was found in his cottage which was just up at the top of Glen Shira...

-And that's nearby?

-Yes.

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It's just on the outskirts of the town.

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Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue, was a sort of Scottish Robin Hood,

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a legendary outlaw and freedom fighter,

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the difference being that, unlike Robin, he and his sporran were real.

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-You can see all the beautiful ornate work...

-Detail.

-Yes, around about.

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Wonderful, isn't it?

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The Argylls fought on the side of the Government

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and against Bonnie Prince Charlie's claim to the throne at Culloden in 1745.

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Incredibly, you can see original banners from that battle still hanging on the castle walls.

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They are so fragile. You can see there's hardly any...

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-Yes, very delicate.

-..Decoration left on them.

-But you can actually still see the outline

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of the Argyll Militia.

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They're obviously a very important part of history.

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And just over 100 years after that, the Argylls actually married into the British Royal Family.

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In the Victorian Room, there's a fine painting of the future 9th Duke getting hitched

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to Princess Louise in 1871.

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-I can spot Queen Victoria in the middle there.

-Yes, yes, pretty...

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Then you've got the bride and groom at the end. And I must admit

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-she does look for once as if she's got a cheeky smile on her face!

-Yes.

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I'm sure she's delighted that's daughter number 4 married!

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But perhaps the most surprising item at Inveraray is one unlikely survivor of the big day,

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a piece of cake!

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Now, Judy, I'm dying to ask you... It just looks like an envelope. Where is the piece of cake?

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-Well, you can see how it's all been delicately wrapped and sealed at the back.

-Wonderful.

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And this isn't the sort of thing that one takes home to eat?

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No, I wouldn't think so. I think you would want to keep it and preserve it carefully.

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It's absolutely beautiful.

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Wonderful.

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And with the sun setting over Loch Fyne, Mark heads back to the hotel to find Anita.

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Day 2, and Mark's at the wheel as they continue their trek around the Trossachs... Sounds painful!

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-Are you dying to get to the shop?

-I am. And are you planning to spend all of your budget?

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I'm not telling you!

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Yesterday Mark spent a mere £55 from his precious £200 on two items.

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That'll be fantastic. Thank you so much.

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While Anita lavished £75 on three things, including an astonishing £50 on a biscuit tin

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shaped like a globe!

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Oh, you're a hard man!

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Will she make a handsome profit at the auction or just crumbs? Time alone will tell.

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Today Anita and Mark hope to motor all the way down to Callander,

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calling in at the little town of Balfron

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to add to their haul.

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Balfron has got quite a history. The name in Gaelic means "village in mourning",

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apparently because a pack of wolves once stole their children. It could have been the Vikings, though.

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Either way, do the good people of Balfron know that Manning and Stacey are a-coming?

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Right, stop!

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Just wait there, Anita.

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I won't take any unfair advantage of you!

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-Why's that, then?

-Because I know you've got your beady eye on me!

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THEY LAUGH

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-Well, I'll just nip in!

-Hey!

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Junktion Antiques is a very different retail experience for Anita and Mark. Plenty of room,

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and with a range that extends from humble bric-a-brac all the way to top quality.

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There should be a bit more scope for our dynamic duo here

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if proprietor David Hill is as good as his word anyway.

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-Have you got any bargains?

-They're all bargains!

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-Be serious!

-They're all bargains!

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Anita always was the bookish type and Junktion seems to have quite a library.

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I always find these Victorian photograph albums very sweet, very evocative.

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Look at that wee girl there.

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She's all dressed up in rather stiff Victorian clothes.

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Nobody ever seems to be smiling in them.

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Mark's found an avian oddity.

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It's really a novelty little item.

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It's made out of an early form of plastic, actually,

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and it's meant to be a sort of rather exotic bird sitting on a branch looking at a little box.

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But actually if you're too lazy to open the box yourself for a cigarette,

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what you do is you push the bird and it picks the cigarette up in its mouth,

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and then you take it from the bird.

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Back in the 1930s when such items were all the rage,

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complicated cigarette dispensing was as popular as devilishly strong gaspers,

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but this one, unfortunately, needs a trip to the novelty bird vet!

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Its beak's broken. What a shame.

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-You haven't got that bit, have you?

-I haven't, Mark.

-What a shame.

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Charming little object.

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There's plenty of furniture at Junktion,

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and beneath its shabby exterior Anita may have found a chest to treasure.

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This is a nice wee chest.

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It's a little Victorian mahogany apprentice piece.

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It's been painted white and it looks terrible,

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but this would strip down quite nicely.

