Episode 3 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 3

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Anita Manning and Mark Stacey's antique hunt takes them from the Scottish borders to Sunderland.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 and one big challenge.

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-I'm here to declare war.

-Why?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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-£15.

-No.

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The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit,

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but it's not as easy as you might think,

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-and things don't always go to plan.

-Push!

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So, will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

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-I'm going to go for it.

-This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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We're wending our wee way through Scotland

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in high summer with Mark Stacey and Anita Manning.

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-Now, there's a coupling for you.

-Welcome to British Summer Time.

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Well, it's always Mediterranean climate in Scotland, Mark.

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Yes, I can see, Anita. My castanets are frozen!

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Mark, Anita and their wee Morris have taken the high road,

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the low road and even a few wrong roads.

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It's right turn.

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And now they're getting very close to the border.

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So, just over that hill is England.

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I'm sure there's been a few battles around here over the years, Anita.

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Do you think it'll improve your performance, Mark?

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-I hope so, Anita, because it needs improving, doesn't it?

-It certainly does!

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Mark is a valuer and a dealer who loves to splash out now and again.

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-I daren't ask you for a discount on...

-No, you wouldn't.

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-Although that can get him into trouble.

-I can't believe it.

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While Anita, an auctioneer, is both the Queen of Canny...

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-£22.

-That's too much.

-And a mother with a shoulder to cry on.

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-I clearly know absolutely nothing.

-Well, as long as you admit it.

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They began with £200 each and have already made a major profit.

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Mark goes into today with £327.44 to spend.

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While Anita has sneaked ahead on £378.60.

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Oh, dear. I knew this was going to be a bad day.

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This week's journey is from the Cairngorms

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via the charming cities of Edinburgh and Durham

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to Thirsk in North Yorkshire.

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Today's show starts out at Melrose in the Scottish Borders

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and heads for a bonnie auction in Sunderland.

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Several hundred years ago, the Borders were a frightening place.

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A lawless region where raiding bands from both sides

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wreaked indiscriminate destruction,

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which is why you'll find an awful lot of ruined abbeys hereabouts.

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-Beautiful little Borders town.

-Lovely, isn't it?

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-I think we've got four antiques shops.

-I think so.

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So there should be plenty of choice.

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This is Melrose, where the heart of King Robert the Bruce is buried

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and where rugby history was made when they invented the seven a side version in 1883.

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Today's activity, however, is strictly a singles competition.

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What's your strategy today?

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I'm not quite sure, Mark, I think I'm going to remain a little canny.

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I do think you ought to try less of this canniness, Anita.

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You need to risk sometimes, you know.

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So, with that thought, our duo hit the streets of Melrose to try for a bargain.

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Anita's arrived at Whole Lot Antiques

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where there are, indeed, quite a few objects gathered under one roof, but no dealers present.

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So inquiries must be directed through the shopkeeper, Pat Glass.

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This is a seal.

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And this part here would be used

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to stamp the wax to seal your letters.

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Just for extra confidentiality.

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I'm not sure of the age of it.

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Do you know anything?

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I'm afraid we don't know.

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All we can tell you is what the dealer puts on the ticket.

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Unfortunately, the only thing on the ticket is a price for £52,

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but Pat may be a little bit flexible.

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I could do that for £30.

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I'm really looking to get that for around about £20.

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-I can give her a ring and find out what the best price would be.

-OK.

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So, while Pat makes the call, Anita steps outside, not to nick it,

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but to take a closer look.

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I'm still not absolutely sure if it's a modern replica.

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It really is touch-and-go. It is touch-and-go.

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Anita, we have good news.

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-I've had the dealer on the phone, and she will take £25.

-Right.

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I think we should just go for it.

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Elsewhere in Melrose, Mark is exploring his first shop,

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Michael Vee Design.

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It's a great place to visit, but hardly a traditional antique shop.

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Among all the painted and the shabby chic, you can spot things like this.

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This is carved piece of doorway.

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It would have gone over a lovely big entrance door.

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Possibly Georgian, probably more likely to be 19th century.

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But a fantastically decorative item.

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Not quite sure that that's going to go down well in the saleroom,

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but it's a lovely object.

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-Hello, Enid.

-Hi.

-I love your shop.

-Thank you.

-I love it.

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I mean, it's just really what the market's going for now,

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a mixture of the new and the old. But, I was looking for

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something a bit more antique and a bit smaller.

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Well, I might have something upstairs

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that was in the filing cabinet,

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and now could come out of the filing cabinet.

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I'm intrigued, I'd love to have a look in your filing cabinet.

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I know. I'd like you to see it. I'll go and get it.

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Well, you see, you never know.

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-I know what's in my filing cabinet at home, bills.

-Here it is.

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Oh, no, this is intricate, a cased item.

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Oh, wow!

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Gosh, Enid.

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Where on earth did you get this from?

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Well, I think I bought it from a local dealer about...

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maybe 12 years ago, 15 years ago.

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Good lord. First of all, we've got some sort of insignia

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with a lion's head. Now, that could be anything.

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-We've got a long chain. So it's going to hang like that.

-Yeah.

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-And then, what happens when you open it...

-Well, it's a whistle.

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Gosh!

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I bet it still works. WHISTLE TOOTS

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It does.

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Absolutely. Police, fire brigade...

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Do you know, I think it is some sort of Commander's,

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-for ceremonial purposes.

-Yeah.

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Whether it's when they're on parade and you've got your finery on.

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You've got all your silver buttons polished up. The big question is,

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-is it for sale?

-I think it could be.

-Oh.

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I don't suppose you have any idea of what you want for it, Enid?

