Episode 14 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 14

Thomas Plant and Paul Laidlaw's negotiating tactics are tested to the limit as they travel from Olney to the auction in Watlington.


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Transcript


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each,

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and one big challenge.

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I'm here to declare war.

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Why?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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-Can we make it...

-No!

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-The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

-Ouch!

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But it's not as easy as you might think,

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and things don't always go to plan.

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Push!

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So will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

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We're doomed!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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It's the penultimate day for our dashing duo,

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Thomas Plant and Paul Laidlaw, and it's all to play for.

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I think my modus operandi is to buy tat again!

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And turn it into gold!

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It's clearly working for you! You've got the junk Midas touch!

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Thomas Plant is an auctioneer and jewel expert,

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but when it comes to decisions, well, it can take some time.

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I need something to come out and grab me.

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-Hmm...

-Our proud Scottish expert, Mr Laidlaw, is a lifelong collector

0:49:070:49:13

with a passion for all things military.

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He loves a bargain and seldom backs down.

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I think my estimate in an auction is £30-60 on that.

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Can we do it? Thank you very much indeed!

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1387, it's a hallmarked silver-cased trench watch.

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At yesterday's auction, Paul was playing it safe

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and stuck with what he knows best, militaria.

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Well done, a big well done, that's a really good profit.

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And it certainly worked.

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Show me the money, more money!

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After a disappointing start, he's now on the up with £255.88.

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But can he catch his fearsome competitor?

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Thomas is keeping his chin up,

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despite a gut-wrenching loss at the last auction.

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Where do we see it? Who's going to start me, £30?

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£30 online, at £30...

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Ouch!

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Sadly, two of his lots didn't impress,

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leaving him with £305.20. He's still on top,

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but he definitely needs to up his game.

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But it's a new day,

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and keeping them on track is their sporty Alfa Romeo Spider.

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Lovely day, isn't it? You know, it's just...

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Laidlaw and Plant in their little Italian hairdryer.

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Starting in Skipton,

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Thomas and Paul will travel over 400 miles south

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through the beautiful Yorkshire Dales,

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the Home Counties of Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire,

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before arriving in Pewsey for the final auction.

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It's the penultimate trip, and they're leaving Towcester behind

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heading for auction four in Watlington.

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First stop is the beautiful market town of Olney.

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Olney is known for its pancake race,

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which has been run in the town every Pancake Day since 1445.

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But it's perhaps best known

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as the place where the Olney Hymns were written.

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# Amazing grace

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# How sweet the sound... #

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John Newton, the author of the hymn Amazing Grace,

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was curate of Olney and is buried here.

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No pancakes on the menu today, and, as the boys go their separate ways,

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Mr Laidlaw's first shop of the day is Dodo Antiques,

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where he's meeting proprietor Owen.

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Do you own this material,

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or are you representing lots of different sellers?

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A bit of a combination. Most of the furniture is mine.

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There's a cabinet in each room pretty much rented out.

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My word, what a lovely offering!

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It just feels lovely in here.

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And it just gets better and better for Paul.

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Look at these fabulous Art Deco cloud chairs round there.

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Fabulous burr veneer table.

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But, between you and me, price is my problem at the moment.

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Not choice, price.

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You've got £200 to spend - surely there's something you can afford.

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It's a dinner gong.

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It's missing a chord at the moment, but let's do the business, shall we?

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-GONG RINGS

-Lovely tone, very Oriental.

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That's a shell case.

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You really are drawn to all things military, aren't you, Paul?

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It's a British naval shell

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and from the markings looks to date to January 1898.

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This was kept as a souvenir and actually re-used,

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but don't they make a handsome gong? Now, what's it on?

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Rather architectural, rather classy.

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Some of these are junk, but this absolutely is not.

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Whopping great big piece of mahogany.

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So far as they go, it's a superior example.

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It's a pretty unique item,

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and I'm sensing Paul has fallen for its charm.

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I can't see a price on it to start with.

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We could do that for £45 for you.

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-Can you think harder about that?

-I'm thinking pretty hard!

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-I think that's not expensive.

-It's not.

-But it's not a bargain yet.

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-So what is a bargain?

-20 quid's a bargain.

-20 quid's scrap!

0:53:240:53:27

-PAUL LAUGHS

-That's it!

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We'll see if we can find a few things and do a deal.

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Why don't we? I like that.

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While Paul hunts for potential bargains,

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Thomas is across the road in Leo's Place, and feeling the pressure.

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Oh, it's difficult, isn't it?

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You see, Paul's got this vision of me just buying tat.

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The thing is, I just know what sells, especially in that jewellery world.

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I mean, he knows about his military thing. Oh, more military stuff!

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It might be draining, Thomas,

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but it's the military stuff that's keeping him hot on your tail.

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With a bit of help from shop manager Di,

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Thomas starts to make progress.

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Is it all right if I just pick out things I'm interested in?

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-Not at all, Martin.

-Thomas.

-Thomas!

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-Where does Martin come from?

-I don't know, is that ridiculous?

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I've never been called a Martin.

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Robert I get a lot of, because of Robert Plant.

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But Martin...

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I think you might have to enlighten Di on that one.

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The singer, Led Zeppelin singer.

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# And as we wind on down the road... #

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Glad you cleared that up, Martin. Now, back to business, Thomas.

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You see, I am drawn to this.

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But this looks like it's been in there a long time.

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It could be an old friend.

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I've put these two to one side, 38 and 9.50.

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It's German, 1920s, 1930s,

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that sort of fashion for that Egyptian-style jewellery.

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I don't even think it's silver... I mean, it's too rich for me at £38.

0:55:000:55:07

-Would you be interested in it?

-I would, but it's a real low figure.

