Episode 18 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 18

The competition hots up on day three as the two Charlies journey from King's Lynn to the auction in Beccles.


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Transcript


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge!

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If I have to declare war.

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Why?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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Gone.

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The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit...

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Well done, buddy!

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But it's not as easy as you might think and things don't always go to plan.

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Push!

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So, will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

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I'm going to thrash you.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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All this week we're out on the road with a pair of very cheeky chappies,

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auctioneers Charlie Ross and Charles Hanson.

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-I'm in a mood now!

-Turn round!

-I'm in a mood now!

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The experienced Charlie Ross really has nothing to prove,

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but he still keeps an eye on his reputation.

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I don't want to walk out that door with you thinking, "That man Ross, he's a bounder!"

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Is he?

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As if he would!

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And as both sidekick and competitor, we have Charles Hanson.

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He always knows exactly what he wants.

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The other one I quite liked...

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was the...

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WIND HOWLS

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Well, despite the occasional dither, Charles made a large if slightly unlikely profit on yesterday's show.

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What you've got here is a bottle stand. You've got this fisherman, smiling, smoking his pipe...

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That is the worst thing I have ever seen in my life!

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If you put it like that, of course...

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I paid £6.

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Selling at £28.

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How on earth did you do that?

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Charlie Ross also did very well, but not quite well enough.

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What a fascinating bit of kit!

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The tape measure, we could take that down to 30.

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-And selling at £10.

-Ouch!

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From his original £200, Charlie now has...

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..weighing down his wallet.

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Aargh! I simply can't lift it up! It's that heavy.

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But the brand-new frontrunner Charles Hanson

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has home-grown his £200 to a wonderful...

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There's only a tenner between them,

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as our boys stride into round 3, and it's full steam ahead

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in their stylish, if slightly unreliable, 1960s Ford Corsair.

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This car, Charlie, is playing up, I'm sure.

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It's going to give us problems.

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I'm hearing some funny noises, I must say.

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Charlie and Charles are travelling over 300 miles

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down the exotic East of England

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all the way to Rye in East Sussex.

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And on today's show they're leaving Grantham

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and heading for their next auction in Beccles,

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alighting first in Norfolk's most regal King's Lynn.

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Now King's Lynn is a historic port,

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dating back to the 12th century.

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In medieval times,

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the Hanseatic merchants of Europe wanted an English base, and chose King's Lynn.

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As well as a rich maritime history,

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the town also has a plethora of antiques emporiums,

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and our boys are ready to spend, spend, spend,

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but their vintage vehicle has just stalled on them.

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There's something wrong.

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There's something wrong.

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-ENGINE TURNS OVER

-Told you so.

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-You want a push?

-Yeah! Are you going to push me?

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-Come on!

-Madam, your name is...?

-Denise.

-Denise.

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-One, two, three!

-Make a name for yourself.

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-ENGINE TURNS OVER

-You don't need to get...

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-Charlie!

-Yes?

-Charlie...

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either we're going to push it and push-start it or you're going to start it on the battery.

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-Denise, you drive, then!

-I've just suggested that Denise starts it. Denise, get in the seat! Come on.

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-Oh, this is lovely!

-You show us how, Denise.

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Three, two, one! Let's go, Charlie! Come on!

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# Denis, Denis

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# I've got a crush on you

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# Denis, Denis

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# La-la-la

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# Denis, Denis

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# I'm so in love with you... # I'm terribly sorry.

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-Yeah?

-This car's dead.

-Denise!

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-I can't open the door.

-Well, this is meant to be for me, then.

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I think we're going to have to give you the car! Can you open that?

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Hang on, Denise. Let me just... Hold on, darling.

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There we go... Denise!

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You've been a sport.

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-Thank you.

-You haven't helped at all, but you've been a sport.

-Thank you.

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-Bye-bye.

-Denise, thank you very much.

-Have a lovely day.

-What will we do, then?

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-I'm going shopping.

-Well, let's go together.

-No!

-Why not?

-No, no.

-Well...

-I don't trust you.

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-Oh, go on, then!

-There's £10 in it, Charlie!

-Come on, old bean!

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Here...don't worry, boys, we'll take care of the car. Just leave it in the middle of the street.

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I don't know! What are they like, eh?

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-You don't know where you're going.

-You don't know what you're doing!

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You might think they'd have trouble finding their first antique shop,

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but our boys managed to stumble upon several shops under one roof, a miracle!

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Where are you going?

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-Toss a coin to see who goes where.

-That seems fair.

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-Heads or tails?

-Heads.

-You sure?

-Yeah.

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Tails. Right, I think...

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-Quick!

-Hold on.

-Too late! I've made up my mind.

-Hold on, hold on...

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If you're not fast, then you're last!

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And Charlie Ross is wasting no time at all!

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-Charlie's the name.

-You're very welcome. Ian.

-And you are Ian?

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Ah, and it looks like Ian could have just the thing.

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-I've got the 1946 and 1947 Rupert annuals.

-Yeah.

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Nice condition. I always look, er...

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-for the front. Nice colours there.

-Yes, nice colours.

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-The spine is intact.

-That's important.

-Er...price?

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-3 shillings and 6 pence.

-Absolutely!

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The annual is now worth considerably more.

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It has become highly collectable.

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-I see the price here is £105.

-Yeah, yeah. And that in itself is a good price.

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You're a salesman, you are!

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I try!

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Elsewhere in the emporium, poor old Charles is struggling to find his first item.

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I've got to be honest, there's pressed moulded glassware, there's decorative china,

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and I use the word decorative to mean it's decorative!

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And, Hanson, you're not buying academic wares here.

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It's very ornamental, without being much more than that.

