Episode 4 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 4

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Anita Manning and Mark Stacey travel from St Helen Auckland to Darlington.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge.

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I'm here to declare war.

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Why?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques

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as they scour the UK?

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-15 quid.

-No!

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The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

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It's not as easy as you may think, and things don't always got to plan.

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Push!

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So, will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

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I'm going to go for it.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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This week, Anita Manning, Mark Stacey and the little Morris Minor

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they call Bluebell are heading for Yorkshire after setting off

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from Bonnie Scotland.

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-You've got to roll your Rs.

-Leave my Rs out of this.

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Anita, from Glasgow, was Scotland's first female auctioneer,

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and she certainly likes to keep prices low.

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What have you got for 20p?

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While Mark, a dealer from Brighton,

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is happy to enlist help from on high.

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Please, please, huge profits.

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THUNDER RUMBLES

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But unfortunately, there's been a cruel twist of fate.

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Anita and Mark's stately progress

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has been interrupted by a breakdown that's left Bluebell in the garage,

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and Mark and Anita stranded in the north-east.

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# Who's going to drive you home tonight? #

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Poor wee Bluebell.

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The radiator's gone.

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Do you know, when that water was spouting out of the grill,

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-it looked as if she was crying.

-I know.

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The shop's just up the road, Mark.

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We should walk up there.

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I'll have a good think and I'll have worked it out,

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what we're going to do, by the time we've done our shopping.

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Cos I can't wait to get started.

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-Come on.

-OK. Let's go.

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Mark and Anita began with £200 each,

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and have already added a handsome sum.

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Mark goes into today just ahead with £496.16 to spend

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while Anita has £426.74.

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This week's journey travels from deep in the Cairngorms via

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the charming cities of Edinburgh and Durham to Thirsk in North Yorkshire.

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Today's show begins in St Helen Auckland, County Durham,

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and heads, we hope, for a canny auction in Darlington.

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This is exciting, Anita. Another treasure trove.

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-It's Aladdin's cave.

-You've got all those earrings to choose from!

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-You go in the back, I'll stay here, then we'll change over.

-Yes, ma'am.

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See you later.

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Now, this shop is called Something Different,

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a Pythonesque pile where bargains can be found amongst bric-a-brac.

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But which, dear expert? Which?

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What on earth is that?

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It's a little brooch, believe it or not,

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which was made of the paw of an animal.

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I've no idea.

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It's hideous but there could be a profit.

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That's the type of thing Phil Serrell loves.

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Dare I buy something like this? I'll get e-mails of hate.

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Anita soon grabs Yvonne for a demonstration of the finest in low fidelity.

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This is obviously the home entertainment section.

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-We wind it up from here and...

-Just stop.

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-Stop and start!

-You've got some 78s.

-Let's have a look.

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I don't believe... I Belong To Glasgow!

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I don't believe that! I do not believe that.

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RECORD WHIRS

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# I belong to Glasgow

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# Dear old Glasgow town

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# There's nothing the matter with Glasgow

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# Cos it's going round and round

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# A couple of pints on a Saturday

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# Glasgow belongs to me. # Hooray!

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THEY LAUGH

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-And we've got a radio here as well.

-That's a Bush one.

-Uh-huh.

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-Bakelite. Is that working as well?

-They take a few minutes to warm up.

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The radio is priced at £58 and the gramophone at £45,

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but if Anita promises not to sing again she might get it down.

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I could be interested in both of these things for £35.

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Is that possible?

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I don't think I could do that.

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If you was to say £50 for the two.

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£50 for the two.

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Could you bring it to £40?

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-What about £45?

-We're nearly there. It's a nice game. Every pound counts.

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-It does. It really does.

-Could we have...

-£42!

-Would you go £42?

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-Would you go £42?

-That's be all right.

-Could we do that?

-We will.

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That's so kind. That's great.

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Next door, Mark's got sporting goods in his sights.

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This is a shoulder of mutton gun case. You open it here.

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Then you put your shotgun and things in there.

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Not that I know about these things.

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I'm not a member of the hunting and shooting brigade.

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Then you'd put it over your shoulder so when you hunt

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it's out of your way and when you're ready to shoot you can get your gun.

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I don't like the price. It's marked up at £68.

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We'll ask Yvonne if we get a moment to see her.

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But whilst he's pondering that unusual target...

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That's quite pretty.

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..something more traditional hoves into view.

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This is a Chinese vase. It's called cinnabar lacquer,

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which is the red lacquer, then it's cut out with this black design.

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It gives quite a dramatic effect.

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It looks in...perfect condition.

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I'm looking to see the delicacy of the carving.

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It's quite a dramatic vase, but as we all know, the Chinese market is rather buoyant at the moment.

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People are just buying anything that's Chinese thinking there's a profit in it.

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Am I falling into that trap? Probably.

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-Yvonne. I like this vase.

-Yes.

-I'm not convinced it's that old.

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-Right.

-It's a shame it's not 19th century.

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-You've got £65 on it.

-Yeah.

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-What sort of movement could you do on that?

-I could do £45 on it.

-£45.

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That does help me a bit.

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I could maybe do you a bit better price on the gun case.

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If I got £45 for that, you give me £40 for that.

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-How does that sound?

-It sounds reasonable-ish.

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Can I be terribly cheeky without offending you?

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-I never take offence.