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-Real low figure.

-How low?

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I mean, it's so low I don't expect people to accept it.

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-20?

-No, it's too much, I'm afraid.

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-How much too much?

-If it was a tenner, I'd have it.

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A tenner?! Thomas, I think you could be pushing your luck here, boy.

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And then there's this brooch, which I'm interested in.

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I like these from the point of view that these are smoky quartz.

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-Yes.

-Not the greatest stone ever to walk this earth,

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but still, it's smoky quartz.

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You know the interesting thing about it? The backing on it,

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so it's foil-backed, so it dates it to 19th century.

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I tell you what... You see, I've got this £20 sitting here.

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I'd give you that for those two, so that makes that 15 and that five.

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Because it's you, Tom...

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..I'll accept 20.

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-Oh! Brilliant.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

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Well done, Thomas, that's a great buy.

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Time for Mr Laidlaw to show us what he's got.

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All, some or none of these could end up worth buying,

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but let's see what we've got.

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Lovely little pocket notepad, nice!

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Pocket fruit knife.

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This is a bit of decadence for you.

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Cocktail swizzle stick, because isn't it so tiresome

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when one's champagne is just a tad too effervescent?

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Like those.

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He's also found an English silver cigar cutter,

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a silver penknife, as well as a lorgnette.

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I say! Isn't Mrs Smith's behaviour

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scandalous in the village at the moment?

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It's a great collection of silver,

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but at £171 it would only leave him with £84.88 to spend.

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-How are you getting on?

-If there's any way you can look at

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what can be squeezed on... all of that, potentially.

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OK. I'll go and give the dealer a ring, see what I can do.

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Be warned, Owen, our Mr Laidlaw loves a good haggle.

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Is that the best?

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Thank you, see you later.

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She's saying really the best she could do would be 145 on the lot.

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And what did we start at? I never even added them up.

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-You've got 15% off there.

-15?! She's not even trying, is she?

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OK. I could throw something else in to try and sweeten it for you.

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-Liking the sound of that.

-I've got something over here.

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This kind of negotiation is right up Paul's street.

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We've had this a little while.

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-For a while!

-PAUL LAUGHS

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Owen has two classic mirrors.

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They're priced at £80 and £95.

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Last time, Paul's mirror did well, much to Thomas's disappointment.

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You've made steady profits on all of them.

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So we've a reproduction, late Georgian style.

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Oval framed, satinwood stringing to the edges.

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There's nothing the matter with it apart from nobody wants it

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and the Victorian one is like a tombstone, isn't it?

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Mr Laidlaw, I'm shocked. I thought you'd be snapping them up.

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I can do them for a tenner each.

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What a bargain! How can you refuse?

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My fear at the moment is I'm shooting all my bolts.

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But I'm still talking to you.

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Where were we with the gong, was it 40?

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I'll go to 30 on the gong.

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Now we're talking about a gong, couple of mirrors

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and a handful of silver and plate.

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-Give me the last price on the lot then.

-Best price is 190.

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Give me a wee bit off it.

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20 quid off that, 170 quid, cash, job done, I'm out of here.

0:58:460:58:49

-Everybody wins.

-I'll drop it to 180.

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170.

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-You want to do it.

-All right then.

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What a result. How do you manage it, Paul?

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One shop down and already he's bought four lots.

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The pressure's back on you, Thomas.

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After a great buy with the brooches, Thomas is hoping for another bargain.

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He's met Alan, one of the dealers.

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-Ooh, we've got the same watch.

-There's good taste for you.

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Alan rents space in the shop for his collection of clocks and watches.

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That's a lovely Albert, isn't it.

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Gorgeous fob as well. A lot of gold.

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Beautifully enamelled centre.

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Named after Queen Victoria's beloved consort Albert,

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it consists of a T bar and two complete chains.

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Basically you'd wear this in your waistcoat here,

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so your watch would have been clipped on.

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Here it is look, being clipped on like this.

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Clip it on. You've got a watch on there.

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That would have gone in to your waistcoat pocket in there,

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and this would have gone into the button hole of your waistcoat.

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That's rather handsome.

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So is that something you're willing to sort of sell to me, at a deal?

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I'd always be willing to sell you something.

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Well, I know you would, but, you know...

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-You mean at the right price.

-At a good price.

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Would you consider £90 a reasonable price?

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Well, that's OK.

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I had another figure in mind.

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A bit less.

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But I know that I'm being sort of pushing.

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I'll take another five off - 85 - which is very reasonable.

1:00:331:00:37

-You wouldn't go as low as 70?

-No.

1:00:371:00:41

You said you'd take a fiver, would you take a bit more off?

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-Not really.

-Really? Go on.

-No.

-No?

1:00:441:00:47

I'll do it for 80, but that's it.

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£80.

1:00:521:00:53

-Yes, that's it.

-Well, I like you. I'm going to say yes.

-OK.

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You've got a deal. Thank you very much. It's a very nice thing.

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I hope it's not the undoing of me!

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Now all that's left is for Thomas to dish the dosh to Di,

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but not before he's had one last try.

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We agreed on 80. He wasn't going down any more, was he? That was it.

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A bit of profit. By the time he's paid commission...

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-How much commission is he going to pay?

-Well...

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-Could you give me the commission off?

-I can't. I'm so sorry.

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I had to ask!

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Meanwhile, after a mammoth shopping spree, Paul drives 14 miles south

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to Bletchley Park.

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This looks promising.

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"Welcome to Bletchley Park National Code Centre."

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Bletchley Park is the historic site

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of secret British code breaking activities during World War Two.

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The museum reveals the incredibly complex processes needed to

1:01:561:02:01

break the German codes that proved so important in winning the war.

