Episode 13 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 13

It's charm versus mathematical prowess, as experts Thomas Plant and Paul Laidlaw hit the shops between Huntingdon to Towcester.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 13. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each

0:00:010:00:04

and one big challenge.

0:00:040:00:06

I'm declaring war!

0:00:060:00:07

Why?

0:00:070:00:09

Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

0:00:090:00:13

The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

0:00:130:00:19

But it's not as easy as you might think, and things don't always go to plan!

0:00:190:00:24

Will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

0:00:240:00:28

This is the Antiques Road Trip!

0:00:290:00:31

It's the third day for our intrepid treasure hunters Thomas Plant and Paul Laidlaw.

0:00:370:00:42

They're battling it out to see who can buy the best and profit the most

0:00:420:00:47

as they zoom along in their rather dishy Alfa Romeo.

0:00:470:00:51

They're in high spirits, especially Thomas, as he did so well at the auction yesterday.

0:00:550:01:02

£600.

0:01:020:01:04

Everything now is all gravy for me! It's all gravy!

0:01:040:01:08

Two of his lots made over £100 in profit

0:01:080:01:12

so Thomas is now loaded with £383.56 to spend today.

0:01:120:01:18

Paul, our militaria enthusiast, did less well.

0:01:190:01:23

He bought wisely, but at the auction, the buyers chose to steer away.

0:01:230:01:28

Paul, that is terrible!

0:01:280:01:30

So today, he's only got £213.78.

0:01:300:01:35

But it would take a lot to dampen this Scot's enthusiasm

0:01:350:01:39

as he tries to enlighten Thomas on their travels.

0:01:390:01:42

-It's a bro' day, I'll tell you that.

-A bro' day?

0:01:420:01:45

-Bro'.

-Fine? Bonny?

-Yes, a bonny day.

0:01:450:01:49

As opposed to the dreich days we saw in Yorkshire.

0:01:490:01:53

Don't remind me!

0:01:530:01:55

Their weekend road trip started in Skipton

0:01:550:01:58

before heading south through Derbyshire to Stamford.

0:01:580:02:01

Then it's Cambridgeshire before they drive south to Tetsworth

0:02:010:02:05

and then Pewsey for the final auction.

0:02:050:02:07

Today, we're kicking off in Huntingdon.

0:02:070:02:11

If all goes well, we'll end up at the auction house in Towcester

0:02:110:02:14

for a right toasting!

0:02:140:02:16

Ah, Huntingdon!

0:02:160:02:17

The birthplace of one of our country's most famous leaders, Oliver Cromwell.

0:02:170:02:22

Our first shop of the day is Hunt's Antiques and Collectibles.

0:02:220:02:27

Spelt with an H. What a welcome for our lucky lads!

0:02:270:02:31

Morning. Hello, girls!

0:02:310:02:33

Nice to meet you. What a lovely reception!

0:02:330:02:37

Let's hope there's lots of beautiful antiques like our beautiful reception!

0:02:380:02:42

Oh, dear! Pass the sick bag! It's time for shopping now in this eclectic mix of stalls.

0:02:420:02:49

What's this?

0:02:490:02:50

Paul's pinched Thomas's tactics!

0:02:500:02:53

Hi, there. I'm Paul Laidlaw. We're popping into your auction shortly to sell some items.

0:02:530:02:59

How low do you stoop, Paul Laid-low? ..Law.

0:02:590:03:02

'We'll start with silver, gold and jewellery, then paintings and prints.

0:03:020:03:06

-'There's a very small selection of clocks this time, so any clocks...'

-Could stand out. OK.

0:03:060:03:12

'The market's pretty hungry for those.

0:03:120:03:14

'Then we have a small rug section, mirrors, and then furniture.'

0:03:140:03:19

What's the furniture market like for you on that evening?

0:03:190:03:23

'It's fairly robust. Everything is price sensitive.

0:03:230:03:26

-'Georgian is a good seller.'

-Jonathan, you've been really helpful. I appreciate it.

0:03:260:03:31

-'No problem.'

-Thanks.

0:03:310:03:33

Paul likes a spot of furniture hunting.

0:03:330:03:35

It doesn't take him long to spot a rather splendid mirror.

0:03:350:03:39

Jonathan mentioned that he had a sophisticated audience

0:03:390:03:42

and that his private buyers had an eye for tasteful Georgian elegance.

0:03:420:03:47

What we have here is an over-mantel mirror. Late Victorian.

0:03:470:03:50

Victorian? Didn't the auctioneer say Georgian and elegant, not Victorian and fussy?

0:03:500:03:55

Marquetry-inlaid rosewood.

0:03:550:03:58

String inlay here.

0:03:580:04:00

Decent mouldings, good quality turnings, bevel-edged mirror.

0:04:000:04:04

The mirror's not oxidised. The condition, apart from

0:04:040:04:08

a repair to that little turned column there

0:04:080:04:12

which frankly doesn't worry me too much.

0:04:120:04:15

It's sharp enough. They've had problems selling that.

0:04:150:04:18

85 now down to 50.

0:04:180:04:21

Between you and me, I want it for a fraction of that price.

0:04:210:04:24

Our Scottish expert is racing off to try and clinch the first sale of the day

0:04:240:04:29

and he isn't shy with his haggling!

0:04:290:04:31

It was 85. Forget that. It's now 50.

0:04:310:04:34

I'm hoping to God that the seller is going to give me a present with that.

0:04:340:04:41

-Are you going to make a phone call?

-I'll have to make a call.

0:04:410:04:45

Julie, upstairs, your over-mantel.

0:04:450:04:50

He's offering ten or £15!

0:04:500:04:52

No, but that was half...

0:04:520:04:54

I know, I know. I thought it was funny as well!

0:04:540:04:58

Would you like to have a word with him?

0:04:580:05:00

Hi. Look, I'm not taking the mickey!

0:05:000:05:03

I think my estimate at auction is 30 to £60 on that.

0:05:040:05:08

Can we do it? Thank you very much. I'll hand you back.

0:05:080:05:11

All the best. Bye!

0:05:110:05:13

Not quite the £15 he was hoping for, but still a good deal at £30.

0:05:130:05:18

With hardly a pause, he's on the hunt for more.

0:05:180:05:20

There's not much of any age here.

0:05:200:05:23

Apart from that clock.

0:05:230:05:25

He's spotted an American Ansonia clock.

0:05:250:05:29

We are looking at a clock that's now 110 years old.

0:05:290:05:33

It looks like black marble, but it's lacquered cast iron.

0:05:330:05:37

And it looks really smart,

0:05:370:05:39

but it's the budget model.