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Plastic handles! Wrong handles.

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Oh, Mark's found a bit of old metal.

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I think it's quite fun, actually. It's quite imposing.

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I suppose if you've got a big Glasgow house or something,

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to have a big tray like that up on your wall...

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It's had some drill holes here.

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If I'm being honest about the piece, it's only a little... It's a beaten tray.

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It's not of huge quality, but actually there's some quite nice detail on it.

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I can't quite make out who it is. Oh, Robert Dudley.

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Associate of Queen Elizabeth I, and as Anita has christened me the Virgin Queen,

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it could actually be quite fortuitous, shall we say?

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Dudley, First Earl of Leicester was certainly one of the Queen's suitors

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and allegedly responsible for the death of his first wife.

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he was also hated by many Scots for his role in the execution of Mary Stuart.

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I can hear him blethering away to David. I want to get in there!

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-David?

-Yes, Mark?

-This is not the sort of thing I normally go for, I have to say.

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-It's got no price on it.

-That piece could go today for somewhere in the region of £30.

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Could I make you a sneaky offer?

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-I'm all ears!

-Can we get anywhere near 15?

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If we could go 18, you've got a deal.

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-16.

-17.

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-You naughty man! Go on, you've done it.

-Right, Mark. Thank you.

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Inspired or just plain bonkers?

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I mean, how will a Robert Dudley charger go down in Scotland?

0:18:400:18:44

Now, that looks familiar!

0:18:460:18:48

I'm thinking that I should probably stay away from terrestrial globes!

0:18:490:18:52

Well, the jury's still out on yesterday's purchase.

0:18:520:18:56

Five minutes later, but who should find himself in that part of the shop but Mark Stacey?

0:18:560:19:02

I think that's lovely.

0:19:020:19:04

I think this is really nice. It's a piece of 1950s or '60s furniture.

0:19:040:19:10

You've got this very typical shape here.

0:19:100:19:11

But I love globes and I'm fascinated by globes anyway.

0:19:110:19:15

And I just think that's really nice.

0:19:150:19:18

There we are, look. There's Glasgow. I'm really getting into this '50s and '60s stuff now,

0:19:180:19:25

because it's what the youngsters want, and you can mix and match it in with the old and the new.

0:19:250:19:30

And it actually creates a home which looks like it's been through the generations.

0:19:300:19:34

It's marked up at the moment at £38,

0:19:340:19:37

which in my part of the world, Brighton, would be terribly cheap.

0:19:370:19:41

I certainly wouldn't have that on it in my shop!

0:19:410:19:44

But whether of course the good bidders of Scotland are ready for the '50s revolution again,

0:19:440:19:51

I'm not sure.

0:19:510:19:52

-David, I absolutely love this. I'm laying my cards on the table.

-Okey-dokey.

0:19:520:19:59

I want to hold the world in my hands.

0:19:590:20:01

-Don't we all?

-And this is my chance of doing it.

0:20:010:20:04

I don't think you can move much from £38, to be honest with you.

0:20:040:20:08

But there is a price I'd like to pay in my mind.

0:20:080:20:10

I'd love, honestly, to pay £25 for it.

0:20:100:20:15

I think at £25, you've got a chance of making something on it,

0:20:150:20:20

-and I think we've got a deal there at £25.

-David, thank you so much.

0:20:200:20:22

Mark has four items so far for a whisker under £100.

0:20:220:20:27

-The world in your hands.

-Thank you very much, David.

0:20:270:20:29

But Anita after yesterday's splurge has yet to spend a shilling.

0:20:290:20:34

This is a fairly modern whatnot.

0:20:340:20:38

But it's rather a nice shape with these three tiers.

0:20:380:20:43

Actually less of a whatnot, more of a reproduction three-tier dumb waiter,

0:20:430:20:49

based on a Georgian model first made in the 1760s.

0:20:490:20:53

I like the three tiers and I also like the little metal claw feet.

0:20:550:21:01

Might have a go at that.

0:21:010:21:03

But will David budge from his £30 asking price?

0:21:030:21:07

Thinking auction value on it. You don't know if it's going to get £10,

0:21:070:21:12

-you don't know if it's going to get £40.

-Very much so.

0:21:120:21:14

-I can do that in the region of £20.

-Right.

0:21:140:21:18

I think that...

0:21:180:21:19

-Oh, Lordy!

-There we go.

0:21:190:21:21

-I think that's needing glued.

-It's needing glued back together.

0:21:210:21:25

-That should halve the value!

-I'll do that at £10 to you and you put that in the auction.