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Meanwhile, Charlie cuts to the chase on the £105 Rupert annual.

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-I would like to pay £40 for it.

-I would really want a little bit more than that.

-Yeah, yeah...

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45?

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Cheeky Charlie!

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I'm a little bit doubtful, but I'm going to let you have it for £50.

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-I'm going to shake on that.

-All right.

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A good deal done. Wow! And how's his competitor getting on?

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I haven't spent my money yet. Charlie Ross is in there dominating proceedings.

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I'm quite happy just to sit back, take it easy

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and let him do the negotiations. I'll then go in and find the treasure.

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Back inside, Charlie is already eyeing up the treasure.

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Old-fashioned but rather lovely.

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That's the silver he's talking about, not himself!

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For his second lot, Charlie is trying to bundle up a job lot of silverware,

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including a tea strainer, grape scissors and a set of nutcrackers. Oh!

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-I think 25's where I'm at, really.

-OK.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

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If they make £100, I'll take you for a night out on the tiles.

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-Thank you very much.

-But don't hold your breath!

-Right.

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Smooth Charlie does it again, which is more than can be said for Mr Hanson.

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No purchase yet and looking a bit lost.

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So far, so good. I'm quite happy. I might actually call the auctioneer... Hello!

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Blimey!

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-Look who's back!

-Do you want on the back?

-Denise!

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-On the back?

-Yes, come on, on the back! MUSIC: "Denis" by Blondie

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-Where are we going? Antique finds?

-Yes!

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# Denis, Denis Oh, with your eyes so blue

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# Denis, Denis I've got a crush on you

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# Denis, Denis I'm so in love with you... #

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I was told Hanson has gone off on a motorbike!

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What is that all about? He doesn't know, though, that I have had a call from the mechanic

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and the car is ready. And I'm going shopping.

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-# ..I'm so in love with you... #

-And he's not the only one!

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Just down the road there's a special delivery at the Old Curiosity Shop.

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-Oh, Denise!

-There we are. Look at that.

-You're a lifesaver.

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-"Collectable antiques".

-Wonderful.

-I hope you do well today.

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Denise, thank you ever so much. You have saved me from Mr Ross.

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-Thanks for the helmet.

-Thank you.

-I'm shaken but not stirred.

-Shaken but not stirred.

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Antique shop?

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Antique shop. She was right.

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TOOT-TOOT!

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I'm alive still. Just about!

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-And your name is...?

-My name's Ruth.

-Hello, Ruth. I'm Charles.

-How do you do?

-Charles Hanson from Derbyshire.

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There's some really nice objects here.

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What we have is a pen wipe.

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You would have it on your desk with your inkwell and your quill pen or your fountain pen,

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and after you'd perhaps written a letter or you'd got a slight blockage of ink,

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you would use this wipe to keep your pen in good order.

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-What's your absolute best price?

-That could be 45.

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-Knowing the market we're going to, Ruth, I think that viably could do quite well.

-Right.

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What we've got here are a very, very nice set of six silver pierced buttons,

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which, in their original Morocco case, hopefully are all original

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and in good condition.

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-Ruth, they're very much in what we call the Arts and Crafts style, aren't they?

-Oh, yes.

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They're priced at 125.

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Right.

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Er...

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I suppose I could go down to 100 on them.

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-£100...isn't bad, but I'll think about it.

-Right, OK.

-OK? Thank you, Ruth.

-OK, that's fine.

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-Ruth, I do... This is quite garish.

-It is, exactly.

-It's not everyone's taste. Has it been here long?

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-No, I've only had it recently.

-Hanson, you've got to start making some decisions,

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because my time's running out. The first thing I saw was a duck.

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And I love him because they say small is beautiful, and, Mr Ross, watch out!

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I'll say yes to him

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at £45. We have a sale. He's going, going, gone, if that's OK with you.

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One down! Fantastic.

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Ruth, the Moroccan light will be my gamble

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-and I'll speculate at £15, I'll say yes to him!

-Right, OK.

-At £15.

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Charles is really driving the deals here.

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But will his luck hold when it comes to these buttons?

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The ticket price is 125. I can do those for 90.

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-Maybe £70.

-Oh, I couldn't possibly do that. They would have to be 80 on the buttons, all right?

-OK.

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-I'm going, I'm going...they're gone.

-Right.

-Sold.

-Thank you.

-To Hanson.

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-Three in a row, one shop, Ruth. Thanks ever so much. Wow!

-Jolly good.

-It's that easy.

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Let's find out where that old Hanson is.

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-Hello, is that Mr Hanson?

-Hello, Charlie!

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-Well, I must say, we're in this together!

-How are you?

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And I look round and you've just gone.

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-How are you doing?

-I just want to let you know, Charlie, that the car is now running,

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and I'm in it and I'm going shopping.

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-Bye.

-Bye-bye.

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I suspect he's done some Hanson buying again! Well, Dick Turpin stealing, more like!

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Am I happy? Yeah!

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Am I happy I'll make a profit? Yeah!

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Am I happy Charlie Ross is going to be going down? Yeah!

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So I need to get on and catch up.

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While Charlie heads off to his next port of call,

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Charles wants to find out more about the history of King's Lynn.

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# I wish I was a fisherman

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# Tumbling on the sea... #

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Situated on the Wash, one of the largest estuaries in Britain,

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the town has long been a centre for commerce.

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For 1,000 years, over 40 generations of fisherfolk here have made a living from the sea.

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Having secured his first catch of the day, Mr Hanson tracks down Paul Richards,

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curator of True's Yard.

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Now, I've come today to True's Yard.

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A fisherfolk museum.

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The fisherfolk lived in yards like this.

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It's all about community and solidarity and a hard life, fishing in the North Sea.