0:05:390:05:41

All that glitters...

0:05:410:05:43

Knowing Paul, he'll want to slash that price tag down by half. Here we go again! Poor woman!

0:05:430:05:48

-The stall there on the corner.

-Yes.

-A few clocks in it.

0:05:480:05:51

-There's an Ansonia cast iron clock.

-Right.

0:05:510:05:56

It is what it is.

0:05:560:05:58

-£65 is on it.

-Mm-hmm.

0:05:580:06:01

Ever the optimist, I'd love to get it for £30 in all honesty.

0:06:010:06:05

Let's try. Hello? Chris? Hello, it's Denise at Trading Post.

0:06:050:06:10

Can I just check - the Ansonia clock on your stand.

0:06:100:06:14

-Marked at 65.

-Ask if they'll go anywhere near 35.

0:06:140:06:19

£40. Final. Lowest.

0:06:190:06:22

-Sold at £40. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:06:220:06:24

Paul's off to a fighting start and has already bagged two items.

0:06:240:06:28

But I'm worried about Thomas

0:06:280:06:30

as he's looking rather empty-handed.

0:06:300:06:33

I genuinely thought you'd gone, it was so quiet!

0:06:330:06:36

Abandoned you! No, I thought you'd gone as well, cos you were quiet.

0:06:360:06:40

-Normally I hear the dulcet tones of...

-"Ooh, we're doomed!"

-"We're doomed!"

0:06:400:06:46

-The Scottish lilt.

-Have you bought anything?

0:06:460:06:49

-No. Not yet. Have you?

-Ask Uncle Laidlaw if he's bought anything.

0:06:490:06:54

-Has he bought any furniture?

-Oh, Laidlaw!

0:06:540:06:58

It's an evening auction. We'll be there all night!

0:06:580:07:02

-It was there, it was big, it was brown!

-I think I'll be moving on quite soon.

-Ditto.

0:07:020:07:08

Now he knows Paul is done and dusted in this shop, Thomas needs to get a move on.

0:07:080:07:13

Oh, no! He's found another hat!

0:07:130:07:15

What's this, the Wild West? Hmm. Could be beaver.

0:07:150:07:19

# Davy, Davy Crockett, king of the wild frontier. #

0:07:190:07:23

I'm looking for jewels. There's a bit more jewellery I want to have a look at.

0:07:230:07:30

Just to get out and see.

0:07:300:07:33

Even if it's costume, great. Costume jewellery, people love it.

0:07:330:07:36

It's a piece of vintage jewellery.

0:07:360:07:39

A marcasite necklace. It's not that old.

0:07:390:07:44

Marcasite is cut steel, cut in a triangle to make it look like a stone.

0:07:440:07:50

It's ticketed at £7.50.

0:07:500:07:53

I'd want to pay a fiver for it.

0:07:540:07:57

With the owner away and not answering, our blonde bombshell comes to the rescue.

0:07:570:08:01

Paula says you can have it for six pounds.

0:08:010:08:03

Six? Go on, six pounds.

0:08:030:08:06

-Can I have some change and a receipt, please?

-Of course.

0:08:070:08:10

I'm going to dazzle them with bling, basically.

0:08:100:08:13

Thank you very much.

0:08:130:08:14

It's not much of a dent in your £383, but it's a start, Thomas!

0:08:140:08:20

As for Paul, he's done with shopping for the day and is trying to find a fascinating local manor house.

0:08:210:08:27

I don't recall the last time we saw a river!

0:08:270:08:31

From Huntingdon, he drives seven miles east to the village of Hemingford Grey,

0:08:310:08:36

a beautiful place by the River Ouse.

0:08:360:08:39

His destination, The Manor, a house set in four acres of flourishing gardens with a fascinating past.

0:08:390:08:45

Showing him round is Diana Boston.

0:08:450:08:47

-Very nice to meet you.

-Likewise.

0:08:470:08:50

You live in an idyll, do you not?

0:08:500:08:52

I know. It's lovely, isn't it? It's perfect.

0:08:520:08:55

Diana, tell me what we're looking at here.

0:08:550:08:57

We're looking at either the oldest or continuously oldest inhabited house in Britain.

0:08:570:09:04

-But obviously we're not looking...

-Not from this prospect!

-No, not from this prospect.

0:09:040:09:09

The original front door is in the south wall of the house and this is the north wall.

0:09:090:09:14

This beautiful house was built by the Normans in 1139.

0:09:140:09:19

Over its many centuries has been added onto by the Tudors and Georgians,

0:09:190:09:24

creating this amazing building.

0:09:240:09:27

The Manor is Diana's private home, but she does open it to the public

0:09:270:09:31

so that they, too, can enjoy this wonderful piece of history.

0:09:310:09:34

Come in, Paul.

0:09:340:09:36

The house was also made famous by Diana's mother-in-law, Lucy Boston,

0:09:360:09:40

a famous children's author who used the house and its contents as inspiration.

0:09:400:09:45

And it's easy to see why!

0:09:450:09:47

What a cosy... I've got to say, my human reaction is, "What a cosy room!"

0:09:480:09:54

It is a cosy room.

0:09:540:09:56

The centrepiece must be this splendid Tudor chimney breast.

0:09:560:10:01

It's huge and still has its bread oven and salt cupboard.

0:10:010:10:05

That chimney goes absolutely slap bang straight to the top of the house.

0:10:050:10:11

Sometimes, when you're sitting here, it's the first time you know it's snowing

0:10:110:10:15

because you see the flakes coming down!

0:10:150:10:19

Right, Paul, now we're coming back into the old part of the house.

0:10:190:10:25

But it makes a lovely room, this, doesn't it?

0:10:250:10:28

It's all opened out, isn't it?

0:10:280:10:30

The light, and again, the views!

0:10:300:10:34

-I know.

-And post guards. Hand-made glass.

0:10:340:10:38

It does something subliminal.

0:10:380:10:41

So you've got the two centuries, 600 years apart.

0:10:410:10:45

You've got the Georgian, and the good old Norman solid stone arch.

0:10:450:10:51

We've got a Victorian cheval mirror

0:10:510:10:53

then early Georgian, 20th-century cane chairs.

0:10:530:10:59

A big Victorian splendid brass divan bed!

0:10:590:11:04

Again, it's all in there.

0:11:040:11:08

But it works!

0:11:080:11:11

This really is a splendid home.

0:11:110:11:13

But typically, Paul's eyes are drawn to the antiques.

0:11:130:11:17

I can see you've spotted something else and you're not a bit interested in my house!

0:11:170:11:22

This is wonderful! But is that an EMG?

0:11:220:11:25

That is an EMG.