1:02:011:02:04

Hello, is it John ?

1:02:071:02:08

Being a military enthusiast, Paul is extremely excited

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to be shown round by volunteer John Jackson.

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-Shall we go in?

-Thank you very much. Expensive technology.

1:02:151:02:18

Yes.

1:02:181:02:19

Enigma is perhaps the best-known cipher machine of all time,

1:02:211:02:26

and Bletchley Park has the largest collection of these machines

1:02:261:02:28

on public display in Europe.

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What we have here is the standard three-wheel Enigma machine

1:02:301:02:34

used by the German armed forces throughout the Second World War.

1:02:341:02:37

This machine was used under battlefield conditions.

1:02:371:02:41

Wherever the German military machine went

1:02:411:02:44

during the Second World War,

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around 50,000 of these machines went with them.

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The Enigma machines were designed and used by the Germans

1:02:491:02:52

to send each other encrypted messages.

1:02:521:02:54

It was these messages that were picked up

1:02:541:02:57

and sent to Bletchley Park for the code breakers to crack.

1:02:571:03:00

So I'm sitting here and I have a secret message to get back to HQ,

1:03:001:03:06

and here is the message, and for every letter I put in

1:03:061:03:10

-I get a different and encrypted or enciphered letter out.

-Yes.

1:03:101:03:15

If Bletchley Park had broken a particular code during the day,

1:03:151:03:19

they had to start all over again, as every night at midnight

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the German operators changed the settings on their Enigma machines.

1:03:231:03:28

When that key was set up for the day,

1:03:281:03:32

the odds against finding it were one in 158 million million million.

1:03:321:03:40

And when you consider that getting the winning ticket in the Lottery

1:03:401:03:45

is only one in 14 million, you understand why the Germans were

1:03:451:03:49

so confident about the security of this machine.

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In order to decipher the German Enigma messages,

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the British designed a machine called the bombe, and this became

1:03:551:03:59

the primary tool used at Bletchley Park to crack the Enigma messages.

1:03:591:04:05

This is the bombe rebuild.

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This is Helen, one of the bombe demonstration team.

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It took the team 12 years to rebuild.

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It has got 12 miles of wiring in it.

1:04:151:04:17

It has got 17,000 screws keeping it together,

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and during the course of the Second World War, these machines broke

1:04:221:04:27

2.5 million messages enciphered on the Enigma machine.

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Astonishing!

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It is said that Bletchley Park probably shortened the war

1:04:351:04:39

by as much as two years.

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And the great tragedy of these machines is that, the day

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after the war ended, they began breaking them up.

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It wasn't until 1974 that anybody outside of Bletchley Park

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even knew that they had existed.

1:04:531:04:55

1,600 Wrens worked on the bombes at Bletchley Park,

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eight-hour shifts, 24/7, right up until 8th May 1945.

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Conditions were hard, they were in bombproof buildings with no windows

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and the need for speed and accuracy made the work relentless.

1:05:081:05:12

The crucial thing about the job they did

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was all the clever interception and all the genius of the code breakers

1:05:151:05:20

would have fallen down if the Wrens had not been 100% accurate

1:05:201:05:24

when they plugged up the bombe.

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If they got it wrong, everything went wrong.

1:05:281:05:31

But they were wonderful young women and they did an outstanding job.

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Churchill called the work at Bletchley Park his ultra secret

1:05:351:05:40

and at one time thanked the Wrens for laying the golden eggs without clucking.

1:05:401:05:45

What a fascinating place,

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and who would have thought that just six miles down the road in Woburn

1:05:491:05:53

another great piece of history took place.

1:05:531:05:56

This was the venue for my wedding. Woburn Abbey.

1:06:001:06:03

A few years down the line, here I am back again,

1:06:031:06:05

and it brings back very, very happy memories.

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So what a lucky boy!

1:06:081:06:10

Hopefully your luck will continue as you head to the old Town Hall,

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aptly named Town Hall Antiques,

1:06:141:06:17

where owner Alvin is on hand to help.

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Well, I wouldn't mind looking in your friend's cabinet.

1:06:201:06:23

-Let me get the key.

-Thank you very much. Thanks.

1:06:231:06:26

I haven't seen that. She's only just put that in.

1:06:261:06:29

-Looks like a nice object.

-A Viennese bronze of a swallow.

1:06:291:06:35

It's well done.

1:06:361:06:38

Just tap it with your ring.

1:06:381:06:41

Obviously, if it's another metal, it doesn't ring as well as bronze.

1:06:411:06:45

That's got a really nice ring to it.

1:06:451:06:47

That's got 125 on it.

1:06:471:06:49

What's she like? Good or bad?

1:06:491:06:50

-She's mean as anything.

-Really?

1:06:501:06:52

-Really hard, yes.

-Really hard.

1:06:521:06:55

I should say 115.

1:06:551:06:58

Really?

1:06:581:06:59

-But I could squeeze to 110.

-Really?

1:06:591:07:02

I love that swallow.

1:07:021:07:05

She wouldn't come down any more on that if you gave her a call?

1:07:061:07:09

I'll take another five, but not a penny less.

1:07:091:07:12

105. I think that's quite a good buy.

1:07:141:07:17

So I think you're being very mean if you're not happy to pay 105.

1:07:171:07:21

What about 100?

1:07:211:07:23

No. No. Not at all.

1:07:231:07:25

105.

1:07:251:07:26

I just think it's slightly out of fashion.

1:07:261:07:28

Well, start a new fashion.

1:07:281:07:30

-Me be the trend setter?

-Yeah. You've got the auction to do it.

1:07:311:07:35

Oh dear, has the Plant charm lost its sparkle?

1:07:361:07:39

I don't know. I'm in two minds.