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And I, Paul, I came in like I've just come in, I'd say, "Look, Dad...

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"here's my fish, here's my shrimps, here's my cockles and everything else,"

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-you know, what do I do next?

-The women and children would do the sorting.

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And they'd load the barrow up ready for the next morning,

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and take fish and cockles to the market and around the streets, selling it.

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And in this cottage here, we can go inside and have a look,

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but 11 people lived in there in the 1840s.

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-11 people?

-11 people.

-In the 1840s?

-Yeah, yeah.

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And one lady in there, you'll see her photograph, she had 17 children in that cottage.

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-17 children in there?

-Yes!

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-Can we go and find Mother?

-You can go and find Mother and there's a nice armchair in there.

-Great!

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-Let's go in.

-Thanks, Dad.

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This would be my sitting room?

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Yes...and also working room.

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If it was bad weather outside, they couldn't work outside. They'd work on this brick floor.

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-I'd work on the floor.

-Your wife and children would sort out the shrimps

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and the other shellfish.

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This is one room. It's where your family exists when they're together.

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-Mum's got to be somewhere, but I can't see Mum anywhere.

-She's putting the kids to bed.

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-Well, I better go there as well.

-Let's go and see the bed.

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-You have to hang on.

-You do, don't you?

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LAUGHTER

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-So, here we are in the main bedroom.

-That's the only bedroom.

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This is mainly for the kids. Three heads there, three heads there, so head to toe.

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-So you'd have three children lying here that way...

-Yeah. And three that way.

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The youngest child, babies, couldn't go on into the bed.

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So the babies went into the baby box.

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Look, it's quite nice.

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Open it up... Look!

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There's even a dressing gown in there. There's even a nightie in there.

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And it's not even lined. All you've got, literally, is some...

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I can't believe it. You've literally just got some what appears to be some sort of fabric,

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-against a tin lining...

-Yeah.

-And be careful, baby!

-Yeah.

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-Lights out!

-And Mum, my wife, would sleep here on the floor on a very thin mattress,

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so she's have the baby to look after on her right, and on her left to keep an eye on the kids.

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You know, Dad, if you and Mum wanted a bit of romance up here,

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-you know, there's no time for that.

-No, that comes on Sundays.

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-Sundays?

-Sundays, yeah.

-I thought Sunday is a religious day of rest.

-It is a day of rest

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in the sense there's no fishing. But on Sundays the kids are packed off to Sunday school,

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and Mum and Dad are on their own on Sundays.

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-So hanky-panky day?

-I think so.

-Excellent.

-I think so.

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Hanky-panky, indeed! But you can't have a fisherman's yard without fish.

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It's here somewhere. All you have to do is follow your nose, Charles.

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-A nice aroma, isn't it?

-This is real herring here?

-Yes.

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What is so nice is the smell.

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-The aroma is great.

-It really takes you back...

-Exactly.

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-..To what was happening here...

-Yes.

-100 years ago.

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Yes, we've rescued an important slice of our local heritage,

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and it's been listed now, Grade 2, like the cottages, by English heritage.

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Charles may be all at sea, but Charlie is taking the dry road.

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Leaving King's Lynn behind,

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he rejoins the antiques trail and crosses the border from Norfolk into Cambridgeshire.

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His final destination of the day is Wisbech, 16 miles away.

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Like King's Lynn, Wisbech is a market town steeped in history,

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and is regarded as the capital of the Fens.

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With Georgian buildings aplenty, Wisbech has often been used as a film location for period dramas,

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adapted from Charles Dickens. So it's little wonder that Charlie Ross has...great expectations!

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-Good afternoon.

-Hello.

-Charlie.

-Richard.

-Hello, Richard.

-Nice to meet you.

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If I may, may I have a browse round on my own to begin with?

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-You may.

-And then hopefully I'll be able to home in on something.

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With a huge selection of glassware, furniture and some lovely jugs,

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Granny's Cupboard is full to overflowing.

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This feels as if I've died and gone to heaven here.

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You just can't believe the amount of stuff.

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Here is a late Georgian...

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almost Victorian, I suppose, might be William IV,

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mahogany bureau, cross-banded in mahogany.

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And people say these things are unsaleable now.

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Well, everything's got a price at some stage. I mean, that, in a saleroom, 20 years ago,

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would have been...it's not the best, 540, 560, 580.

0:17:290:17:33

And that's the sort of thing that perhaps Richard's had for years,

0:17:330:17:36

and he might really take a ridiculous offer, £100 or something.

0:17:360:17:40

-Richard? I don't suppose you'd like £50 for it, would you?

-No.

0:17:400:17:45

-Not really.

-I didn't think you would.

0:17:460:17:48

-It could be yours for 100.

-That's really kind.

0:17:480:17:52

Charlie seems convinced that he can turn a profit on the unfashionable bureau,

0:17:520:17:57

but it could well come back to bite him on the bottom.

0:17:570:18:00

-I've spotted a bit of Sorrento, olive wood.

-Yeah.

-Well, it's, of course, the land of olives, isn't it?

0:18:000:18:06

-It is.

-I like a nice olive from Italy.

0:18:060:18:09

-And made for tourists.

-Definitely.

-Definitely made for tourists, wouldn't it be?

0:18:090:18:15

-1910, '20s.

-Yes. Could that be £20?

0:18:150:18:18

-No.

-No? You're very rapid with your responses, it's very good.

0:18:180:18:22

Well, with these sort of offers you'd have to be! LAUGHTER

0:18:220:18:25

-Do you £30 on the mirror.

-I'm going to give you £30 for it.

0:18:250:18:29

And he's not finished yet.

0:18:290:18:31

And I bought some things this morning of no great consequence, some bits of silver, silver plate,

0:18:310:18:37

well, mostly silver plate, and I thought I could bump up my job lot.

0:18:370:18:41

That is a sugar basin, silver plate. Don't worry, no hallmark.

0:18:410:18:46

-How much for the lot?

-35.

0:18:460:18:48

What? Tenner!

0:18:480:18:49

You'll be lucky. 30.

0:18:490:18:52

-15.

-20.

0:18:540:18:56

Oh, go on! £20!

0:18:560:18:58

Pure heaven!

0:18:580:19:00

Having secured another three lots for auction, Charlie is a very happy bunny,

0:19:000:19:05

as the first day of shopping comes to an end.

0:19:050:19:08

Early morning and our experts are up with the lark.

0:19:100:19:14

-But you know my old strategy? Try and get it bought early.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:19:150:19:19

So far Charlie's spent £225 on four lots.

0:19:210:19:25

The Rupert annual, the job lot of silverware,

0:19:250:19:28

the mahogany bureau and the Sorrento hand mirror,

0:19:280:19:31

leaving just £52.16 for the day ahead.

0:19:310:19:36

Charles, meanwhile, was a little more conservative with his cash,

0:19:370:19:42

spending just £140 on three lots.

0:19:420:19:45

The duck pen wipe,

0:19:450:19:46

the Arts and Crafts silver buttons and a rather garish lampshade.

0:19:460:19:51

That gives him a total of £147.65 for the second day of buying.

0:19:510:19:58

Now they're heading 55 miles east towards the administrative centre of Norfolk,

0:20:000:20:06

and the historic city of Norwich.

0:20:060:20:09

-Isn't it magnificent?

-It's fabulous!

0:20:100:20:13

-So I'm getting out now.

-You get out.

-I'll leave you to it.

0:20:130:20:15

-I'm going off to Bury St Edmunds.

-I'll see you later. Bye.

0:20:150:20:19

In the 11th century,

0:20:190:20:20

Norwich was the second-largest city in the country after London,

0:20:200:20:24

and regarded as one of the most important places in the kingdom.

0:20:240:20:28

Norwich Castle was founded soon after the Norman Conquest,

0:20:280:20:32

and, according to the Domesday Book,

0:20:320:20:34

98 Saxon homes were demolished to make room for it.

0:20:340:20:39

Tapping into such a rich historic location,

0:20:390:20:42

it shouldn't be too difficult to find some local treasures,

0:20:420:20:45

but, then, it is Charles we're talking about here!

0:20:450:20:48

Where are the antiques?

0:20:500:20:52

And it isn't too long before Carlos strikes it lucky.

0:20:550:21:00

"Anything old and interesting". That sound like Charlie Ross to me!

0:21:020:21:06

-I'm Charles Hanson.

-Hi, Charles.

-Your name is...?

-I'm Paul. Paul Moraski.

0:21:090:21:13

The painting over there is quite nice, Paul. Is it an oil painting?

0:21:130:21:17

-It's oil and I think it's dated 1887.

-Is it for sale?

-It is for sale.

0:21:170:21:22

He's a typical Victorian gent.

0:21:220:21:24

Here's his fob chain.

0:21:240:21:26

-And your best price is?

-£200.

0:21:260:21:29

-And with discounts?

-£200.

-And between friends?

-£200.

0:21:290:21:32

Well, I've been told it's £200 and there's no discounts. So I think, Paul, I'm out. Thanks.

0:21:320:21:37

How much was that again?

0:21:370:21:39

Oh, wow!

0:21:390:21:40

As a young boy, I always wanted one of these.

0:21:400:21:44

It's actually a coin cabinet.

0:21:440:21:46

If you were a collector and you want somewhere to house your collection of crowns or guineas,

0:21:460:21:51

you would acquire one of these.

0:21:510:21:52

-You can have it for £10.

-£10. What's £10?

0:21:520:21:56

Firewood would cost you that, wouldn't it?

0:21:560:21:58

-I'll take it.

-OK.

-£10, Paul. Excellent.

0:21:580:22:01

Case closed!

0:22:010:22:04

If you were in my shoes now, what would you buy?

0:22:040:22:06

-I'd buy that oil painting for £100.

-£100?

0:22:060:22:09

-NEEDLE IS LIFTED OFF RECORD

-I thought he said £200!

0:22:090:22:12

-Oh, Paul!

-As it's a display painting, you can have it for £100.

-You're giving me a headache now!

0:22:120:22:17

Did you hear that?

0:22:170:22:18

At that price, the painting is certainly on the money.

0:22:180:22:22

-And that's the absolute best?

-That's the very best.

0:22:220:22:24

If I said 80...would you possibly say, "Yes, Charles"?

0:22:240:22:28

OK, Charles, we'll do a deal at 80.

0:22:280:22:31

That portrait has to be one of the best buys ever.

0:22:310:22:35

From £200 down to 80, unless of course they saw him coming.

0:22:350:22:38

Yes! We got rid of it at last!

0:22:400:22:42

LAUGHTER

0:22:420:22:44

Ever get the feeling you've just been had?

0:22:440:22:46

While Charles cleans up in Norwich, his partner in crime has gone on ahead,

0:22:460:22:52

southwest to Bury St Edmunds, just over an hour away.

0:22:520:22:56

Ho-ho! This is the life, Hanson!

0:22:570:23:02

Profits, sunshine

0:23:030:23:05

and Bury St Edmunds!

0:23:050:23:09

Lordy!

0:23:090:23:11

Originally known as Beodericsworth,

0:23:110:23:14

it's thought that Bury St Edmunds was the site of a Roman settlement, later claimed by the Saxons.

0:23:140:23:20

Nowadays the place is best known for brewing and malting,

0:23:200:23:23

so what better place to start than a small libation in the smallest pub in Britain?

0:23:230:23:29

Looks like I've broken into a private party here.

0:23:290:23:33

-It's wonderful. Hello.

-Hello. How are you?

-Greetings.

0:23:330:23:36

-Are you the owner, landlord, whatever?

-I'm the manager, yeah.

-Nice to meet you. I'm Charlie.

0:23:360:23:40

-I'm Jack.

-I've come to learn all about your pub. Is it really the smallest pub in the UK?

0:23:400:23:45

-The smallest pub by drinking area, yeah.

-By drinking area? Good lord! How many people can you get in here?

0:23:450:23:51

The record was set in '84 when they got in 102.

0:23:510:23:54

-102?

-Yeah, just in this room.

0:23:540:23:57

Good grief! Now, what about the history of the pub? Has this been in one ownership for...?

0:23:570:24:02

-No, it became a pub in 1873.

-Yeah.

-Next door was a pawnbroker's who owned this little side building.

0:24:020:24:09

And they noticed the majority of their trade was alcoholics

0:24:090:24:11

who were pawning their possessions to go and buy booze with...

0:24:110:24:14

-I know the feeling.

-They turned their side building into a little pub to catch them on the way out.

0:24:140:24:18

Gosh! How extraordinary!

0:24:180:24:21

Is it just me or is this place a little strange?

0:24:210:24:25

This creature here, what is that?

0:24:250:24:28

-That's not a cat?

-It is a cat. It was actually found bricked up here,

0:24:280:24:31

-and it's supposed to be very lucky to brick a cat up.

-Really?

0:24:310:24:35

Yes, in a chimney. Not very lucky for the cat...

0:24:350:24:38

but it keeps the witches away.

0:24:380:24:40

-There's a three-legged chick in the glass bowl up there on the wall.

-Nice.

0:24:410:24:45

A human lower leg hanging from the ceiling.

0:24:450:24:48

There's a little creature at the bottom there. What is that?

0:24:480:24:51

That's a shed tarantula skin.

0:24:510:24:53

-A tarantula skin?

-I didn't realise this until I was given that.

0:24:530:24:56

They shed their skins a lot like snakes, and that's just the husk of a tarantula.

0:24:560:25:00

-Well, I might have to give you something to hang up here.

-Great.

0:25:000:25:03

Yeah, I think a photograph of Charles Hanson probably.

0:25:030:25:06

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Pleasure to meet you.

-Wonderful.

0:25:070:25:10

It's almost time to call last orders on today's spending spree

0:25:100:25:15

and our two Charlies are reunited with just minutes to spare.

0:25:150:25:19

-We haven't got much time, have we?

-No. What's the plan?

0:25:190:25:22

Well, my plan is to run over there where you can see Past & Present and spend my money.

0:25:220:25:28

-And let me go to the more idyllic picturesque Hanson type?

-Yeah, that's more your sort of place.

0:25:280:25:33

Get a move on!

0:25:330:25:35

And for the final time today, let's get shopping!

0:25:350:25:39

It's got to really jump out and say, "Hanson, look at me. Hanson, look at me."

0:25:410:25:47

20 minutes. I don't think I should be looking at furniture.

0:25:470:25:50

With time ticking away, Charles spies a silver cigar cutter.

0:25:500:25:55

Your best price?

0:25:560:25:57

36 we start at...

0:25:570:26:00

I'd be looking for, say, 25.

0:26:000:26:02

I would buy it for 20.

0:26:040:26:06

I'm being cheeky, Richard, and if someone offers you more, I'll put it back.

0:26:060:26:10

-Anybody offering more?

-Going, going, gone.

-Looks like it's yours for 20, then.

0:26:100:26:14

-Are you sure, Richard?

-Go on, special offer of the day.

0:26:140:26:16

In the shop next door, Charlie is also banking on some silver.

0:26:160:26:21

-Tell me what that little object...

-I don't know what it is.

0:26:210:26:24

It's not a swizzle-stick. I don't know what it's for. It's not a toothpick, is it?

0:26:240:26:27

It's a silver thingamabob, Charlie!

0:26:270:26:30

-£20?

-Yes.

-I shall shake on that at £20.

0:26:310:26:34

There's a stool down there. It's marked at £35. Would you take £20 for it?

0:26:340:26:39

I'd take 25 for it.

0:26:390:26:41

£25, and I've done my shopping in no time at all!

0:26:410:26:45

Our boys are all spent up, and it's time for them to discover what the other has bought.

0:26:450:26:52

-Charlie, they say small is beautiful.

-Yeah.

-So let's start with my small one.

0:26:520:26:57

This is tiny!

0:26:570:26:59

Oh, I love it. It's a pen wipe. At auction it will make between

0:26:590:27:04

-£40 and £60.

-And it cost me £45.

-Oh, you've hit the nail on the head. Like it?

0:27:040:27:10

-Slim profit, but lovely object.

-Thanks.

-Well done. Would you like to see something of mine?

-Please.

0:27:100:27:15

This has been accumulated over the days from various establishments.

0:27:160:27:21

In each establishment I bought one thing and I put them all together in one sumptuous lot.

0:27:210:27:27

-And the whole lot, I suspect, cost you about £50.

-65.

0:27:270:27:32

Oh, lovely!

0:27:340:27:36

Very, very nice. I don't know how marketable they are.

0:27:370:27:41

-No.

-But they asked 125, didn't they?

-They did.

-And you bought them for 45?

0:27:410:27:46

-No, I wish. £80.

-Yes.

0:27:460:27:48

-If I saw this in an antiques shop, I would steer clear of it.