0:11:250:11:27

Oh, my word!

0:11:280:11:30

Steady, Paul! Take a tablet.

0:11:300:11:32

EMG, otherwise known as Ellis Michael Ginn,

0:11:320:11:36

were responsible for producing some of the best gramophones at the time in the world

0:11:360:11:41

and these are now serious collectors' items. So Paul's excited!

0:11:410:11:45

For me, in the first instance,

0:11:450:11:47

they are so sculptural.

0:11:470:11:50

-Acoustically, in its day, this was it.

-Somebody made it with love.

0:11:500:11:54

Extraordinary to think that this huge great horn

0:11:540:11:57

-is made out of 1920s London telephone directories!

-It's papier-mache.

0:11:570:12:03

The papier-mache goes right the way down to here.

0:12:030:12:07

And this then is brass to here.

0:12:070:12:10

That is a magical instrument, I've got to say!

0:12:100:12:14

-Any chance of...

-You'd like to hear it?

0:12:140:12:17

How about that? Yes.

0:12:170:12:20

The whole ceremony of winding it up,

0:12:200:12:23

sharpening the needle and putting on a record is part of the gramophone's fascination.

0:12:230:12:28

But for Paul, I think, we've lost him to the music!

0:12:280:12:31

Oh, Lordy!

0:12:310:12:32

SCRATCHY VOCAL RECORDING

0:12:330:12:36

While Paul is away with the wee fairies,

0:12:510:12:54

Thomas is keen to keep spending!

0:12:540:12:57

Ramsey is just a small town, but has a very famous Benedictine abbey,

0:12:570:13:02

which, in its heyday, was home to at least 80 monks

0:13:020:13:06

and all those habits!

0:13:060:13:07

Now all that remains is the abbey college and the gatehouse.

0:13:070:13:11

And Thomas,

0:13:110:13:12

still on a mission to find all that glitters and shines.

0:13:120:13:17

Hopefully, Abbey Antiques and owner Rita have a good hoard.

0:13:170:13:20

-How long have you been here?

-Over 30 years.

-Really?

0:13:200:13:23

I'm sure you're only 21!

0:13:230:13:26

'Oh, Thomas, stop the charm offensive and start hunting!'

0:13:260:13:31

Basically, because there's silver and jewellery in here, I'm going to have a look.

0:13:310:13:35

It's a Georgian silver spoon with this bright cut design to it.

0:13:350:13:40

It's quite sweet, really.

0:13:400:13:43

There's another spoon here. This is fiddle pattern.

0:13:430:13:46

You can see the fiddle here.

0:13:460:13:48

Again, this is a Victorian spoon.

0:13:490:13:52

1886, London.

0:13:530:13:56

Thomas has brought his scales with him to see how much these silver pieces could be worth

0:13:560:14:01

should someone want to melt them down.

0:14:010:14:03

They're objects in their own right. Georgian and Victorian objects.

0:14:030:14:07

One shouldn't be looking at their weight.

0:14:070:14:12

But I'm afraid, in this modern day,

0:14:120:14:14

with the price of metal, it is a consideration.

0:14:140:14:18

These two spoons are priced at £54 for the pair.

0:14:180:14:23

But I'm sure Thomas can work his magic!

0:14:230:14:25

I've had a word with my husband and he says, yes, they can both be...

0:14:260:14:30

-£18?

-Each.

0:14:300:14:32

Really. OK, wonderful.

0:14:320:14:34

-Thank you.

-I can do that for you.

-That's very kind.

0:14:340:14:37

-That's a nice decorative one.

-I love the bright cut pattern. It's one of my favourite things.

0:14:370:14:43

-I will take those.

-Right.

0:14:430:14:45

-If that's all right.

-Yes.

0:14:450:14:46

-So that will be...36, isn't it?

-Yes, that's right, yes.

-36.

0:14:460:14:51

I will buy those.

0:14:510:14:52

-Can I look at other things?

-Yes.

0:14:520:14:54

This is a nurse's belt.

0:14:560:14:58

Silver is malleable. It bends. This is plated.

0:14:580:15:02

It's quite a nice nurse's belt, though, isn't it?

0:15:020:15:05

It wouldn't go round my waist! Look at that.

0:15:050:15:08

Er, no, Thomas. It's for a lady, if you hadn't noticed!

0:15:080:15:12

Not for a beast like me!

0:15:120:15:15

I know it doesn't fit me!

0:15:150:15:17

But I like it. I know it's silver plate. Doesn't matter.

0:15:180:15:21

I think it's delightful. What's the very, very best on that, please?

0:15:210:15:26

-As I like you, I'll do a special price of 15.

-I'll go for that as well, if that's all right.

0:15:260:15:33

So 15 for this, then we've got 36 for those.

0:15:330:15:37

Now, where's Paul when you need a mathematician?

0:15:370:15:40

That's £48, isn't it?

0:15:400:15:42

I think you'll find that adds up to 51, Thomas. Nice try!

0:15:420:15:46

-Let's get our minds to it!

-No, 51. It's 51.

0:15:460:15:49

£51. Shall we call it a cool 50?

0:15:490:15:52

-After knocking all that off for you?

-I know, I know!

0:15:520:15:56

Would you mind?

0:15:560:15:58

Well, you do smile nicely!

0:15:580:16:00

Please, Rita, don't encourage him!

0:16:000:16:02

Thomas pockets his three pieces. A nice addition to his necklace.

0:16:030:16:07

After a slow start, Thomas has raised his game and is feeling so confident,

0:16:070:16:12

he's taking some time out. Ducky!

0:16:120:16:15

Very therapeutic, this.

0:16:150:16:17

I'm ahead of the game. I've got three items.

0:16:170:16:20

I've got plenty of money.

0:16:200:16:22

I can just relax and feed the ducks!

0:16:220:16:25

What a lovely end of the day for both of them.

0:16:250:16:29

They make a lovely couple, don't they?

0:16:290:16:31

The next day, as the sun shines across Cambridgeshire,

0:16:330:16:36

our intrepid experts are on the road again and talking dirty!

0:16:360:16:40

I've gone down the furnishing route. Who would have thought? Picked up the big brown things.

0:16:400:16:46

-Oh.

-But look, when in Rome... We're going to a furniture sale.

0:16:460:16:51

Not exactly. The sale is split.

0:16:510:16:53

I believe it starts with jewellery and silver and watches, et cetera.

0:16:530:16:57

So I'll have all my stuff out the way and then we have to wait three hours

0:16:570:17:01

for the Laidlaw's bits of brown to come up.

0:17:010:17:04

So far, Paul has two buys under his belt.