1:07:391:07:41

I'm about to spend £105 on a bronze figure,

1:07:411:07:46

but it is just not fashionable?

1:07:461:07:48

Alvin, he's a nice guy, he knows his stuff.

1:07:481:07:52

I don't think I can push him that much further. I might get thrown out if I do.

1:07:521:07:56

Time for a change of tactics.

1:07:561:07:59

Thomas is looking for something to pair with the swallow

1:08:011:08:04

in the hope that Alvin will do him a deal.

1:08:041:08:08

These are cultured pearls

1:08:081:08:09

so the beads have been implanted inside the oyster.

1:08:091:08:14

They're quite nice though.

1:08:141:08:16

They've got this creamy colour to them -

1:08:171:08:20

but look how they change colour.

1:08:201:08:22

Creamy colour against my skin - you see that?

1:08:221:08:25

But put pearls against white and look what happens.

1:08:251:08:29

They come alive. Isn't that amazing?

1:08:291:08:32

Do you think...

1:08:321:08:34

you would do me a deal on these two items?

1:08:341:08:39

On that and the swallow?

1:08:391:08:40

We got these at 59 and I've got the swallow at 125.

1:08:401:08:46

That's 184.

1:08:461:08:49

If I say 150 for the two items.

1:08:491:08:52

Could I sneak a little bit more?

1:08:541:08:57

I really don't think so, no.

1:08:571:08:58

Are you sure?

1:08:581:09:00

I'm sure.

1:09:001:09:01

150 for the two items.

1:09:021:09:04

-And are you really positive...

-I'm absolutely...

-..you couldn't do 140?

1:09:041:09:08

Woah, woah, no, no, definitely not.

1:09:081:09:11

-Definitely?

-150 is my absolute death.

1:09:111:09:14

-You're sure not 140?

-No, definitely not.

1:09:141:09:16

-150.

-Meet me halfway?

1:09:161:09:18

No. 150 is the deal.

1:09:181:09:20

-Just do it for 145.

-No.

1:09:201:09:22

-150. But I will toss a coin for it.

-All right!

1:09:221:09:25

-Call.

-Heads.

1:09:251:09:27

Tails it is.

1:09:271:09:29

That means I would've spent 250 in my first day.

1:09:291:09:33

Go on. Well done.

1:09:331:09:35

Who'd have thought it?

1:09:371:09:39

Thomas has bought five lots in the first day.

1:09:391:09:43

The competition's heating up

1:09:431:09:45

but for now our antique hunters need their beauty sleep.

1:09:451:09:48

It's a new day and our chaps on the road again.

1:09:561:09:59

What are you going to buy? More things? You've bought four already.

1:09:591:10:03

Yeah, look, I'm on a roll. I can't help myself.

1:10:031:10:06

One expensive item. Go on!

1:10:061:10:08

So far you haven't bought one item over three figures yet, have you?

1:10:081:10:12

# No, you haven't. No, you haven't. Not a single item. #

1:10:121:10:18

LAUGHTER

1:10:181:10:19

So far Paul's spent £170 on four lots.

1:10:201:10:24

The dinner gong, a Victorian dressing mirror,

1:10:241:10:28

a Sheraton string inlaid mirror as well as a collection of silver delights,

1:10:281:10:33

leaving £85.88 for the day ahead.

1:10:331:10:37

Thomas, meanwhile, hit the first day's shopping hard,

1:10:371:10:41

spending a colossal £250 on five lots -

1:10:411:10:45

an Egyptian brooch, a smoky quartz brooch,

1:10:451:10:48

a double Albert watch chain,

1:10:481:10:50

a figurine of a swallow and a pearl necklace.

1:10:501:10:53

He has just £55.20 left to spend.

1:10:531:10:57

-Pretty good fun, huh!

-Yeah.

1:10:571:10:59

They're leaving Woburn behind

1:10:591:11:01

and chauffeur Paul is dropping Thomas in Shuttleworth,

1:11:011:11:05

where he's in for a treat.

1:11:051:11:06

-Chocks away!

-Chocks away for me!

1:11:061:11:09

I feel like a very lucky spoilt boy!

1:11:091:11:12

With all his shopping done in the first day, Mr Plant is off to a flying start

1:11:121:11:17

so he's come to the Shuttleworth aerodrome.

1:11:171:11:20

Good luck! Spend all your money!

1:11:201:11:23

Yeah(!) Enjoy!

1:11:231:11:25

The Shuttleworth Collection is an assortment of working aircraft and automobiles

1:11:251:11:30

founded by the young aviator, Richard Shuttleworth.

1:11:301:11:32

Showing Thomas around is Tony Podmore.

1:11:331:11:35

Come on in.

1:11:351:11:37

I'm fascinated by the collection and how it came to be.

1:11:371:11:41

Obviously there was a Mr Shuttleworth.

1:11:411:11:45

Richard Shuttleworth was born in 1909.

1:11:451:11:48

He had inherited his grandfather and father's flair for all things mechanical.

1:11:481:11:53

Richard Shuttleworth was passionate about cars

1:11:531:11:56

and became a motor racing driver,

1:11:561:11:58

taking part in the first ever British Grand Prix in 1935.

1:11:581:12:03

But after a nasty accident, his career was cut short.

1:12:031:12:07

He decided, however, to take an interest in flying

1:12:071:12:11

because he thought it was so much safer!

1:12:111:12:14

This "never give up" attitude, this "never die" attitude.

1:12:141:12:17

It's terribly British.

1:12:171:12:19

And Richard's gung-ho attitude didn't stop there.

1:12:191:12:23

When war broke out, he volunteered as a pilot for the Royal Air Force.