-Thank you.

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I wonder if we could do the pair for £75.

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-Yeah, all right. Yeah. You've got to have a chance as well.

-You sure?

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-Yeah, that's fine.

-Give me a big kiss.

-Ah, thank you.

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This is a lovely little cloisonne buckle. I love cloisonne ware.

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The patterns are made by little wire sections

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made up and filled with coloured, glazed enamels,

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and they make this wonderful pattern.

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It's not a silver back, which I would love to see. It's a brass back.

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I like it as an object to look at but I worry that it's not useful.

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But really quite pretty.

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After a quick shuffle through the cabinet...

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I've found a little bronze which I think is charming.

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It's nicely modelled,

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and I like the patina, which is the surface of the bronze.

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I think it's probably from the 1930s but...I'm not absolutely sure.

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I do like it. He's sweet, isn't he? But I need to get him for about £30.

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£39 less than he's priced at. And the label on the buckle says £29.

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Yvonne, I'm thinking him round about £40.

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On this one I'd be looking in the region of £10, the cloisonne.

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That could be £40.

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-I'd probably need £20 for that.

-Can that cloisonne be £10?

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-Can't be £10?

-I can't.

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Could you go £12 on that, £40 on that, so we're doing £52 on the two?

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-Cash again, cash again.

-Money talks!

-That's right.

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£12 on that, £40 on that, £52.

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-All right.

-Shall we go for it?

-We'll go for it.

-I love these items.

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That's what I do. I buy things I like.

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Yeah.

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Anita is making great strides today,

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and Mark's no slouch either with yet another Oriental find.

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This is quite interesting. This isn't complete. It should have a cover on it.

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It's got a hair crack.

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It's a piece of Chinese porcelain. It's typically decorated in a palette knows as Imari,

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the use of these iron reds and blues and a bit of gilding.

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No great shakes, but it's 18th century and I was just thinking,

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it's priced up at £22. I feel awful doing it, but I might ask Yvonne

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if she'll take a sneaky fiver for it

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and put it in with the cinnabar lacquer.

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They're both Chinese so there's a link,

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and two birds are better than one.

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No. What is that expression? Two heads are better than one. But that doesn't fit.

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I'm getting all confused.

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Yvonne, I was rather hoping you'd bought this as part of a very cheap house clearance.

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I was going to make you a terribly cheeky offer on it.

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-Go on, I love cheeky offers.

-Do you?

-I do. I do.

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I'm going to offer you... You won't slap me, will you?

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I've got to hear it first! Go on!

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-A fiver.

-Ah!

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-I'll put it in with the Chinese vase.

-That's shocking.

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-It is shocking. Aren't I awful?

-Let me examine this. Let me have a look.

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-Where's this damage you was...

-You see there?

-Yes, it is, actually.

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-I would have had the nice couple...

-I never noticed that before.

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I'm being very cheeky with you, Yvonne,

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and you have every right to slap me and say, "Go away."

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-Oh, go on.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

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-Love our kisses.

-We do love our kisses. And I think that makes a nice addition to the lot.

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So while Mark's schmoozing threatens to nab him the entire stock...

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-Thanks, Mark.

-My change in my pot.

-Good luck.

-Thank you very much.

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..Anita has sensibly called a mini-cab

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to take her to the next shop,

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and is travelling from St Helen Auckland to Cleadon.

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I'm very happy having Peter driving me about. Very comfortable.

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Oh! Anita soon finds herself amongst a mix of antiques and gifts,

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with a special emphasis on the animal kingdom.

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This is Griselda Hill. This pottery brought over the name of Wemyss and the patterns of Wemyss.

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Wemyss was that wonderful Fife pottery of Robert Heron and sons.

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This is quite typical of Wemyss ware, with these wonderful cabbage roses,

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and if this was an early 20th century Wemyss cat it would be worth thousands of pounds.

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It's very jolly, it's Griselda Hill, and I love it to bits.

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I might ask the price of that.

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This is more local.

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It's a wonderful piece of Maling which was made in Newcastle-on-Tyne.

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Very, very popular, very colourful.

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We can see this pattern here which is called the Maling Thumbprint.

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The factory closed in 1960, which was a shame,

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but people love it. And no wonder.

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But the Maling plate is £56

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and the big Wemyss cat £195, well outside her budget.

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Time to get a move on, Anita.

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This is also Wemyss ware, and at £42, a bit more realistic.

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I'd love to buy a piece but I don't know if I can make a profit on it.

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-I'd like to buy a piece.

-The profit's the thing, isn't it?

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Because they're still being produced they're not going to reach high prices in auction.

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-Would it be possible to buy that for, say, £20?

-Go on, then.

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-Will we do it?

-Yes, go on.

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Mark, meanwhile, has also been forced to hail a cab

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with boring things like air conditioning.

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You look very familiar.

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-They always say that.

-He probably thinks I'm David Barby.

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I wonder if I'll get away with saying,

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"Is that your very lowest fare?"

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Cheeky! I don't know.

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Mark's travelling from St Helen Auckland

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to Stanley to visit Beamish.

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This open-air museum is a specially created village

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made up of authentic buildings hand-picked from the surrounding area

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to tell the story of the north-east from Georgian to Edwardian times.

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Look at that. The village is described as a living museum

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that the public can experience first-hand,

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and it's the original Beamish colliery which dominates the landscape.