0:17:040:17:07

Both brown, but not just furniture. A mirror and a clock for £70.

0:17:070:17:12

Thomas has stuck to his strengths.

0:17:120:17:16

All things shiny and small.

0:17:160:17:18

But he's only spent £56.

0:17:180:17:19

That's not much considering he has £383 in his pocket!

0:17:190:17:24

But let's hope he digs deeper today as they drive west

0:17:240:17:28

leaving Cambridgeshire behind and entering Northamptonshire

0:17:280:17:32

and the town Finedon, formerly known as Thingdon.

0:17:320:17:35

Maybe they couldn't agree on a name!

0:17:350:17:37

It has a magnificent church which has an organ

0:17:370:17:41

which was apparently once played by Handel, who knew a thing or two!

0:17:410:17:44

They've got two antique shops bang next door to each other.

0:17:440:17:48

I wonder what our dynamic duo will come up with next?

0:17:480:17:51

-So you're going in there?

-Yeah.

-I'll see you in there. Swap.

0:17:510:17:55

-See you.

-See you in a min.

0:17:550:17:57

-Hello.

-Hello!

0:17:570:17:59

-I'm Thomas.

-Hi, Thomas, it's Sean.

-Very nice to meet you.

-And you.

0:17:590:18:02

I'll enjoy having a good look round

0:18:020:18:05

-and hopefully doing some deals with you.

-Excellent.

0:18:050:18:08

-I'll leave you to it.

-Thanks very much.

0:18:080:18:10

After saying he was going to stick with his jewellery plan,

0:18:110:18:14

Thomas is going off-piste!

0:18:140:18:16

There are some really nice works of art in here.

0:18:160:18:20

It's fascinating.

0:18:200:18:21

It's late 19th-century, that sort of Olympian look to it.

0:18:210:18:27

That aesthetic taste with these ladies

0:18:270:18:30

in dinaferous robes. Dinaferous. See-through robes.

0:18:300:18:34

I love late-Victorian art. I love it.

0:18:340:18:36

The word, Thomas, is diaphanous!

0:18:360:18:38

-I really like it.

-And me. I might have a chat!

0:18:380:18:42

What's the best price on this?

0:18:420:18:43

To you, you've made it sound so fantastic,

0:18:430:18:47

-I've left a one off the front of the 275!

-Yeah, yeah!

0:18:470:18:51

£200.

0:18:510:18:52

-That's your cheapest, is it?

-Absolute. The oils on it are worth that!

0:18:520:18:57

Yeah!

0:18:570:18:59

You wouldn't do it for 150?

0:19:000:19:02

You're right. Absolutely right! I wouldn't!

0:19:020:19:05

What would you do it for, then?

0:19:050:19:07

I think 200 is as cheap as I'd go.

0:19:070:19:09

I'll bring it down and have a look.

0:19:090:19:11

This is huge. I could really bomb on this!

0:19:110:19:14

No, I still like it. Sean and I need to chat more. But I'll have a good look around.

0:19:140:19:20

It's the first thing I've seen.

0:19:200:19:22

Back to the original plan, then. Small and shiny. Remember?

0:19:220:19:26

Are you sure you haven't got any jewels floating about?

0:19:260:19:29

I've possibly got some things, and also some silver. I live down the road.

0:19:290:19:36

I was going to bring it in, but we don't keep valuable silver here.

0:19:360:19:40

So Thomas is off to see a secret bit of silver down at Sean's.

0:19:400:19:44

-Are we going to walk or drive?

-Walk.

-It's only down the road?

0:19:440:19:47

There's a few items over there. A nice scent bottle.

0:19:500:19:53

A small Russian icon.

0:19:550:19:57

Yeah. That's nice. The scent bottle is sweet.

0:19:570:20:00

You've got a silver top there.

0:20:000:20:02

A little love heart.

0:20:020:20:04

It's Edwardiana.

0:20:040:20:06

Birmingham 1904.

0:20:060:20:08

That's quite nice.

0:20:100:20:12

This heart-shaped scent bottle would please the ladies at the auction.

0:20:120:20:16

-Or how about the clock? The auctioneer said they do well.

-What's this watch?

0:20:160:20:21

It's Swiss. A bit of ormolu.

0:20:210:20:24

-Yes.

-A bit of paste, bit of fun.

0:20:240:20:27

-It's good fun, really, isn't it?

-Yep.

0:20:270:20:29

-A bit of 19th-century fun.

-Working condition.

0:20:290:20:32

-And a good movement.

-Yeah.

0:20:320:20:34

It's a lovely movement.

0:20:340:20:37

While Thomas considers his options with a coffee...

0:20:370:20:40

Nice garden. Nice dog. Whoops, dogs!

0:20:400:20:44

..Paul's keen sense of a bargain has got him excited.

0:20:440:20:47

He's spotted a very quirky Edwardian stand made from mahogany.

0:20:470:20:52

Let's just cut to the chase.

0:20:540:20:56

-It's got 48 on it.

-Yeah.

0:20:560:20:59

Best price, £40.

0:20:590:21:00

No, we're not trying hard enough!

0:21:000:21:03

Don't mind me being shockingly cheeky, but you'd have to want to get rid of it at 20-odd quid.

0:21:030:21:09

The best I can really do for you on it would be 30.

0:21:090:21:13

Should we get it out and have a look at it?

0:21:130:21:16

-I know it's surrounded. Is that OK?

-No problem.

0:21:160:21:18

I'm making you work and you've already done me a favour. Let's see.

0:21:180:21:22

-Now, it might go back in the window.

-I'm used to it! Excuse me.

0:21:220:21:27

-Thanks very much.

-OK.

0:21:270:21:29

-Ah, it's had a fabric back.

-Yes, it had some Silvacote material.

0:21:320:21:36

But very decorative. Very attractive.

0:21:360:21:38

It's just the quirkiest little screen

0:21:380:21:41

you've seen in a long time!

0:21:410:21:42

-No way on God's earth that's going to be a £20 job?

-28. We must be getting there now.

0:21:420:21:48

We are getting close, aren't we?

0:21:480:21:50

I hate these rubbish numbers cos 28, I always round up.

0:21:500:21:53

At 25 I'll shake your hand and we'll do a deal.

0:21:530:21:55

You've squeezed me, but we'll do it.

0:21:550:21:58

Forever squeezing, Paul clinches the deal and heads off to Thomas's shop.

0:21:580:22:04

Little does he know, Mr Plant has done a runner, but what an opportunity

0:22:040:22:08

to sweep in and find something that Thomas has missed.