0:21:250:21:31

Crikey, it worked! I must try that.

0:21:310:21:33

I mean, I know this is really the naughtiest thing in the world,

0:21:330:21:38

but could you come down to a fiver?

0:21:380:21:41

-We'll split the difference. We'll do 7.50.

-7.50?

0:21:410:21:45

And we've got a deal. And if you can't make £15 on that...

0:21:450:21:49

-If I can't make £15 on that...

-It's time to chuck it!

-It's time to chuck it!

0:21:490:21:53

Thanks very much.

0:21:530:21:54

-Where's Mark Stacey?

-TOOT!

0:21:560:21:58

Am I keeping you waiting, darling? I've just got all the bargains.

0:21:580:22:01

-Are you happy, darling?

-I'm ecstatically happy, Anita.

0:22:010:22:06

So, darlings, with a potential bargain safely in the boot, Anita is now in the driving seat.

0:22:060:22:11

I love this big steering wheel. I think it's great, it's wonderful.

0:22:110:22:15

It's like driving a huge, big car!

0:22:150:22:17

You look like the flower of Scotland...or is it an old thistle?

0:22:170:22:21

From Balfron our trippers head north to Aberfoyle where they might do just a little more shopping.

0:22:220:22:29

Aberfoyle is in the heart of the Trossachs, and has several tales to boast of,

0:22:290:22:36

and most of them involve trees. The local minister, Reverend Robert Kirk,

0:22:360:22:41

used to write books about fairies, as you do.

0:22:410:22:44

Legend had it that he fell out with them and they trapped his spirit in a tree.

0:22:440:22:48

Not this one, though! That's where Rob Roy once hid from the law, allegedly.

0:22:480:22:53

Aberfoyle is also famous for its ice cream and Mark and Anita simply can't resist.

0:22:530:22:58

Delicious ice cream, Anita.

0:22:580:23:00

Listen, I'm going to do you a favour. As you need to get shopping,

0:23:000:23:03

I'll relieve you of that and finish it for you. Off you go!

0:23:030:23:05

Anita wants to buy still more and knows of a place nearby,

0:23:050:23:09

while Mark chooses to shop locally with both ice creams.

0:23:090:23:13

And who should he bump into but that nice Jimmy Gauld from Killin!

0:23:130:23:17

We're just in to do some more shopping because you were so mean to us!

0:23:170:23:20

-Well, naturally, I'm an Aberdonian!

-We had to get some bargains.

-I'm an Aberdonian!

0:23:200:23:24

-I'll never go to Aberdeen.

-Thank God for that!

0:23:240:23:27

Nice to see you!

0:23:270:23:28

Anita, however, doesn't head straight for the next shop.

0:23:290:23:33

She takes a quick diversion into Scotland's industrial past instead...

0:23:330:23:38

..making her way from Aberfoyle over to Dumbarton near Glasgow.

0:23:390:23:43

This is the River Clyde, sunny and a bit sleepy today,

0:23:430:23:47

but once one of the world's major shipbuilding areas.

0:23:470:23:50

Great ships like the Lusitania...

0:23:520:23:54

..the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth were built here.

0:23:550:23:58

And the Scottish Maritime Museum is based on the site of William Denny and Bothers,

0:23:590:24:03

a famous name in shipbuilding since 1840.

0:24:030:24:07

This here is the model of the Cutty Sark.

0:24:070:24:10

-And this was the fastest tea clipper in the world?

-Indeed, yes.

0:24:100:24:14

-And one of the most famous ships in the world.

-Of course.

0:24:140:24:17

Built here in Dumbarton.

0:24:170:24:19

But Denny's were a go-ahead company who soon introduced science into shipbuilding,

0:24:190:24:26

and here in Dumbarton they created one of the world's first experimental testing tanks.

0:24:260:24:31

And what does it do?

0:24:320:24:33

Well, what happened was when Denny's won an order to build a new ship, the order would come here first.

0:24:330:24:38

And the drawing office upstairs would then produce a drawing of a scale model of the ship's hull.

0:24:380:24:44

The innovative design of Denny's tank

0:24:440:24:45

meant that those little scale models could be tested under the conditions

0:24:450:24:50

that real ships would encounter at sea, and the idea was soon copied elsewhere in Britain

0:24:500:24:55

and around the world.

0:24:550:24:57

I heard a wee story that this was called the mother tank,

0:24:570:25:01

and when they built other tanks of this type they would take a cup of water from the tank.

0:25:010:25:07

-Is that true or is it just a myth?

-That is true.

0:25:070:25:09

-So that's holy water?

-Yes, more or less, yes!

0:25:090:25:13

Now that she's done in Dumbarton, Anita must make her way to her final shopping date in Callander,

0:25:130:25:20

gateway to the Highlands.

0:25:200:25:22

Callander, which became famous during the 1960s as the setting

0:25:220:25:27

for fictional Tannochbrae of Dr Finlay's Casebook fame,

0:25:270:25:31

is also notable as the birthplace of Helen Duncan,

0:25:310:25:34

Britain's last convicted witch in 1944.

0:25:340:25:38

Well, I never did!

0:25:380:25:40

All that and Lady Kentmores, an antique shop.

0:25:400:25:44

-Hi, George, lovely to meet you again.

-How are you doing?

-I'm well.

0:25:440:25:48

George's shop is one of Anita's road-trip favourites, full of quirks and curiosities.

0:25:480:25:54

It's the sort of place where Crown Derby can happily nestle up against a jukebox or a slot machine.

0:25:540:25:59

-Have you got 5 pence, George?

-I'll give you 5 pence. I know what a gambler you are!

0:25:590:26:03

I'm going to try my luck, George.

0:26:040:26:06

-Am I going to win?

-It's like Vegas!

0:26:060:26:09

Oh, this is great fun!

0:26:090:26:11

Many have compared antiques dealing to gambling, but I don't know how many of them are good at both.

0:26:110:26:16

I've got 20 pence back!

0:26:160:26:19

Yes!

0:26:190:26:22

-You can now buy something now you're rich!

-All right! What have you got for 20 pence?

0:26:220:26:26

Well, first pay him back his 5p!

0:26:260:26:29

In amongst the porcelain in this cabinet,

0:26:290:26:31

there's certainly a couple of very unusual and collectable items.

0:26:310:26:35

Are these eyes old eyes?

0:26:350:26:37

A pair of blue eyes from the 1940s.

0:26:370:26:40

What happened at the beginning of World War II,

0:26:400:26:42

the Spitfires and everything, the pilots got a lot of eye injuries,

0:26:420:26:45

and Churchill found out about this.

0:26:450:26:48

And he summoned the tops ones on the medical side of the Army in and said, "We need to fix this!"

0:26:480:26:54

These eyes are ceramic, all hand-painted with the eyes,

0:26:540:26:57

and they used to take a day to do each one.

0:26:570:27:00

I mean, they are absolutely gruesome.

0:27:000:27:03

But beautifully done.

0:27:030:27:05

Mark is still browsing in Aberfoyle. Slate used to be mined hereabouts,

0:27:060:27:12

and Mark has found something made from the rock in the James Rae antique shop.

0:27:120:27:17

This is a very nice late-19th century slate mantel clock.

0:27:170:27:23

This is all slate which has been engraved and then gilded.

0:27:230:27:27

I think they're very elegant but they don't actually, funnily enough, sell that well at auction.

0:27:270:27:33

But they look wonderful. I'd love one of these in my house,

0:27:330:27:35

because it's very imposing and I'm sure it tells the time very nicely.

0:27:350:27:40

Meanwhile in Callander Anita is also looking at a clock.

0:27:410:27:46

What attracted me to this one

0:27:460:27:49

is the shape.

0:27:490:27:51

-Mm-hm.

-I like the shape.

0:27:510:27:54

And it has a little Arts and Crafts look about it.

0:27:540:27:58

The Arts and Crafts movement flourished with William Morris

0:27:580:28:02

in the third quarter of the 19th century, and the philosophy soon spread to Scotland,

0:28:020:28:06

especially Glasgow, where it was adopted enthusiastically in both architecture and design.

0:28:060:28:12

A conservative estimate on that, I would say, would be £20-30.

0:28:120:28:17

Yeah, I think eventually that would finish up about 45-50.

0:28:170:28:21

If you was wanting this, we could probably do something around about the 30, which would be...

0:28:210:28:26

Round about the 30s? How about 22 on it?

0:28:260:28:29

-25 and it's yours.

-I'm tempted to say, "Let's halve it and go 23."

0:28:290:28:35

-That's not half.

-Oh, no!

0:28:350:28:37

Arithmetic!

0:28:370:28:39

-OK, what about 24?

-24 and you've got a deal.

0:28:390:28:41

Oh, you're a darling!

0:28:410:28:44

Mmm...enough of that! Anita now with five items to declare must head for a date

0:28:440:28:50

with Mark at the lake at Menteith, Scotland's only lake.

0:28:500:28:54

It apparently got its name because the local baron was a traitor to the English.

0:28:540:28:59

Do you know, Anita? No wonder I'm so tired.

0:28:590:29:01

-You're sitting down and I'm always fetching and carrying!

-Well, I like a man to run after me!

0:29:010:29:07

-Cheers, darling.

-Cheers.

0:29:070:29:09

-First up, Anita's Strathearn vase.

-I love the colours.

0:29:090:29:13

-The colours...

-The swirls.

0:29:130:29:15

I think that there's a lot of movement in this piece and I quite like it.

0:29:150:29:21

Well, I just hope there's a lot of movement in the price. What did you pay for it?

0:29:210:29:24

-I paid £20.

-Well, that's a bit cheap, isn't it?

0:29:240:29:27

Show me your first one.

0:29:270:29:29

I just thought if there was a buyer in the saleroom who had quite a sort of baronial entrance space

0:29:290:29:36

or fireplace, that would look lovely hanging up.

0:29:360:29:38

-It's not great quality, but it's quite impressive.

-I like this.

0:29:380:29:43

It has the look and I love the detail in the border.

0:29:430:29:48

-How much did you pay for it?

-You won't laugh, will you?

0:29:480:29:51

-I might.

-£17.

0:29:510:29:54

It's a thing which will appeal to the Scottish rural buyers.

0:29:540:29:59

-Now, the biscuit tin that doubles as a globe.

-Oh, how lovely!

0:29:590:30:03

And it was made for Crawford's Biscuits.

0:30:030:30:07

-Lovely.

-It was made in 1938.

-Fabulous.

0:30:070:30:11

And it was made by Chad Valley, so we have several good elements there.

0:30:110:30:16

There is also an example of this little biscuit tin

0:30:160:30:21

in the Victoria and Albert Museum.

0:30:210:30:24

Gosh, Anita, you are bigging this up!

0:30:240:30:26

-How much did you pay?

-I paid £50!

0:30:260:30:29

It's a corker. I'll tell you what, I really, really like it, Anita.

0:30:290:30:34

And after Anita's corker, Mark's barrel.

0:30:340:30:37

I like the fact that the coloration is quite good and the detailing is quite good.

0:30:370:30:43

-I think it's the type of thing that will look very nice in a country cottage.

-Well, I thought...

0:30:430:30:48

Or a wee croft.

0:30:480:30:50

-How much?

-35.

0:30:500:30:51

Well, I know, it's not... you might make it back.

0:30:510:30:56

-I might.

-And you might make a wee profit.

0:30:560:30:58

-But then again I might make a wee loss.

-Yes.

0:30:580:31:00

Next, the imitation Tiffany vase.

0:31:000:31:03

It's fairly insignificant, but it is rather pretty.

0:31:030:31:08

-But I hope you didn't pay a lot for that.

-No, I paid a fiver for it.

-Well...

-I know.

0:31:080:31:13

-It might get £1.

-Or it might get £20, you just don't know.

0:31:130:31:17

-Now, my third item, Anita...

-Oh, right.

-It's a sample panel.

0:31:170:31:21

Now, when I looked at it, of course, the first thing that struck me was the frame.

0:31:210:31:27

Because it's very decorative with all the graining on it.

0:31:270:31:29

And again I thought if somebody wanted something for a long alcove or a hallway or a small room,

0:31:290:31:37

-that would actually look quite appealing up on the wall.

-Yeah.

0:31:370:31:40

-Uh-huh.

-You don't like it, do you?

0:31:400:31:42

I guess in the end it depends on the price that you paid for it.

0:31:420:31:46

-£20.

-I think that for £20, they will overlook the fact that the frame is not contemporary

0:31:460:31:52

with the panel, that the moulding is split,

0:31:520:31:57

and that it's absolutely...wrong!

0:31:570:32:01

But for £20, I would have bought it for £20.

0:32:010:32:05

Go on, say what you really think, Anita!

0:32:050:32:07

Now for the wonky dumb waiter.

0:32:070:32:09

-Do you like it?

-No.

0:32:090:32:12

I don't!

0:32:120:32:14

-Well, what I was doing... There was a psychology behind the buying of this item.

-Right.

0:32:140:32:19

-It's modern. We know that it's within the last 20 years...

-Oh, is it(?)

0:32:190:32:22

Yeah... We know that it's within the last...

0:32:220:32:26

ten years. We know that it might be in the last... Stop laughing!

0:32:260:32:31

Five years! You haven't seen the best of it yet!

0:32:320:32:35

It was a wee bit shoogly-woogly.

0:32:350:32:37

Well, I was just going to say to you, Anita, I love Italy,

0:32:370:32:41

and I've been to the Leaning Tower of Pisa,

0:32:410:32:44

but I've never seen the leaning dumb waiter before!

0:32:440:32:47

Has it had a wee drink?

0:32:480:32:49

-I put a wee bit of sticky tape on it.

-Well, at least that's added value!

0:32:490:32:55

-It's in quite good condition, although it's wibbly-wobbly.

-Shiggly-wiggly,

0:32:560:33:01

-or whatever it is you say!

-£7.50! I've got to make a couple of quid on that.

-Absolutely!

0:33:010:33:06

-This is my favourite item.

-Yes.

-It's in the art nouveau style.

0:33:060:33:10

There's a little bit of detail on the carving here,

0:33:100:33:13

but what I think I like most of it is this shape.

0:33:130:33:17

I completely agree with you about the tendency towards the art nouveau.

0:33:170:33:22

It's not quite there, because the leaves are too formalised,

0:33:220:33:26

they're not quite organic enough, as you know.

0:33:260:33:29

-Was it expensive?

-£24.

-I think that's a very reasonable buy, Anita.

0:33:290:33:33

-I think there's a profit in that.

-I think there's a chance.

-I think there's a very good profit in there.

0:33:330:33:37

Oh, I love that!

0:33:370:33:40

Finally, Mark's globe.

0:33:400:33:42

Well, I like that one a lot better than the one that I bought.

0:33:420:33:46

-Well, I paid for this one...

-Uh-huh?

-25.

-That's not bad.

0:33:460:33:52

I raise my glass to you.

0:33:520:33:54

-Thank you so much for being so entertaining.

-We've had a lovely couple of days.

0:33:540:33:58

And here's to the rest of the trip.

0:33:580:33:59

All very jovial, but what do they really think?

0:33:590:34:03

His big embroidery... well, it's kind of OK, but I think the frame spoils it.

0:34:030:34:10

She was start staring bonkers when she bought the wibbly-wobbly brand-new dumb waiter.

0:34:100:34:17

I think that Mark might win this stage.

0:34:170:34:21

I think I'll have to be very, very lucky or make a very big profit on one thing to beat Mark.

0:34:210:34:27

I think I deserve to come out marginally on top.

0:34:270:34:31

Anita, though, at the saleroom, might well just have that clan spirit amongst the Scots!

0:34:310:34:37

And they might just beat me.

0:34:370:34:39

After starting out all the way back in Aberfeldy,

0:34:410:34:44

this leg of our bargain battle concludes in Dunblane...

0:34:440:34:48

MOO!

0:34:480:34:49

..here, at the auctioneer's, Robertsons of Kinbuck.

0:34:490:34:53

-OK, Mark, here we are.

-Oh, it's exciting, isn't it, Anita?

0:34:530:34:57

-The saleroom! All this hard work over the last few days.

-I know. Are you worried?

0:34:570:35:01

-Very worried.

-Come on, I'll hold your hand.

0:35:010:35:03

Lead me into the saleroom, Anita!

0:35:030:35:06

So, as the would-be bidders begin their inspection...

0:35:070:35:10

MIAOW!

0:35:100:35:12

Hey, watch out for the China, pussy!

0:35:120:35:14

-..Auctioneer Bob Robertson has his own thoughts.

-Thank you.

0:35:140:35:18

The biscuit barrel, that's by Chad. Chad predominantly made

0:35:200:35:24

tinplate toys and whatever, so quite unusual to see a biscuit barrel made as such.

0:35:240:35:29

Robert Dudley plaque. Quite unusual. Nice. And I reckon that might make the most this evening.

0:35:290:35:36

With the hammer about to fall, Mark has spent £97 on four lots.

0:35:360:35:41

Very pleased with it.

0:35:410:35:43

And Anita, £106.50 on five.

0:35:430:35:48

Thanks very much!

0:35:480:35:49

Let the auction begin!

0:35:490:35:50

Who's going to win?

0:35:500:35:52

-Well, of course you know the answer to that.

-You?

-Of course!

0:35:520:35:56

First up, Mark's late-Victorian, lidded pokerwork barrel

0:35:560:36:00

with those Tudor roses.

0:36:000:36:03

-Oh, here it is, Anita.

-Good luck!

0:36:030:36:05

£30. £30 opening.

0:36:050:36:09

30 bid. 35. 40.

0:36:090:36:12

-Oh, my!

-You're away!

0:36:120:36:14

-At £40 only. Come on, a wee bit more.

-A wee bit more.

0:36:140:36:18

-Please, one more.

-£40. All out now at £40.