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I can't remember what I paid for it. That's the honest truth.

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-So it can't have been too much?

-I think it was over £100.

-Was it?

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I'm sure it was over £100.

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I mean, how close do you think we could get to £80?

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Oh, a bit more than that. No. Definitely, a bit more than that.

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-How much more?

-Well...

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Putting you on the spot a bit.

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Putting me on the spot.

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£120.

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HE EXHALES

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Can we meet in the middle, Enid, and say £100?

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£110. I'm a hard woman from Scotland.

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You are a hard woman!

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-£105?

-OK.

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-And a kiss.

-Absolutely.

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Lovely. Despite having sealed her deal,

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Anita is still wholly occupied at the Lot down the road.

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I keep seeing lovely things.

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It's a wee bit small.

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Sometimes I like having things like that just to, sort of,

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lie on my dressing table.

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Even though you couldn't wear it. Yes.

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At £15, it may be worth it just as an ornament.

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I mean, could it be done for 10?

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Oh, I'm sure we could do that for 10.

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There we go.

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So, Anita has spent a mere £35

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on an amber seal and a jade bracelet,

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while her rival has already blown a packet on a whistle.

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£105 there, Enid.

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Oh, never mind.

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I'll tell you what I'll do, £5 back for a luck penny.

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That's so kind of you.

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I'm sure it all helps.

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Well, I'm absolutely thrilled with that.

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It's just a hop, skip and a jump to my next shop.

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Steady old boy! Hopefully, the best things in this shop aren't hidden under the dog.

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This is much for what I'm used to and comfortable with.

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An antiques shop with lots of antiques, hopefully.

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The question is, will they be in my price range?

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This is a very interesting little object.

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We've got a very finely modelled porcelain

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or bone china fox's head here with lovely eyes.

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Everything is nicely decorated.

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And then you've got, written on the bottom, Tally Ho.

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We know it's something straightaway to do with fox hunting

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and these would've been served

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with a nip of whisky or brandy before the hunt.

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You'd swig that back and hand it to your man-servant and off it would go.

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It's almost got a look of Anita Manning, cos she's a sly old fox!

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Miaow! At £750 the pair,

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these stirrup cups are well beyond Mark's budget

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but he soon hunts out something almost as foxy.

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That's a pretty little brooch. H Samuel.

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Largest watchmaker and jewellers in the world, it says.

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Market Street, Manchester, London, Glasgow and Cardiff, no less.

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And all principal cities.

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There's a box and a half, isn't there?

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That's a charming little art nouveau brooch, probably in gold,

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set with a little bit of turquoise.

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I don't normally go for jewellery,

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but I'm sure that's just the sort of sweet little quality piece

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that Anita would find endearing.

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It's a beautiful thing. Be out of my price range, I'm sure.

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I love the box.

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-Yes, it is its original box.

-It is beautiful, isn't it?

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-Go on, hit me with it.

-70.

-70?

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I don't often buy jewellery. I just think it's such a charming...

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-Would 50 help you?

-It would help me a lot.

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-I couldn't do any better than that.

-You couldn't go lower than 50?

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-Not 45?

-No.

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Go on then.

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-Go on what?

-45.

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Thank you.

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When Anita was here earlier, there were a lot of antiques to choose from.

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Now, there are a few less, but still, quite enough for Mark.

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Might be a good sign.

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This has been in the window so long, it's faded the price ticket.

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This is sometimes called Satsuma ware,

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after the region in Japan where it comes from.

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You can see here, it's got a signature

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and that little mark there,

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is the mon for the Prince of Satsuma.

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That shows it's come from that area.

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It's not the best quality but it's not the worst quality either.

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It's actually quite decorative.

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Satsuma earthenware originated in Japan in the late 16th century

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and is still produced today.

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It's usually brightly enamelled.

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I think I read that as 28.

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-28?

-Yes.

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Are you able to negotiate on behalf of the dealer?

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I can do it for £20.

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I'm going to take that.

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So, while Mark oversees the wrapping of another potential bargain...

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That's lovely, thank you.

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..Anita drives a few short miles to Abbotsford...

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..to visit the home of the great poet and novelist, Sir Walter Scott.

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He was the first English language author to have a successful international career

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as a writer in his lifetime,

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for romantic novels like The Lady of the Lake and Ivanhoe.

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Anita's here to meet Jason Dyer, of the charity that safeguards the estate.

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-Hi, Jason.

-Hi, Anita, welcome to Abbotsford

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and the home of Sir Walter Scott.

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Tell me when this building was built.

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It's in the Scottish baronial style.

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It is and it's the first in the Scottish baronial style.

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Sir Walter Scott started building in 1811

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and he completed the house in 1824.

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This is the study, so this is where Scott actually wrote many of his later novels.

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-This is?

-This is his original desk where he wrote those novels.

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It really is the beating heart of the house, if you like.

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And in the desk, his spectacles are still there,

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his Thomas Coutts chequebook that he'd have used is still there.

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So quite incredible.

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Also, his indexing system that he used for the various books around the shelf.

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There are 2,000 books normally in this study,

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these were books he was working on right up until his death.

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It has incredible atmosphere, this room.

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Not only did Sir Walter Scott virtually invent the historical novel,

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but he was also a great collector of historical objects.

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People would send him significant artefacts from all over the world,

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which inspired both novels and non-fiction,

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like his biography of Napoleon.

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According to the museum, the wood in this chair grew at the place

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where Scottish rebel leader, William Wallace, was captured.

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And the timber in this box came from the Spanish Armada.

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OK, Anita, this is just a few of the items that Scott was collecting.

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Quite an incredible array in this case here.