0:22:080:22:12

Laidlaw, in a desperate moment,

0:22:120:22:14

dares to ask the price of a Viccy swivel toilet mirror

0:22:140:22:17

that couldn't be further from fashionable!

0:22:170:22:20

I'd do that for a £20 note to give you a fighting chance.

0:22:200:22:23

Fighting chances work for me in this life, Mike!

0:22:230:22:26

Never mind the quality, feel the weight!

0:22:260:22:28

You'll have to be there.

0:22:320:22:34

Between you and me, these should be easy-sellers all day long.

0:22:340:22:39

They're such good things in houses.

0:22:390:22:41

The problem with these is,

0:22:410:22:43

you and I appreciate them, and no-one wants to know! They're unloved.

0:22:430:22:48

I'm not going to take the mickey at £20. Thanks very much.

0:22:480:22:52

Paul's buying flurry isn't over yet. He's off to find yet another shop

0:22:520:22:57

while Thomas is still deliberating over the scent bottle and clock at Sean's.

0:22:570:23:02

What could you do that for?

0:23:020:23:04

As we've had such a good day, this is a crucifying price,

0:23:040:23:08

£90.

0:23:080:23:10

You said 220 for the clock.

0:23:100:23:13

-Yep.

-What would be your uber-best on that one

0:23:130:23:17

if I went with these two?

0:23:170:23:19

Those two? Again, it was the best price. 190 would be the cheapest on that clock.

0:23:190:23:26

-Let's go back and look at the picture.

-That's a good idea.

0:23:260:23:29

Back to the shop, then. After a lot of thought,

0:23:290:23:32

Thomas decides the picture isn't for him. But just when I thought

0:23:320:23:36

he'd finally made up his mind,

0:23:360:23:38

another item is thrown into the mix.

0:23:380:23:40

If you like that style of French clock,

0:23:400:23:44

I personally think that's a better quality one.

0:23:440:23:48

That one can be 210.

0:23:480:23:50

-It's signed as well.

-Yeah.

0:23:500:23:52

V.Dogesy, or something.

0:23:520:23:55

Put the two together and actually, you're right.

0:23:550:23:59

-That is a little boudoir clock.

-Absolutely.

0:23:590:24:02

It's titchy. This is the boy.

0:24:020:24:03

Can I just ask, can I have a one in front of this, somewhere along the line?

0:24:030:24:08

-You're really, really pushing...

-I know I'm pushing. But I'm asking.

0:24:080:24:14

190 is the absolute death. And that's, in my view, giving it away.

0:24:140:24:19

180?

0:24:190:24:21

I can see the estimate, 150 to 250 at auction. I'm thinking as an auctioneer.

0:24:210:24:26

180, as I'm feeling worn down.

0:24:260:24:29

Now, Thomas, you've got your reduction. At least make up your mind now.

0:24:290:24:33

You know you hate parting with any cash.

0:24:330:24:36

-Can we make it...

-No!

-No?

0:24:360:24:38

No. Don't even ask! If you ask, the price is going up!

0:24:380:24:41

OK, I get where we are.

0:24:410:24:44

What I'll do, as an act of good faith,

0:24:440:24:46

is I'll throw something in that will ease the pain.

0:24:460:24:51

-So 270, plus a bonus?

-Plus a bonus.

0:24:510:24:55

-A bonus buy!

-Fine.

-Deal.

-Deal.

-Done.

0:24:550:24:58

-I'd better give you some cash.

-I think that would help!

0:24:580:25:01

OK. Spondoolies, here we come.

0:25:010:25:04

So... Two, four, six, eight.

0:25:040:25:08

Finally, Thomas has made a decision

0:25:080:25:11

and gone with the pretty scent bottle and the expensive French clock.

0:25:110:25:15

I think that might give you a chance.

0:25:170:25:19

-It's...

-I think it's an American high school fraternity ring.

0:25:190:25:24

Silver. Bit of fun.

0:25:240:25:26

"Central High". It's great.

0:25:260:25:29

Thank you! I can't look a gift horse in the mouth.

0:25:290:25:32

After that, I'm exhausted! Thomas is off for a change of scenery.

0:25:340:25:38

Thank you!

0:25:400:25:42

While Paul has decided with £100 still left to spend, he can afford

0:25:420:25:46

to whizz round one more shop.

0:25:460:25:48

-Hello! I'm Paul.

-Nick.

0:25:480:25:51

Nick, I'll be back in a mo.

0:25:510:25:53

This is a palace of retro.

0:25:550:25:57

OK. There you go. There's a watch in there.

0:25:570:26:01

And what may be a silver case.

0:26:010:26:04

It will date from the 1910s or 1920s.

0:26:040:26:09

These are commonly called today trench watches.

0:26:090:26:13

They are red hot at the moment. Military watches of all periods, on fire!

0:26:130:26:19

As long as it's assayed before 1918, you can call that a trench watch.

0:26:190:26:25

It's worth asking. I can't see the price. Who knows?

0:26:250:26:28

Nick has come to the rescue.

0:26:280:26:30

It's sterling silver and it bears import marks.

0:26:360:26:39

It's priced at £25, but before going any further,

0:26:390:26:43

Paul needs to check two things.

0:26:430:26:45

Was it made before 1918, therefore officially a trench watch,

0:26:450:26:49

and does it go tick-tock?

0:26:490:26:50

Bear with me while I look at my little bible here!

0:26:500:26:54

1918.

0:26:540:26:56

What I do is give these a little shake

0:26:560:26:59

and the balance wheel there...

0:26:590:27:01

If it's been dropped, the arbor that the balance wheel rotates on can snap.

0:27:010:27:06

In a trench situation, it could take a knock and that could happen.

0:27:060:27:10

It's running. Is the mainspring any good?

0:27:100:27:12

No! That's where it falls down.

0:27:120:27:15

These are wearable little watches. I'll try and buy that.

0:27:150:27:19

But not for £25. And my route in is the mechanical defect.

0:27:190:27:25

-Hi.

-Nick, how are you doing?

0:27:250:27:27

The wee watch you got for me has got £25 on it.

0:27:270:27:31

If you try winding it, the winding pinion is shot.

0:27:310:27:35

I need it for a tenner. That's what I need.

0:27:350:27:38

If we said 15, I'd shake hands.

0:27:380:27:40

You would shake hands, but I can't.

0:27:400:27:44

Any chance of that being a tenner?

0:27:440:27:46

-£12.

-I've got you on the run now!

0:27:460:27:50

It's a tenner, isn't it?

0:27:520:27:54

£11.

0:27:540:27:55

It's 11 quid. You're a good man!

0:27:550:27:57

Wow. Three shops and three buys. Not bad at all, Paul.