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Dressed like that, you have to be Richard.

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-Hello.

-I'm Mark.

-Hello, Mark.

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-Very nice to meet you.

-Welcome to Beamish.

-I'm very pleased to be here.

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Now, I understand you're going to show me some items

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-the public don't normally get the chance to look at?

-Absolutely.

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-We're going to go inside the Aladdin's cave that is our collection store.

-Fantastic.

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Nice bowler!

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Behind the scenes at Beamish is a vast archive of material

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which can't be displayed in the village, and Mark is here

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to find a few of the treasures they hold.

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We've pulled out for you here a really special collection,

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relating to a huge mining disaster just a mile up the road at Stanley.

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This shows all the men and boys who died in the mine.

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168 people lost their lives, a huge explosion.

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Between 150 and 200,000 people turned up to the funeral in Stanley.

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There were 15,000 people at the top of the mine,

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while they were rescuing the people coming out. It was this huge disaster,

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-and people were waiting to hear news of their brother, son...

-Their loved ones.

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And their children. Children aged 13 were killed.

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Neighbouring Stanley has a fine memorial to those who died in 1909,

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but most other traces of the industry have now almost completely disappeared.

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Well, Richard, I emphasise Wales, of course, another great mining area,

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and we've had our own share of disasters in the past.

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And I'm from a family of miners.

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My father and a lot of his brothers were miners.

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And I remember as a child going up to the pit,

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and it was a very scary place, actually, very scary indeed,

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even in the 1970s.

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And I remember my father telling me that his brother was killed in a mining accident.

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So it was very, very, very hard work. Very hard work.

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Although mining was without doubt a grim business,

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there's a strong tradition of miners in their spare time

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creating works of art such as banners and other, more unusual items.

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This is miners' folk art.

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Folk art made by the range at night.

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Tell me about this, Richard, because this is really quite weird, isn't it?

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-Have you ever seen anything like this?

-I've never.

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-Are these wood in there?

-It's wood in there.

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It's dropped in the shape of a cross.

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-It's called God in a bottle.

-God in a bottle.

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It would sit on the mantelpiece or in the corner of the room

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and was thought to have slightly mysterious magical qualities.

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It is something rather eerie about it, isn't it?

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It's a bit like a sort of ship at the bottom of the ocean.

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The bits and pieces floating around.

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Or alternatively you could maybe say it's a Damien Hirst.

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A Damien Hirst. A very early one.

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A very early one. I do love all this. This is old Players cigarette cards.

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-They've got all the faces going so neatly around.

-Beautifully inlaid.

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It must have taken them hours. It really is a work of art, isn't it? It really is a work of art.

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I just think when I look at an item like that,

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I think of the person that made it and how they would smile and laugh if they were stood here now.

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-Appreciating it.

-In the middle of a museum.

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I can't imagine what they'd call it.

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I think it would be hilarious, wouldn't it?

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Now, for sheer authenticity, that cab beats everything.

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But it may take some time to get back to the hotel. Bye, Mark!

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Day two, and there's much anticipation in the hotel car park

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as Mark and Anita await Bluebell's temporary replacement.

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-Where is this car?

-I don't know, but I'm dying to get spending, you know.

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-Yeah.

-Well, I'm sure it'll be here shortly.

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-They said it would be, didn't they?

-Yeah.

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HORN BLEEPS

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Oh, Anita, look.

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Yes!

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# Oh, yeah... #

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Oh, Anita!

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# Oh, yeah... #

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-Oh, I like it.

-I like the wheels.

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# Oh, oh, yeah. #

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Can you not help? You're supposed to be a man.

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-Good with his hands?

-Let me see. Soft hands.

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ENGINE REVS

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It sounds healthy.

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-Yeah. Brum, brum, brum.

-Brum, brum, brum.

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I want to try it out.

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Oh, oh, gosh.

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I can't get in.

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Oh! Can't get in!

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-Do you like it?

-I do love it.

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-Oh, oh.

-Forward, Macduff.

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Yes!

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Yesterday, Mark bought three items for £80,

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including a leather gun case.

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It's a man bag. You could add a bottle of gin in there.

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Anita bought five items at a cost of £114, and had a singalong.

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# I belong to Glasgow, dear Glasgow town. #

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But has it made them happy?

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-Smile, Mark.

-Smile, Anita. Smile!

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-Smile, Mark.

-Smile, Anita.

0:19:400:19:43

Yeah, averagely bonkers, I'd say.

0:19:430:19:46

Today they make their way to an auction in Darlington,

0:19:460:19:49

calling in first at Staindrop,

0:19:490:19:52

where Mark will deliver Anita to Raby Castle.

0:19:520:19:55

Ah, a drawbridge.

0:19:580:20:00

Will they let you in? The Scottish marauder.

0:20:000:20:03

So beautiful, isn't it? It's gorgeous, isn't it?

0:20:030:20:06

Raby, the home of Lord Barnard, is one of Britain's finest medieval castles.

0:20:060:20:13

It was begun in the 12th century by the Neville family on land given to them by King Cnut.

0:20:130:20:20

-Clare, it's so lovely to meet you.

-Welcome to Raby Castle.

0:20:200:20:24

The Nevilles were one of the most powerful dynasties in the country,

0:20:240:20:29

and Raby was, for several hundred years, their heavily fortified home,

0:20:290:20:34

until, as the castle's curator, Clare Owen, explains, the family fell from grace.