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This is intriguing.

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A piece of oatcake found in the pocket of a Highlander

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on the field of Culloden.

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Incredible if that's what it is, that it survived all this time!

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Quite often Sir Walter did want to prove

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what he was collecting is what it was meant to be.

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But you have grey areas around some objects.

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-He liked doing the detective work.

-He did, yes.

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Scott's incredible collection at Abbotsford also includes

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several famous locks of hair,

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as well as some precious possessions that have rarely been handled.

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-What about this crucifix here?

-The crucifix is an important object in the case.

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It's believed to be the crucifix

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that Mary Queen of Scots took to her execution.

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We'd like to think if Sir Walter Scott's done the detective work,

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that is what it is.

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If it is, it really is something that's been held by history.

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One of the central features in this case

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is the blotting book that belonged to Napoleon.

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-Is it possible to have a look?

-Of course.

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I'm going to have to ask you to put some gloves on, I'm afraid,

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so we can handle these.

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-This is a privilege to handle this!

-It's wonderful.

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-I've never looked inside before.

-It's an adventure for both of us.

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It's an adventure for me.

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There's this letter here which again, I've never looked at before.

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It would be interesting to see if we can make out what it says.

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It says, "This sealing case was left by Napoleon on his writing table

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"in the Palace of the Elysees in 1815."

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So, as he was obviously making his escape, he left this behind.

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That's wonderful.

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Do you want me to open it to see if we find any other surprises inside?

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And we have got what looks like some letters.

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And this one does seem to say something about Napoleon.

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-And it is some of his hair.

-ANITA GASPS

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"I take the liberty of sending you some of Napoleon's hair."

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So that is amazing, actually, to suddenly see that.

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So what would have happened is that...

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I mean, Scott would have a wide circle

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of influential friends throughout Europe,

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-and they would know of his passion...

-Definitely.

-..for collecting.

-Yep.

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And they would send him perhaps this type of thing.

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Indeed. He had a whole series of people who went out and collected for him.

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-So this is a find of some significance.

-I think so, yes.

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-We just didn't know it was there. That's quite incredible.

-Well done.

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-Thank you.

-We did it together.

-We did indeed, yes.

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Well, I wonder if the significance of what Anita has found has sunk in yet.

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I mean, anyone can discover the odd bargain, but the Emperor's hair?

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Incroyable!

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The next day, Jason did some further research into their discovery

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and asked Anita back to hear about the reaction

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it had already provoked.

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The flurry of e-mails I've had back from various people,

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all saying it's an exciting find,

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and for some of them, because they've seen it referenced

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in his letters, even more powerful to them because it matches up

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an object in the collection to something that's mentioned in his letters

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that they've never been able to find before.

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You know, did this really happen? And now we know for certain that it did.

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-The provenance is there.

-Yes.

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And what is incredible, when you look at that lock of hair,

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when you compare it to the other locks of hair we've got in the case,

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they're all bleached white by the sun,

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and yet this, you can see the actual colour of Napoleon's hair.

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-What a story!

-Indeed!

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And a real first for the Road Trip, too. Bravo!

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Back on the road and our trippers are taking the easy way

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out of the Borders.

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-Mark, the second day of our third leg.

-And the sun is shining, Anita.

-The sun is shining.

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The weather's on our side.

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-There's nobody listening, this is just a conversation between us.

-Just between us?

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-Just between us.

-A wee secret?

-A wee secret. Tell me what you bought.

-No.

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Well, strictly hush-hush,

0:18:210:18:23

but Anita spent just £35 on two wee things, including a jade bracelet.

0:18:230:18:29

-So she now has £343.60.

-Bye-bye.

-Thanks now, bye-bye.

0:18:290:18:34

While Mark lavished £165 on three items, not least a very collectable whistle.

0:18:340:18:42

WHISTLE BLOWS

0:18:420:18:43

Leaving him with just £162.44.

0:18:430:18:46

Today's minor excursion is from Melrose to Sunderland,

0:18:480:18:52

calling in first at Kelso.

0:18:520:18:54

Situated where the River Teviot meets the Tweed, Kelso has an abbey,

0:18:560:19:01

also ruined, just like its neighbour,

0:19:010:19:05

plus a fine castle where Mark will soon be heading.

0:19:050:19:08

Look up there. Floors Castle.

0:19:080:19:11

-But there's something for you there, Anita.

-What's that?

0:19:110:19:13

-Retirement apartments.

-Watch it!

0:19:130:19:16

THEY LAUGH

0:19:160:19:18

-It's Melrose Abbey. That's fabulous.

-Melrose Abbey? We're in Kelso.

0:19:180:19:23

-Oh, Kelso Abbey.

-I think we'll nip to those apartments sooner than I thought.

0:19:230:19:27

SHE LAUGHS

0:19:270:19:28

But the town of Kelso is well worth a visit, too -

0:19:300:19:33

a model of Georgian elegance and grace.

0:19:330:19:37

-So, Mark, off to Floors Castle.

-Off to Floors Castle for me, Anita.

0:19:370:19:41

And you've got a lovely market to go and explore.

0:19:410:19:44

There will be hundreds of bargains in that market,

0:19:440:19:47

and I'll buy one for you.

0:19:470:19:49

I look forward to seeing it, Anita.

0:19:490:19:53

Kelso's marketplace is nicely cobbled and resembles,

0:19:530:19:57

on a sunny day, somewhere in Provence or the Dordogne.

0:19:570:20:00

Luckily for Anita, however, the vendors here today are not flogging

0:20:000:20:05

local legumes but a varied collection of antiques and curios.

0:20:050:20:08

-An old spanner.