0:27:570:28:01

Not content with three changes of venue today,

0:28:010:28:04

Thomas is back on the road again.

0:28:040:28:06

Travelling west for about 32 miles, he's heading for Rugby

0:28:060:28:10

to the Rugby Football museum

0:28:100:28:12

to meet Second Row Forward curator Victoria.

0:28:120:28:15

The museum is in the original building where William Gilbert,

0:28:150:28:20

boot and shoemaker, made the first rugby balls in 1842.

0:28:200:28:23

Thank you very much for letting us come to this wonderful museum.

0:28:230:28:27

What's the story behind it?

0:28:270:28:29

This is a privately-owned collection of rugby football memorabilia.

0:28:290:28:34

One of the most interesting things about it is that the building it's in

0:28:340:28:40

is the building that's got the longest continuous association with football in the world.

0:28:400:28:45

It was William Webb Ellis, a pupil at Rugby School,

0:28:450:28:50

who invented the game of rugby

0:28:500:28:52

and asked the bootmaker, William Gilbert, to design the new type of ball.

0:28:520:28:56

I believe that we can see somebody who used to make balls here.

0:28:560:29:01

Indeed. John Batchelor started ball-stitching in 1948.

0:29:010:29:05

In over 60 working years,

0:29:050:29:07

it's estimated he's stitched over 60,000 balls.

0:29:070:29:10

That's a lot of balls!

0:29:100:29:12

-What's this?

-That's a stitching horse.

-A stitching horse.

0:29:120:29:16

If I go on here like this, so you'd sit down like that.

0:29:160:29:19

That would go in the jaws of the horse

0:29:190:29:21

and there's a ratchet to put your foot on.

0:29:210:29:24

That brings it down so you're holding the work tight

0:29:240:29:27

and your hands are free all the time.

0:29:270:29:29

-Like a vice in a workshop.

-A bit like a vice, yes.

0:29:290:29:32

But gentle so you don't hurt the leather.

0:29:320:29:34

I suppose nowadays they're made by machine.

0:29:340:29:37

But there's so much skill in making something correct.

0:29:370:29:40

When it's correct, you appreciate the craftsmanship

0:29:400:29:44

and the absolute love which has gone into it. Did you love it?

0:29:440:29:48

I suppose if you make anything with your hands, it's satisfying if it's a nice thing.

0:29:480:29:53

When I watch the game again, I will watch it with a new interest.

0:29:530:29:59

A new dimension. Thank you.

0:29:590:30:01

Thomas, you'd better trot off. It's wet and Mr Laidlaw is waiting for you with his wares.

0:30:010:30:06

Laidlaw, look at all of that.

0:30:060:30:09

-Never mind the quality, see the size!

-I'll kick off.

0:30:090:30:13

Because it's a jewellery sale, I bought a little...

0:30:130:30:16

-Diamante.

-Yep, I call it paste.

0:30:160:30:19

Makes sense. Paste necklace.

0:30:190:30:22

I paid six quid.

0:30:220:30:23

Double the profit on that one.

0:30:230:30:26

-Come on, I want to see what's behind...

-OK.

0:30:260:30:29

I'm staying here. I'm not getting involved!

0:30:290:30:32

-Looks better from a distance!

-Is it better from a distance?

0:30:320:30:35

-Behold!

-Right.

0:30:370:30:39

-You cleaned it up?

-What do you mean? That's authentic dust!

0:30:390:30:44

I'm throwing that in with the deal!

0:30:440:30:46

-What did you pay?

-£30.

0:30:460:30:47

-No!

-Sweet, isn't it?

-No way you paid 30 for that!

0:30:470:30:50

Can't argue with that. Nice little tablespoon, that.

0:30:530:30:56

-Tablespoon, 1804.

-That's fine. And a little fiddle.

-That's a Victorian one for a marriage.

0:30:560:31:03

-Yep.

-But it's by George Morley. It's really nice.

0:31:030:31:06

-What did you pay for those?

-I paid 35 for the two.

0:31:060:31:10

-You cannot lose money on those.

-You can't.

0:31:100:31:13

Actually, Thomas, I think you'll find it was 36.

0:31:130:31:17

So I'll see your few ounces and raise you a few kilo!

0:31:170:31:19

Oh, here we go!

0:31:190:31:21

Oh, the back's gone!

0:31:210:31:23

-A slate mantel clock. Fair enough.

-Yeah. That's what I thought.

0:31:260:31:29

-German movement on the back.

-Ansonia.

0:31:320:31:35

Ansonia. Oh, it's an American one.

0:31:350:31:37

-40?

-40 quid.

-That is interesting.

0:31:370:31:40

OK. A waist belt.

0:31:400:31:43

-It's a waist belt.

-Made of?

-Electroplated.

0:31:430:31:46

EPNS. Not silver. Would be nice if it was.

0:31:460:31:48

I'm not sure I see the quality in that.

0:31:480:31:50

But it didn't cost much.

0:31:500:31:52

-It's electroplated. An Edwardian electroplated...

-You'll get 20 to 40 for that.

0:31:520:31:57

-14 paid.

-I'm happy with that. No worries.

0:31:570:31:59

It's a daft thing. It's a hearth shelf.

0:31:590:32:04

I think that wants a nice William Morris fabric at the back, then you're away.

0:32:040:32:08

But Edwardian, Sheraton-influenced.

0:32:080:32:13

Strong mahogany. Quirky, dotable little piece.

0:32:130:32:16

-£25.

-God.

0:32:160:32:19

-It's all right.

-25 quid? This is where I really played the game.

0:32:190:32:22

-That's sweet.

-Sweet as a nut.

0:32:220:32:26

Hand-enamelled porcelain perfume, silver-mounted.

0:32:260:32:29

-It's not hand-enamelled.

-Print and tint, is it?

-Yes. But you can't have everything in life!

0:32:290:32:35

-But that didn't cost you a fortune?

-Oh, it did.

0:32:350:32:38

90 quid.

0:32:380:32:39

-It's a lot of money.

-You went too far.

0:32:390:32:42

-It's nice, though.

-I think you're cruising, thus far.

0:32:420:32:45

That's a punt.

0:32:450:32:47

-OK. Next item.

-Right. Where did I go?

0:32:470:32:50

I then went to the shop you were in.

0:32:500:32:53

-OK.

-Had a bit of fun.

0:32:530:32:55

Came away with...

0:32:550:32:57

I know. It won't set the world alight. But find fault with it.

0:32:590:33:04

I can't find fault with a Victorian toilet mirror, or dressing table mirror.

0:33:040:33:09

-But no-one loves them at the moment.

-They're not loved.

-20 quid.