-Yes. And that's why I bought it!

0:27:480:27:56

Because it's going to show me a profit.

0:27:560:27:58

Ah, how interesting!

0:27:590:28:01

-A cigar cutter.

-How much?

0:28:010:28:03

I think that's worth £40.

0:28:030:28:06

Well, it cost me 20.

0:28:060:28:08

-Little French stool.

-I like it. Is that a gout stool?

-It might be a gout stool for you!

0:28:080:28:13

I like it.

0:28:130:28:14

You want a good lady of leisure to come and buy this.

0:28:140:28:18

-I do.

-And I suspect she might pay about £60 for it.

0:28:180:28:23

-Would she really?

-I hope so.

-Cost?

-How much?

-25.

-It didn't.

-It did.

-It didn't.

-It did.

0:28:230:28:28

-It didn't.

-It did.

0:28:280:28:30

It's a ceiling light, isn't it? Repro. This is hideous.

0:28:330:28:37

-For me, Charlie, it's full of Eastern promise.

-Mmm...

0:28:370:28:40

For me, it's empty of Eastern promise.

0:28:400:28:43

Ah!

0:28:430:28:44

To me, that's something which sadly is past its sell-by date.

0:28:440:28:49

-It is.

-However, I wouldn't be annoyed if you said, "Charles, put a 250 reserve on,

0:28:490:28:55

-"and make it 250-350."

-250's what it cost.

-Yeah, it's good.

0:28:550:29:00

-I think...don't forget, going to auction, we've got the 15% to think about.

-It didn't cost 250.

0:29:000:29:05

Take off 50.

0:29:050:29:07

It didn't? £200?

0:29:070:29:09

-Take off 50.

-It didn't? £150?

0:29:090:29:11

-Take off 50.

-No!

0:29:110:29:12

-No!

-Yes! £100.

-It didn't?

-£100.

0:29:120:29:16

What is it?

0:29:160:29:17

-Oh, it's a little collector's chest.

-Yes.

-It is.

0:29:170:29:22

-Age?

-Charlie, I don't think it's very old...

-Very old?

0:29:220:29:26

-I would say that this is approximately...

-50 years old?

-July last year?

0:29:260:29:31

It's the nicest plywood I've seen for a long time.

0:29:310:29:33

There we go, mate!

0:29:330:29:35

No, no! It'll make £50.

0:29:360:29:38

-It cost me £45.

-Oh, did it?

-Yeah.

-Yeah, that's about right.

0:29:380:29:41

-Think so?

-Yeah. About right.

-No, it cost me £10.

-Oh...!

0:29:410:29:45

-Right. There we are.

-That's a lovely pierced oval hand mirror.

0:29:470:29:51

-I love this design. Very aesthetic.

-Yeah.

0:29:510:29:54

I just wonder whether...

0:29:540:29:57

-Oh!

-..What I've bought is the real McCoy.

0:29:570:30:00

I think it is.

0:30:000:30:02

I don't think he's a print.

0:30:020:30:04

-It's not a print.

-No.

-It's what I used to sell as "instant ancestors" to the Americans.

-Sure.

0:30:040:30:11

"Gee, hang it on the wall and that's my Uncle Joe!" It never was his Uncle Joe.

0:30:110:30:15

-Cost you £100?

-80.

0:30:150:30:17

Yeah. I don't know... It's not a great thing, is it?

0:30:170:30:21

But if I had to put a price on it, £140.

0:30:210:30:24

-Less commission, nice profit of £30 or £40.

-It'd help, Charlie.

-Yeah.

0:30:240:30:28

Having seen each other's purchases, what do our experts really think?

0:30:280:30:32

His star lot by far is going back to his golden age of auctioneering.

0:30:340:30:38

It's that wonderful bureau, mahogany. It's circa 1830,

0:30:380:30:42

and I truly thought it cost him 250.

0:30:420:30:44

To have bought that for £100 was a bargain.

0:30:440:30:46

His painting could be a bit of a sleeper.

0:30:460:30:49

£80. I think it'll make £140.

0:30:490:30:52

But, you know, it could make 200.

0:30:520:30:55

That would spell difficulty for old Rosko!

0:30:550:30:58

There's only one way to find out,

0:30:580:31:00

and that's to get back on the road and head to auction.

0:31:000:31:04

It's been a competitive third round from Grantham, via King's Lynn,

0:31:040:31:09

Wisbech, Norwich and Bury St Edmunds,

0:31:090:31:12

with the final destination of Beccles on the horizon.

0:31:120:31:16

Beccles is a medieval town in the heart of the Waveney Valley in Suffolk.

0:31:160:31:20

In the parish church, the union of Reverend Edmund Nelson

0:31:200:31:25

and local lass Catherine Suckling produced one of Britain's finest,

0:31:250:31:29

Admiral Horatio Nelson.

0:31:290:31:32

As our experts arrive in town, it's time to find out which of them will be sailing away

0:31:320:31:38

on their own HMS Victory. It's auction day!

0:31:380:31:42

-They're going to do really well for me today.

-It's packed.

0:31:420:31:46

-Is the car OK here?

-I shall be back in my rightful place at the top.

0:31:460:31:51

-Is the car OK here?

-It's fine.

-Are you sure?

0:31:510:31:54

Durrants have been conducting auction sales since 1853,

0:31:550:31:58

and Rebecca Mayhew is today's auctioneer.

0:31:580:32:02

She's kindly agreed to give her opinion on some of our featured lots.

0:32:020:32:05

My absolute favourite piece is probably the Rupert Bear annual

0:32:060:32:10

because of its rareness. It's still got lovely bright colours inside,

0:32:100:32:14

and I'm hoping it will appeal to quite a wide audience.

0:32:140:32:17

My least favourite item is Mr Hanson's collector's case.

0:32:170:32:20

It's of modern construction which is going to limit its saleability and attractiveness for the market.

0:32:200:32:25

The mahogany bureau is a good solid piece, but the bureau furniture market is still fairly poor.

0:32:250:32:30

But we'll see. It's an auction. Anything could happen and that's all part of the fun.

0:32:300:32:34

Quite right. Charlie Ross started today with £277.16,

0:32:340:32:39

and spent £270 on five auction lots,

0:32:390:32:42

leaving him with £7.16 in hand.

0:32:420:32:47

Charles Hanson began with £287.65

0:32:470:32:52

and has spent £250 on six lots,

0:32:520:32:55

leaving him with £37.65 in his pocket.

0:32:550:32:59

Now, then, are we sitting comfortably? Then, let the auction commence!

0:33:010:33:04

First up, Charles is firmly in the spotlight

0:33:070:33:10

with his garish, glass lampshade. Yuck!

0:33:100:33:13

Interesting piece. Where are you going to start me? 40?

0:33:130:33:17

-Come on!

-Shh!

0:33:170:33:19

20. Thank you, I'm bid.

0:33:190:33:20

It's the woman next to you who's bidding for it!

0:33:200:33:23

28. 30. At £30. Now, don't put her off.

0:33:230:33:26

It could be yours, madam!

0:33:260:33:28

Fresh bidder. 35. 38.

0:33:280:33:31

-40. 42.

-Oh, no!

-Gentleman's bid now at £42. Any more do I see at 42?

0:33:310:33:37

At 42. He's looking desperate. On my right at 42.

0:33:370:33:42

Great start.

0:33:420:33:43

Charles is off to a flying start. Next up, everyone's favourite bear,

0:33:430:33:47

or at least Charlie is hoping that that's the case.

0:33:470:33:50

The 1946 Rupert annual. It's in good condition.

0:33:530:33:57

One of the rarer ones. Got to be £50 to start it, surely? 50?

0:33:570:34:01

You're all quiet. 30.

0:34:010:34:03

Oh, dear. 10 to start it, surely?

0:34:030:34:04

-Come on, Charlie.

-10. 12.

0:34:040:34:06

15. 18.

0:34:060:34:09

20. 22.

0:34:090:34:11

25. 28.

0:34:110:34:13

28. Your turn, sir. 30.

0:34:130:34:16

30. Your turn again, if you like, sir. 35.

0:34:160:34:19

38.

0:34:190:34:20

40. 45.

0:34:210:34:23

50. 55.

0:34:240:34:26

Anyone else, then? I will sell at £55.

0:34:270:34:31

It's early days, but Charlie is finding the disappointment

0:34:310:34:35

a little hard to "bear"!

0:34:350:34:37

My big hope!

0:34:370:34:38

My big hope down the drain!

0:34:380:34:42

Next up is the oil painting,

0:34:420:34:44

and Charles is hoping this Victorian gentleman will leave him quids in.

0:34:440:34:48

Lovely piece. Where are you going to start me? Got to be 100.

0:34:480:34:51

-100, then, to get it going, surely?

-Come on.

-All quiet. 50 to start it.

0:34:510:34:55

Thank you. I'm bid at £50.

0:34:550:34:57

-55. 60 if you like.

-It's going.

0:34:570:34:59

60 now. 65. 70.

0:34:590:35:02

75. 80. 85.

0:35:020:35:05

-90.

-There you go.

-At £90, are you sure?

0:35:050:35:08

At £90.

0:35:080:35:10

Not a huge profit, but a profit nonetheless.

0:35:110:35:16

Hopefully there's a larger sum to be made on this next charming item.

0:35:170:35:21

Nice little lot, this. It's an upholstered French stool

0:35:210:35:24

on carved cabriole legs. Pretty piece. Start me 40 for it. 40.

0:35:240:35:30

20, then, surely? A nice little stool. Anyone for 20.

0:35:300:35:32

All quiet. 10 to start, surely? Thank you, I'm bid.

0:35:320:35:35

At 12 now. 12. 15. 18.

0:35:350:35:39

£18. Lady's bid in front. 20 now in the second row.

0:35:390:35:42

22, if you like, madam, yes. 22. 25.

0:35:420:35:45

Are you sure? No, 28. Completely fresh bidder. At 28 now. 30.

0:35:450:35:50

32. 35.

0:35:500:35:52

-Lady's bid at 35.

-Getting better. Is that the lady behind us bidding?

0:35:520:35:57

-Thank you, sir, you're back. 38. 40 if you like, £40.

-The lady behind...

0:35:570:36:01

One more, sir? No. At 40, then. Second row.

0:36:010:36:04

Make no mistake. Selling this time at 40.

0:36:040:36:07

-Well done, bean!

-May I say, madam, you have impeccable taste?

0:36:070:36:11

I won't be able to sell it!

0:36:110:36:13

Smoothie Charlie can put his feet up and relax.

0:36:140:36:16

He's made a tidy profit of £15 on the footstool.

0:36:160:36:21

Charles was against the clock when he bought this silver cigar cutter,

0:36:210:36:25

but at £20 he got it for a snip! Ooh!

0:36:250:36:28

I have three commissions bids and I must start at £40.

0:36:290:36:33

I can take 42.

0:36:330:36:35

At £40 with me. £40.

0:36:350:36:37

42 on the back wall. 45 with me. One more if you like. At 48.

0:36:370:36:40

I'm out. On the back wall at 48. Do I see any more.

0:36:400:36:44

Anyone else surely at 48?

0:36:440:36:46

Another success. Not bad for a last-minute purchase.