-A Rolls-Royce spanner.

-This man's better than me.

0:20:110:20:14

-Would this work in a Morris Minor?

-No, I think it's a wee bit more sophisticated than that.

-Is it?

0:20:140:20:21

I suppose there is a market for that, for Rolls-Royce collectors.

0:20:210:20:24

-Well, having Rolls-Royce written on it is quite good.

-Yeah.

0:20:240:20:27

I quite like this piece here, the wee jockey.

0:20:270:20:31

So this, we would put this into our decanter.

0:20:310:20:35

And it has a hallmark here. We'll just have a wee look, see where it was made.

0:20:350:20:40

Birmingham hallmark.

0:20:420:20:43

But the date letter's a wee bit obscured, but I think we're maybe

0:20:430:20:48

thinking about '20s, '30s.

0:20:480:20:51

I would be estimating it round about £20.

0:20:520:20:56

And I think you'll make a lot more money than £20 for it.

0:20:560:20:59

You think so? But you're selling it to me.

0:20:590:21:01

-Yeah, yeah.

-You're a good salesman.

0:21:010:21:03

-But since I would like you to win the competition...

-Oh, wow!

-Um...

0:21:030:21:09

-20?

-I would be prepared to sell it to you for £20.

-Give me a kiss.

0:21:100:21:15

Thank you. £20. I hope this little jockey gallops past the post.

0:21:150:21:20

-I'll be looking forward to it - first place again.

-I know.

0:21:200:21:22

Thanks very much. Thank you.

0:21:220:21:24

I'm always interested in fountain pens.

0:21:290:21:33

-And I also like to see a nine carat gold nib. There's three here.

-Uh-huh.

0:21:330:21:39

And we've got two quite plain ones and this quite jazzy affair here.

0:21:390:21:45

-What kind of price can you do on the three?

-£22?

-Uh-huh. That's too much.

-20?

0:21:450:21:50

-That's still too much on them.

-What do you think yourself?

0:21:500:21:54

-Can I make you an offer?

-Yes, certainly.

-Could you do those for 12?

0:21:540:22:00

-Yes, all right.

-Could you do them for 12?

-Uh-huh.

-That would be great.

0:22:000:22:04

No sooner has Anita pocketed her pens than she is accosted

0:22:050:22:08

-by a tall, dark stranger.

-Hi.

-Sorry to interrupt.

0:22:080:22:12

-Are you looking for stuff for your competition?

-Yes.

0:22:120:22:14

My car's parked just round the corner

0:22:140:22:16

and I've got an item that you might be interested in.

0:22:160:22:20

Lead on. I'm intrigued.

0:22:200:22:23

It's not the usual premises for the purchasing of fine antiques,

0:22:230:22:27

but Anita Manning's not put off by the back of a people carrier.

0:22:270:22:31

You'd know what that is straightaway.

0:22:310:22:33

-Is that a lovely piece of Carltonware?

-No, it's not.

-Is it Wedgwood?

0:22:330:22:36

-Oh, it's Crown Devon. Right, OK.

-With a lid.

-That's a lovely bit.

0:22:360:22:41

Crown Devon originated in a pottery in Stoke on Trent

0:22:420:22:46

which used to be called the Railway Works until it was reinvented in 1912.

0:22:460:22:52

-It's nice, isn't it?

-That's a nice bit.

-Pretty.

0:22:520:22:55

It's still got the original label on it.

0:22:550:22:57

The label on the bottom, yeah.

0:22:570:22:59

The only thing that worries me is that slight wee nick there.

0:22:590:23:03

What price are you looking for on it?

0:23:030:23:05

I haven't a Scooby Doo. Not a clue.

0:23:050:23:09

I know what my minimum would be.

0:23:090:23:12

-Tell me your minimum.

-No, you tell me...

-No, tell me your minimum.

0:23:120:23:17

-30.

-30?

0:23:170:23:19

I'm sure you'll make a profit on that, even with the nick.

0:23:200:23:23

-OK, let's do it. It's a deal.

-Super.

-Lovely, thank you very much.

0:23:230:23:27

-Thank you. That's lovely.

-Thank you very much.

0:23:270:23:30

So, while Anita completes her pottery purchase,

0:23:300:23:34

Mark makes for Kelso's Castle, the seat of the Duke of Roxburgh.

0:23:340:23:38

There's been a castle here beside the Tweed since 1721,

0:23:420:23:46

but Floors didn't acquire its fairytale turrets and pinnacles

0:23:460:23:51

until the middle of the 19th century.

0:23:510:23:53

-Hello, Mary.

-Hello there.

0:23:530:23:57

Mark's here to see some of the highlights

0:23:570:23:59

of the Duke's collection with guide Mary Campbell.

0:23:590:24:02

It's a real privilege to welcome you to Floors Castle today.

0:24:020:24:06

Thank you. I'm very much looking forward to the visit.

0:24:060:24:08

I hope you'll enjoy it. I'm sure you will.

0:24:080:24:11

The largest inhabited house in Scotland has always possessed

0:24:140:24:18

an excellent art collection,

0:24:180:24:20

but that significantly increased in the early 20th century

0:24:200:24:23

when the 8th Duke married Mary Goelet, an American heiress.

0:24:230:24:28

-It's a very spectacular room.

-It is, it is. It's lovely.

0:24:280:24:33

One of Mary's contributions was this outstanding work by Gainsborough.

0:24:330:24:38

It's Captain Roberts, who was Captain Cook's cartographer.

0:24:380:24:40

And he's pointing to the Sandwich Islands, which he charted,

0:24:400:24:44

-and which is now, of course, Hawaii.

-Hawaii.

0:24:440:24:47

-It is actually a beautiful portrait, isn't it?

-It is.

0:24:470:24:51

It's one of my favourites. In fact, I think it is my favourite one in the whole castle.

0:24:510:24:55

Wow!

0:24:550:24:56

What a wonderful picture.

0:24:560:24:58

One recent addition to the collection comes close to rivalling

0:25:000:25:04

what Anita discovered yesterday - a treasure from one of Scotland's greatest sons.

0:25:040:25:09

-This is a hitherto unpublished poem by Robert Burns.

-No!

0:25:090:25:15

-Scotland's greatest poet.

-Wow!

-It's lovely, isn't it?

0:25:150:25:19

-Gosh, yes, you can see it's signed down here.

-And the date as well.

0:25:190:25:22

-1789.

-A long time ago. And this is about a poor little wounded hare.

0:25:220:25:29

Oh, how romantic!

0:25:290:25:31

Yep. The poem, an early version of On Seeing A Wounded Hare,

0:25:310:25:36

in Burns' own hand,

0:25:360:25:38

was enclosed in a letter recently unearthed by a member of staff,

0:25:380:25:41

and it's now displayed at the castle.

0:25:410:25:43

This must be really exciting for Scotland,

0:25:430:25:47

-to get a find like this.

-Oh, it is.

0:25:470:25:49

And all sorts of people are making their way to Floors

0:25:490:25:52

-purely to look at it.

-Gosh!

0:25:520:25:54

"Inhuman man, curse on thy barbarous art.

0:25:540:26:00

"And blasted be thy murder aiming eye.

0:26:000:26:04

"May never pity soothe thee with a sigh.

0:26:040:26:06

"Nor ever pleasure glad thy cruel heart."

0:26:060:26:11

Wow, this is turning into quite a trip!

0:26:110:26:14

Ah, but it's time to get back on the road.

0:26:140:26:18

Mark and Anita are heading from Kelso to Jedburgh.

0:26:180:26:21

The man who wrote Rule Britannia was born here.

0:26:250:26:28

The border with England is just ten miles away.

0:26:280:26:31

Jedburgh also has strong rugby ties

0:26:310:26:34

and, you've guessed it, a ruined abbey.

0:26:340:26:38

-Look at the abbey.

-That's fabulous.

-Spectacular.

0:26:380:26:40

You go that way, and I'll go this way.

0:26:400:26:43

-I'll go this way?

-Yeah.

-Are you sending me the wrong direction?

0:26:430:26:46

Would I do something like that!

0:26:460:26:48

She would do something like that! I'm sure it's the wrong direction.

0:26:480:26:51

-On you go, see you later.

-See you later.

-Good luck.

0:26:510:26:54

I'm sure she's sending me the wrong direction. It's not down here at all.

0:26:540:26:57

Anita is tempted into the curiosity shop and soon finds plenty to excite.

0:26:590:27:05

Quality antiques. Many with a local flavour.

0:27:050:27:07

This is a wonderful bowl.

0:27:070:27:10

It's an example of Sunderland lustre.

0:27:100:27:12

And we are going to an auction in that area,

0:27:120:27:16

so it's the type of thing that would be,

0:27:160:27:20

it would be a real hit in that auction.

0:27:200:27:24

It has an almost naive look about it,

0:27:240:27:28

but it's highly collectible and sought after

0:27:280:27:31

by collectors of this type of thing.

0:27:310:27:33

"Too oft is a smile but the hypocrites wile."

0:27:330:27:37

Now, isn't that wonderful?

0:27:370:27:39

Well, I don't know, but at £225,

0:27:390:27:42

that bowl might struggle to make a profit even at a Tyne and Wear auction.

0:27:420:27:46

I haven't got any pictures yet. There's lots of pictures in here.

0:27:460:27:50

Having a quick glance around, there's a wild, big abstract

0:27:500:27:54

in the corner there, and I'm going to have a closer look at that.

0:27:540:27:58

But it's a bit expensive.

0:27:580:28:00

-Have you got it?

-Yes.

0:28:000:28:03

This is done by Robert Methven.

0:28:030:28:05

And he lived in 104 Renfrew Street in Glasgow, which is just where the art school is.

0:28:050:28:11

My interest in abstract art has grown,

0:28:110:28:15

and I think it's because, as an auctioneer, I handle so many things,

0:28:150:28:20

and I think I'm being drawn away from the natural, into the abstract.

0:28:200:28:27

But it seems that a price of £145 just can't tempt her enough.

0:28:270:28:32

And while Anita's agonising over her art, Mark is just plain lost.

0:28:320:28:39

Perhaps Anita's directions weren't altogether accurate after all. Cunning woman!

0:28:390:28:44

I've enjoyed my little walk, but I've had enough. I'm going to Hawick.

0:28:440:28:47

And, hopefully, when I get to Hawick, there might be a nice antique shop

0:28:470:28:52

or an antique centre, and I'll be finding my missing bargains.

0:28:520:28:57

So, off to a place which, unless you knew better,

0:28:570:29:00

you might think was called Haw-wick.

0:29:000:29:05

I think we're coming up to the antiques centre. It's around here somewhere.

0:29:050:29:09

That's a golf club.

0:29:090:29:13

Lovely village green.

0:29:130:29:15

Antiques centre. Now...

0:29:150:29:18

This is it.

0:29:180:29:20

This looks like the place. Antiques centre.

0:29:200:29:23

They've even got a vintage car which is better than ours.

0:29:230:29:26

It's a nice old thing, isn't it?

0:29:260:29:28

Might come in handy if the Morris has an off day too!

0:29:280:29:31

But there are plenty of smaller, less mobile items on display as well.

0:29:310:29:37

This is a very sweet little Victorian miniature frame,

0:29:370:29:40

I suppose for maybe a lady to put on her dressing table,

0:29:400:29:44

with a photograph of her loved one on.

0:29:440:29:46

It's very highly decorated, with these flowering scrolls. There's a little ram's head here.

0:29:460:29:51

And you've got little figures at the bottom.

0:29:510:29:55

It's a very pretty little object.

0:29:550:29:57

Something I think would be quite highly collectible these days.

0:29:570:30:00

And it does look in good condition. Mind you, the price is 48.

0:30:000:30:04

But it's London 1890, so it's an antique piece of silver.

0:30:040:30:07

It's rather charming.

0:30:070:30:10

While Gail goes to blow up a storm with the dealer,

0:30:100:30:13

Mark gets the scent of another possible purchase.

0:30:130:30:16

Well, now, that's a bargain.

0:30:160:30:18

I couldn't possibly.

0:30:180:30:21

I couldn't, could I?

0:30:210:30:25

Come over here.

0:30:250:30:27

Follow me.

0:30:280:30:30

I've brought you into this quiet room because you know how Anita

0:30:300:30:34

is always going on about her beautiful pieces of Murano glass?

0:30:340:30:38

And they've never got any labels or anything on them.

0:30:380:30:42

Well, here we have a glass vase by Murano,

0:30:420:30:47

with not a label, but two labels.

0:30:470:30:50

And it's got a price label.

0:30:500:30:53

And it's priced at £4!

0:30:530:30:56

Murano glass was produced originally

0:30:560:31:00

on the Adriatic island of the same name.

0:31:000:31:02

The glass makers were allegedly encouraged to move there

0:31:020:31:06

from nearby Venice because of medieval 'elf and safety concerns!

0:31:060:31:10

News that the dealer will take a very reasonable £28 for the silver frame prompts Mark to go for a deal.

0:31:100:31:17

Listen, I'm going to go for this at 28.

0:31:170:31:20

And I daren't ask you to discount on £4, dare I?

0:31:200:31:24

-No. You wouldn't.

-Wouldn't I?

0:31:240:31:26

Yes, you would, but no!

0:31:260:31:29

You're not getting one.

0:31:290:31:30

Well, I think that's fair enough.

0:31:300:31:33

With those two final items,

0:31:330:31:36

Mark is now happy to reveal all to his friendly rival.

0:31:360:31:39

It's been a great day, hasn't it?

0:31:390:31:42

I've had a wonderful time, Mark. I'll show you my first buy.

0:31:420:31:45

And this is a little seal. Nice little glass handle,

0:31:450:31:50

and a little amethyst glass matrix.

0:31:500:31:53

Very charming. What did you pay for it, Anita?

0:31:530:31:56

-I paid £25.

-£25?

0:31:560:31:59

You can't lose too much on £25, can you?

0:31:590:32:01

This is an oriental bangle.

0:32:010:32:04

It's not of the best quality.

0:32:040:32:08

But I thought it was rather pretty.

0:32:080:32:10

And I bought it for £10.

0:32:100:32:12

I think it's a good punt. And I can see that you're really stretching yourself there, Anita!

0:32:120:32:17

Now, my first item I've got to show you. It's a lovely little...

0:32:170:32:21

-Oh, isn't that gorgeous?

-Satsuma cover.

0:32:210:32:25

Oh, that's lovely.

0:32:250:32:26

I was first attracted to the little heart-shaped cut-outs.

0:32:260:32:29

And it is marked underneath. It's signed, and it's got the Prince of Satsuma's mon on there.

0:32:290:32:34

-I love it, it's wonderful.

-I'm so pleased.

0:32:340:32:37

-Tell me?

-£20.

0:32:370:32:39

That's a cracking buy. That is a wonderful buy.

0:32:390:32:44

Next, Anita's equestrian stopper.

0:32:440:32:47

It's hallmarked silver.

0:32:470:32:49

It has a Birmingham hallmark.

0:32:490:32:51

-What I liked most about it was the little jockey...

-Yes.

-On the top.

0:32:510:32:56

Very appealing.

0:32:560:32:58

-I liked that, and I paid £20 for it.

-Well, it's not a lot of money, Anita.

0:32:580:33:02

Next, Mark's brooch.

0:33:020:33:05

But I do hope you agree with me that it's a lovely little object.

0:33:050:33:10

Oh, that's very, very sweet.

0:33:100:33:12

-Art nouveau.

-Set with a turquoise.

0:33:120:33:14

-Nine carat rose gold?

-That's right.

0:33:140:33:17

-Edwardian?

-1905 or so. And I love the little box.

0:33:170:33:21

Aha. It all depends on price.

0:33:210:33:24

I know, that's the key thing, isn't it? £45.

0:33:240:33:28

It's certainly worth more than £45 of anyone's money.

0:33:280:33:32

I'm finding that pen collectors just love this type of thing,

0:33:320:33:37

particularly the marbled one. And I'm hoping that the addition

0:33:370:33:43

-of gold content in them will carry the thing through.

-Absolutely.

0:33:430:33:46

-What did you pay for them?

-£12.

0:33:460:33:48

-Well, it doesn't sound a lot to me.

-No.

0:33:480:33:51

My next item, Anita, it's a little silver photo frame.

0:33:510:33:55

Ah, isn't that...

0:33:550:33:57

It's hallmarked for 1890.

0:33:570:34:00

Very much in that classical style.

0:34:000:34:02

And I just thought it was a lovely little quality item.

0:34:020:34:05

-How much did you pay for it, Mark?

-£28.

0:34:050:34:07

That's excellent. Really, really excellent. That's your best buy, don't you think so?

0:34:070:34:12

-You haven't seen my other item yet.

-Oh no!

0:34:120:34:16

I just thought it was a really attractive thing, and I love glass, as you know.

0:34:160:34:21

I love the Italian glass factories.

0:34:210:34:25

-Tell me what you paid for it?

-£4.

-Oh! Well done!

0:34:250:34:29

You've done an Anita!

0:34:290:34:31

£30.

0:34:310:34:34

I love the shape, I love the cover.

0:34:340:34:36

-There is a small chip on it.

-I know.

0:34:360:34:37

Which I think you could probably just get over with a bit of gilding.

0:34:370:34:42

Aha. I know. That slightly worried me a wee bit.

0:34:420:34:46

-I think there's a working profit, in my opinion.

-Aha.

0:34:460:34:49

But I can see why you wanted it, it's a beautiful object.

0:34:490:34:53

What we're looking at here, Anita, is a ceremonial item

0:34:530:34:57

connected to the police force.

0:34:570:34:59

We've got a silver chain.

0:34:590:35:01

We've got a lovely little badge here that would have gone on the tunic.

0:35:010:35:05

-But this is what really appealed to me. It's that.

-Oh!

0:35:050:35:10

You got a whistle.

0:35:100:35:11

And, when you go like that.

0:35:110:35:13

HE WHISTLES It still works.

0:35:130:35:15

Absolutely superb.

0:35:150:35:17

I don't really even want to ask you how much you paid for it

0:35:170:35:20

-because it's such a pleasure to see something of that quality.

-It actually cost me 100.

0:35:200:35:27

And I, obviously...

0:35:270:35:28

That's got to get £200.

0:35:280:35:30

I think, Anita, if my hunches are right, and your hunches are right, we know quality when we see it,

0:35:300:35:35

if the bidders recognise it for what it is,

0:35:350:35:38

this could well make £300 or more.

0:35:380:35:41

And here's what they really think.

0:35:410:35:44

The brooch, 45. A wee bit dear.

0:35:440:35:49

It was very pretty. But the gold is high just now, so he might just get away with that.

0:35:490:35:53

She brought out that little seal.

0:35:530:35:56

In my mind, it's a reproduction.

0:35:560:35:58

The glass is too clear, the silver is too clear.

0:35:580:36:01

He bought glass, that was just a bit of fun.

0:36:010:36:03

It had no quality at all, absolutely no quality.

0:36:030:36:06

The jade bangle. I honestly have to say that's got utterly no quality at all.

0:36:060:36:12

After starting out in the borders at Melrose,

0:36:160:36:19

this leg of our trip will be decided in Sunderland

0:36:190:36:22

at the auctioneers, Boldon Auction Galleries.

0:36:220:36:26

-Are you nervous?

-No, I'm excited.

-And so you should be.

0:36:260:36:29

Oh, Anita, you never know, it's not over till the end of the sale!

0:36:290:36:33

Until the fat lady sings?

0:36:330:36:36

Well, that's not you, Anita, is it?

0:36:360:36:38

Wearsiders and Tynesiders have gathered to get a good look at the lots.

0:36:380:36:43

Giles Hodges, the man with the hammer, has his own views on what Mark and Anita are selling.

0:36:430:36:48

There's a pretty little jade bangle.

0:36:480:36:51

Anything oriental, Chinese, flavour of the month at the moment.

0:36:510:36:55

My favourite by far is the Victorian silver whistle.

0:36:550:36:59

I think it's lovely. It's nice to see it in its original box.

0:36:590:37:03

I'm hoping it will make £200-300, maybe over the 300 mark.

0:37:030:37:07

Again, we'll see where we're at when we're on the rostrum. The proof of the pudding.

0:37:070:37:12

Mark has spent £197 on five lots.

0:37:140:37:17

That's lovely, thank you.

0:37:170:37:21

While Anita has spent exactly £100 less. Also on five lots.

0:37:210:37:26

-OK, let's do it, it's a deal.

-Excitement mounts.

0:37:260:37:28

Yes! Yes!

0:37:280:37:30

-All right, Anita.

-Yes!

0:37:300:37:33

First, Mark's Victorian frame.

0:37:350:37:37

-I'm bid 15 to start it.

-15?

-Straight in at 15.

0:37:370:37:39

18. 20. 22. 25. 28. 30.

0:37:390:37:45

32.35. 38.

0:37:450:37:48

-40. 5. 45. We're upstairs, right.

-I'd have thought more than that.

0:37:480:37:53

Make no mistake, at 45.

0:37:530:37:55

Ooh, that's a bit disappointing really.

0:37:550:37:58

Especially after commission, oh yes.

0:37:580:38:01

45 is a profit at the end of the day. £17.

0:38:010:38:05

Anita's Crown Devon jar.

0:38:050:38:08

40, straight in.

0:38:080:38:10

40. 45. 50. 5.

0:38:100:38:14

At £55, anybody else, feel free.

0:38:140:38:17

At £55, and all done.

0:38:170:38:19

That was very good.

0:38:190:38:22

Actually, almost twice what she paid.

0:38:220:38:25

Next, Mark's Murano. Was it a bargain?

0:38:250:38:28

And £5 bid for it, somebody?

0:38:280:38:31

Fiver and away?

0:38:310:38:33

A couple of pounds to start me then?

0:38:330:38:35

£2 bid on the front. At two. Four. Six. £6.

0:38:350:38:39

-Oh no.

-Six. At £6. All done?

0:38:390:38:43

At £6.

0:38:430:38:44

Definitely not what Mark had hoped for.

0:38:440:38:47

I mean, £6 for that. It's fully marked.

0:38:470:38:50

That's all it was worth.

0:38:500:38:53

Next, the fountain pens from Kelso market.

0:38:530:38:56

-20 to start them.

-Yes.

-At £20, for the three.

0:38:560:38:59

At £20. Two, anybody now? 22, the lady's bid. At £22.

0:38:590:39:05

25, yes or no? All done at £22.

0:39:050:39:09

785.

0:39:090:39:10

That's a nice £10 profit, Anita. Well done.

0:39:100:39:14

Less commission, of course.

0:39:140:39:16

Mark's art nouveau gold brooch next.

0:39:160:39:19

I have two commission bids.

0:39:190:39:21

We start at £55.

0:39:210:39:24

60 now? At £55. 60, anybody?

0:39:240:39:29

At £55, last chance.

0:39:290:39:31

-At 55. Commission bid.

-That was a very good price for that.

0:39:310:39:36

That wasn't too bad actually.

0:39:360:39:37

Thanks, in part, to a late discount from the dealer.

0:39:370:39:41

-I think you're lucky to get out of that one.

-Really?

-Yes.

0:39:410:39:44

Next, the little silver jockey stopper.

0:39:440:39:47

And I'm bid 15 to start it, At £15. 18, anybody?

0:39:470:39:52

At 15. 18. 20.

0:39:520:39:54

Two. At £22. The bid's upstairs. 25.

0:39:540:39:59

25.

0:39:590:40:00

Once costs are deducted, she's just got her money back.

0:40:000:40:04

I'm surprised. I'm surprised at that.

0:40:040:40:07

-Now, Anita's jade bracelet.

-I've got two bids.

0:40:070:40:12

And 30 starts me.

0:40:120:40:13

35. 40. 5. 50. 5.

0:40:130:40:17

I'm out. £55. 60, anybody?

0:40:170:40:20

At £55. And we're away at 55.

0:40:200:40:24

Yes!

0:40:240:40:27

Well! Over five times what it cost.

0:40:270:40:30

Well done, Anita, you've got an eye for picking these bits!

0:40:300:40:34

Don't be jealous! Next, Mark's Satsuma vase.

0:40:340:40:37

£45.

0:40:370:40:38

£45.

0:40:380:40:41

5. 60. The bid's upstairs at 60.

0:40:410:40:44

Anybody else left?

0:40:440:40:45

All done at 60.

0:40:450:40:48

-Good.

-I'm pleased with that. I'm pleased with that.

0:40:480:40:50

And so you should be.

0:40:500:40:54

I was thinking 40 or 50. So, 60 is above my expectations on that.

0:40:540:40:57

-It made its price.

-I'm pleased.

0:40:570:40:59

Mow, the amber desk seal.

0:40:590:41:03

Will the bidders give it the stamp of approval?

0:41:030:41:05

Commission bid straight in at £5 to start me. 5. 8. 10. 12.

0:41:050:41:11

15. 18. 20.

0:41:110:41:13

£20. The bid's upstairs. £20.

0:41:130:41:16

Are we all done? At 20.

0:41:160:41:19

-Well.

-I suppose it could have been worse.

0:41:190:41:22

Sadly, after auction costs, it will be.

0:41:220:41:25

It needed to go up to 20, so, well done, auctioneer.

0:41:250:41:29

Now, for the once forgotten whistle.

0:41:300:41:34

-I'm bid 100 to start it.

-Oh gosh.

0:41:340:41:35

120. 140. 160. 180.

0:41:350:41:40

200. 220.

0:41:400:41:42

240. 260. 280.

0:41:420:41:46

At 280. At £280 for the last time. At 280.

0:41:460:41:52

-That's good.

-Yes.

0:41:520:41:54

That real treasure has put Mark back in the lead.

0:41:540:41:58

In a fine sale, it might even have made a bit more

0:41:580:42:01

but I'm thrilled with that, I'm very pleased.

0:42:010:42:04

-I'm happy you're happy.

-Thank you.

0:42:040:42:07

Well then, we're all happy!

0:42:070:42:09

And we want everybody to be happy.

0:42:090:42:12

A great day in Tyne and Wear then. Especially for Mark Stacey.

0:42:120:42:17

He began with £327.44.

0:42:170:42:21

And made £168.72 after auction costs.

0:42:210:42:27

So he has £496.16 to spend tomorrow.

0:42:270:42:32

Anita started this round with £378.60.

0:42:340:42:38

And made £48.14 after auction costs.

0:42:380:42:43

Leaving her with £426.74 to spend tomorrow.

0:42:430:42:48

So, Mark, that's our third auction over.

0:42:480:42:51

-Absolutely.

-There was one each and now you're on top.

0:42:510:42:54

I'm on top. 2-1 to me, Anita. It's like a tennis match.

0:42:540:42:59

Just promise me one thing, Anita.

0:42:590:43:01

Keep buying small things and making small profits and I'll be really happy.

0:43:010:43:04

Leave the big profits to me, all right?

0:43:040:43:07

We'll see what happens next time.

0:43:070:43:09

Join us tomorrow when Mark gets cheeky.

0:43:090:43:14

-Oh Mark, I love cheeky offers.

-You like cheeky offers?

-I do.

0:43:140:43:17

Anita gets sentimental.

0:43:170:43:19

SINGS: I belong to Glasgow, dear Glasgow town...

0:43:190:43:24

And the little Morris has a "minor" mishap.

0:43:240:43:28

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:360:43:38

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:380:43:39