-Perfect.

0:33:090:33:14

It's a 150 to 250 estimate.

0:33:190:33:21

I could live with that, Thomas. What did you pay for that?

0:33:210:33:24

180.

0:33:260:33:27

-180?!

-180.

0:33:270:33:30

It's a really nice - I don't mind telling you, I could take that home.

0:33:300:33:35

Now down to your order of magnitude, in terms of scale!

0:33:350:33:39

You're going to mock this.

0:33:390:33:41

When I drop it and it doesn't bounce!

0:33:410:33:44

Ah!

0:33:440:33:46

Birmingham imports, 1918.

0:33:470:33:50

-So it can legitimately be called...

-A trench watch.

0:33:500:33:52

-That's sweet.

-It's all right, isn't it?

-£30?

0:33:520:33:55

75.

0:33:550:33:57

Laidlaw!

0:33:570:33:58

-No, 11.

-Thank God for that!

0:33:580:34:00

£11. Trench watch. Silver case.

0:34:000:34:04

-It's not bad, 11 quid.

-It's all right.

-There's a profit on all your items.

0:34:050:34:09

Because I wanted these for a certain price, the college ring was passed over.

0:34:090:34:15

-You could squeeze 20 to £30 out of that.

-It's silver. It's a tenner.

0:34:150:34:20

-Good luck to you.

-Good luck, my man. Another interesting auction.

0:34:200:34:24

-If I'm not crying at the end of this one!

-You won't be.

0:34:240:34:27

I'll be the one with tears.

0:34:270:34:29

But forget all these niceties. What are you really thinking, boys?

0:34:290:34:33

I can't say anything derogatory about any of his stuff.

0:34:330:34:36

It's all good clean stuff.

0:34:360:34:38

It's a little bit... "Oh, I might be a bit bored!"

0:34:380:34:41

But, you know, he's played a safe one.

0:34:410:34:45

I think I was maybe a bit reserved and/or polite to Tom.

0:34:450:34:48

The diamante's junk

0:34:480:34:51

and has no place in a catalogued auction.

0:34:510:34:54

But he'll make money on it.

0:34:540:34:55

The belt, I'm sorry to say, ditto.

0:34:550:35:00

It may have some age, but it's junk.

0:35:000:35:02

The perfume, you may be surprised to hear, I also consider junk.

0:35:020:35:08

It has age and it has a silver mount

0:35:080:35:10

but it wasn't a rich thing in its day.

0:35:100:35:13

It's not junk. I was over harsh. But it's not a rich thing.

0:35:130:35:16

I think maybe he paid too much money for that.

0:35:160:35:19

I think they've both done jolly well so far in the journey.

0:35:190:35:23

Starting in Huntingdon, then on to Finedon and now Towcester,

0:35:230:35:27

where their fabulous finds will go under the hammer.

0:35:270:35:30

This Northamptonshire town is the oldest in the county

0:35:300:35:34

with a very illustrious and bloody history.

0:35:340:35:38

Dating back to the Vikings, the Romans, the Civil War,

0:35:380:35:41

it's hard to imagine it all now

0:35:410:35:43

with its busy, bustling centre.

0:35:430:35:46

And there is another battle on today

0:35:460:35:49

as our experts arrive at the auction house.

0:35:490:35:51

-Here we are.

-This is it, Thomas.

-Excited?

0:35:510:35:53

-I'm feeling good. How are you?

-I've got to get out of the car.

0:35:530:35:57

Swell. I've given you a trump card.

0:35:570:36:00

I've spent so much money.

0:36:000:36:02

Do you want to go up? I think I could be the loser on this one.

0:36:020:36:06

Holding the fort today is auctioneer Jonathan Humbert.

0:36:070:36:11

I've spent a huge amount of money. I could be in trouble.

0:36:110:36:14

I bought the nice ormolu clock.

0:36:140:36:16

We like that. Sexy, small, appeals to a lot of people. I think it'll do all right.

0:36:160:36:22

How about Paul's really interesting clock?

0:36:220:36:24

The cast iron one!

0:36:240:36:26

Yeah, I think that's got a niche market.

0:36:260:36:30

-There are people that enjoy that sort of thing.

-Scrappers?

0:36:300:36:33

We've bought completely different things. He's gone furniture. I've bought smalls.

0:36:330:36:39

-Do they fit the business?

-Everything you've bought just about should find a home.

0:36:390:36:44

But how much that home is willing to pay... Hmm.

0:36:440:36:48

Hmm. This auction is split into jewellery and silver at the beginning

0:36:480:36:52

and furniture at the end.

0:36:520:36:54

It's looking rather quiet. Let's hope it picks up.

0:36:540:36:57

First, Thomas's silver spoons.

0:36:570:37:00

£30 bid. Five online.

0:37:000:37:01

40 if you like. Five online, please.

0:37:010:37:04

-What did you pay?

-36.

-In the money.

0:37:040:37:07

£50 here, then. I'm selling at £50. All out? The hammer's up.

0:37:070:37:11

At £50.

0:37:110:37:12

-£50.

-Bang on the money.

0:37:130:37:15

That's a good start, Thomas.

0:37:150:37:17

The next item is much riskier. The expensive perfume bottle.

0:37:170:37:21

Heart-shaped. Good thing. Who's going to start me at £30?

0:37:210:37:25

£30 online. £30 bid now.

0:37:250:37:28

Five online also. 40 anywhere else?

0:37:280:37:31

£35 bid becomes 40. £40 here, then.

0:37:310:37:34

Five anywhere? £40 bid.

0:37:340:37:36

Take five, it's up to you. At £40.

0:37:360:37:38

£45. 50. 50 here now. 60 anywhere? Surely.

0:37:380:37:42

£50. What a pretty thing it is.

0:37:420:37:44

At £50 here and I'm selling.

0:37:440:37:47

At £50.

0:37:470:37:49

Ouch!

0:37:490:37:52

I couldn't agree more. Now,

0:37:520:37:54

it's Thomas's necklace.

0:37:540:37:56

Come on, let's go easy start. £20, surely?

0:37:560:37:59

£20 will be a miracle. How did you get away with that?

0:37:590:38:02

35 here. At £35 bid. Who's going 40?

0:38:020:38:06

£40 bid. At £40.

0:38:060:38:08

All out and selling at £40.

0:38:080:38:10

40 only, then. Sold, then, at 40.

0:38:100:38:13

-That's all right.

-You jammy...what!

0:38:150:38:17

Considering he only paid £6, that's a massive profit for Thomas.

0:38:170:38:21

And since the next item was his free ring, surely his luck must continue?