1:12:231:12:27

It was during, very sadly, a night-flying sortie

1:12:271:12:32

at RAF Benson in Oxfordshire that he suffered a fatal crash.

1:12:321:12:38

He was only 31.

1:12:381:12:39

In 1944, Richard's mother set up a trust in his memory

1:12:401:12:45

and today the collection houses some of Richard's most prized possessions.

1:12:451:12:50

There she is!

1:12:501:12:51

The world's oldest air-worthy aeroplane.

1:12:521:12:56

The 1909 Bleriot.

1:12:561:12:58

1909!

1:12:581:12:59

-Isn't she amazing?

-It is amazing.

1:12:591:13:01

Richard believed that the very best form of preservation

1:13:011:13:05

was to keep everything in working order.

1:13:051:13:08

Has this ever been up?

1:13:081:13:09

-Oh, yes.

-Really?

1:13:091:13:10

Absolutely. Yes.

1:13:101:13:11

It goes up in the air?

1:13:111:13:13

Yes.

1:13:131:13:14

In view of the rarity value of this aeroplane,

1:13:141:13:16

it is the only one of its kind in the world,

1:13:161:13:19

we restrict it to what we affectionately call hops.

1:13:191:13:24

-Oh, right!

-This is where it goes down our runway,

1:13:241:13:26

the aircraft comes off the ground and just hops along.

1:13:261:13:31

It looks like one of those model aero engines I sell at actions!

1:13:351:13:39

There's no chance we can hop with this one today?

1:13:391:13:42

No, but I tell you what we can do.

1:13:421:13:44

We can actually fly one for real for you.

1:13:441:13:46

Not one of these though?

1:13:461:13:48

Not the Bleriot. Vintage 1931 de Havilland Tiger Moth.

1:13:481:13:52

Yes!

1:13:521:13:53

This way.

1:13:531:13:54

While Thomas gets kitted out,

1:13:561:13:58

Paul's taking his £80.55 south to Hemel Hempstead.

1:13:581:14:03

After World War II, Hemel Hempstead was designated a new town

1:14:031:14:09

for people displaced by the London Blitz.

1:14:091:14:12

Interesting wee neck of the woods.

1:14:121:14:14

The original part of Hemel Hempstead is still known as the old town

1:14:141:14:18

and it's where Paul is on the hunt.

1:14:181:14:21

That looks the part, doesn't it!

1:14:231:14:25

Off The Wall.

1:14:251:14:27

Eccentric European collectables.

1:14:271:14:29

That's got Laidlaw written all over it. But closed.

1:14:291:14:32

Never one to be defeated, he's on the phone to track the owner down.

1:14:321:14:36

Why not?

1:14:361:14:38

In for a penny. Give it a try.

1:14:381:14:41

Where are you?

1:14:411:14:43

When I need you?

1:14:431:14:45

'Can't answer your call right now.'

1:14:451:14:47

As he patiently waits for news, Thomas is ready for action.

1:14:481:14:53

That's fabulous. You look great. How do you feel?

1:15:131:15:15

I feel ready to do it.

1:15:151:15:16

Up, up and away!

1:15:291:15:31

Hold on tight, Biggles!

1:15:311:15:33

The de Havilland Tiger Moth is a 1930s byplane,

1:15:331:15:36

designed by Geoffrey de Havilland

1:15:361:15:39

and was operated by the Royal Air Force as a primary trainer.

1:15:391:15:43

The Tiger Moth remained in service with the RAF until 1952.

1:15:431:15:48

Thomas, it looks as if you're having a ball!

1:15:531:15:56

That was just awesome.

1:15:581:15:59

Absolutely awesome.

1:16:011:16:03

Absolutely wonderful.

1:16:031:16:04

Very honoured and as you can tell by my big smile,

1:16:041:16:08

it's been a wonderful trip up.

1:16:081:16:10

Mmm. Awesome(!)

1:16:131:16:14

While Thomas is on cloud nine, Paul's prayers have been answered.

1:16:141:16:19

Shop owner Michelle opened up

1:16:211:16:23

but in order to get in, he needs to help move stuff out.

1:16:231:16:28

This is like the auction room again!

1:16:301:16:33

Michelle has owned the shop for 11 years

1:16:361:16:38

and it's bursting at the seams.

1:16:381:16:41

Good luck, Paul!

1:16:411:16:42

This place is like an antiques Tardis!

1:16:431:16:45

Have you seen round here?

1:16:451:16:47

Look at this!

1:16:491:16:50

You know what I need?

1:16:501:16:51

One of those big long poles, that's what I need. Tightrope.

1:16:511:16:56

That is a Georgian cribbage board.

1:17:011:17:04

I love cribbage - my favourite card game.

1:17:041:17:07

I played too much of this in 6th form.

1:17:071:17:09

So how does one use a cribbage board for playing crib?

1:17:091:17:13

Well, you get points for certain card combinations

1:17:131:17:17

and I start at this end and you may start at the other

1:17:171:17:22

and we race one another round the board.

1:17:221:17:24

This is just a score-keeping board.

1:17:241:17:27

People played crib round this, maybe 150, maybe even 200 years ago

1:17:271:17:32

in a tavern, smoking a clay pipe.

1:17:321:17:36

I think it's charming.

1:17:361:17:39

It is £3.

1:17:391:17:41

Now, what have you spotted?

1:17:471:17:49

It is a Chinese armchair.

1:17:491:17:52

A striking piece of furniture.

1:17:521:17:54

You have to come and have a look.

1:17:541:17:56

I don't know if there's any tremendous age to it.

1:17:561:17:59

Never mind the quality, feel the weight.

1:17:591:18:02

I'd like it to be 18th or 19th century,

1:18:021:18:05

brought back in some tea clipper or in someone's military baggage train.

1:18:051:18:11

What I don't want is it to have been brought over 30 years ago

1:18:111:18:14

in a shipping container with a whole lot of other looky-likies.

1:18:141:18:18

After his antique assault course, it's time to talk numbers.

1:18:191:18:24

I think I paid about £90 for it about 15 years ago.

1:18:241:18:28

Wow. Wow. Ouch.

1:18:281:18:29

How about 50 for the chair and you've got a deal?

1:18:291:18:33

OK.

1:18:331:18:35

You might see me looking at the cribbage board.

1:18:351:18:37

Am I feeling a buy one get one free moment coming on?

1:18:371:18:40

Oh! You could read minds as well!

1:18:401:18:42

I'm psychic.

1:18:421:18:43

I'm sticking my neck out with the chair. That is a gamble.

1:18:431:18:47

It could go the other way, it could work for me.

1:18:471:18:49

If you give me the chair for 45, throw that in as a wee freebie,

1:18:491:18:52

I'll take a punt at the chair.

1:18:521:18:55

OK.

1:18:561:18:57

The chair takes up more room in this very overcrowded shop.

1:18:571:19:00

LAUGHTER

1:19:001:19:01

It's empty!

1:19:011:19:03

True.

1:19:031:19:04

With his last two lots secured, it's time for Mr Laidlaw to show Mr Plant his treasures.

1:19:041:19:09

Did you spend all your money?

1:19:121:19:14

I spent a goodly sum.

1:19:141:19:15

-Come on, show me.

-Prepare to be underwhelmed.

1:19:151:19:19

Come on, just get on with it!

1:19:191:19:20

LAUGHTER

1:19:201:19:22

I'm so bored!

1:19:231:19:24

When you're gifted, you find it difficult to walk past mirrors.

1:19:251:19:30

LAUGHTER

1:19:301:19:31

-A tenner.

-No!

1:19:321:19:34

-Get in!

-A tenner?!

1:19:341:19:35

That's amazing. Well done you.

1:19:351:19:37

So, this...

1:19:371:19:39

Oh my word.

1:19:391:19:40

Nine carat silver.

1:19:401:19:42

With a lovely enamel and silver...

1:19:421:19:45

With gold on it. But I paid 80.

1:19:451:19:48

If you want one, try and find me better. I defy you.

1:19:481:19:52

-Gorgeous quality.

-Speaking of gorgeousness...

1:19:521:19:55

Oh, for God's...

1:19:551:19:57

No! Not another one!

1:19:571:19:59

Why did you buy an Edwardian one?

1:19:591:20:01

That was cheap so that one was 70.

1:20:011:20:04

No, it wasn't 70. Don't be so ridiculous!

1:20:041:20:07

A tenner.

1:20:071:20:08

Is there a pattern here?

1:20:081:20:10

The pattern is - Laidlaw bought a good thing at a killer price again!

1:20:101:20:15

-There we are.

-Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah.

1:20:161:20:18

King Tut, is it 1920s Egyptian revival?

1:20:181:20:21

1920s Egyptian revival.

1:20:211:20:23

OK, but it's not...

1:20:231:20:25

No, but it's £15!

1:20:251:20:28

How can you go wrong with that?

1:20:281:20:29

£15, you can't.

1:20:291:20:31

If you're lucky, double your money?

1:20:311:20:33

£20 or £30 if it goes.

1:20:331:20:35

It's gonna make more than 15. It's a good-looking thing.

1:20:351:20:38

Close your eyes. Trust me.

1:20:381:20:41

Can I open them?

1:20:411:20:43

GONG SOUNDS

1:20:431:20:46

-Oh, God.

-You're weeping at the splendour of my dinner gong.

1:20:461:20:51

So a shell in a fire iron set, attached to it with a bit of string.

1:20:511:20:57

It's fun but did you spend more than £35 on it?

1:20:571:21:03

Would that be a bad thing if I had?

1:21:031:21:05

Personally, yes.

1:21:051:21:07

Paid £30 for it.

1:21:071:21:10

So I think it's a silver, bronze.

1:21:101:21:14

It cost me 100.

1:21:141:21:15

-I'm loving that.

-It's a good thing.

-What a great thing.

-Lovely thing.

1:21:151:21:19

So, come on.

1:21:191:21:22

Gone to the microscopic now.

1:21:221:21:24

Onto this titchy-witchy, lovely silver fruit knife.

1:21:241:21:28

£20. 18? Oh no, come on.

1:21:281:21:31

I know when he's pleased with himself.

1:21:311:21:33

So this is a little Laidlaw lot? These are nice, gold lorgnettes

1:21:331:21:37

Well, I don't know. I did not buy them as gold.

1:21:371:21:40

-That's just part of it.

-Oh no! Oh, and another one.

1:21:401:21:44

-Oh yes, sweet.

-That's better by far.

1:21:441:21:46

-Let's be sensible.

-Yeah. You're not gonna get that cheap.

1:21:461:21:49

I would say that lot cost you £65.

1:21:491:21:54

-120.

-120, no, that's fine.

1:21:541:21:57

It's a nice lot and it's gonna make that.

1:21:571:22:00

-But that's not the lot. I got that.

-And something else, come on.

1:22:001:22:04

Tripping over it.

1:22:041:22:07

Oh, and a cigar cutter.

1:22:071:22:08

-And, er, what's this?

-No.

-What's this then?

1:22:081:22:12

-A swizzle stick?

-Yeah.

1:22:141:22:16

120 all of that? That's a very, very good lot.

1:22:161:22:21

OK, it's smokey quartz, nine carat.

1:22:221:22:25

Yeah, it is gold. 19th century setting.

1:22:251:22:28

-Obviously it would have been part of a brooch.

-OK.

1:22:281:22:30

-You got that dirt cheap, you paid £15 for that.

-I paid a fiver.

1:22:301:22:33

-Oh!

-£5.

-You're romping home with that. That's not a problem.

1:22:331:22:37

OK, Chinese chair.

1:22:401:22:41

Yeah. All the hallmarks of authenticity.

1:22:411:22:44

Yeah, yeah.

1:22:441:22:45

-What did you pay for it?

-45.

1:22:451:22:48

That was cheap.

1:22:481:22:49

I would have to be unlucky to lose on that.

1:22:501:22:53

The thing is I was so disappointed with these, but they were only a tenner each.

1:22:531:22:58

You're not walking past those, are you?

1:22:581:23:00

-I'm walking past those.

-A tenner?

-I'm not interested.

1:23:001:23:03

Oh, you're interested in diamante, I forgot.

1:23:031:23:07

I've got a string of pearls. They're lovely, creamy pearls.

1:23:071:23:10

-Very sutterly graded.

-Yeah, they're not bad.

1:23:101:23:13

And a wee sterling clasp. I've seen these picking up.

1:23:131:23:17

Did you buy these for £80 under the hammer?

1:23:171:23:19

-Yeah, they were 50 to me.

-Yeah.

1:23:191:23:21

-Are we done?

-Wait a minute, wait a minute.

1:23:211:23:24

I got a freebie.

1:23:241:23:25

Why did you get that free? You shouldn't be getting free things.

1:23:271:23:31

-If I was you I'd put it with that lot.

-Can somebody pick up Tom's dummy.

1:23:311:23:34

He spat it over there.

1:23:341:23:36

-No, it is quite nice. It's gonna make 20 or 30 quid.

-Absolutely!

1:23:361:23:40

I don't mind saying you've done really well.

1:23:401:23:43

Well, it's all sounding very nice, isn't it? Time to hear what they really think.

1:23:431:23:47

I am really nervous what's gonna happen at the auction because he's bought really well.

1:23:471:23:52

Although I've bought well,

1:23:521:23:54

that silver lot is gonna eclipse everything!

1:23:541:23:57

As soon as that came out I went, "Oh!"

1:23:571:23:59

I think this is the auction where it turns in my favour.

1:23:591:24:05

Well, maybe.

1:24:051:24:07

It's been a fabulous jaunt, though, delightful Olney,

1:24:071:24:10

via Woburn and Hemel Hempstead

1:24:101:24:13

with the auction house in Watlington firmly in their sights.

1:24:131:24:16

I feel pretty confident, Paul. You've got some great lots coming up.

1:24:161:24:20

I've played a good hand.

1:24:201:24:21

Reputedly England's smallest town, nestling in the shadows of the Chiltern Hills,

1:24:211:24:27

Watlington offers a traditional market town welcome.

1:24:271:24:31

Just what our cheeky chaps need on auction day.

1:24:311:24:35

Kicking things off today is auctioneer, Simon Jones.

1:24:361:24:39

But first, what does he think of their choices?

1:24:391:24:43

There's a good cross-section. The bronze bird will do well

1:24:431:24:46

because it's a pretty little thing.

1:24:461:24:48

My favourite item will be the chair,

1:24:481:24:51

simply because you don't see many of them and it's a lovely object.

1:24:511:24:54

Paul began this leg with £255.88

1:24:541:24:59

and has since spent £215 on six auction lots.

1:24:591:25:04

As for Thomas, he started with £305.20

1:25:061:25:10

and threw caution to the wind spending £250 on five auction lots.

1:25:101:25:14

It's the moment of truth. Let the auction begin.

1:25:171:25:20

First up it's Paul's dressing mirror.

1:25:221:25:25

What can we say for that? 50, £60 for it?

1:25:251:25:29

40 then to start me for the toilet mirror.

1:25:291:25:31

40 I'm bid, 42 anywhere?

1:25:311:25:34

All done then at 40.

1:25:341:25:37

Excellent start, but will the dinner gong strike the right note?

1:25:371:25:44

50 or £60 for it?

1:25:441:25:46

£50? 50 I'm bid.

1:25:461:25:47

55 before I go to the phone. Coming to you at 55, Kay.

1:25:471:25:52

55 I'm bid. 60 anywhere?

1:25:531:25:55

At 55 then, 60.

1:25:551:25:57

65, 70.

1:25:571:26:01

70 I'm bid. 75.

1:26:011:26:03

Come to daddy.

1:26:031:26:05

75, 80? 80 I'm bid, 85?

1:26:051:26:09

At £80 then, it's in the room at £80.

1:26:101:26:16

Well done.

1:26:161:26:18

We did it, we planned.

1:26:181:26:20

Well done, Paul. You're off to a flying start

1:26:201:26:22

and it can only get better as your next lot was the freebie!

1:26:221:26:26

Lot 110 is the Treen cribbage board. Sweet, little chap this.

1:26:281:26:32

What can we say for that? 40, £50 for it?

1:26:321:26:34

That will do.

1:26:341:26:36

20 to start me. 15 to go.

1:26:361:26:37

Weird that.

1:26:371:26:39

Anyone want a cribbage board? Ten?

1:26:391:26:42

-Ten I'm bid.

-Dirt cheap, dirt cheap.

1:26:421:26:44

I would give you more than that for it.

1:26:441:26:47

At £10 then, all done at ten.

1:26:471:26:50

Oh, well, it was a tenner.

1:26:501:26:52

It cost you nothing, it owes you nothing. It's £10.

1:26:521:26:54

Three lots down and Paul's hot on your heels, Thomas.

1:26:541:26:59

Let's hope your figurine pays off.

1:26:591:27:00

Lot 116 is the bronze figurine of a swallow.

1:27:001:27:05

Silver plated on a little circular base there. £100 for it?

1:27:051:27:08

-He's asking big money.

-80 to start.

1:27:081:27:10

50 then?

1:27:101:27:12

50 I'm bid, 55 anywhere? At £50.

1:27:121:27:14

55? Yes, 55.

1:27:141:27:17

60, 65?

1:27:171:27:18

At £60, right at the back of the room. At 60.

1:27:181:27:23

Somebody got a bargain, Thomas. You were unlucky there.

1:27:231:27:26

-Somebody got a bargain.

-Oh dear!

1:27:261:27:28

It was always going to be risky. Now for Paul's second mirror.

1:27:281:27:32

128 is the Sheraton string in-laid dressing mirror.

1:27:321:27:36

40 or £50 for this.

1:27:361:27:38

30 then to start me.

1:27:381:27:40

20 for the dressing mirror.

1:27:401:27:42

A little Sheraton one, shield shape.

1:27:421:27:44

£20 I'm bid.

1:27:441:27:46

All done at 20.

1:27:461:27:48

-I can thank the auctioneer.

-£10 profit.

1:27:481:27:51

Back to Thomas for his pearls. Fingers crossed.

1:27:511:27:55

Lot 330 is a string of graduated culture pearls with a silver

1:27:551:27:58

and Marquisette clasp.

1:27:581:28:01

40, £50 for it?

1:28:011:28:02

30 to start me then.

1:28:021:28:06

Don't tell me pearls are out of fashion.

1:28:061:28:10

£20 I'm bid. 22 anywhere? At £20, all done at 20.

1:28:101:28:13

Ouch!

1:28:131:28:14

Oh, go on, give him a hug.

1:28:141:28:16

-Well.

-A hug?

1:28:161:28:18

-No.

-You want a hug?

1:28:181:28:20

-No.

-Later?

-No hugs later.

1:28:201:28:23

Surely his silver double chain and fob will get him back in the game.

1:28:231:28:28

What are you going to start me? 40 I'm bid. 42, 44?

1:28:281:28:31

£42 seated, 44 anywhere?

1:28:311:28:34

At £42 then all done. At 42.

1:28:341:28:38

Do you want me to start bidding on your stuff because I've a lot of money to burn.

1:28:401:28:45

Keep positive, Thomas. Things can only get better.

1:28:451:28:48

350 is an enamel 1930s Egyptian brooch.

1:28:481:28:50

In a little box there. 30, £40 for this?

1:28:521:28:55

It's what it should do.

1:28:551:28:57

20 then to start me.

1:28:571:28:58

£20 I'm bid, 22 anywhere for the brooch?

1:28:581:29:01

22, 24, 26, 28.

1:29:011:29:04

30, 32, 34, 36.

1:29:041:29:06

38, 40, 42?

1:29:061:29:08

At £40 all done at 40?

1:29:081:29:12

-Sweet.

-That's more like it!

1:29:141:29:16

Now for Thomas's last stab, the double smokey courts brooch.

1:29:161:29:21

£30 for it?

1:29:221:29:24

25 I'm bid. 28?

1:29:251:29:27

£25 then for the smokey quartz.

1:29:271:29:29

£25, are you all done at 25? With Alan.

1:29:291:29:32

Fair enough.

1:29:321:29:33

The brooches were your saving grace.

1:29:331:29:35

Now for Paul's collection of silver.

1:29:371:29:39

I'm nervous about this, here it comes.

1:29:391:29:42

£100 to start me. £100 I'm bid.

1:29:421:29:45

110 anywhere? 110, 120, 130, 140.

1:29:451:29:49

150? 140 then standing at the back of the room.

1:29:491:29:53

140. 150 anywhere?

1:29:531:29:54

-Cheap for all that stuff.

-140, all done.

1:29:541:29:57

It's Paul's last stab at a big profit.

1:30:001:30:03

A Chinese chair. What can we say for that?

1:30:031:30:06

£100 to start me for it. £100 I'm bid.

1:30:061:30:10

110? At £100, are you all happy at £100.

1:30:101:30:14

A maiden bid of £100, are you all done?

1:30:141:30:16

Can you lend me some money?

1:30:181:30:21

Can you lend me some money?

1:30:211:30:23

In spectacular fashion, Mr Laidlaw wins the day.

1:30:231:30:27

Thomas started today's show victorious with £305.20.

1:30:281:30:35

After commission he's made a hideous loss of £96.66, giving him

1:30:351:30:40

a meagre £208.54 to spend tomorrow.

1:30:401:30:45

Paul, meanwhile, started with £255.88.

1:30:471:30:51

He made a fabulous profit of £104.80,

1:30:511:30:57

so with a whopping £360.68 in the kitty he's firmly in the lead.

1:30:571:31:03

-What a roller-coaster!

-Tell me.

1:31:031:31:07

I feel like I've been on the helter-skelter, you know.

1:31:071:31:10

It's going to make for an interesting shop in the last leg.

1:31:101:31:14

-All to play for, for me.

-Yeah.

-I'm going for it.

1:31:141:31:17

We've heard that before! Next time on the Antiques Road Trip it's the grand finale.

1:31:171:31:21

Thomas is playing catch-up.

1:31:211:31:23

My shop closes in three-quarters of an hour, time is against me.

1:31:231:31:28

I'm going to have the devil chasing me on my back.

1:31:281:31:31

And has Mr Laidlaw met his match?

1:31:311:31:34

Make it £28 and I will buy it.

1:31:341:31:38

I can't!

1:31:381:31:39

You're good!

1:31:391:31:41

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1:31:521:31:56

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1:31:561:31:59

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