0:20:340:20:39

Anita, I'm now taking you into the baron's hall, which is reputedly

0:20:430:20:47

one of the largest rooms in a house in the North of England.

0:20:470:20:50

-It's 132 feet long, and they plotted the rising of the North here in 1569.

-I see.

0:20:500:20:54

700 knights met here to plot against Elizabeth I in support of Mary Queen of Scots,

0:20:540:21:01

and of course that uprising failed, and then the Nevilles, who at that time owned the castle,

0:21:010:21:08

they had to flee, and the castle became Crown property.

0:21:080:21:13

All around the gigantic room where the plot was hatched, there are now

0:21:130:21:18

reminders of the Vanes, who bought the place

0:21:180:21:22

just over 50 years later for just £18,000.

0:21:220:21:26

Since 1626, the Vane family have extensively remodelled

0:21:260:21:30

the interior of the castle and added many fine works of art.

0:21:300:21:35

Perhaps the most spectacular of their creations is the Gothic entrance hall.

0:21:350:21:39

The work was commissioned in the late 18th century by the second the Earl of Darlington

0:21:390:21:42

to celebrate the coming of age of his son, who was returning from a grand tour of Europe.

0:21:420:21:49

And when he came back, young Barney, in 1787,

0:21:490:21:52

he could drive into the castle like this in his carriage,

0:21:520:21:56

-in one side and out the other.

-And is that his carriage?

-That is his carriage, that is his carriage.

0:21:560:22:00

And near the corner of the entrance hall stands one of the castle's oldest residents.

0:22:040:22:09

It was first displayed in the Great Exhibition 1851,

0:22:090:22:14

and the Duke of Cleveland at the time

0:22:140:22:16

saw this beautiful statue there,

0:22:160:22:18

where it actually had been draped

0:22:180:22:20

for the sake of modesty when Queen Victoria visited the exhibition.

0:22:200:22:24

From 1859 right up to two years ago, it had stood in Raby Castle.

0:22:240:22:29

-I see.

-And actually in 2008, the Tate Britain asked to borrow it.

0:22:290:22:34

It was quite a star attraction there,

0:22:340:22:37

and while she was away, we took the opportunity to have her washed.

0:22:370:22:40

-She's had a bath!

-So now she looks really splendid, yes.

0:22:400:22:43

Absolutely beautiful.

0:22:430:22:46

While Anita admires Raby's treasures, Mark has made his way

0:22:480:22:52

to his first shop of the day,

0:22:520:22:54

travelling from Staindrop to Willington.

0:22:540:22:57

Hello there, how are you doing?

0:22:590:23:01

-Hello, I'm Mark.

-Morning!

-Nice to meet you.

0:23:010:23:03

Hagas Antiques is a little like the museum Mark visited yesterday,

0:23:030:23:08

plenty of reminders of North East life and plenty of quirky items,

0:23:080:23:13

like this brown glass object.

0:23:130:23:16

I like these sort of things, you know, because they're so ridiculous.

0:23:160:23:20

This is a piece of glass,

0:23:200:23:22

and it's a walking cane.

0:23:220:23:23

I don't think I'll be buying it, but rather a nice item.

0:23:260:23:29

Mark does, however, soon find something he is interested in,

0:23:290:23:33

but all that glitters isn't necessarily gold.

0:23:330:23:36

At first glance, it looks like a sovereign, a half sovereign.

0:23:360:23:40

If it is a sovereign, it's probably going to be out of my budget,

0:23:400:23:43

but you never know.

0:23:430:23:44

At the back, there are the results of several house clearances,

0:23:440:23:47

with plenty more to rummage amongst.

0:23:470:23:50

I think this is a darning mushroom,

0:23:500:23:54

and it's the sort of thing that a lady would have used to darn the

0:23:540:23:56

socks, and the socks would have gone over there and you can make repairs.

0:23:560:24:00

Of course, we throw them away these days,

0:24:000:24:02

but normally these are very plain, just very plain wood,

0:24:020:24:06

but actually this one is quite nice.

0:24:060:24:09

It's got all the sort of geometric inlay in it.

0:24:090:24:11

It has got a nasty crack, actually, but I mean, from the sort of

0:24:110:24:14

marquetry inlay, it's probably going to date to the Edwardian period.

0:24:140:24:18

It's got a nice feel to it, it's been well worn.

0:24:180:24:21

It shouldn't be really that expensive,

0:24:210:24:24

and I don't want to be a meanie,

0:24:240:24:26

but I might find something that will go with it.

0:24:260:24:29

Now, what's this?

0:24:290:24:30

It does look rather like some sort of gourd-shaped shell,

0:24:300:24:34

but I just wonder whether maybe a whaler,

0:24:340:24:38

out on the seas for many months,

0:24:380:24:40

has found some sort of floating shell or something

0:24:400:24:42

and has decided to use a bit of old brassware they've found

0:24:420:24:46

and make some sort of water vessel, a water-carrying vessel.

0:24:460:24:50

I think that's rather intriguing.

0:24:500:24:53

I do like these two little items,

0:24:530:24:55

so I'm going to see if I can secure a deal on them.

0:24:550:24:57

I mean, you've got £30

0:24:570:24:59

-on the...water carrier or the liquid carrier.