0:38:210:38:25

If this ring makes 50 quid, I'll buy you a drink!

0:38:250:38:28

-Fiver away, surely.

-No!

0:38:280:38:32

A fiver away. Hoorah! Five and a five and a five.

0:38:320:38:34

I'll take £6 if you will.

0:38:340:38:36

-Go on!

-£5 bid. Six. Six we have.

0:38:360:38:38

Seven upstairs.

0:38:380:38:40

It's up to you at £7. Make no mistake.

0:38:400:38:42

£6 it is downstairs and selling at £6.

0:38:420:38:45

All money for nothing, though. All money for nothing.

0:38:450:38:48

I know. It's hardly worth it, though, is it?

0:38:480:38:50

I'm relieved to say not.

0:38:500:38:53

Six. Seven pounds. Goodness me, here we are.

0:38:530:38:56

-£7 bid.

-Give them half an hour they'll get to 50 quid!

0:38:560:38:59

Quiet! No need to be nasty.

0:38:590:39:02

And sold upstairs at seven pounds.

0:39:020:39:08

Wow. Time for the nurse's belt. Fingers crossed.

0:39:080:39:13

At £30, surely.

0:39:130:39:15

£30 surely. Bid me £20 to clear.

0:39:150:39:17

£20 in. £20 bid. Then five.

0:39:170:39:20

At £25 bid, then 30 surely?

0:39:200:39:23

25 here.

0:39:230:39:24

30 anywhere? It's up to you.

0:39:240:39:26

The hammer's up. Last chance.

0:39:260:39:28

At 25 before me.

0:39:280:39:30

-Go on, one more.

-Sold then at £25.

0:39:300:39:33

Pretty tight audience, isn't it?

0:39:330:39:35

I don't know, it's a belter! Anyway,

0:39:350:39:38

moving quickly along, at last it's one of Paul's pieces.

0:39:380:39:41

The trench watch.

0:39:410:39:43

A bit on the rare side. Start me now, easy money. £40.

0:39:430:39:47

-40?

-£40 in, sir. Thank you.

0:39:470:39:49

£40 bid, then. Five online. £50, sir?

0:39:490:39:53

£50 in.

0:39:530:39:55

£50. £50. At £50 bid then.

0:39:550:39:57

60, surely? At £50 bid.

0:39:570:39:59

£50. At £50. £50 before me here and I'm selling.

0:39:590:40:02

At £50. Are we all out?

0:40:020:40:03

Well done. That's a really good profit.

0:40:050:40:07

Well done, Paul. Next up is Thomas's very expensive clock.

0:40:070:40:11

£100. 110.

0:40:140:40:16

110 bid. 120. 120 bid.

0:40:160:40:18

120 bid. 130.

0:40:180:40:20

The hammer's up now. Last chance.

0:40:200:40:22

At £130.

0:40:220:40:24

Unfortunately, the right buyers are just not here tonight.

0:40:260:40:29

That was a £50 loss. Ouch!

0:40:290:40:31

It's Paul's turn. It's the battle of the clocks!

0:40:310:40:34

-At £40 I've got. 45 online will buy.

-Get in!

0:40:340:40:38

-£40 now in the room.

-You've got 40.

0:40:380:40:41

£40 bid, then. At £40. Are we all out?

0:40:410:40:44

At £40 only, here selling.

0:40:440:40:46

Oh, dear! Hopefully Paul's Victorian mirror will make a profit.

0:40:480:40:53

£30 bid, then. Five upstairs. 40 downstairs I go.

0:40:530:40:57

£40 bid. Five if you like.

0:40:570:40:59

At £40 bid. £40. At £40 bid.

0:40:590:41:01

Five. 45, then. At 45.

0:41:010:41:03

At £45. 45 and sold at 45.

0:41:030:41:08

That's a nice £25 profit for Paul.

0:41:080:41:11

-It should have been 75.

-Stop it! Stop it.

-Show me the money.

0:41:110:41:15

Paul's large rosewood mirror is next.

0:41:150:41:17

Bought for just £30.

0:41:170:41:19

Bid me £40 if you will. It's a good example.

0:41:190:41:22

£40 if you will, please.

0:41:220:41:23

£40, please. £40 in.

0:41:230:41:26

£40 bid, then. 45 upstairs.

0:41:260:41:28

50 downstairs. £50 here.

0:41:280:41:30

-Sold in the room, then, at £50.

-What did you pay for it?

0:41:300:41:34

50 - not bad. That's £20 profit before auction costs.

0:41:350:41:39

-Little nibbles.

-It could have been 120.

0:41:390:41:41

Next, another of Paul's lots, and his last.

0:41:410:41:44

The slightly ambiguous stand.

0:41:440:41:47

I've not seen another one before. Who'll go £30 on it?

0:41:470:41:50

£30, please.

0:41:500:41:51

-£20, if you will.

-There's no way this is making a loss.

0:41:530:41:56

£20 in. At £20 only. Five if you like, anywhere else?

0:41:560:42:00

-At £20.

-It's not great.

-The hammer's up. Last chance.

-No way!

0:42:000:42:05

At £20 only. Are we all out? At £20 only.

0:42:050:42:08

Don't worry, Paul. This item may have flopped,

0:42:100:42:12

but it's still your day.

0:42:120:42:14

I didn't think I'd claw it back so soon, if at all, Tom.

0:42:140:42:17

-No.

-Let's go and celebrate!

-Let's have a drink.

0:42:170:42:21

That is an extremely good idea!

0:42:210:42:24

Mine's a Scotch!

0:42:240:42:25

Thomas started today on top with £383.56.

0:42:250:42:30

But, after auction costs, he's made a horrific loss of £78.36

0:42:300:42:35

leaving him with £305.20 in the piggy bank.

0:42:350:42:40

Paul, on the other hand, was trailing behind with £213.78 after auction costs,

0:42:410:42:47

though today he's made a profit of £42.10.

0:42:470:42:50

So with £255.88 to spend,

0:42:500:42:54

Mr Laidlaw is catching up.

0:42:540:42:56

Oink!

0:42:560:42:58

You're driving. Don't make me feel sick!

0:42:580:43:00

We're off!

0:43:010:43:02

Red sky at night, shepherd's delight.

0:43:050:43:08

Red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning.

0:43:080:43:10

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, our dashing duo head east

0:43:100:43:14

where Tom, also known as Cruise, is flying high.

0:43:140:43:17

Ready for take-off. Bit nervous.

0:43:170:43:19

And Paul has a mountain to climb.

0:43:230:43:25

Yuk!

0:43:250:43:26

What I need is one of those big long poles.

0:43:260:43:31

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:530:43:56

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS