Episode 5 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 5

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Anita Manning and Mark Stacey's final leg takes them from Richmond in North Yorkshire to the auction in Huby near York.


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0:47:500:47:57

'The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge...'

0:48:020:48:06

I'm going to declare war.

0:48:060:48:07

Why?

0:48:070:48:09

'Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?'

0:48:090:48:13

-15 quid?

-No!

0:48:130:48:15

'The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit,

0:48:150:48:19

-'but it's not as easy as you might think, and things don't always go to plan.'

-Push!

0:48:190:48:25

-'So will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?'

-I'm going to go for it.

0:48:250:48:29

'This is The Antiques Road Trip.'

0:48:290:48:31

This week, Mark Stacey and Anita Manning have travelled through Scotland

0:48:370:48:41

to the picturesque north-east of England.

0:48:410:48:44

Oh, look at this, Anita. This looks very pretty.

0:48:440:48:47

# Summer breeze

0:48:470:48:49

# Makes me feel fine

0:48:490:48:53

# Blowing through the jasmine in my mind... #

0:48:530:48:59

-The sun is shining for us.

-The sun is shining, and the sun you know, Anita, only shines on the righteous.

0:49:010:49:06

That counts you out, then, Mark.

0:49:060:49:08

-Mark, of course, is a valuer and dealer.

-What do you think? Is it me?

0:49:080:49:12

Oh, I don't know. Mark's penchant for a cheeky question sometimes just goes too far.

0:49:120:49:18

-I'm going to ask you a little sneaky favour.

-What's that?

-Could I just touch it?

-See what I mean?

0:49:180:49:24

While Anita, an auctioneer-ess, is a woman who takes no prisoners.

0:49:240:49:28

Tell me your minimum. No, you tell me...

0:49:280:49:31

No, tell me your minimum.

0:49:310:49:33

See what I mean again?

0:49:330:49:34

They began the week with £200 each, and both have already more than doubled their money.

0:49:340:49:40

Mark starts today with £684.86 to spend,

0:49:400:49:46

while Anita is trailing with a still-impressive £458.74.

0:49:460:49:52

But she's not giving up. Oh, no!

0:49:520:49:54

The game isn't over until the fat lady sings.

0:49:560:49:59

I hope you're not talking about me!

0:49:590:50:02

Well, you did ask the question.

0:50:020:50:04

This week, they're travelling from deep in the Cairngorms

0:50:040:50:08

via the ancient charms of Edinburgh and Durham to North Yorkshire.

0:50:080:50:13

Today's show sees them arrive in Richmond

0:50:130:50:15

and work their way through North Yorkshire

0:50:150:50:18

to their final auction of the week in Huby,

0:50:180:50:21

just north of York.

0:50:210:50:23

This is Richmond, a town that is nearly 1,000 years old.

0:50:240:50:28

It has one of the largest cobbled marketplaces in England,

0:50:280:50:33

and a castle built by a loyal follower of old "Willie the Conk".

0:50:330:50:38

Let today's battle commence.

0:50:380:50:40

Well, Anita, here we are...

0:50:400:50:43

the first of our buying trips.

0:50:430:50:45

My last chance to make up that 200 quid with you.

0:50:450:50:49

-It's a big ask, Anita, but you're going to spend all your money, are you?

-Everything, every single cent.

0:50:490:50:54

-Every penny?

-Every penny.

-Do I believe that?

-I want to go for it.

0:50:540:50:58

-I want to go for gold.

-I think you're going for gold that way, and I'm going downhill.

0:50:580:51:02

Oh, well. Maybe that's the way for you.

0:51:020:51:05

HE LAUGHS

0:51:050:51:06

Anita's first stop is at Richmond Antiques. "Good moaning!"

0:51:060:51:11

-Good morning.

-Good morning. Can I have a wee look around?

-Yeah.

0:51:110:51:15

Well, it looks promising to me -

0:51:170:51:19

the kind of shop where you just know a priceless relic

0:51:190:51:23

-will be lurking in a lost corner, like the 83-year-old owner Harry.

-TIM GIGGLES

0:51:230:51:29

Of the items actually for sale, though,

0:51:290:51:31

the first to catch Anita's eye is this oddity.

0:51:310:51:34

Is it a stool or is it a...stool?

0:51:340:51:36

This has probably started its life off as a chair.

0:51:360:51:39

Someone at some point in its history

0:51:390:51:42

has taken the back off and it now exists as a stool.

0:51:420:51:47

It's quite nice, Victorian.

0:51:470:51:50

Look at these wonderful legs...

0:51:500:51:52

with original castors on here.

0:51:520:51:55

It's got no price on it, it was tucked away in a corner,

0:51:550:51:59

and I quite fancy it. Harry?

0:51:590:52:02

See because it's only a bit of something

0:52:020:52:05

and the upholstery is not good, it's all falling apart,

0:52:050:52:09

are you able to give that to me for a knock-down price? A tenner on that?

0:52:090:52:14

-Aye, put a tenner on it.

-A tenner on it?

-Tenner.

-Yeah.

0:52:140:52:18

Huh! The stool could be a steal!

0:52:180:52:20

As Anita scours the shop for yet more bargains,

0:52:200:52:24

Mark is heading into York House Antiques.

0:52:240:52:27

Gosh! This is rather full-on, isn't it?

0:52:270:52:30

The right place for you to splash your cash, then, Mark.

0:52:300:52:34

We'll really have to hunt for any bargains here.

0:52:350:52:38

Well, get on with it, then.

0:52:380:52:40

But do watch out for Sooty.

0:52:400:52:42

It has got a label inside. Yes, it says -

0:52:420:52:45

I think it says Stradivarius, but I've a feeling it won't be

0:52:450:52:49

Antonius Stradivarius because it would be quite a valuable piece if it was.

0:52:490:52:54

Oh, do stop fiddling with your fiddle, Mark. Get shopping, mate!

0:52:540:52:59

Anita, time to bring out the big guns.

0:52:590:53:01

Probably ornaments for the side of your fire

0:53:010:53:04

or they might be for holding pokers.

0:53:040:53:07

That wasn't quite what I had in mind. Carry on, though.

0:53:070:53:11

If I buy these, would it blast me into profit?

0:53:110:53:15

Listen, you leave the jokes to me.

0:53:150:53:18

-Harry?

-Yeah?

-Do you think they're fun?

0:53:180:53:20

They're rubbish.

0:53:200:53:22

They're rubbish! SHE LAUGHS

0:53:220:53:24

Harry says they're rubbish!

0:53:240:53:27

Maybe from the 1940s?

0:53:270:53:30

They've maybe been there since 1940, I don't know.

0:53:300:53:33

I don't think they're things of any great quality,

0:53:330:53:36

and you've told me that. I mean, you've told me that they are rubbish.

0:53:360:53:41

-They're very nice.

-They're nice rubbish?

-Oh, without a doubt.

0:53:410:53:44

If you've got them on your fireplace,

0:53:440:53:46

people will want to buy them off you.

0:53:460:53:49

There's some very, very good-quality cobwebs on these as well.

0:53:490:53:53

It takes me ages to get them cobwebs on, you see.

0:53:530:53:56

If you wipe the cobwebs off,

0:53:560:53:58

they think they're reproduction, don't they? So I just leave them on.

0:53:580:54:02

-I've trained the spiders to do that.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:54:020:54:05

Well, it'll be the cost of training the spiders that justifies the £10 price on these quality items.

0:54:050:54:12

Come along now, Anita. Have a wee haggle.

0:54:120:54:15

Harry, could you sell me this pair of mad cannons for a fiver?

0:54:150:54:19

-You're such a nice lady, you can have them for a fiver, dear.

-You are a darling.

0:54:190:54:23

I'll suffer for the loss, you know.

0:54:230:54:26

When I tell my little kids I haven't made a profit today,

0:54:260:54:30

-they'll all start weeping.

-HE LAUGHS

0:54:300:54:33

I think I'm going to have to seal this deal with a kiss. All right?

0:54:330:54:36

Without a doubt, dear.

0:54:360:54:38

I tell you what...

0:54:380:54:41

Oh, look at that. By 'eck!

0:54:410:54:44

Well, you've made HIS day anyway, Anita.

0:54:440:54:47

Now calm yourself, comb up and concentrate.

0:54:470:54:52

What about these glasses?

0:54:520:54:54

I quite like them.

0:54:550:54:57

They are copies of earlier glasses, continental.

0:54:570:55:01

They have a nice little bit of etching here

0:55:010:55:04

and they are very pretty.

0:55:040:55:07

They don't appear to have a price on them. Time to talk to Harry.

0:55:070:55:11

I don't think that they're terribly, terribly old,

0:55:110:55:14

but I think a nice set of glasses might be desirable.

0:55:140:55:18

-Start at 10 and argue?

-£10 for the set?

0:55:180:55:21

I got you down a wee bit on these, but I think...

0:55:210:55:24

-I'm quite happy to pay that 10 on those. £15, Harry.

-Yes, dear, thank you very much.

0:55:240:55:31

-Thank you very much.

-That's got me off the breadline!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:55:310:55:34

Nothing funny about that. 25 in total, including the old stool.

0:55:340:55:39

Hello! Mark's heard the rustle of money being spent

0:55:390:55:42

and is heading in Harry and Anita's direction.

0:55:420:55:45

-I'm sure you've found all the bargains.

-Oh, this is...

-How are you doing?

0:55:450:55:49

-It's absolutely lovely and Harry is wonderful.

-Is he?

-Uh-huh.

0:55:490:55:53

-So shall I leave you to it, or do you want me to point you in the right direction?

-No, you go off.

0:55:530:55:58

-You go off and have a little sit-down.

-OK. Happy hunting.

-Thank you.

0:55:580:56:01

-See you later.

-Bye.

0:56:010:56:03

Now, sorry to disappoint you, Mark old fruit,

0:56:040:56:07

but the cannons have already been sold.

0:56:070:56:09

On the other hand, Harry's out of his closet!

0:56:090:56:13

No flush. That must be a good sign.

0:56:130:56:16

There's quite a nice mixture of pieces in here, isn't there?

0:56:160:56:20

This is quite fun. This is a sort of,

0:56:200:56:22

you know, for your hallway, for putting your coats on.

0:56:220:56:27

You hang your coats on here and then you could have you favourite vase or something there.

0:56:270:56:32

It's not terribly old - carved eagle, but he's got rather a cheeky face and I like his glass eye.

0:56:320:56:38

That's quite a nice object, actually, if the price is right.

0:56:380:56:41

Harry, I think that's quite a fun piece, isn't it?

0:56:410:56:44

It's not an antique one, but it's quite a decorative piece, isn't it?

0:56:440:56:48

-Oh, yeah. If you like it.

-I quite like it, with the little eye there. That's quite nice.

0:56:480:56:52

-What price have you got on that?

-£20.

-£20.

0:56:520:56:57

I have to ask, I suppose.

0:56:570:56:58

It's quite reasonable enough as it is,

0:56:580:57:01

but could you do anything on that?

0:57:010:57:04

-Are you poor?

-Very poor.

-MARK LAUGHS

0:57:040:57:07

-15, me lowest.

-15?

0:57:070:57:09

Yeah, I think I'm going to take that for £15.

0:57:090:57:12

I think that's quite reasonable.

0:57:120:57:14

That's Harry's fourth sale of the day!

0:57:140:57:16

But it seems this place may yet yield even more bargains.

0:57:160:57:21

That's quite interesting.

0:57:210:57:22

Now, I've found down here this rather intriguing vase

0:57:220:57:26

which I think would've had a lid on it originally.

0:57:260:57:29

But it's rather fun with these sort of grotesques on the side of it.

0:57:290:57:34

And I love the Chinese panels on it.

0:57:340:57:37

It's got the odd little chip and things there.

0:57:370:57:40

Priced up at £25.

0:57:400:57:43

Mind you, I can see...

0:57:430:57:44

Yes, the other big thing is the heads are missing.

0:57:440:57:48

These should have little sort of lizards' heads or dragons' heads on,

0:57:480:57:51

and they're missing.

0:57:510:57:53

But it's a heck of a lump for 25 quid, isn't it?

0:57:530:57:57

I have seen a couple of things in the other room, Harry.

0:57:570:58:01

One of them is the oriental-type piece, pottery,

0:58:010:58:04

but it's got the heads missing from it.

0:58:040:58:06

You've got 25 on it.

0:58:060:58:08

I quite like it, but it's missing its cover

0:58:080:58:10

and it's got quite a lot of damage on it.

0:58:100:58:13

It'd be worth a fortune, would that?

0:58:130:58:16

It would be with the cover and things, wouldn't it?

0:58:160:58:18

Go to 20.

0:58:190:58:21

Quite interested in it but it is damaged.

0:58:210:58:23

Could you do anything on that?

0:58:230:58:26

-15.

-OK, lovely. Thank you very much.

0:58:260:58:28

-That's it. I'll go home broke now.

-MARK LAUGHS

0:58:280:58:32

You don't look broke to me, Harry.

0:58:320:58:35

Still, five items sold, Harry...

0:58:350:58:38

-Lovely to meet you.

-Cheers.

-Bye.

0:58:380:58:41

So, a great start to the day, but Anita knows she has

0:58:410:58:44

a lot of catching up to do at the final auction and she wants details.

0:58:440:58:48

So, did you buy something off Harry?

0:58:480:58:50

No, you got all the bargains, Anita.

0:58:500:58:52

-What did you buy?

-No comment.

-What did you buy?

-Stop tickling me!

0:58:520:58:56

-Did you find any silver?

-No comment.

0:58:560:58:59

-Did you buy a picture?

-No comment.

0:58:590:59:01

Did you spend over £10?

0:59:010:59:03

Oh, look! Trees.

0:59:030:59:04

Are we nearly there yet, Mum? Fortunately for Mark,

0:59:060:59:09

it's just an eight-mile drive from Richmond to Scorton,

0:59:090:59:13

and the peace and quiet of Kiplin Hall.

0:59:130:59:15

Well, I'm running a bit late with all your falderalling about.

0:59:150:59:19

-OK, well, I've leave you to it, then. Bye, Anita.

-OK, bye-bye.

-Bye.

0:59:190:59:23

Kiplin Hall was built in the 1620s

0:59:250:59:29

by George Calvert, Secretary of State to King James I.

0:59:290:59:34

Over the years, the families that have owned the house

0:59:350:59:38

have filled it with some spectacular furniture and works of art.

0:59:380:59:42

-Hello.

-You must be Dawn.

-Ah, yes. Nice to meet you, Mark.

0:59:420:59:45

Mark is shown round the hall by the curator Dawn Webster.

0:59:470:59:51

She has picked out some of the finest pieces in the house to show Mark.

0:59:510:59:56

We're up on the second floor now, but this you have to see.

0:59:560:59:59

First, a painting of Venice

1:00:011:00:04

commissioned by Kiplin Hall's 18th-century owners.

1:00:041:00:07

This is St Marks' Square during carnival

1:00:071:00:09

and you can see the carnival masks.

1:00:091:00:12

It's by Luca Carlevaris who was one of Canaletto's predecessors

1:00:121:00:15

and fantastic for painting people, figures, faces, dogs.

1:00:151:00:20

Canaletto was mostly architecture in his paintings. Carlevaris filled his architectural spaces

1:00:201:00:26

with people, and it's the most exquisite jewel-like painting.

1:00:261:00:30

I do love the fact that the people look so identifiable.

1:00:301:00:34

It doesn't look like made-up people.

1:00:341:00:36

This lady with her fan. I'm not sure whether she's saying, "I love you," or, "My husband is away.

1:00:361:00:41

"Come up and see me later tonight." The language of fans.

1:00:411:00:44

Oh, I think it might be Anita Manning making sure I'm not getting any bargains.

1:00:441:00:48

Maybe it is! How did she get in there?

1:00:481:00:50

-Oh, she's been around a long time.

-Huh!

1:00:501:00:53

Next, to the library and a relic

1:00:531:00:55

from one of the country's most famous battleships.

1:00:551:00:59

And here I've something very special to show you, Mark.

1:01:021:01:05

This is Lord Nelson's chair from on-board Victory and it has a silver plaque to prove it.

1:01:051:01:09

I think it's wonderful. Very typical of that period with those scrolling arms

1:01:091:01:13

and those sabre legs at the front, isn't it?

1:01:131:01:16

-Also, I can see there's something rather nice about this chair, isn't there?

-It's metamorphic.

1:01:161:01:21

That's one of my favourite antique terms - metamorphic.

1:01:211:01:24

Cos it's like a caterpillar, really.

1:01:241:01:26

It changes into an even more beautiful butterfly.

1:01:261:01:29

-These tip up, don't they?

-That's right.

1:01:291:01:32

And then you'd have library steps so you could reach the book,

1:01:321:01:35

bring it down, put it back and sit there and read your book.

1:01:351:01:38

Yes. And I'm told that the cabin on board Victory had a very low ceiling,

1:01:381:01:42

so exactly why he needed a metamorphic chair for his cabin, I have no idea.

1:01:421:01:46

-But there it is, all part of history.

-Absolutely. Part of Kiplin's history as well.

1:01:461:01:50

Now part of Kiplin Hall's history. Wonderful.

1:01:501:01:53

And so Mark ends his visit to Kiplin Hall,

1:01:531:01:56

bringing us to the end of an exceedingly good day.

1:01:561:01:59

Day two, and both our experts are looking, and feeling, a bit flush.

1:02:061:02:10

Our very, very last day of shopping together.

1:02:101:02:15

I can't believe it, can you? I feel very confident, Anita.

1:02:151:02:18

I've got lots of money burning a hole in my pocket.

1:02:181:02:21

I want to get out there and spend, spend, spend.

1:02:211:02:24

Great. Mark has a wallet burning

1:02:241:02:26

with £650 in his pocket,

1:02:261:02:30

having spent a miserly £30 on two items on the first day.

1:02:301:02:34

-I'll go home broke now.

-MARK LAUGHS

1:02:341:02:36

Anita has spent £25 on three items,

1:02:361:02:39

including £5 on a pair of fireside cannons,

1:02:391:02:43

and has over £400 in her armoury.

1:02:431:02:46

Right now, she's £200 behind Mark.

1:02:461:02:50

Maybe today will be the day she gets lucky and catches him up?

1:02:501:02:55

Bye-bye, Harry, and thank you again.

1:02:551:02:57

Today's journey sees them leave Richmond

1:02:571:02:59

and head for Huby near York.

1:02:591:03:01

Mark's first stop is Masham

1:03:011:03:03

but first, Anita gets dropped off for her shopping in Middleham.

1:03:031:03:06

Middleham has sat on this spot in Wensleydale since Roman times.

1:03:081:03:14

Its 12th-century castle was home to Richard III

1:03:141:03:18

and the royal, loyal and ancient township of Middleham

1:03:181:03:22

was once the heart of English life.

1:03:221:03:24

Ah, wonderful, wonderful. Have a good time and shop well.

1:03:241:03:29

-And you too, Anita. See you later.

-OK.

1:03:291:03:32

Mark heads nine miles down the road to Masham.

1:03:341:03:37

Do you know what's really nice? Being in the car on my own.

1:03:391:03:41

The wind in my hair, the sun shining

1:03:411:03:44

and no Anita going on and on and on about the "burdies"

1:03:441:03:49

and the trees and how WONDERFUL everything is.

1:03:491:03:52

Ho-ho! Despite his big lead, he's still a worried man.

1:03:541:03:58

If I buy the wrong thing that makes a big loss,

1:03:581:04:01

it's all over.

1:04:011:04:03

It's called paranoia.

1:04:031:04:05

Anita is in the kind of shop she loves, stuffed to the gunnels with

1:04:051:04:09

who knows what, and it's not long before something catches her eye.

1:04:091:04:14

This is an interesting little album.

1:04:151:04:19

We have several of these embroidered postcards

1:04:191:04:24

which are, in the main, from the First World War.

1:04:241:04:28

And it was the type of things that soldiers would send their wives.

1:04:281:04:31

And this one is from someone who was in the Royal Engineers.

1:04:311:04:36

"With love from yours." It's from Willie, and this was sent in 1916,

1:04:361:04:43

just right in the middle of the First World War. "Good luck, your loving brother."

1:04:431:04:47

Postcard collecting is very popular just now.

1:04:471:04:50

It's looking back, it's nostalgia,

1:04:501:04:53

it's seeing what the world was like at that time.

1:04:531:04:57

Very moving...

1:04:571:04:59

but not rare. Indeed, it's estimated that

1:04:591:05:01

over 10 million were made during the First World War.

1:05:011:05:04

This isn't going to make me a fortune if I buy this,

1:05:051:05:08

whatever the price, but it's so irresistible!

1:05:081:05:11

Mark has arrived at Aura Antiques in Masham.

1:05:111:05:15

It sells mainly large items, but in amongst those

1:05:151:05:19

there's some quirky little things

1:05:191:05:21

that might just make Mark a few quid.

1:05:211:05:24

That's quite an interesting jug, isn't it?

1:05:241:05:26

It's very brightly decorated. It looks almost modern, doesn't it?

1:05:261:05:29

It's a nice thing. I think, looking at the mark,

1:05:291:05:32

this is going to be dating to around about

1:05:321:05:36

1860, 1870, so a true antique.

1:05:361:05:39

I quite like it with Newton on it.

1:05:391:05:41

I've never seen that before.

1:05:411:05:43

And that's priced up at £25.

1:05:431:05:46

Just checking. It's a very good way of checking for restoration

1:05:491:05:54

because it feels very soft to your teeth,

1:05:541:05:59

whereas, if it's perfect, it feels quite hard and brittle.

1:05:591:06:03

I might ask Robert about that,

1:06:031:06:06

see if we can get it a little bit lower.

1:06:061:06:08

Back in Middleham, shop owner Angela pulls out

1:06:091:06:13

something from her secret stash. Steady!

1:06:131:06:15

-I've got some more postcards.

-Ah, right!

1:06:151:06:18

Mostly Raphael Tuck.

1:06:181:06:20

As most deltiologists, or postcard collectors, will know,

1:06:201:06:24

Raphael Tuck and Sons were publishers to royalty in the 18th and 19th centuries,

1:06:241:06:30

and by the First World War they dominated the postcard market.

1:06:301:06:33

These two albums won't come cheap, but you just try telling Anita that.

1:06:331:06:37

You want a price? Off the top of my head, I'm looking...

1:06:391:06:43

Yes, I know, I know. I would be talking 100 for the two.

1:06:431:06:47

And that is really...

1:06:471:06:49

cos, you know, they are quite rare.

1:06:491:06:51

I'll tell you what my estimate would be on it.

1:06:511:06:53

If that was coming in,

1:06:531:06:56

I would be estimating it somewhere between 60 and 80.

1:06:561:07:00

Would you be able to come any nearer to these figures for me?

1:07:001:07:04

Simply because I've fallen...

1:07:041:07:07

Simply because I've fallen in love with them.

1:07:071:07:10

Yeah. 85.

1:07:101:07:12

-Really. Cos it's tearing my heart out letting them go.

-Could you come to 75?

1:07:121:07:16

80. 80.

1:07:161:07:19

Could you go to 75? Oh, go on!

1:07:191:07:23

75! It'll give me a chance!

1:07:231:07:26

75, I'd be happy.

1:07:261:07:28

-Go on, then.

-Oh, you're a darling!

1:07:281:07:31

So Anita has her postcards.

1:07:311:07:33

I just love them. I love them.

1:07:331:07:36

So do I!

1:07:361:07:38

Crikey. But has Mark found anything to write home about?

1:07:381:07:43

It's a bit of a wibbly-wobbly, as Anita would call it.

1:07:431:07:45

But actually it's quite a fun shape.

1:07:451:07:48

It's got a nasty split in the top there and some of the little

1:07:481:07:52

cabochons are missing.

1:07:521:07:55

I like this little decoration there.

1:07:551:07:56

It's got a very sort of odd feel to it.

1:07:561:07:58

Now, maybe it's just up here because it's going to be restored.

1:07:581:08:02

I might ask and see how much it is. Might be bargain price.

1:08:021:08:05

So far, Anita has bought two cannons, eight glasses,

1:08:051:08:09

two postcards albums and a stool. Huh!

1:08:091:08:13

But still she keeps on shopping.

1:08:131:08:16

I want to have a look at the jewellery now.

1:08:171:08:20

And sometimes it's the wee unusual pieces that I find most attractive.

1:08:201:08:25

What we have here is a wee sort of mixture that I've separated out.

1:08:251:08:30

There is nothing there of any great significance, and you probably know that yourself.

1:08:301:08:35

I'm going to make you an offer on this stuff and you can say yay or nay.

1:08:351:08:39

What I'd be prepared to pay on that would be £8.

1:08:391:08:43

Oh, no, I need more. I need more than that. I would want at least 25. At least.

1:08:431:08:47

-25?

-Yeah.

1:08:471:08:50

Mark is also ready to start dealing.

1:08:501:08:53

But it's certainly got an interesting appeal.

1:08:531:08:56

Although shop-owner Robert seems happy to do most of the work.

1:08:561:09:00

So you really don't have any idea in your mind what you'd like to get for it.

1:09:001:09:06

If you offered me a tenner, I'd take it.

1:09:061:09:09

I'll give you a tenner for it. Done.

1:09:091:09:13

Mark, you're such a thoroughbred. But now Anita has to get involved in some real horse-trading.

1:09:131:09:19

-Angela, you are going to think that I am mad.

-Yeah.

1:09:211:09:25

I bought a pair of cannons...

1:09:251:09:28

-Like that?

-Uh-huh, and I thought it would be quite fun...

1:09:281:09:32

-Mmm, to put them together.

-To put them together.

1:09:321:09:34

What about if I paid £25 for that and that?

1:09:341:09:38

-I could do that and it would give me a bit of fun with him.

-I know, yes.

1:09:381:09:42

-Go on, then.

-Will you do 25?

1:09:421:09:45

It's a pleasure to do business with you.

1:09:451:09:47

Back in Masham, a mysterious force...

1:09:471:09:52

Could it be gravity? ..is pulling Mark back to the Isaac Newton jug.

1:09:521:09:57

I rather was taken with this little water jug

1:09:571:10:01

and I rather liked the fact that this was Newton, which I presume is Isaac Newton.

1:10:011:10:06

-Must be.

-Must be. I don't think that's Mrs Newton, though, somehow.

1:10:061:10:10

I know it's cheeky of me,

1:10:101:10:11

cos you haven't priced it very highly, but is there anything you could do on 25?

1:10:111:10:15

Yes, yes. Yes, I can.

1:10:151:10:18

-£15.

-I can't really say no to £15, Robert.

1:10:201:10:23

-That's what I thought you'd say.

-I really like that. Thanks a lot. I appreciate that.

-Thank you.

1:10:231:10:28

Well, there we are, another purchase. I love it.

1:10:281:10:31

Anita's bought enough items to start her own shop!

1:10:331:10:37

OK? That's been a pleasure.

1:10:371:10:39

But she can't stop hunting for one last item, bless her.

1:10:391:10:44

Yeah, well, it's horse-measuring stick

1:10:441:10:46

but it's in the form of a walking stick.

1:10:461:10:49

Silver topped, Boyce and Rogers, Newmarket,

1:10:491:10:52

so it's very important because probably used in the racing industry.

1:10:521:10:55

-So I would think it's a special gift to a vet or a trainer even.

-Yeah.

1:10:551:10:59

-And it's got...

-So what we do is we pull out the measuring stick from the body of the stick

1:10:591:11:05

and we can pull out this bar, this brass bar here, and this brass bar would be?

1:11:051:11:12

It goes over the withers and that's the point where they measure the horse.

1:11:121:11:17

Wee Angela is looking for £80 for this late 19th-century silver-topped measuring stick.

1:11:171:11:22

I think we're in a horsey part of the country, aren't we?

1:11:221:11:25

Oh, yeah. Well, it's countrified round York. You've got your big race course there and everything.

1:11:251:11:30

-Yeah. How about letting it go for 40?

-I can't. I'd be glad to take 60.

1:11:301:11:34

It's another interesting item. Could you go 50?

1:11:341:11:38

Go on, it's cash back in my pocket. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

1:11:381:11:43

I think that's Anita finished buying now. Maybe we should have a little recap on what she's bought.

1:11:431:11:49

Two cannons,

1:11:491:11:51

eight glasses, a stool,

1:11:511:11:54

two postcard albums, a pocket watch,

1:11:541:11:56

a silver albertina,

1:11:561:11:58

two pairs of cufflinks, two tie pins,

1:11:581:12:00

the vitreous china horse and cart, and a broken ring of 18-carat gold, and no cuddly toy.

1:12:001:12:06

-Thank you very much.

-OK, thank you.

1:12:061:12:09

Thank YOU!

1:12:091:12:11

Meanwhile, Mark has also spotted a last-minute item.

1:12:111:12:15

But just as we were going downstairs, this caught me out of the corner of my eye.

1:12:151:12:20

Not terribly well carved... sorry to say that...

1:12:201:12:23

on the hands and things, but there's just something about him.

1:12:231:12:27

-His eyes are quite nicely painted.

-Quite nice boots, aren't they?

1:12:271:12:31

Yeah, it's a little bit amateurishly done, but there's something rather appealing about him.

1:12:311:12:37

What I might do, you know, Robert,

1:12:371:12:39

is put him rather sneakily with the jug because he kind of has a little look of Isaac Newton about him.

1:12:391:12:45

-Can I make a sneaky offer on that?

-Yes.

1:12:451:12:47

I mean, could I possibly get him for the same price as the table, a tenner?

1:12:471:12:51

Oh, go on, then.

1:12:541:12:56

-Yes?

-Yes.

1:12:561:12:58

That's item three from this shop. Good work, Mark.

1:12:581:13:01

Thank you very much indeed.

1:13:011:13:03

Our friends reunited, Anita and Mark, head for Northallerton, the county town of North Yorkshire.

1:13:051:13:12

Its situation in the Vale of York

1:13:121:13:14

means that it's an important market town, attracting traders after a bargain.

1:13:141:13:20

Talking of which...

1:13:201:13:22

This is the very last shop.

1:13:221:13:24

I know, and it's mine. It's all mine!

1:13:241:13:27

Oh, well, darling, have the very best of luck.

1:13:271:13:31

-Listen, enjoy your last visit.

-OK, then, bye-bye. Break a leg.

1:13:311:13:35

Mark's last shop is Cobweb Antiques.

1:13:351:13:39

As he starts to rummage, Anita heads to Thirsk to visit the vet.

1:13:391:13:45

Hmm, she doesn't look unwell.

1:13:451:13:47

In 1978, the BBC showed the first of 90 episodes

1:13:471:13:50

of All Creatures Great And Small, and viewing figures sometimes reached 13 million.

1:13:501:13:55

The series was based on the books of James Herriot,

1:13:551:13:58

who wrote about his post-war adventures as a vet in the Yorkshire Dales.

1:13:581:14:03

-Hi, I'm Anita.

-Jim Wight, Alf Wight's son.

1:14:031:14:07

Alf Wight was James Herriot's real name.

1:14:071:14:09

Jim, his son, is showing Anita round the World of James Herriot,

1:14:091:14:13

a series of exhibits and displays based in his original surgery and home.

1:14:131:14:18

This room doubled up as our... best room if you like.

1:14:181:14:21

-Best room.

-The visitors' room.

-That's right, the show-off room.

1:14:211:14:25

This is the office where the farmers used to come in and pay their bills.

1:14:251:14:29

-They always came in on a Monday when it was market day.

-I find it fascinating

1:14:291:14:33

that he had the farmers paying the bills in his best room.

1:14:331:14:36

It's amazing, isn't it? A lot of them didn't pay their bills, you know.

1:14:361:14:40

They'd say, "I was going to pay you, Mr White, but..."

1:14:401:14:43

And they'd go, "But, ee, I've forgotten my cheque book.

1:14:431:14:46

"But while I'm here, I'll have... "

1:14:461:14:48

Cos we had all the drugs on the old shelves. "I'll have a bottle of that and I'll have some of that."

1:14:481:14:53

It was market day on Monday when the farmers came in so they'd all had a good skinful as well.

1:14:531:15:00

This here is the old dispensary where all the drugs used to be made up,

1:15:061:15:11

and it was the days before antibiotics and corticosteroids and the modern drugs, you know.

1:15:111:15:16

-It's just like a big pantry.

-It is, because they were making their own recipes if you like.

1:15:161:15:21

Here's the old scales. They used to weigh out the master ingredients for the cure-all medicines.

1:15:211:15:28

You see these things... Embrocations, drink for calves...

1:15:281:15:32

-Cleansing drinks...

-Calves cordial.

-Calves cordial. Fantastic, isn't it?

-I wonder what was in that!

1:15:321:15:37

The best one was one called Universal Cattle Medicine.

1:15:371:15:42

There isn't exactly an example of it here, but it was called UCM. It was in bottles like this.

1:15:421:15:47

There was turpentine and ether and arsenic and all sorts of stuff in it,

1:15:471:15:51

and you'd whack that down a cow's throat and it cured everything.

1:15:511:15:55

After more than 25 years of this bovine tough love, James Herriot's first book was published in 1966.

1:15:551:16:03

It wasn't until publication in America six years later

1:16:031:16:06

that the books really took off

1:16:061:16:08

and he became an international bestselling author.

1:16:081:16:12

In the television series, he always seemed such a mild-mannered man.

1:16:121:16:17

-He was.

-He was like that?

1:16:171:16:19

He always regarded himself as the onlooker thrust among a lot of interesting characters.

1:16:191:16:24

You could describe him as the archetypal gentleman, my dad.

1:16:241:16:27

He was a very gentlemanly guy.

1:16:271:16:29

Back in Northallerton,

1:16:291:16:32

during Mark's last shopping opportunity of the week,

1:16:321:16:34

the All Creatures Great And Small theme continues. Meow!

1:16:341:16:39

Hello. Have you come for a bit of attention as well?

1:16:391:16:43

Have you? What do you think of this lot?

1:16:431:16:46

Yeah, rubbish.

1:16:461:16:48

Ruff! Honestly, the quality of customers these days.

1:16:481:16:51

No rubbish here.

1:16:511:16:52

-You just have to look carefully.

-These are lovely. I love wood.

1:16:521:16:55

Terribly tactile.

1:16:551:16:57

Gosh, you're sounding like Anita Manning.

1:16:571:17:01

As long as you weren't going to say Bernard Manning!

1:17:011:17:04

I feel that Mark needs some direction.

1:17:071:17:10

This is quite fun, actually.

1:17:101:17:12

It's a little travelling compass in a nine-carat gold frame.

1:17:121:17:17

Now, I'm not sure if the little chain mount on it is gold, but certainly the frame is.

1:17:171:17:23

It's rather sweet, actually.

1:17:231:17:25

Sweet price? £89. There's a lot of bargaining that needs to be done here.

1:17:251:17:30

I quite like the little compass.

1:17:301:17:32

-It's rather sweet.

-Rather sweet.

1:17:321:17:34

89...

1:17:341:17:36

-Do that one for 75.

-75.

1:17:361:17:39

I don't want to pay that.

1:17:421:17:44

-But I had to buy it.

-Would you lose at 60?

1:17:451:17:49

65. That's the death.

1:17:491:17:51

-65?

-Mm-hm.

1:17:511:17:54

Thank you, Susan. You're an angel. Thank you so much for helping me out.

1:17:541:17:58

With his gold compass to guide him, Mark heads south to meet up with Anita and reveal all.

1:17:581:18:05

-Are you sad?

-I am.

-You silly, sentimental old softy.

-Ohh.

1:18:051:18:10

I'd like to show you my first item.

1:18:101:18:13

-Please do.

-The first of Anita's mixed lots.

1:18:131:18:17

She certainly has the quantity, but we all know it's the quality that counts.

1:18:171:18:21

-And how much did you pay for this little bundle?

-£20.

1:18:211:18:25

I think it's an Anita Manning lot.

1:18:251:18:28

Well done. My first lot is a little coat rack, quite nicely carved with the little eye there.

1:18:281:18:35

I mean, a very practical thing.

1:18:351:18:36

You could have it up in your hallway, hang your coats up,

1:18:361:18:40

have your favourite vase or top hat on there.

1:18:401:18:42

-At last! Somewhere to keep my favourite top hat.

-How much?

1:18:421:18:47

-£15.

-Oh, I think that's a steal.

1:18:471:18:49

My second lot is a collection of postcards. This is an Art Nouveau,

1:18:491:18:56

turn of the century album which has been made by Raphael Tuck.

1:18:561:19:02

-Oh, very nice.

-And some of the cards are Raphael Tuck as well.

1:19:021:19:06

Further to that, we have an addition with some World War I embroidered cards.

1:19:061:19:12

I think I have about eight or ten.

1:19:121:19:13

-What did you pay?

-I paid 75.

1:19:131:19:16

That's not bad. I think there's a jolly good profit in there.

1:19:161:19:19

Now, my second lot...

1:19:191:19:20

it's a lovely big decorative piece, but if

1:19:201:19:23

you look on the actual handles, the heads are missing of the creatures.

1:19:231:19:27

Listen, it was £15.

1:19:271:19:29

It can't make less than £15.

1:19:291:19:31

It can't. Now, my mixed lot is another...

1:19:311:19:35

Oh, Anita, have you bought a mixed lot on everything?

1:19:351:19:39

We've got one of those,

1:19:391:19:40

we've got another one of those...

1:19:401:19:43

We seem to have one of everything in this lot.

1:19:431:19:46

Tell me, have you fallen in love with it?

1:19:461:19:49

No.

1:19:491:19:50

No, I haven't. How much did you pay?

1:19:501:19:53

-£20.

-Take them away, Anita.

1:19:531:19:55

-Next, Mark?

-I bought a little mixed lot here.

1:19:551:20:00

My first part of the lot is that doll, and the second part is this lovely little Victorian jug.

1:20:001:20:09

It's marked underneath, it's about 1840, 1860, and I just thought

1:20:091:20:12

the little doll was a wee bit of fun and I put it in with that.

1:20:121:20:17

-OK, what did you pay for those?

-£25.

-That's probably all they're worth.

1:20:171:20:23

Ha-ha-ha-ha(!) Next, Anita's walking stick with a difference.

1:20:231:20:27

-Oh, that's nice.

-It's a horse-measuring stick.

-Oh, that's lovely, Anita.

1:20:271:20:32

-London make, 1890, but inscribed on the silver is Rogers and Boyce, Newmarket.

-Oh, lovely.

1:20:321:20:41

-So that gives it a further...

-A good profit on this.

1:20:411:20:45

-..horse-racing connection.

-That's lovely.

1:20:451:20:47

-Now, what did you pay for that?

-I paid £50.

1:20:471:20:49

I think that's quite a good buy, Anita.

1:20:491:20:52

I think that could double your money.

1:20:521:20:55

I bought a little gentleman's fob

1:20:551:20:58

-in the form of a compass. It's nine-carat gold.

-How much did you pay for it?

1:20:581:21:02

Quite a lot.

1:21:021:21:04

65.

1:21:041:21:06

It's a bit much, isn't it? I think so. What's your last item, Anita?

1:21:061:21:10

It's a Victorian stool...

1:21:101:21:13

Yes.

1:21:131:21:15

Which might have started off life as a chair.

1:21:151:21:18

No, I'm not going to let you get away with that, Anita.

1:21:181:21:20

I just want to state for the record...

1:21:201:21:23

It DID start life as a chair.

1:21:231:21:25

There's no might about this, Anita Manning. I think it's a great

1:21:251:21:29

little buy, very nice indeed, and I presume you paid very little for it.

1:21:291:21:33

-£10.

-Well...

1:21:331:21:35

Must get my money back on that.

1:21:351:21:37

Oh, well, you'll get more than that. £40 or £50 I would've thought.

1:21:371:21:41

Now time for Mark's trump card. Or is it a joker?

1:21:411:21:43

It's a little wibbly-wobbly table.

1:21:431:21:45

It's a hand-made design thing which is going to be very, very rare.

1:21:451:21:51

-How much?

-£100.

1:21:511:21:53

£100?

1:21:531:21:56

What do you think?

1:21:561:21:58

I think your money was burning a hole in your pocket!

1:21:581:22:01

Well, that's just as well, though, cos I paid a tenner for it.

1:22:011:22:05

Ohh! You were kidding me on!

1:22:051:22:07

-I was kidding you. I paid a tenner.

-Good buy for a tenner.

-Thank you.

1:22:071:22:11

I must say I think you've bought a lot better things than I have.

1:22:111:22:14

Well done.

1:22:141:22:16

They're being very polite about that mixed lot of mixed lots. Come on, tell us what you really think.

1:22:161:22:22

I love the walking cane with the horse-measurer.

1:22:221:22:26

Silver topped, good provenance.

1:22:261:22:28

I can see that possibly making 100.

1:22:281:22:29

As for his big oriental-type vase, it's damaged, the lid's

1:22:291:22:34

missing, it's nibbled on the top, the heads are missing on the dragons.

1:22:341:22:38

I think he'll have to be lucky to get his money back on that one.

1:22:381:22:42

This leg of Mark and Anita's journey started in Richmond and will end in Huby just outside York.

1:22:441:22:51

They're taking their assorted antiques to be auctioned

1:22:511:22:54

by Summersgills in the local village hall.

1:22:541:22:57

I'm really excited now, Anita.

1:22:571:22:59

This is our final sale, the day of reckoning.

1:22:591:23:02

We cannot do any more, Anita.

1:23:021:23:05

The die is cast.

1:23:051:23:07

Is cast.

1:23:071:23:09

A crowd has gathered to inspect the items in this general sale.

1:23:091:23:12

Auctioneer Tim Summersgill has cast his seller's eye over Anita and Mark's lots.

1:23:121:23:19

A couple of lots we might struggle with.

1:23:191:23:21

The three-legged table, we might be lucky to sell that.

1:23:211:23:24

But probably one of the best lots we've got in is the measuring stick.

1:23:241:23:29

We've got a lot of interest, quite a few commission bids, so I think it should fly, should that one.

1:23:291:23:34

-Mark has spent £130 on six items.

-Done.

1:23:351:23:40

Anita has spent £175 on...

1:23:401:23:45

You know, I think it's twelve items making up five lots.

1:23:451:23:48

Oh, you're a darling!

1:23:481:23:51

So to the auction, with Anita needing to make up £200.

1:23:511:23:56

Are you feeling confident, Mark?

1:23:561:23:58

-Anita, I'm very, very nervous, I have to tell you.

-Don't be nervous.

1:23:581:24:01

I'm sure they'll be entranced by all the junk that you bought.

1:24:011:24:07

-First up, Mark's Isaac Newton jug coupled with the doll.

-£20 bid here.

1:24:071:24:12

£20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30.

1:24:121:24:17

£30 then, on commission at 30.

1:24:171:24:19

32 in the room. £32 bid.

1:24:191:24:22

For £32, all done at 32?

1:24:221:24:24

-Well done!

-Well, that is a bit of a profit.

1:24:261:24:28

-A slow but steady £7 profit for Mark.

-You were lucky, Mark.

1:24:281:24:34

Don't be a meanie! It's our last day together.

1:24:351:24:38

I'm not being a meanie.

1:24:381:24:40

Next are the two cannon, the horse and cart and the eight glasses.

1:24:401:24:45

We start at £20 bid on this one.

1:24:451:24:47

-It starts at 20.

-£20 on commission, 25 anywhere else?

1:24:471:24:50

£20 buys it. Just in time.

1:24:501:24:52

22, 24 here, 26 there. £26, 28 I'm looking for.

1:24:521:24:56

26, lady's bid.

1:24:561:25:00

Well, I've managed to wipe my face with that one.

1:25:001:25:03

£6 profit, so the cannon didn't misfire completely.

1:25:031:25:08

Now, you called me lucky, Anita.

1:25:081:25:10

I think you were jolly lucky with that.

1:25:101:25:12

Mark is hanging high hopes on his carved-eagle coat rack.

1:25:121:25:17

Quite a bit of interest on this one so we start at £30.

1:25:171:25:20

-30 straight in.

-£35 anywhere else?

1:25:201:25:23

35, 38, 40 at the back.

1:25:231:25:26

-40, 42, 45, 48, 50...

-Yes!

1:25:261:25:28

£50 then. In the doorway at £50...

1:25:281:25:33

-Oh, that's good.

-That was good. That was good.

1:25:331:25:36

Sold for £50 minus commission.

1:25:361:25:38

Mark's eagle eye for a bargain didn't let him down.

1:25:381:25:41

-So you're happy at that?

-I am happy at that.

1:25:411:25:44

That's a good buy that at £15.

1:25:441:25:47

Next, Anita's horse-measuring stick.

1:25:471:25:50

Interest on this one so we start it at 130. 140, 150, 160 with you.

1:25:501:25:55

-£160. Right at the back at 160.

-Yes!

1:25:551:25:58

All done at 160? All sure?

1:25:581:26:02

-Yes!

-Well, done, Anita.

1:26:021:26:04

I said you'd make 100 on that, didn't I?

1:26:041:26:07

-Yeah.

-Well, I never did. £110 profit.

1:26:071:26:11

-Much more of this and she'll be catching Mark up.

-Congratulations.

1:26:111:26:15

-Thank you, darling.

-Congratulations.

1:26:151:26:17

Next up, it's the lump...

1:26:171:26:19

Mark's damaged vase.

1:26:191:26:21

-Straight in at £30...

-Oh, £30!

1:26:211:26:24

35 anywhere else? On commission at £30.

1:26:241:26:28

35 I'm looking for.

1:26:281:26:29

All done, then, at 30? No-one else?

1:26:291:26:33

You got away with murder there!

1:26:331:26:36

That's not a bad profit on an item that's missing most of its bits.

1:26:361:26:41

Well done, darling. That's put a smile on your face.

1:26:411:26:46

Ah, the postcard albums that Anita fought so hard for.

1:26:461:26:50

40 in the doorway. 42, 44, 46, 48, is it?

1:26:501:26:55

46 the lady. All done at 46?

1:26:551:26:57

-Is that mine?

-No.

-48, 50...

1:26:571:27:00

-It is.

-No, it's not.

-It is.

1:27:001:27:02

-Is it?

-£50. Lady's bid this time.

1:27:021:27:05

Oh.

1:27:051:27:07

Come on, team, pay attention!

1:27:071:27:09

£25 under the purchase price means the first loss of the day.

1:27:091:27:13

-Was it 50?

-Was it 50 or 58?

1:27:131:27:15

50, Mark. Come on, moving on.

1:27:151:27:17

The jewellery's next, items too numerous to mention.

1:27:171:27:23

193 are watches et cetera...

1:27:231:27:24

-Exactly.

-Starting at £40 this lot.

1:27:241:27:28

£40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70...

1:27:281:27:32

-Is this mine?

-85 with you.

1:27:321:27:35

90 there. 95 back with you.

1:27:351:27:38

-100 in the doorway.

-100!

-105.

1:27:381:27:41

All done at 105?

1:27:411:27:43

That was excellent!

1:27:431:27:46

Well, the mixed lot made lots. She's catching up.

1:27:461:27:50

105 for my wee mixed lot. I'm delighted with that.

1:27:501:27:54

I'm amazed at that, Anita. I was unfair with your price for that.

1:27:541:27:57

This'll be interesting.

1:27:571:27:58

Remember Mark fought hard to get the compass fob for £65.

1:27:581:28:03

Bid here at £20. £20 for this one.

1:28:031:28:05

25, 28, 30, five,

1:28:051:28:08

40, five, 50, five.

1:28:081:28:10

55 then? All done at 55?

1:28:101:28:13

-Ah, hard luck.

-Ouch!

1:28:131:28:16

That's a big smack in the wallet.

1:28:161:28:19

-I was expecting that, to be honest.

-I know.

1:28:191:28:21

Next up, the wibbly-wobbly table.

1:28:211:28:24

Bidding starts at an optimistic £20.

1:28:241:28:27

-£20, any interest?

-Come on!

1:28:271:28:29

-15 I'm bid. 15 the lady.

-Thank goodness for that.

1:28:291:28:33

£15 only. Seems cheap enough at 15.

1:28:331:28:36

-No-one else?

-Ohh!

1:28:361:28:38

Never mind. Well done, you made profit, Mark.

1:28:391:28:43

A wibbly-wobbly profit on a wibbly-wobbly table.

1:28:431:28:46

Are you upset?

1:28:461:28:48

Are you upset?

1:28:481:28:50

-Are you upset?

-Oh, shut up, Anita!

1:28:501:28:52

Come on, you two. Toys back in the pram.

1:28:521:28:55

Finally, the stool that was once a chair.

1:28:551:28:57

15 then, here to sell.

1:28:571:29:00

-15!

-£15. 16 anywhere else.

1:29:001:29:03

All done at £15?

1:29:031:29:07

Well, that was fair, Anita.

1:29:071:29:09

Our last two lots made the same amount of money.

1:29:091:29:12

£5 profit on that stool.

1:29:121:29:14

I'm going to need a little sit-down.

1:29:141:29:16

I think it just shows you... what idiots we are.

1:29:161:29:19

A good day at auction.

1:29:211:29:23

Anita did well and I thought she might have caught him up.

1:29:231:29:27

She started today with £458.74 and her mixed-lot policy certainly paid off.

1:29:271:29:33

She made a profit of nearly £117 after auction costs, giving her a total for the week of £575.66.

1:29:331:29:42

Mark started the day with £684.86 and after auction costs he made a profit of £19.24.

1:29:421:29:51

This takes his grand total to £704.10

1:29:511:29:54

and that's a fantastic effort over the week, Mark. Well done!

1:29:541:29:59

-Well, Mark, that was a wonderful auction.

-Well, for you it was, yes.

1:29:591:30:03

-So are you going to drive me off into the sunset?

-I am, and then I'm going to leave you there.

1:30:061:30:11

Good for you. No more antiques.

1:30:111:30:14

-One week is enough!

-That's us finished.

1:30:141:30:17

And that brings us to the end of Anita and Mark's journey together.

1:30:171:30:21

-I'll hold your hand, darling.

-Come on, lead the way, darling.

1:30:211:30:24

-A bargain!

-What a strange trip it's been.

1:30:241:30:28

It's here, it's right turn.

1:30:281:30:30

Despite a little car trouble, Anita and Mark have crossed the border and occasionally crossed the line.

1:30:301:30:36

I've messed around...

1:30:361:30:39

Oh, gosh!

1:30:391:30:42

-Ohh!

-My mind's fried.

1:30:421:30:43

# We're doing the mess around

1:30:431:30:46

# Everybody's doing the mess around... #

1:30:461:30:50

Stop the road trip, I want to get off.

1:30:501:30:52

# If you're going to give me good kissin' like that... #

1:30:551:30:59

Oh, you are a jammy besom.

1:30:591:31:00

This flirtatious twosome have made lots of friends on the way, but we know where their hearts really lie.

1:31:001:31:08

Anita, will you marry me?

1:31:081:31:10

SHE LAUGHS Will I give you a surprise?

1:31:101:31:14

YES!

1:31:141:31:15

Oh, my good Lord.

1:31:161:31:19

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

1:31:371:31:40

Email [email protected]

1:31:401:31:43