-Yes.

0:24:590:25:05

There's no price on this.

0:25:050:25:07

Well, we don't normally put prices on things

0:25:070:25:09

that have got some damage to them.

0:25:090:25:10

Oh, so I can get the two of them quite cheap.

0:25:100:25:13

We might be able to do something there for you.

0:25:130:25:15

I was rather hoping we could get the two of them for like 15 quid.

0:25:150:25:20

-Oh, £15?

-Is that too cheeky?

0:25:200:25:23

-15's a little bit too cheeky.

-Is it?

0:25:230:25:26

-Yes, I'm thinking those for you... er, would be 25.

-25?

0:25:260:25:32

25.

0:25:320:25:34

Could we do a round figure of 20?

0:25:340:25:36

I think we could, yes.

0:25:360:25:38

-Are you sure?

-Yes, I think we could.

-Let me shake your hand.

-Smashing.

0:25:380:25:41

Actually, you know, as we're placed in front of the cabinet here,

0:25:410:25:44

could I just have a look at the little coin in the envelope there?

0:25:440:25:48

You certainly can, yes.

0:25:480:25:50

I think this is a full sovereign, a half sovereign,

0:25:500:25:51

probably a full sovereign, but the weight just doesn't feel

0:25:510:25:55

-the right balance to me in my hand.

-Yeah.

-It feels too thin.

0:25:550:25:58

Mark's quite right. Gold has a certain warmth and feel to it.

0:25:580:26:03

Casting base metal to look like gold is quite easy

0:26:030:26:06

if the plating on the outer surface is a thin layer of real gold.

0:26:060:26:11

I mean, it's meant to look like a sovereign,

0:26:110:26:14

but I think it feels more like a token of some sort.

0:26:140:26:17

Yes, I mean, I've got to be honest with you, I couldn't be 100%.

0:26:170:26:22

It's about 1826.

0:26:220:26:24

1826 it's dated, the date's in the right place.

0:26:240:26:27

So what price have you put on that, do you know?

0:26:270:26:30

I wouldn't like to sell you that coin to say that it was a gold coin.

0:26:300:26:33

No, I don't think it is gold, actually.

0:26:330:26:35

I honestly think that it's some sort of token,

0:26:350:26:39

but I think you could probably have a nice little punt at that,

0:26:390:26:42

because it would attract

0:26:420:26:44

people who were interested in gold at the moment,

0:26:440:26:47

-so they might know a little bit more than I do.

-Yes.

0:26:470:26:50

So I think, er...for you to have a little bit of fun with it,

0:26:500:26:55

how about a £10 note?

0:26:550:26:57

Oh, gosh.

0:26:570:26:58

It is tempting, isn't it? It is tempting.

0:26:580:27:02

Do you know? I'm going to do that.

0:27:020:27:04

-Yeah?

-Ten quid.

-Yeah, smashing.

0:27:040:27:06

-I'm just going to have a bit of fun.

-Best of luck with it.

0:27:060:27:08

Now, Mark and Anita are together again

0:27:090:27:11

and heading for their final shopping opportunity,

0:27:110:27:15

travelling from Willington to Barnard Castle.

0:27:150:27:18

-Oh, it's a little drafty, I'll put the window up.

-Yeah.

0:27:190:27:24

It'll take more than that! Barnard Castle in Teesdale isn't just a castle,

0:27:240:27:29

but a whole town, built around a fortification.

0:27:290:27:32

It was founded by the Normans,

0:27:320:27:35

and used to make a living from spinning and weaving.

0:27:350:27:38

The castle's now an attractive ruin,

0:27:380:27:40

and there's the famous Bowes Museum nearby.

0:27:400:27:44

Or, round by the Butter Market, some antique shops.

0:27:440:27:48

-Hello!

-Mark has already had a full day.

0:27:500:27:55

But he just can't resist one more shop.

0:27:550:27:58

Let us hope that we might be able to find something I want to buy.

0:27:580:28:01

-BELL RINGS

-Hi.

0:28:010:28:03

While across the street, Anita still has lots of cash and plenty to choose from.

0:28:030:28:08

Oh, it's perfect.

0:28:110:28:13

And then, she's once more tempted by a picture.

0:28:130:28:17

This is a chalk drawing of a charming little boy.

0:28:170:28:23

He's very sweet. Well executed. It's obviously a pair.

0:28:230:28:28

And we do have an artist's signature on this one. I like those.

0:28:280:28:34

But she's not so keen on the price.

0:28:340:28:36

This one is £88, but for the pair, the shopkeeper will accept £140.

0:28:360:28:42

I would put an estimate of £50-£80 on the pair.

0:28:420:28:45

I'm wondering if you are able to come anywhere near

0:28:450:28:50

that price for me to buy them?

0:28:500:28:53

-Well I could possibly come somewhere near it.

-Yes?

0:28:530:28:57

-I would have thought 120.

-120.

0:28:570:29:01

I couldn't sell them for less than £120.

0:29:010:29:02

Could you come to the 80? That would be my top.

0:29:020:29:06

I can't sell them for £80. I can't sell them for £80.

0:29:060:29:09

Could you come down a bit more? Could you come down to 100?

0:29:090:29:13

If you could come down to 100, I feel that I might have a chance

0:29:130:29:17

-and I would be willing to take that chance on it.

-Go on then.

