Episode 2 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 2

Antiques experts travel across the UK as they compete to make the most money at auction. Anita Manning and Mark Stacey travel from Wiston in South Lanarkshire to Edinburgh.


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0:47:500:47:57

'The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge.'

0:48:020:48:06

-I'm going to declare war.

-Why?

0:48:060:48:09

'Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?'

0:48:090:48:13

-15 quid.

-No.

0:48:130:48:15

'The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

0:48:150:48:19

'But it's not as easy as you might think

0:48:190:48:21

-'and things don't always go to plan.'

-Push!

0:48:210:48:24

'So, will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?'

0:48:240:48:28

-I'm going to go for it.

-'This is the Antiques Road Trip.'

0:48:280:48:31

'Welcome to Scotland, where the mountains are tall,

0:48:350:48:39

'the lochs are long and even if, for the non-native, the dialect can be a bit tricky to master,

0:48:390:48:46

'folk are always happy to help out.'

0:48:460:48:49

You've got "wee good" but have you got "murder" right?

0:48:490:48:53

-Murder.

-No. Open your mouth more.

0:48:530:48:56

-Murder.

-Enjoy it! Embrace your Rs!

-Murder!

0:48:560:49:00

'Ha! Mark Stacey and Anita Manning

0:49:020:49:04

'are driving their marvellous Morris Minor through sumptuous Scotland this week.

0:49:040:49:09

'Bargain-seekers and sightseers.'

0:49:090:49:12

Mark, I thought we'd stop for a wee minute just to take in this scenery.

0:49:120:49:15

It's a beautiful Scottish day. Little fluffy clouds in the sky.

0:49:150:49:20

-Everything's gorgeous, isn't it?

-It is beautiful, Anita. Start of the second day.

0:49:200:49:24

-You dying to spend your money?

-I'm absolutely itching to get my wallet out.

0:49:240:49:28

Drive on!

0:49:280:49:30

'Anita is an auctioneer from Glasgow with a fondness for Scottish jewellery.'

0:49:300:49:36

-Could you that for in the region of £12?

-No.

0:49:360:49:39

'And the personality to light up a room.'

0:49:390:49:41

-Do I look like a standard lamp?

-SHE LAUGHS

0:49:410:49:44

'On yesterday's programme, she employed some unusual negotiating tactics.'

0:49:440:49:50

It's a wee bit wibbly-wobbly. Oops.

0:49:500:49:52

-'Before ending up quids in.'

-HAMMER BANGS Yes!

0:49:520:49:55

'Mark Stacey is a valuer and dealer from Brighton.

0:49:570:50:00

'No surprise, then, that Regency is one of his favourite periods.'

0:50:000:50:04

I tell you what, I always go for a shapely leg.

0:50:040:50:07

'Mark's new to Scotland but learning fast.'

0:50:070:50:11

Naughty me.

0:50:110:50:13

'Thanks to some canny buys, Mark's on top, but we all know what pride comes before, don't we?'

0:50:130:50:19

-I can't believe this.

-'They began with £200 each

0:50:190:50:23

'and have already made a nice profit.

0:50:230:50:25

-'Anita goes into today's show with £294.40 to spend.'

-HAMMER BANGS

0:50:270:50:32

'And Mark is just ahead on £324.40.

0:50:320:50:37

'Now, if they could just find their first shop...'

0:50:370:50:40

-It's here. It's right turn!

-I know, but I got my left and my right mixed up.

0:50:400:50:46

'This week's journey travels from the Cairngorms,

0:50:490:50:52

'via the charming cities of Edinburgh and Durham,

0:50:520:50:55

'to Thirsk in North Yorkshire.

0:50:550:50:58

'Today's show starts out in Wiston, South Lanarkshire,

0:50:580:51:01

'and ends up at an auction showdown in Edinburgh.

0:51:010:51:05

'The hamlet of Wiston, under Tinto Hill, is the home of Sunnyside Antiques.

0:51:060:51:11

'Anita drops Mark off there before heading to her own destination.'

0:51:110:51:16

And I want you to have a lovely time

0:51:160:51:19

and I want you to spend, spend, spend.

0:51:190:51:23

Oh, Anita, you are terrible! But remember, my darling,

0:51:230:51:27

I've got more money than you to spend, spend, spend.

0:51:270:51:30

-Dash it!

-See you later!

-Bye!

0:51:300:51:32

'So with Anita's words ringing in his ears,

0:51:320:51:35

-'Mark strides purposefully off.'

-Hello.

0:51:350:51:38

-Good morning!

-It's a bit chilly out there, isn't it?

0:51:380:51:41

-Hi. I'm Mark.

-I'm Mark, as well. That's a good start.

0:51:410:51:44

'Sunnyside is the sort of shop where anyone could happily while away some time

0:51:460:51:51

'surrounded by the essentials of a bygone era.'

0:51:510:51:54

Oh, that's a beautiful thing, isn't it? Oh, sorry, I'm looking at the mirror and it's me.

0:51:540:51:58

'Mark Stacey's disposition is verging on the sunny side, too, with his nose just in front.'

0:51:580:52:04

Oh, look. Above it. I don't think it's quite the weather for a boater, do you?

0:52:040:52:10

Now, this is really the height of luxury.

0:52:110:52:14

You and I would normally go to work

0:52:140:52:18

with our sandwiches wrapped up in silver foil.

0:52:180:52:21

But if you were the man or lady who had everything,

0:52:210:52:25

you'd actually take your sandwiches

0:52:250:52:27

very delicately prepared with the crusts cut off

0:52:270:52:31

in a solid-silver sandwich box.

0:52:310:52:34

For me, it would be a very small sandwich.

0:52:340:52:37

I'd probably keep my fondant fancies in there.

0:52:370:52:40

'Very nice, but £185? A man might struggle for a real bargain here.

0:52:400:52:45

'Not that Mr Stacey seems to care.'

0:52:450:52:47

I do love these sort of shops. I mean, there is something for everyone.

0:52:470:52:52

Although most of the things are out of my price range, it's not because they're over-priced.

0:52:520:52:57

They're a fair retail price.

0:52:570:52:59

But I simply never have enough money in these shops.

0:52:590:53:03

BELL DINGS

0:53:030:53:05

It's not my time up already, is it? Surely not.

0:53:060:53:10

'Anita has motored on from Wiston

0:53:100:53:13

'to arrive at the town of Innerleithen,

0:53:130:53:16

'her first shopping destination.

0:53:160:53:19

'In the 12th century, the son of King Malcolm IV

0:53:190:53:22

'drowned near Innerleithen in what's now known as the Droont Pool.

0:53:220:53:27

'And when the locals recovered his body,

0:53:270:53:30

'the king bestowed the rights of sanctuary on the town.

0:53:300:53:34

'It also has two antique shops. Phew.'

0:53:340:53:36

-Hi there.

-Hello, Brian. It's lovely to meet you.

0:53:360:53:39

-Nice to meet you.

-Lovely to be back in Innerleithen.

0:53:390:53:42

'ABK Antiques is a little lesson in Scottish rural history.

0:53:440:53:49

'A fitting contrast to Sunnyside and packed to the rafters with practical stuff,

0:53:490:53:54

'like Brian's fine tool collection.'

0:53:540:53:56

-I mean, isn't that beautifully made?

-150 to 200.

-Yeah.

0:53:560:54:00

Most of them are over 100 years old.

0:54:000:54:02

I love them. I'm not an expert on tools, but I love to look at them

0:54:020:54:06

and I think it's sort of thinking back to my childhood, seeing tools in the house.

0:54:060:54:11

-Feel the weight of that.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:54:110:54:15

'Brian's esoteric collection includes items so obscure

0:54:150:54:19

'that he can happily quiz his customers as to their use.'

0:54:190:54:23

It's obviously a... Is it a measuring device?

0:54:230:54:26

No? OK, right. Don't tell me.

0:54:260:54:28

I don't... Is it an instrument of torture?

0:54:290:54:32

-That's what it looks like!

-That's what it looks like!

0:54:320:54:35

Thumbs screws for a hoof or something like that.

0:54:350:54:39

You better tell me.

0:54:390:54:41

It's to hold a horse's mouth open when you're doing dental work.

0:54:410:54:45

-Is that right?

-And it was a thing that was used quite regular.

0:54:450:54:48

'South Lanarkshire is a great horse-rearing area

0:54:480:54:52

'and Brian has plenty more tack, including a pair of leather hoof boots.'

0:54:520:54:57

I love these horses' shoes. I think they're great. What does that say?

0:54:570:55:02

Red Rum?

0:55:020:55:04

'Unfortunately not. They'd be worth a fortune.

0:55:050:55:08

'The leather over-shoe could be used when a horse-drawn lawnmower was employed

0:55:080:55:14

'so that the imprint of hooves didn't damage the lawn surface.'

0:55:140:55:19

I think this'll bring a smile to Mark Stacey's face.

0:55:190:55:23

'But £45, Anita?'

0:55:240:55:26

Can you sell me these horse boots,

0:55:260:55:29

these very useful horse boots, for...15 quid?

0:55:290:55:34

-No.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:55:340:55:37

I was only kidding you on. I was only kidding you on.

0:55:370:55:40

I need to buy them at round about the 25-ies.

0:55:400:55:45

Round about the 25-ies.

0:55:450:55:48

-26?

-No, 30. Bottom line.

0:55:480:55:51

£30 and you're getting a wonderful bargain.

0:55:510:55:54

Nobody else will have them. It's an item that's really unusual.

0:55:540:55:59

-Could you...

-Guaranteed money-maker.

0:55:590:56:02

Well, you see, they might be because they're so crazy.

0:56:020:56:05

Could you take another couple... Could you go 28?

0:56:050:56:07

-OK, 28.

-28. That's great. We'll seal the deal at that.

-Deal done.

0:56:070:56:12

'After making one of her stranger buys,

0:56:120:56:14

'Anita spies something she's a bit more familiar with. Also practical but a bit more decorative.'

0:56:140:56:20

That's rather pretty.

0:56:200:56:22

I mean, it's quite light for a paperweight.

0:56:220:56:25

-It's probably the latter half of the 20th century.

-I would think so.

0:56:250:56:29

-And we've got this nice...

-Cairngorms.

-..smoky topaz.

0:56:290:56:35

'Topaz is easily confused with Scotland's own smoky quartz from the Cairngorms.

0:56:350:56:41

'But the stone in this £30 paperweight is almost certainly European.'

0:56:410:56:44

Silversmith's work. It's got the nice stone on it.

0:56:440:56:48

A wee bit of detail. What I'd put on it is £12 to £18.

0:56:480:56:52

Could you do that for in the region of £12?

0:56:520:56:55

-No.

-No. Uh-huh.

-I'll do it for £25.

0:56:550:56:58

-What is the very best...

-£20.

-20 is the...

0:57:000:57:05

If you could even come down to,

0:57:050:57:09

perhaps take a wee bit more,

0:57:090:57:13

a wee bit more, it would be...

0:57:130:57:16

I'm not wanting to make huge amounts of money because I won't make it on that,

0:57:160:57:20

-but I'm trying not to lose...

-18. OK?

0:57:200:57:24

That's you getting an excellent buy.

0:57:250:57:28

-It is pretty, isn't it?

-It is, very nice.

0:57:280:57:31

-It's at the top end of my estimate.

-And the bottom end of mine.

0:57:310:57:35

Do you know, a couple of pounds might make a difference.

0:57:350:57:39

It makes a difference to me, as well.

0:57:400:57:43

-No, 18 is the bottom.

-18's the bottom?

-Yep.

-That's lovely.

0:57:430:57:47

'So, Anita is now the proud owner of one paperweight and a pair of horse boots.

0:57:480:57:54

'And Mark is still in the paddock thinking seriously about a box.'

0:57:540:57:58

That's quite a sweet little thing. It's a simple little mahogany box.

0:57:580:58:02

Then on the top we've got "Dr R Mill Murray."

0:58:020:58:06

So whoever owned this might have been a doctor.

0:58:060:58:09

I don't know why but something's telling me that.

0:58:090:58:11

It might have actually contained little bottles originally

0:58:110:58:16

as a sort of apothecary box.

0:58:160:58:18

So he might have kept some of his favourite medicines

0:58:180:58:22

and lotions and potions in there for curing his patients.

0:58:220:58:27

So there might be a little chance there. Mark, what about the little mahogany box?

0:58:270:58:32

-The little mahogany box is 135.

-Oh, gosh. I would love that but I think I can't do anything with that.

0:58:320:58:37

I don't think it would make money at auction.

0:58:370:58:40

-'Saved by the bell.'

-BELL DINGS

0:58:400:58:43

'Anita doesn't go far, just a few steps to MC Collectables.

0:58:430:58:47

'Unlike the next door neighbours, this is the traditional antique shop,

0:58:490:58:52

'less paraphernalia, more Victoriana.'

0:58:520:58:56

-See this wee brooch here.

-Yes, my love?

0:58:560:58:58

We see there's a photograph there. Is it a soldier or a sailor?

0:58:580:59:04

That's a boy scout by the looks of it.

0:59:040:59:07

It's the type of thing that you would put a lock of a loved one's hair.

0:59:070:59:10

It's what we call a mourning brooch. A Victorian mourning brooch.

0:59:100:59:14

And that little boy scout is in there. I wonder what happened to him.

0:59:140:59:19

'Pendants and brooches containing portrait miniatures and locks of loved ones' hair

0:59:190:59:25

'have been popular for centuries, particularly in the Victorian period.

0:59:250:59:30

'The price of £20 reflects that Michael probably thinks it's pinchbeck,

0:59:300:59:34

'a brass imitation of gold.'

0:59:340:59:37

It looks as if somebody's maybe tested that there.

0:59:370:59:40

-Did you test it?

-No, I didn't, no, but I think it has been tested.

0:59:400:59:43

It is, it's definitely pinchbeck.

0:59:430:59:46

I still quite like it.

0:59:460:59:48

I still quite like it. It depends on the price.

0:59:480:59:51

-It's something that I could maybe go for.

-I'd do it for 15.

0:59:510:59:55

-Uh-huh.

-Mm-hm.

-Yeah. Erm...

-25 percent off.

0:59:550:59:59

Could you do it for £10?

0:59:591:00:02

-Go on then.

-Can you do it for 10? Thank you very, very much.

-It's all right, my dear.

1:00:021:00:07

'Anita's eye catches the glint of amber glass. And if there's a bargain to be had...'

1:00:071:00:12

I collect glass myself. This is quite pretty.

1:00:121:00:16

There's no maker's name on it. And I prefer it to have a maker's name.

1:00:161:00:20

But I think it's quite pretty and I am a sucker for glass.

1:00:201:00:23

'No name and also no price. Anita's on the case.'

1:00:231:00:28

-Michael, could you do that one for a tenner?

-I think I could, yeah.

1:00:281:00:32

-Yeah? OK. That's great.

-OK?

-No maker's name but it's still a bonny bit of glass.

1:00:321:00:36

-That's lovely.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

1:00:361:00:40

'So, Anita's on a roll today.

1:00:401:00:42

'Four in the bag at a cost of a mere £66, even with her hoof boots.

1:00:421:00:48

'And meanwhile, at Sunnyside,

1:00:481:00:50

'Mark has decided it's time to finally plump for one or two of the luxuries he's been longing for.'

1:00:501:00:55

I've found a little agate or onyx box

1:00:571:01:00

very nicely made, with these little gilt brass hinges.

1:01:001:01:06

'It's made of alabaster actually, Mark.

1:01:071:01:10

'Like onyx and agate, a mineral that's been carved by man since ancient times.

1:01:101:01:15

'And the name may derive from an Egyptian goddess called Bast.

1:01:151:01:19

'Believe that, you'll believe anything.'

1:01:191:01:21

Now I am looking for a maker's mark. HG and S. Made in England.

1:01:211:01:27

I would have put this around about 1910, 1920.

1:01:271:01:32

It's really a bit of a nonsense piece

1:01:321:01:34

because it's just for one of those people who had everything,

1:01:341:01:38

for your desk, or even you could keep cufflinks in it.

1:01:381:01:41

But it's just a very, very pretty little thing.

1:01:411:01:44

The price on that at the moment is £40, which is not too bad, actually.

1:01:441:01:48

The difficulty is you're relying really on people that have the same taste as me,

1:01:481:01:53

who would like the finer things of life.

1:01:531:01:56

'And what could be even more frivolous than that?'

1:01:571:02:02

It's a little sort of purse that you'd have your sovereign for your carriage fare home after a ball.

1:02:021:02:09

So you'd have this in your little elegant

1:02:091:02:11

Edwardian or Victorian handbag, evening bag.

1:02:111:02:16

We've got this little taffeta silk inside, a lovely blue,

1:02:161:02:20

and of course, because it's been inside this little case, it's remained remarkably fresh,

1:02:201:02:25

and the colour is just absolutely beautiful with that lovely...

1:02:251:02:28

You've still got that water effect when you move it round in your hand.

1:02:281:02:32

Well there's no price on it. So I'm either going to be leaving here very happy, or "greetin'".

1:02:321:02:39

-'Yes, Mark. That means crying.'

-Is that right?

1:02:391:02:42

'Those lessons from Anita are clearly paying off. Looks like he's learnt something else from her too,

1:02:421:02:48

'Scottish glass can make a tidy profit.'

1:02:481:02:51

Anita did very well with her Strathearn vase yesterday,

1:02:511:02:53

but I think that was because she was the local girl.

1:02:531:02:56

Not that I'm in any way bitter.

1:02:561:02:58

I mean, I love this because I love the shape of it,

1:02:581:03:01

and it's very much that Monart glass style, it's got that nice ground pontil on the bottom.

1:03:011:03:06

But is it a £100 piece?

1:03:061:03:10

A £20 piece or a £200 piece? I simply have no idea.

1:03:101:03:14

'Monart from Moncrieff owes its distinctive look

1:03:141:03:18

'to a family of Spanish glassblowers called the Ysarts,

1:03:181:03:22

'who came to Scotland in 1915.

1:03:221:03:25

'Their paperweights, scent bottles, vases and the like

1:03:251:03:28

'were soon in huge demand at shops like Liberty and Tiffany's in the 20s and 30s.

1:03:281:03:34

'And Mark's also tempted by something he does know a fair bit about.'

1:03:341:03:40

It's quite nice detail on here, actually, even though it's a very simple, plain piece of silver.

1:03:401:03:46

It's Sheffield but I think, looking at that mark,

1:03:461:03:49

it's probably George V, late teens, early 20s, I think.

1:03:491:03:53

So we'll put that there for the moment because that's 45.

1:03:531:03:57

Mark, I need to start considering decisions now. I mean, this one I like.

1:03:571:04:03

You've got 40 on it, which is a reasonable start.

1:04:031:04:06

What would be the absolute lowest on that.

1:04:061:04:09

-30?

-Not 25?

-Not even 28.

1:04:091:04:12

-HE LAUGHS

-Not 29?

-No. 30.

-£30, OK.

1:04:121:04:17

-And what about this one? You said 45 on that.

-That's correct, erm...

1:04:171:04:21

-I would come down to 38.

-38.

-It would be worth more in scrap.

1:04:231:04:27

This is the thing I absolutely adore, Mark.

1:04:271:04:31

You've got it priced up at 105. What would be your absolutely lowest price on that?

1:04:311:04:36

The best I could do would be...

1:04:361:04:38

..90. If it helps, I'll go the extra 5 at 85.

1:04:391:04:43

-Thank you, Mark. And this Monart.

-I would do for 60.

-60.

1:04:431:04:49

Gosh, Mark, you are giving me a conundrum.

1:04:491:04:52

OK, so we have 153 for those three...

1:04:521:04:56

Erm, and I'll put that one in, £200 the lot.

1:04:561:05:01

I'm going to go for it.

1:05:031:05:05

I've blown most of my budget, very close to my budget on four items in my first shop.

1:05:051:05:10

Am I mad? Yes, of course I am. Completely.

1:05:101:05:14

'I couldn't possibly comment, Mark.

1:05:141:05:17

'So, while we give Mark the opportunity to pay up in haste and repent at leisure,

1:05:171:05:23

'Anita is back on the road,

1:05:231:05:26

'driving from Innerleithen to Roslin in Midlothian

1:05:261:05:30

'to visit its world-famous, 15th century chapel.

1:05:301:05:34

'If you've ever seen the movie of The Da Vinci Code,

1:05:361:05:39

'then you'll probably recognise the chapel, which featured in a fairly climactic scene.

1:05:391:05:45

'For centuries people have puzzled over the meaning of the rich and abundant carvings here.'

1:05:451:05:52

Oh, Simon!

1:05:521:05:54

This is the most extraordinary,

1:05:541:05:57

-extraordinary place.

-Yes, it's quite a place, isn't it?

1:05:571:06:01

'Dan Brown, like many before him,

1:06:041:06:06

'concluded that the carvings must be the key to a great secret,

1:06:061:06:10

'usually involving Knights Templars and the Holy Grail,

1:06:101:06:14

'but there's a confusing amount of Pagan imagery too,

1:06:141:06:16

'as Anita's guide, Simon Beatty explains.'

1:06:161:06:19

This green man, it's a symbol that pops up all over the world.

1:06:191:06:23

It's a Pagan symbol originally. It's a god of nature, a god of fertility.

1:06:231:06:27

Usually you get one or two in a church, we've got over 100.

1:06:271:06:31

Do you sometimes feel that the eyes are following you around? SHE LAUGHS

1:06:311:06:34

There are occasions when you do feel someone's watching you, certainly.

1:06:341:06:38

'Amongst the incredible detail of what remains a working chapel are numerous quirks and curiosities,

1:06:411:06:47

'like this, the oldest known carving of a Scottish bagpiper,

1:06:471:06:51

'as well as a reminder or two of the nameless craftsman who built Roslin.'

1:06:511:06:56

What a magnificent pillar!

1:06:561:06:59

-The Apprentice Pillar.

-Is that the Apprentice Pillar?

-Yeah.

1:06:591:07:02

-That's wonderful. I believe there's a story behind that?

-There is, yes.

1:07:021:07:07

The master mason was given the task of recreating a pillar that was in Rome.

1:07:081:07:12

So he went off to Rome to look at this original pillar.

1:07:121:07:15

While he was away, an apprentice mason carved this pillar,

1:07:151:07:19

without permission of the master mason, the master mason came back,

1:07:191:07:23

was very upset that someone had carved in his spot, and killed the apprentice for doing it.

1:07:231:07:28

-That's very gruesome.

-That is not a nice story, really.

1:07:281:07:32

'He got his comeuppance, though.

1:07:331:07:36

'This is the face of the master, condemned to stare forever at his apprentice's work.'

1:07:361:07:41

'Those two could have done with making a study of Mark and Anita's harmonious working relationship.

1:07:441:07:50

'Although the auction is still to come. Right now though,

1:07:501:07:53

'Mark's reached Innerleithen, hot on Anita's shopping trail.'

1:07:531:07:57

Anita Manning is in the vicinity.

1:07:571:08:00

There's a number of shops on this street.

1:08:001:08:02

I'm heading for the nearest one which is Keepsakes. And let's hope she's not in there.

1:08:021:08:07

-Hello. You must be Margaret.

-Hello, nice to meet you.

-I'm Mark.

1:08:091:08:12

'Even though he already has four items, Keepsakes has plenty to catch Mark's eye.

1:08:151:08:21

'Like some typical Scottish pottery, as well as famous names like Susie Cooper and Clarice Cliff.'

1:08:211:08:26

And what's on the Clarice Cliff clog, do you know?

1:08:261:08:29

-The clog I think is about 400.

-Oh, gosh! But I think it's a wee bit over my budget.

1:08:291:08:35

'Mark's now getting even warmer,

1:08:361:08:39

-'following Anita's hoof steps to ABK.'

-Hello.

1:08:391:08:44

So this is just the sort of shop Anita Manning would love

1:08:461:08:49

because it's got lots of little knick-knacks and interesting objects

1:08:491:08:53

and Anita is very good at getting into shelves

1:08:531:08:58

and finding something that a lot of other people would miss.

1:08:581:09:01

But I tell you what I have found.

1:09:011:09:03

These are a pair of brass lighthouse door fittings.

1:09:031:09:08

And I think they're rather fun.

1:09:081:09:10

The problem is, will they be a beacon at the saleroom?

1:09:121:09:15

-What sort of price are you hoping to get for those?

-About 85, I don't know.

1:09:151:09:20

I do love them, actually, but choices, choices. What's this?

1:09:201:09:24

-Don't you know what that is?

-I don't think I do.

1:09:241:09:27

-It's a prayer stool.

-Oh, it is a prayer stool.

1:09:281:09:31

I don't think I've ever seen one that shape before.

1:09:311:09:34

-So is that Victorian, do you think?

-I think so. It's well-upholstered.

-Quite nice, isn't it?

1:09:341:09:40

-It's quite well upholstered. Probably an oak frame, I would have thought.

-Beautifully made, yes.

1:09:401:09:45

-So how does it work?

-Well, I think you actually... I think you just kneel like that.

1:09:451:09:51

-Fun wee thing that, isn't it?

-Different.

-You've got it priced up at £25.

1:09:511:09:55

-Can you be charitable with me?

-I could do you it for 18.

1:09:551:09:59

I've just seen that little box with N on it. What's it for?

1:10:031:10:07

-It's for cigarette holders.

-See, I like these two things.

1:10:071:10:10

Brian, I wasn't intending to buy any more today. I was going to save my muster for tomorrow.

1:10:111:10:18

-A bird in the hand, Mark.

-Yes, I know. Oh, Brian, you are terrible. You're leading me astray.

1:10:181:10:23

You'll go tomorrow, find nothing and say, "I wish I'd bought that stuff in Innerleithen."

1:10:231:10:28

-Can I be cheeky with you?

-Aye.

-Very cheeky.

-Course you can be cheeky.

1:10:281:10:32

Could we do the two for 18?

1:10:321:10:34

Do you the two for 20, how's that? That's an excellent bargain.

1:10:361:10:40

I'm going to do it. Brian, thank you very much.

1:10:411:10:43

Oh, my giddy aunt, what have I done? I've been rash again! I promised I wouldn't do this!

1:10:481:10:53

And now I'm stuck with the consequences.

1:10:531:10:55

'Day two finds our hero and heroine heavy in baggage and light in funds,

1:11:011:11:06

'after a bumper start to their bargain-seeking tour.'

1:11:061:11:09

We really don't know what's round the corner as far as antique shops go

1:11:091:11:15

-and that's just such a pleasure.

-Well, it is, but also quite a worry.

1:11:151:11:19

'Mark has already splashed out £220 on six items.

1:11:191:11:23

'Not least a potentially lucrative prayer stool.'

1:11:231:11:26

WHISPERS: Please, please, huge profits.

1:11:261:11:29

'Leaving him with just over £100.

1:11:291:11:33

'While Anita spent £66 on four items,

1:11:331:11:36

'including some fairly unusual hoof boots.'

1:11:361:11:39

-Guaranteed money-maker.

-'Leaving her with just under £230.'

1:11:391:11:44

'Today's canter is from Roslin to Edinburgh,

1:11:451:11:48

'calling in on Thirsk, on the outskirts of Dalkeith.'

1:11:481:11:52

-I tell you what, you save your legs, you go in there, I'll go in here.

-OK.

1:11:521:11:56

'Mark makes first for Drum Farm Antiques,

1:11:581:12:01

'a vast barn of a place mostly filled with furniture

1:12:011:12:05

'that's sure to appeal to trade buyers wanting to refurb and sell on.'

1:12:051:12:09

If you need a chair, this is the place to come.

1:12:091:12:12

'Retropolis, next door, certainly lives up to its name.

1:12:121:12:17

'Not fine antiques but everyday items arranged decoratively,

1:12:171:12:21

'with an emphasis on fun and kitsch.'

1:12:211:12:24

Do I look like a standard lamp? SHE LAUGHS

1:12:241:12:27

'A long way above standard, surely?

1:12:271:12:29

'But after the fashion, Anita wastes no time in unearthing yet another very practical box.'

1:12:291:12:36

In the west of Scotland they love Arts and Crafts beaten metal.

1:12:361:12:41

I wonder if they'll like it in the east coast, as well? It is hand-hammered.

1:12:411:12:46

And I love the text, I love that stylised text.

1:12:471:12:51

'At the turn of the 20th century, Scotland experienced a flowering of Art Nouveau design.

1:12:511:12:57

'The Scottish blend of Arts and Crafts, Celtic revival and Eastern influences

1:12:571:13:02

'became known as the Glasgow School.'

1:13:021:13:05

-Think we can do that for £20.

-£20?

-Yeah.

1:13:051:13:08

-Could I make an offer of a tenner on it?

-Oh!

1:13:081:13:11

-LAUGHS

-My wallet's contracting there.

-SHE LAUGHS

1:13:111:13:16

-If you can come to ten.

-12, 12...

-If you can come to ten, it would give me a chance.

1:13:161:13:20

I mean, I might make 18 on it. I might not get £18 but it might go to 18.

1:13:201:13:26

-It's still 12.

-It's still 12. SHE LAUGHS

1:13:261:13:28

-Squeeze 12 out. I think you'll...

-Can we come in between 10 and 12?

-All right, £11.

1:13:281:13:35

You'd think we were buying a Lamborghini or something.

1:13:351:13:38

-I know, it's a blooming slipper box, but OK. £11, it's yours.

-11? Thank you very much.

1:13:381:13:44

-I haven't got any change.

-Do you want to just go for ten quid? HE LAUGHS

1:13:441:13:51

-'While Anita notches up another saving...'

-OK, Anita. Good luck with it.

1:13:511:13:55

'..Mark has decided that his dwindling funds are unlikely to be dispersed in Dalkeith.

1:13:551:14:01

'Instead, he's liberated the little Morris for a trip to the university.

1:14:011:14:05

'Mark travels from Dalkeith to Edinburgh, Scotland's capital.'

1:14:051:14:11

'Dominated by a castle and a rock,

1:14:141:14:16

'not forgetting the extinct volcano of Arthur's Seat,

1:14:161:14:20

'Edinburgh is famous for its arts festival and its rich literary tradition.

1:14:201:14:26

'Writers like Boswell and Sir Walter Scott lived here.

1:14:261:14:29

'JK Rowling still does. It's also the birthplace of Robert Louis Stevenson,

1:14:291:14:35

'author of the chilling Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde,

1:14:351:14:39

'and where two real-life sinister characters, Burke and Hare,

1:14:391:14:44

'went on a grizzly murder spree to supply corpses for medical research.

1:14:441:14:48

'Mark's here to visit the Department of Anatomy,

1:14:481:14:51

'where Gordon Findlater, the museum's curator, can show him plenty of old bones.'

1:14:511:14:57

And it's the skeleton of William Burke.

1:14:571:15:01

-Oh, gosh.

-He's been hanging here for the last 190 years.

-Yes. Gosh!

1:15:011:15:06

He started on a murdering spree, as fortuitous as it was,

1:15:061:15:10

an old soldier died in his lodging house owing money to Hare.

1:15:101:15:14

One way of getting his rent back was to sell the body on to the anatomists.

1:15:141:15:18

Shortly after that, another lodger in the lodging house took unwell with an infection,

1:15:181:15:22

not good for business, so rather than wait until he died, they murdered him

1:15:221:15:26

and again took the body along to the anatomists.

1:15:261:15:30

I mean, what sort of price would they be paid per body?

1:15:341:15:37

Well, they reckon £10, £12 in the winter and down to £7 in the summer.

1:15:371:15:42

Mind you, even £7, if we're looking at the 1820s, that was an awful lot of money.

1:15:421:15:47

Some people were probably paid £7 a year back then.

1:15:471:15:50

I'm not sure, but I think I read somewhere that it was the equivalent of £10,000 or £12,000.

1:15:501:15:56

'Burke and Hare murdered 15 people

1:15:571:15:59

'over the course of nine months before they were finally arrested.'

1:15:591:16:03

Burke was sentenced to...

1:16:061:16:08

He was sentenced to be hung. In fact, his sentence was to be hung,

1:16:081:16:11

dissected and put on display, hence why we have him here to this day, that was part of his sentence.

1:16:111:16:17

'Incredibly, William Hare, who had testified against his partner, escaped punishment entirely.'

1:16:171:16:24

Here we have the life masks of Burke and Hare.

1:16:241:16:28

And above is the death mask of Burke.

1:16:281:16:31

-Showing the...

-Garrotte marks going around the back of his neck.

1:16:311:16:35

25,000 people were in the Lawnmarket to watch Burke's hanging.

1:16:351:16:39

So it was a public spectacle.

1:16:391:16:42

-He wasn't very popular.

-Very, very unpopular.

1:16:421:16:45

'From body snatchers to bargain grabbers.

1:16:501:16:53

'Anita now has five items. So will she stop the shop? Not likely!'

1:16:531:16:58

I have one more shop. I have five items.

1:16:581:17:01

However, I have a cunning plan.

1:17:011:17:04

What I was thinking, if I see a nice piece of jewellery,

1:17:041:17:09

then I can buy it, I can put it in with my little brooch just to bulk it up a bit.

1:17:091:17:15

'Anita is travelling from Dalkeith to North Berwick

1:17:151:17:21

'to visit Lovage & Lace.'

1:17:211:17:24

-Helen, can I have a wee look around?

-Yes.

-This looks absolutely wonderful.

1:17:241:17:28

'Lovage & Lace sells a mixture of antique, vintage and reproduction.

1:17:281:17:32

'Anita, though, has eyes for only one thing.'

1:17:321:17:36

I want to have a look at the jewellery now.

1:17:361:17:38

That's a lovely thing. That's not dear.

1:17:401:17:43

I'm looking for something specific. SHE LAUGHS

1:17:431:17:47

And I'm being pulled away by this marvellous vintage costume jewellery, which I absolutely love.

1:17:471:17:53

Can we look at that wee cat brooch?

1:17:531:17:56

I think that's lovely. I think it looks French.

1:17:561:17:59

-I know.

-SHE LAUGHS

1:17:591:18:02

-It's very tempting, but it won't...

-You can have it for... What's on it? 16.

1:18:021:18:07

You can have it, as it's you, for 13. How about that?

1:18:071:18:10

-It's got that sort of je ne sais quoi.

-Yes, it does.

1:18:101:18:14

-It's very stylish.

-A bit of style.

-Everything from France is stylish.

1:18:141:18:18

Can I look at it in the daylight?

1:18:191:18:22

I think it's from the 1930s

1:18:221:18:25

and I like the form. It's a stylised cat.

1:18:251:18:29

Would I be able to make you an offer for it?

1:18:291:18:34

-£10?

-No. I'll do it for 12 for you.

1:18:341:18:37

-I can't. Because it's such a bargain already at that.

-Yes.

1:18:371:18:40

Would you take 10? I could take a chance on 10.

1:18:401:18:43

-On 10.

-No. I'll take 11.

1:18:431:18:45

11? Shall we just go for it? Let's go for it! THEY LAUGH

1:18:451:18:49

'With the cat in the bag, it's time for Anita to meet Mark

1:18:501:18:54

'and reveal what she's been up to for the last few days.'

1:18:541:18:57

-Shall I start?

-Yes.

-OK. I'll dig into my wee bag

1:18:571:19:01

and take out a little silver decanter holder.

1:19:011:19:05

The price of silver is high just now. Did you have to pay a lot of money?

1:19:051:19:10

-I paid £38 for it.

-£38? That's not bad at all.

1:19:101:19:15

'And now for Anita's paperweight.'

1:19:151:19:18

It's continental silver. Marked 925.

1:19:181:19:21

-OK.

-So we have this rather nice work on the silver here,

1:19:211:19:26

-this lovely smoky topaz.

-But the crucial question, Anita,

1:19:261:19:31

-how much?

-I paid 18 for it.

1:19:311:19:33

-That's very reasonable.

-Do you think so?

-I do.

1:19:331:19:35

-I was hoping to get it round about £12.

-I think you're being very mean, Anita.

1:19:351:19:40

'One of Mark's luxuries, the alabaster box.'

1:19:401:19:44

When you open it up, it's marked with a marker's mark and made in England.

1:19:441:19:49

So I think that fits the 1920s. I paid 30.

1:19:491:19:53

-Well, it's not too bad.

-It's on the border, isn't it?

1:19:531:19:58

My next item is a piece of 20th century design.

1:19:581:20:04

When I lifted it up, it's a good weight.

1:20:041:20:07

-Yes.

-I saw this beautifully finished base here.

-Yes.

1:20:071:20:11

-Smoothed off with a pontil.

-Mm-hm.

1:20:111:20:13

So there is quality there.

1:20:131:20:16

-How much did you pay for it?

-£10.

-Well, it's nothing, is it?

1:20:161:20:19

-My third item is also a piece of glass.

-That's Monart.

1:20:191:20:24

I just fell in love with that sort of banister shape.

1:20:241:20:28

It's very curvaceous, it's very touchable.

1:20:281:20:31

You want to stroke it and feel it. I paid 47 for it.

1:20:311:20:35

That's a very conservative price. That's a very good price.

1:20:351:20:40

-Do I see a wee nick here?

-No, you didn't see a wee nick there.

-SHE LAUGHS

1:20:401:20:44

Right, my next item,

1:20:461:20:49

very useful item, no home should be without them.

1:20:491:20:52

-SHE LAUGHS Clip-clop, clip-clop.

-Oh, Anita!

1:20:521:20:57

Anita Manning! I mean, you're going from the sublime to the ridiculous here!

1:20:571:21:02

-What on earth did you buy them for?

-These may have belonged to

1:21:021:21:08

a very famous racehorse. In fact, I'll just have a wee look.

1:21:081:21:12

-Red Rum. Look!

-Oh, no, murder.

-THEY LAUGH

1:21:121:21:17

-So you paid nothing for them?

-£28.

1:21:171:21:20

-Do you like them?

-Er, no. But shall I gallop on to my next item?

1:21:201:21:24

'A little prayer stool from the very same shop.'

1:21:241:21:28

-I think it's been reupholstered by a carpenter.

-Do you think so? Do you?

1:21:281:21:33

The dealer said I could have it for £18.

1:21:331:21:36

And then I spotted this. He said I could have them both for 20.

1:21:361:21:40

-Uh-huh.

-And I thought it was a little bit of fun.

1:21:401:21:43

-Are you going to put them as one lot?

-Yes.

-I think that's a lovely wee box and I like pokerwork.

1:21:431:21:48

Although, you didn't do too well in pokerwork in your last sale.

1:21:481:21:52

-Thanks for reminding me.

-Sorry for reminding you.

1:21:521:21:54

-You carry on. Shall I get you the tab of salt now?

-SHE LAUGHS

1:21:541:21:58

'Next, Anita's Art Nouveau slipper box.'

1:21:581:22:02

It's rather sweet, actually.

1:22:021:22:04

I like beaten metal work and it goes for very good prices at auction.

1:22:041:22:08

-Did you pay a lot for it?

-£11.

-Well, I can't really say anything.

1:22:081:22:14

-It's a good price for that.

-It is. It's a little ladies' sovereign case.

1:22:141:22:18

-Oh, that's so sweet.

-With a lovely blue organza silk inside.

1:22:181:22:23

-And that's the original material.

-It is.

1:22:231:22:25

-I have to ask you now, how much?

-I paid £85.

1:22:251:22:28

On a good day with a good wind behind the sails,

1:22:281:22:32

-you could go to £150.

-Oh, thank you, Anita.

1:22:321:22:34

'Anita's jewellery joint lot.'

1:22:341:22:37

Now, it's a typical Victorian mourning brooch.

1:22:371:22:41

I'm sending it to the auction as yellow metal.

1:22:411:22:44

But it has some quality.

1:22:441:22:47

I bought it for £10.

1:22:471:22:49

-Oh, Anita.

-Yeah.

-Are you going to be adventurous at all in this leg?

1:22:491:22:54

And you've got another one here.

1:22:541:22:56

It's a little stylised cat. It is continental

1:22:561:23:00

and it may well be a little Parisian moggy.

1:23:001:23:05

-£11.

-So that's £21.

-21 for the two.

-OK.

1:23:051:23:09

Well, Anita, I think it's a tale of two buying trips this time.

1:23:091:23:13

I mean, I think I've gone for reasonable quality pieces.

1:23:131:23:18

You've bought wisely, as I expected. And we'll find out what happens at the auction.

1:23:181:23:24

'And here's what they really think.'

1:23:241:23:26

The Red Rum two-legged horse clippety-clop things,

1:23:261:23:30

I wouldn't have touched them for £24.

1:23:301:23:33

But Anita's had wacky things before and made a profit.

1:23:331:23:36

That kneeler, it's more like a cat scratcher.

1:23:361:23:39

It's absolutely horrible.

1:23:391:23:43

Comparing the two lots, I've really bought better items.

1:23:431:23:47

Whether that'll result in better profits, it's anyone guess, really.

1:23:471:23:51

I'm not taking as much chance as Mark is on this one

1:23:511:23:56

and I think that I probably have the edge on this sale.

1:23:561:24:02

'After starting out in the Lanarkshire countryside at Wiston,

1:24:041:24:08

'this leg of our bargain battle will be decided in Edinburgh

1:24:081:24:11

'at the auctioneers Thomson Roddick & Medcalf.'

1:24:111:24:15

-Are you excited?

-I'm very excited. I'm always excited.

1:24:151:24:18

You've bought lovely items and I'm sure you'll make a profit.

1:24:181:24:22

-And, of course, you didn't, Anita, and I'm sure you will make a profit. Shall we get in?

-Yes.

1:24:221:24:27

-I'll hold your hand, darling.

-Come on, lead the way, darling.

1:24:271:24:30

'The Edinburgh public are gathering. to inspect the goods and the hammer is poised to fall,

1:24:301:24:35

'but Mark and Anita are keen to grab a quick word with auctioneer Sybelle Thomson.'

1:24:351:24:41

-How are they going to do?

-We'll keep our fingers crossed.

1:24:411:24:44

You bought one or two nice quality items.

1:24:441:24:47

-Well, I did.

-Well, I don't know who bought what.

-THEY LAUGH

1:24:471:24:50

I particularly like the little Georgian ivory purse,

1:24:501:24:55

which is particularly special and probably inlaid with gold.

1:24:551:24:58

The horse hoof covers, I think they're great fun,

1:24:581:25:01

they're a real novelty collectors item. They're interesting and so we'll see.

1:25:011:25:05

-'Anita has spent £88 on five lots.'

-We'll seal the deal at that.

-Deal done.

1:25:061:25:12

-'While Mark has lavished £220 also on five lots.'

-There we are. Crisp notes.

1:25:131:25:19

-'Let's go.'

-One minute to go. Are you excited?

1:25:191:25:23

I am excited. And nervous, of course, as usual.

1:25:231:25:25

'Kicking off with the hoof boots.'

1:25:271:25:29

-I've got 20 bid on commission.

-20 is bid.

-20 bid.

1:25:291:25:32

25. 30.

1:25:321:25:34

5. 40. You're all out seated. Make no mistake.

1:25:341:25:37

They're on commission at 40. Anyone going on? At £40.

1:25:371:25:42

Well, that's not bad, Anita.

1:25:421:25:43

'A profit of £12 before commission on the boots.'

1:25:431:25:48

It's more Red Rum than Dobbin.

1:25:481:25:51

'Next, Mark's Monarch vase.'

1:25:511:25:54

100. 50. 50.

1:25:541:25:57

-Come on.

-30 bid.

-35.

1:25:571:25:59

-40.

-Oh, no.

-£40. Any advance on 40?

1:25:591:26:02

45. £50. Bid's with the lady at 50. 55.

1:26:021:26:07

-Any advance on 55?

-Come on.

-Selling to my right at 55.

1:26:071:26:11

-60.

-Oh, new place.

-£60. Right at the back at 60.

1:26:111:26:16

65. 65.

1:26:161:26:18

-Any advance on 65?

-HAMMER BANGS

1:26:181:26:21

'Almost £20 made. Not to be sniffed at.'

1:26:211:26:25

So it's a small profit but at least it's a profit.

1:26:251:26:27

'Next, Anita's anonymous glass.'

1:26:271:26:30

Who'd like to start me? £30 for it. 30.

1:26:301:26:33

-20. 20 bid.

-20 bid.

-20.

1:26:331:26:36

20 bid. Who's going on? At 20 bid. 25. 30.

1:26:361:26:40

£30. Still on commission at £30.

1:26:401:26:43

-Yes!

-'Also a good return.'

1:26:431:26:47

Not huge profits, but reasonable, decent, working profits.

1:26:471:26:53

'Now Mark's favourite item, the sovereign purse.'

1:26:531:26:57

Quite a lot of bids on it and I'm going to start it at £65. 65.

1:26:571:27:02

70. 5. 80. 5.

1:27:021:27:05

-85. With me on commission at 85.

-Come on.

1:27:051:27:09

-85. 90. 5.

-On the phone.

1:27:091:27:12

-100. 100.

-Come on, a bit more. Come on.

-On the telephone at 100.

1:27:121:27:16

-A little bit more.

-At 100. Any advance on 100?

1:27:161:27:20

-Oh, no.

-On the phone at £100.

1:27:201:27:24

Oh, that's disappointing.

1:27:241:27:26

'Certainly not what he'd hoped for.'

1:27:261:27:29

Technically, after commission, that's a loss.

1:27:291:27:32

'Anita's Scottish slipper box.'

1:27:321:27:35

-20 bid. 20 bid.

-We're in at 20.

-25. 30.

-That's good.

1:27:351:27:40

On the right at 30. Anyone else going on?

1:27:401:27:42

At 30. The bid's on my right at £30.

1:27:421:27:46

Well, you were spot on there, Anita. Absolutely spot on.

1:27:461:27:49

'Thanks to some shrewd bargaining,

1:27:491:27:52

'another small gain for Anita.'

1:27:521:27:54

I would've liked a wee bit more, but then again, I'm happy with that.

1:27:541:27:58

'Mark's silver coaster is under the hammer next.

1:27:581:28:01

'But Mark's head, it seems, is elsewhere.'

1:28:011:28:04

5. 50. 5.

1:28:041:28:07

-60. 5.

-Ooh.

-70.

-Is this mine?

-5.

1:28:071:28:10

-75.

-Never.

-Standing on my left at 75.

-No. Is it?

1:28:101:28:13

Would anyone else like in? At £75.

1:28:131:28:17

-Yes!

-£75, Anita.

1:28:171:28:20

'Full marks for silver. £37 profit before commission.'

1:28:201:28:25

That's pushed me right back in the game, Anita.

1:28:251:28:28

'Anita's smoky topaz paperweight.'

1:28:281:28:32

£30 to make a start. 30. 30 bid.

1:28:321:28:35

30 bid. 35. 40.

1:28:351:28:37

5. 45. 45.

1:28:371:28:40

At £45.

1:28:401:28:42

-'Not a hefty profit, but over twice the cost.'

-What do I know, Anita?

1:28:421:28:46

-I clearly know absolutely nothing.

-Oh, well, as long as you admit it.

1:28:461:28:50

'That tasteful alabaster box.'

1:28:501:28:53

-20 bid. 20 bid.

-Oh, please, a bit more.

1:28:531:28:56

£20. First and only bid of 20.

1:28:561:28:58

Anyone going on for a nice alabaster box at 20?

1:28:581:29:01

At £20.

1:29:011:29:04

Damn.

1:29:041:29:06

-'A £10 loss before commission.'

-No, that's disappointing.

1:29:061:29:11

'Anita's little jewellery lot.'

1:29:111:29:13

The mourning brooch and cat brooch at 45.

1:29:131:29:16

-45.

-50. 5. 60.

1:29:161:29:18

-5. 65. Still on commission at 65.

-That must've been gold, Anita.

1:29:181:29:24

At £65. 901.

1:29:241:29:27

A very sharp profit.

1:29:271:29:29

Oh, dear. I knew this was going to be a bad day.

1:29:291:29:33

'Now, does this lot have a prayer?'

1:29:331:29:37

-£85.

-I don't think I can even look, Anita. I can't even look.

1:29:371:29:41

Who'd like to start me at £40 for these? 40.

1:29:411:29:44

-20. 20. £20.

-Oh, come on.

1:29:441:29:48

20. £10. Beautifully upholstered. At 10.

1:29:481:29:51

£10. £10. Anyone for 10?

1:29:511:29:53

-I don't think it's going to sell.

-£10. 10 bid. 10 bid.

1:29:531:29:57

-Oh, no.

-10 bid. First and only bid of 10.

1:29:571:30:00

-Come on.

-12.

-12!

-Come on!

1:30:001:30:02

-12. Have another, sir. At 12.

-It's lovely! Come on!

1:30:021:30:05

-At £12.

-Oh, that's terrible.

1:30:051:30:08

'An £8 loss before auction costs.

1:30:081:30:12

'Seems like he wasn't listening, Mark.'

1:30:121:30:14

£12, Anita.

1:30:141:30:17

I can't say that I'm surprised.

1:30:171:30:19

'Anita's less than consoling words are tempered by the knowledge

1:30:211:30:25

'that she now leads by about £50. Call it a short head.

1:30:251:30:29

'Mark began with £324.40

1:30:291:30:33

'and made £3.04 after auction costs,

1:30:331:30:37

'so he now has £327.44 to spend tomorrow.

1:30:371:30:42

'Anita started this round with £294.40

1:30:431:30:47

'and made £84.20 after auction costs,

1:30:471:30:51

'leaving her with £378.60 to spend tomorrow.'

1:30:511:30:57

Never mind, Mark. Not much ahead.

1:30:571:30:59

-Don't be depressed. We'll go for a wee spin and have a nice cup of tea.

-Wonderful.

1:30:591:31:04

-The ride's on you.

-SHE LAUGHS

1:31:041:31:06

'Join us tomorrow when Mark celebrates a bargain find.'

1:31:091:31:13

-And a kiss.

-Absolutely.

1:31:131:31:16

'And Anita unlocks a little bit of history.'

1:31:161:31:19

-This is actually a piece of Napoleon's hair?

-That's amazing. We didn't know that was there.

1:31:191:31:26

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1:31:281:31:32

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1:31:321:31:36

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1:31:361:31:36