0:36:180:36:21

At 40. Selling at £40.

0:36:210:36:23

Oh, I need some air.

0:36:230:36:26

We've got a long way to go.

0:36:260:36:28

Phew! A modest £5 profit, less commission.

0:36:280:36:31

But out of jail for Mr Stacey, eh?

0:36:310:36:34

-£40, that's not too bad, actually.

-It's good.

0:36:340:36:38

Now it's the turn of Anita's little biscuit globe

0:36:390:36:41

and the quest to get her money back.

0:36:410:36:45

50? 45? £40 only.

0:36:450:36:47

-Start the bidding. 35. £35. This is a collector's item.

-Anita, behave!

0:36:470:36:51

35! We need your bids, come on!

0:36:510:36:54

-Stop it!

-We need your bids for this woman.

-Stop encouraging him!

0:36:540:36:57

Come on! She's against that rascal next to her.

0:36:570:37:00

We've got to help the poor woman out!

0:37:020:37:05

No, you don't have to help her out.

0:37:050:37:07

£35. 30 only?

0:37:070:37:08

£35 only.

0:37:080:37:10

40. Come on, a wee bit more!

0:37:100:37:13

-45. £45.

-Oh, come on!

0:37:130:37:15

£45.

0:37:150:37:17

-Well done, well done.

-Well, I can't believe that! It's shocking!

0:37:170:37:21

Shocking display of nationalism!

0:37:210:37:23

So Anita loses £5 less commission, but it could have been much worse.

0:37:230:37:28

-Smile at him.

-I won't even look at him after that!

0:37:280:37:33

Now for Anita's jack-in-the-pulpit vase.

0:37:350:37:38

£15. Go on! That lassie's jumping about in her seat again!

0:37:380:37:42

A tenner.

0:37:420:37:44

-£10. Bid at 10.

-Oh, my God, I can't believe it!

0:37:440:37:48

-At 10.

-Come on!

-At 10.

0:37:480:37:51

At 10. 12. 14. 16 I'm bid. 18?

0:37:510:37:55

18. £20.

0:37:550:37:57

22? 22. All done now at £22.

0:37:570:38:00

Yes!

0:38:000:38:01

First blood to the lassie. A nice profit of £17.

0:38:010:38:05

I might as well give up now. There's no point in me sitting here.

0:38:060:38:09

Oh, don't do that, Mark,

0:38:090:38:11

just as your favourite purchase goes under the hammer.

0:38:110:38:14

£60?

0:38:140:38:15

£60? 55? 50.

0:38:160:38:18

£40. Start the bidding now at £40.

0:38:180:38:21

£40. 30 bid. That's 30. 35 at the back. 35.

0:38:210:38:26

40. 40 bid only. 45.

0:38:260:38:30

50? Come on, a wee bit more.

0:38:300:38:32

-Come on!

-50. 55. 60.

0:38:320:38:35

65? Come on, a wee bit more.

0:38:350:38:37

I'm doing your trick here!

0:38:370:38:40

-All done now.

-Come on, it's worth more than that.

0:38:400:38:42

He's shouting! Come on!

0:38:420:38:44

I need some help here.

0:38:440:38:46

65. 70.

0:38:460:38:47

Thank you, sir. I'm getting the hang of this!

0:38:470:38:50

Sold! Give him a round of applause, guys!

0:38:500:38:54

Thank you, thank you.

0:38:540:38:55

There's one happy chappy, and so he should be,

0:38:550:38:59

with a whopping £45 of profit, less commission.

0:38:590:39:03

-That's a good price.

-Are you happy, darling?

-I'm happier now, yeah.

0:39:030:39:06

Now for Anita's Arts and Crafts clock.

0:39:070:39:11

I have a 75. Any advance on 75?

0:39:110:39:13

£75. Any advance on 75?

0:39:130:39:15

£75 only.

0:39:150:39:16

80. 85.

0:39:160:39:18

£90. £90 I'm bid.

0:39:180:39:20

At 90. At £90. All out on £90. Selling now at £90.

0:39:200:39:25

Yes!

0:39:250:39:27

£66 profit and Anita, it seems, is on a roll.

0:39:270:39:32

Anita, it was a nice clock, I admit that, it was your best buy.

0:39:320:39:36

Watch out, Scotland! Here's Robert Dudley.

0:39:370:39:41

The auctioneer thought the plaque was the best item.

0:39:410:39:43

Well, he's clearly wrong because the clock was the best item.

0:39:430:39:46

-You've maybe...

-It's not going to make £90, let's be honest.

0:39:460:39:50

The first Governor of the Netherlands. 150, 120, £100?

0:39:500:39:54

£100 on it. Bid.

0:39:540:39:55

Any advance on 100?

0:39:550:39:56

At £100. 100. Any advance on 100?

0:39:560:40:00

Come on, guys, we're needing a bit. Lady's getting rather excited there.

0:40:000:40:03

£100.

0:40:030:40:05

At 100. Any advance on 100? At 100.

0:40:050:40:06

Well done!

0:40:060:40:08

From £17 to a ton. Beat that, smiler!

0:40:090:40:13

-Was that a wee smile on your face?

-A wee smile.

0:40:130:40:17

Now for Anita's Scottish glassware.

0:40:190:40:22

£50. 45 to start.

0:40:220:40:24

£45 to start the bidding.

0:40:240:40:26

30 bid.

0:40:260:40:27

35. 40. 40 bid. 45.

0:40:270:40:31

50. 50 bid.

0:40:310:40:33

At 50. Any advance on 50? At £50.

0:40:330:40:35

-Come on, boys, a wee bit more.

-That's it.

0:40:350:40:37

All done now at £50.

0:40:370:40:40

Not bad, Anita, for a £20 outlay.

0:40:400:40:42

That is a very good price.

0:40:420:40:44

-And I am very happy.

-I'm very happy you're happy!

0:40:440:40:48

And he'll be even happier if the embroidery does well.

0:40:500:40:54

-£60?

-Come on.

-45, then?

0:40:540:40:56

30 to go.

0:40:560:40:58

-We've got 30, so...

-35. 40.

0:40:580:41:00

40 only. 40.

0:41:000:41:02

45. 50.

0:41:020:41:04

At £50. Come on. £50. Somebody needs to...

0:41:040:41:08

-Come on!

-It's getting you £50.

-55.

0:41:080:41:10

55. Another wee bid.

0:41:100:41:12

-You want it, madam!

-60.

0:41:120:41:15

At 60. Any advance on 60?

0:41:150:41:17

£60. The last time at £60. Yes, no? Here, then.

0:41:170:41:20

Ah, yes!

0:41:200:41:22

-You happy?

-I'm happy with that.

-And I do believe he is!

0:41:220:41:27

It's reasonably good.

0:41:270:41:28

It's blooming great!

0:41:280:41:30

Now, we hold on tight for that dumb waiter.

0:41:300:41:34

-A lovely object, lovely!

-50. 50 I'll start it.

0:41:350:41:40

-Start it at £50.

-It's not worth 50.

-40.

0:41:400:41:43

Start at £30. Bid me, come on! £30.

0:41:430:41:46

At £30. 35. £35, any advance on 35?

0:41:460:41:51

35. I can go 36. £36?

0:41:510:41:53

36. 38?

0:41:530:41:55

At 38. Any advance on 38? £38.

0:41:550:41:59

-Well done, Anita.

-38, good, good.

0:41:590:42:01

-Good, good.

-38 was a good price for what you paid for it, in fairness.

0:42:010:42:06

Very good indeed for an item costing all of £7.50.

0:42:060:42:10

I think you're right.

0:42:100:42:12

It was worth 38.

0:42:120:42:14

So it's pretty much neck and neck after round 1 with Mark's nose just in front.

0:42:140:42:20

Maybe Scotland could turn out to be bonnie for him after all.

0:42:200:42:23

Mark began with £200,

0:42:230:42:26

and made £124.40 profit after auction costs,

0:42:260:42:32

leaving him £324.40.

0:42:320:42:35

While Anita, who also started out with £200,

0:42:360:42:39

made £94.40 after auction costs.

0:42:390:42:43

So she now has £294.40 to spend tomorrow.

0:42:430:42:48

-We've made substantial profits, Anita.

-I so enjoyed that.

0:42:480:42:52

-Are you pleased?

-Oh, I'm ecstatic!

-Is it my round?

0:42:520:42:57

I think you've made more money, so it's your round!

0:42:570:42:59

That's what I like to hear! Long may it continue!

0:42:590:43:02

Join us tomorrow on Antiques Road Trip to see Mark catch sight of a bargain.

0:43:020:43:09

That's a beautiful thing! Oh, I'm looking in the mirror. That's me!

0:43:090:43:12

Huh! Anita models a brand-new look.

0:43:120:43:15

Do I look like a standard lamp?

0:43:150:43:17

But will Mark be in her shade at the auction?

0:43:170:43:20

I don't think I could even look at these!

0:43:200:43:23

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:290:43:33

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:330:43:37