0:29:170:29:21

-I will let you off.

-Oh, thank you.

-I realise you have got strong competition.

0:29:210:29:25

Speaking of which, how is Mark getting on?

0:29:250:29:29

This is a little bottle cooler.

0:29:290:29:31

It's a nice little thing, it is very crisply engraved.

0:29:310:29:35

What they've done here is, they've put a little bit of hot glass

0:29:350:29:38

on there, and they have teased it out and they have made that lovely,

0:29:380:29:42

delicate little squirrel.

0:29:420:29:44

But what I do like is the lovely, engraving on the glass here.

0:29:440:29:49

This is priced at £25, which is not a lot of money,

0:29:490:29:54

but if I was putting it into sale, I would put it into £20-£30.

0:29:540:29:58

It might be worth the risk. I like quality of it.

0:29:580:30:01

Unfortunately, the shopkeeper is a bit shy.

0:30:010:30:04

So, we just have to wait here and listen in.

0:30:040:30:08

Do you think 18 is the very least you would take?

0:30:080:30:11

Are you sure if I can't tweak you down just one more pound? Maybe 17?

0:30:110:30:15

I love your stock and I wish I had more money

0:30:150:30:18

and more time to look at it properly.

0:30:180:30:20

-Go on, you've said all the right things.

-Right!

0:30:200:30:22

After some hard negotiation and some sweet talking,

0:30:220:30:26

I have bought it for 17 and I have got my £3 change,

0:30:260:30:28

and I'm going to get out of here pretty sharpish.

0:30:280:30:31

So, with a bargain struck with the mystery shopkeeper,

0:30:310:30:36

they are now poised to reveal their purchases.

0:30:360:30:39

-My first item...

-Oh, Anita!

-..is a wonderful picnic gramophone.

0:30:390:30:46

It's a Columbia. And Yvonne was kind enough to give me a couple of 78s

0:30:460:30:52

one of which is, I Belong To Glasgow.

0:30:520:30:56

And you certainly do, Anita. And Glasgow is very lucky to have you.

0:30:560:30:59

I'm going to put these two lots together, Mark,

0:30:590:31:02

and I've bought a little Bakelite Bush radio.

0:31:020:31:06

Right, how much did you pay for it?

0:31:060:31:08

-I paid for both of them, £42.

-£42.

0:31:080:31:11

-Mmm. Not too bad, is it?

-You might nudge it!

0:31:110:31:15

-I'm not what you call the hunted and shooted?

-You certainly are not.

0:31:170:31:22

I find that these things are doing well in auction.

0:31:220:31:25

-How much did you pay for it?

-£30.

-That is good.

0:31:250:31:29

Now, I note you like Cloisonne, Mark.

0:31:290:31:32

This is a little Cloisonne buckle.

0:31:320:31:35

Very, very pretty. Very, very you, if I may say so.

0:31:350:31:38

-What did you pay, my dear?

-£12.

-Oh, well. That is very you as well.

0:31:380:31:42

-It's not a bad by at all.

-Not a bad buy.

0:31:420:31:44

Next, Mark's Chinese lot, but there's been a hitch.

0:31:440:31:48

It's Cinnabar lacquer, of course.

0:31:480:31:50

But I put it together with an 18th-century Imari pot.

0:31:500:31:55

-But we can't find the pot.

-You've lost your pot?

0:31:550:31:59

Well, I haven't lost it. But somebody has lost it.

0:31:590:32:02

So, we're hoping that we can retrieve it.

0:32:020:32:04

Actually, Mark, that somebody should mean you.

0:32:040:32:08

But never fear, we have found it in the draw that you left it in,

0:32:080:32:11

and it will get to the auction.

0:32:110:32:13

-My third item has a Scottish connection.

-Unmistakably.

0:32:130:32:17

-It looks like a piece of late 19, early 20th-century Weems.

-Is it not?

0:32:170:32:23

No, in actual fact, it is a piece of Weems Griselda Hill.

0:32:230:32:26

Now you have pointed out to me,

0:32:260:32:29

I have learned something that I have never heard of Griselda Hill.

0:32:290:32:32

-What did you pay for it?

-£20.

-Is that good? I don't know.

0:32:320:32:35

-I've never heard of her.

-Well, we'll find out at the auction.

-OK.

0:32:350:32:39

What is your next piece?

0:32:390:32:41

I fell in love with this little darling mushroom.

0:32:410:32:45

Because it's so colourful.

0:32:450:32:47

But the thing that caught my eye, Anita,

0:32:470:32:51

was a piece of maritime history.

0:32:510:32:53

-This wonderful water carrier.

-I think this is absolutely charming.

0:32:530:32:59

I love naive art. I love naive craft.

0:32:590:33:01

I knew you'd like it. I paid £20 for it.

0:33:010:33:04

Oh, I mean, I think both of these could stand on their own, Mark, but it makes a very charming little lot.

0:33:040:33:11

It's a wee cheeky chappie. I paid £40 for it.

0:33:110:33:14

Oh, Anita, £40 to me is a bargain.

0:33:140:33:18

I would like to see this item, just for the charm of it, making 80, £100.

0:33:180:33:23

Well, my next item, Anita,

0:33:230:33:26

is a little late 19th century bottle cooler.

0:33:260:33:29

Well, it's absolutely lovely, and I do love that engraving.

0:33:290:33:33

-It's so beautifully done.

-So crisp.

-How much?

-I paid £17 for it.

0:33:330:33:40

Well done. You old charmer!

0:33:400:33:43

Now, I found this lovely pair of pastel portraits.

0:33:430:33:50

-Of little children.

-Oh, gosh.

-Not your type of thing?

0:33:530:33:59

-To be honest with you, can I be honest with you?

-Yes.

-They're not at all.

0:33:590:34:02

I think they look like they have come from the Village Of The Damned.

0:34:020:34:06

SHE LAUGHS I think that one looks a wee bit like you.

0:34:060:34:10

See if you twirl that wee piece of hair at the front,

0:34:100:34:13

that wee blonde piece, it would be a dead ringer for you.

0:34:130:34:18

-Did you pay very much for them?

-£100.

0:34:180:34:20

THEY LAUGH

0:34:200:34:23

I think that's not a bad bargain. I wanted to pay £50 for them.

0:34:230:34:28

-I'm speechless.

-It is a mad buy.

-Well done.

-What is your last item?

0:34:280:34:36

-My last item is that.

-All right.

-Have a look.

0:34:360:34:40

How did you manage to buy a piece of gold? The price of gold is so high.

0:34:400:34:46

It's George IV and it's 1826. A lot of sovereigns were dated 1826.

0:34:460:34:52

-It's a year I've seen frequently.

-How much did you pay?

-Well, it was a real punt, Anita. £10.

0:34:520:34:59

I think it was a good punt.

0:34:590:35:02

Oh, dear, my mascara's running.

0:35:060:35:08

Whoo!

0:35:080:35:11

She's horrid!

0:35:110:35:13

Those pair of paintings,

0:35:130:35:15

are you scared? I'm very scared. Those eyes.

0:35:150:35:20

I've heard about following you around the room but burning a flame into

0:35:200:35:24

your spirit is something completely different, isn't it, surely?

0:35:240:35:27

The coin, I'm just not sure about.

0:35:270:35:29

He's not sure either but he's taken a punt.

0:35:290:35:33

For £10, it's not much of a punt.

0:35:330:35:37

I'm going to call it a sovereign with a question mark and we'll let the auctioneer decide what he thinks.

0:35:370:35:42

After starting out in St Helen, Auckland, this fourth leg of our

0:35:440:35:48

programme will be decided at the auctioneers - Thomas Watson in Darlington.

0:35:480:35:54

Are you leading me astray again?

0:35:540:35:56

I think I'm going up a No Entry sign.

0:35:560:35:59

And, guess what? Bluebell is back.

0:35:590:36:02

Still no satnav though.

0:36:020:36:05

Darlo folk have crowded in to soak up the lots, including Mark's misplaced vase.

0:36:070:36:14

What does auctioneer Peter Robinson think about what Mark and Anita have entered, and especially that coin?

0:36:140:36:20

I'm not sure what it is, to be quite frank.

0:36:200:36:23

It's definitely a gold coin and it is definitely of a period.

0:36:230:36:26

It's not a fake, we know that.

0:36:260:36:29

What it is exactly, I don't know.

0:36:290:36:32

Today we're going to leave that to the bidders.

0:36:320:36:35

Mark has spent £127 on five lots.

0:36:350:36:40

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:36:400:36:41

While Anita has spent £214, also on five lots.

0:36:410:36:47

-A pound change.

-A pound change.

-Means everything.

0:36:470:36:50

Time for the nerves to jangle.

0:36:520:36:55

I'm getting butterflies.

0:36:550:36:56

Mark's Chinese lot - together again.

0:36:560:37:02

£15 for the two pieces together. 20, 5, 30, 5, 40.

0:37:020:37:08

£35 second row, I have.

0:37:080:37:09

At £35, 40. 5. At 40.

0:37:090:37:13

The gentleman has it upstairs now.

0:37:130:37:15

£40. It's down 10, Anita.

0:37:150:37:18

And down a bit more after commission.

0:37:180:37:20

Well, I've got to now claw that back somehow.

0:37:200:37:25

Next Anita's bronze bust.

0:37:250:37:28

At £20. 25 can I have? 25, I'm bid.

0:37:280:37:33

25, £30 for it.

0:37:330:37:36

At £25, the bid's on the Net. Nobody in the room?

0:37:360:37:40

30 I have. Thank you. At £30 bid.

0:37:400:37:43

£30. 35, anywhere for it?

0:37:430:37:46

At £30. Going to the Net at £30.

0:37:460:37:49

Being sold. £35, thank you. At £35.

0:37:490:37:53

-Nobody loved him.

-I loved him.

0:37:530:37:56

-Next Mark's leather gun case.

-£30.

0:37:560:38:00

At £30. At £30, for the gun case.

0:38:000:38:05

35, 40. At £35.

0:38:050:38:08

At £35, for the leather gun case.

0:38:080:38:10

A nice furnishing item.

0:38:100:38:12

40 for it, 40. 45, 50.

0:38:120:38:16

£45, back in the room.

0:38:160:38:17

That's up 15, Anita. Disappointed?

0:38:170:38:21

-Not exactly a flying start for either of them.

-We're onward and downward.

0:38:210:38:27

I hope not. Next, Anita's Victorian enamel buckle.

0:38:270:38:33

-At £15. 20, can we say?

-20 is bid.

0:38:330:38:36

20 I have. 25.

0:38:360:38:38

30. 35 is the next bid...

0:38:380:38:40

-35 on the Net.

-40, Sir.

0:38:400:38:42

£35, unusual lot, a buckle.

0:38:420:38:45

40 I have now. 45.

0:38:450:38:48

50, Sir.

0:38:480:38:49

£50, the bid's in the room. £50.

0:38:490:38:52

-That's good, Anita. That's good.

-I'm happy enough with that.

0:38:520:38:55

-I think that's its money, don't you, Anita?

-Yes.

0:38:550:38:58

Next Mark's favourites - the darning mushroom and the maritime gourd.

0:38:580:39:04

At £15, the two together, 20 upstairs. 5, 30, 5.

0:39:040:39:10

£30 upstairs on the balcony with the two pieces together.

0:39:100:39:13

£30, in the balcony at £30 for the two together.

0:39:130:39:17

-Well, Anita...

-It's still profit. It's still profit.

0:39:180:39:22

But not much after commission.

0:39:220:39:25

I'm not terribly optimistic about the rest of it now, Anita, I'm afraid.

0:39:250:39:29

Anita's cabbage rose jam pot.

0:39:290:39:32

At £30, at £30. 35.

0:39:320:39:36

35. £40. 45. £50. 55. £60. At £55.

0:39:360:39:43

The bid's on my right, beside me. At £55, have we all finished now?

0:39:430:39:47

Being sold at £55. All done?

0:39:470:39:50

-You must be pleased with that, surely?

-I'm happy enough with that.

0:39:500:39:54

The star of the show so far.

0:39:540:39:56

There's quality in decoration.

0:39:560:39:59

Now for Mark's sovereign with a question mark. Is it or isn't it?

0:40:020:40:07

It is slightly larger than a sovereign but it is of gold, 1826.

0:40:070:40:13

At £50.

0:40:130:40:15

At £50? At 60, 70, 80, 90, 100.

0:40:150:40:20

£100. 150. 160, 170. 180. 190.

0:40:200:40:27

200.

0:40:270:40:30

It's on the Net at £200. 220.

0:40:300:40:33

Being sold now at £220.

0:40:330:40:36

You're out in the room. The bid's with the Net at £220. All done?

0:40:360:40:40

I'm absolutely staggered, Anita.

0:40:400:40:43

Whatever it was, someone wanted it badly.

0:40:430:40:48

Oh, you are a jammy besom.

0:40:480:40:50

I wonder where I've learned that from.

0:40:500:40:52

-I wonder! Now, who will adopt these two adorable scraps?

-Bid's here.

0:40:520:40:59

I have £40 to start the bid. £40.

0:40:590:41:02

At £45. At £45. At 50. Five, 60, five, 70, five, 80, five, 90.

0:41:020:41:10

Lady in the balcony at £90 for the pair. Are we all finished at £90?

0:41:100:41:15

All done?

0:41:150:41:18

It could have been worse, Anita.

0:41:180:41:20

It sure could. But an even bigger loss, I'm afraid, after commission.

0:41:200:41:24

Now Mark's last buy, the Victorian wine cooler.

0:41:240:41:27

£30. At £30. 35.

0:41:270:41:31

40. 5?

0:41:310:41:33

50. 5. At £50 in the far corner under the balcony.

0:41:330:41:36

At £50, the wine glass cooler.

0:41:360:41:39

Being sold now at £50, the lot selling at £50. All done?

0:41:390:41:44

Well done!

0:41:440:41:46

That surprised me, Anita.

0:41:460:41:49

Now, anyone for a good old singalong?

0:41:490:41:51

£30 bid. At 35 now. £35. 40. 5.

0:41:510:41:54

50. 5?

0:41:540:41:58

60. 60 at the back now. At £60.

0:41:580:42:00

All done at 65? 70.

0:42:000:42:02

£70, all finished now at £70. The two together.

0:42:020:42:07

-Yes.

-That's good, Anita.

0:42:070:42:10

Dare I say, a sound return?

0:42:100:42:14

I'm happy enough with that.

0:42:140:42:16

That's a reasonable profit.

0:42:160:42:18

It's not a record profit though, is it?

0:42:180:42:21

So, Darlington was especially kind to Mark Stacey.

0:42:220:42:27

Mark began with £496.16

0:42:270:42:31

and made £188.70 after auction costs.

0:42:310:42:36

So, he now has £684.86 to spend tomorrow.

0:42:360:42:42

Anita started this round with £426.74 and made

0:42:420:42:48

£32 after auction costs, leaving her with £458.74 to spend tomorrow.

0:42:480:42:56

So, a good result for both of us, Mark, and a very good result for you.

0:42:560:43:00

I'm very pleased. I'm very confident.

0:43:000:43:02

-3-1.

-You just got lucky.

0:43:020:43:05

What, three times?!

0:43:050:43:07

And off we go.

0:43:070:43:09

Join us next time for answers to these important questions.

0:43:110:43:15

Anita, will you marry me?

0:43:150:43:19

Will Anita's direct bargaining technique work out?

0:43:190:43:22

You told me they are rubbish.

0:43:220:43:24

Will Mark's wish be granted?

0:43:240:43:27

Stop the road trip, I want to get off.

0:43:270:43:29

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:470:43:50

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:500:43:53