0:36:470:36:51

Well done, Charles.

0:36:510:36:53

This pretty Sorrento mirror could be one of Charlie's better buys.

0:36:530:36:58

I have commission interest and I need to start it at £35.

0:36:580:37:03

I'll take 8 if it helps. At £35 now. At £35.

0:37:030:37:07

At 35. At 38. 40. At £40.

0:37:070:37:10

Come on, Charlie! Keep going.

0:37:100:37:11

42, fresh bidder. 45, still my commission.

0:37:110:37:15

At 45, then.

0:37:150:37:16

A nice little mark-up on the mirror.

0:37:170:37:20

It's not all doom and gloom for Charlie.

0:37:200:37:22

He's still in with a chance.

0:37:220:37:24

This handy little cabinet is perfect for displaying coins.

0:37:240:37:28

But will there be any cash in it for Charles?

0:37:280:37:31

-The drawers. It's a nice, useful piece.

-Look at the drawers! Love it.

0:37:310:37:35

-As such I have commission interest.

-Great.

0:37:350:37:38

-And I've got to start to clear the sheets at £40.

-Oh, yes.

0:37:380:37:41

45. 50. 55. 60.

0:37:410:37:44

65. 70.

0:37:440:37:46

One more, if you like, sir. 70 commission bid.

0:37:460:37:48

75 in the corner. Completely fresh bidder, sir.

0:37:480:37:51

At 75 now. Do I have any more?

0:37:510:37:54

At 75, I think that's done it. We're selling now at 75.

0:37:540:37:58

Charles streaks ahead with that low-risk purchase.

0:37:580:38:03

A fantastic profit of £65.

0:38:030:38:05

# Hanson is the man

0:38:060:38:09

# He is the kiddy today. #

0:38:090:38:13

I wonder if Charlie can catch up with his beloved bureau.

0:38:150:38:19

He's banking on this lot to make a fat profit.

0:38:190:38:21

Well, you see it. It's got to be 200 for it.

0:38:220:38:25

£100 anywhere to get going?

0:38:250:38:27

-Nice piece. For 50, surely?

-Come on.

-No-one for 50.

0:38:280:38:32

You're all quiet. No-one wants it for 50?

0:38:320:38:36

I'm going to get tears in a minute. No-one wants it even for 20?

0:38:360:38:38

-Come on, Charlie.

-I'll give you 20.

0:38:380:38:41

You're a good man, Bruce. At 20. £20 I have.

0:38:410:38:46

It's a plea for help. 25. Thank you, sir.

0:38:460:38:48

Will you give me 30 now, Bruce? No, he's quiet.

0:38:480:38:51

30 I have close to me. Would you like 35, sir?

0:38:510:38:54

40.

0:38:540:38:56

It's a super piece for 40.

0:38:560:38:58

-At £40. At £40. At £40. I will sell it.

-Oh, dear!

0:38:580:39:02

At only £40.

0:39:020:39:04

Thank you.

0:39:040:39:06

That is a disastrous result for Charlie.

0:39:060:39:10

-Even Charles feels his pain.

-It's worth 150.

0:39:100:39:13

It just shows... Come to auction, you can find bargains

0:39:130:39:16

at Charlie Rosko's expense. Bad luck, mate.

0:39:160:39:19

The next lot are those pretty little silver buttons.

0:39:190:39:24

I've got three bids and I need to start these at £70.

0:39:240:39:28

At 70 with me. I'll take 5 if it helps. 75 on the back wall.

0:39:280:39:32

80 with me. One more if you like.

0:39:320:39:34

-75 off the wall?

-It's in the room now at £85. £90 close to me.

0:39:340:39:40

95. Your turn if you like.

0:39:400:39:42

100, completely fresh bidder. 110?

0:39:440:39:47

Back again with Bruce at 110. No?

0:39:470:39:50

Shake of the head. With Bruce, then, at 110. Any more do I see at 110?

0:39:500:39:54

Another success story for Carlos,

0:39:540:39:57

with an Arts and Crafty profit of £30!

0:39:570:40:01

Charlie's last hope lies with the job lot of silver,

0:40:010:40:05

bought from three different shops.

0:40:050:40:07

-I've got commission interest.

-If I could pull out now, I would.

0:40:070:40:11

25. I can take 28. At 28. 30. 32, commission's out. Your turn.

0:40:110:40:16

32. 35 here.

0:40:160:40:18

No? At 35, in the cap. New bid. 38. 40.

0:40:180:40:22

42. Fresh bidder.

0:40:220:40:24

45.

0:40:250:40:26

I'm thrilled with this, I'm thrilled.

0:40:260:40:29

Any more? 55, fresh bidder. At 55. Your turn. 60.

0:40:290:40:33

I'm nearly getting my money back.

0:40:330:40:36

-65. Seated bid I have at 65.

-65? I've nearly got my money back.

0:40:360:40:42

70. At £70 now.

0:40:420:40:44

Going to sell this time at 70.

0:40:440:40:46

-Well done.

-I've never been so excited about breaking even!

0:40:470:40:51

He might be happy to make his cash back,

0:40:510:40:54

but the silver gives Charlie a lacklustre finish to the auction.

0:40:540:40:58

-Charlie?

-Yes.

-Do you know why I've been losing money?

-Why?

0:40:580:41:01

-My jacket.

-What about it?

-I bet if you put my jacket on,

0:41:010:41:05

you won't make a profit.

0:41:050:41:07

-I think my duck will make a profit.

-Put my jacket on and see.

0:41:070:41:11

I bet it doesn't.

0:41:120:41:14

Are you sure?

0:41:150:41:16

It's time to put Charlie's lucky-jacket theory to the test

0:41:160:41:20

with the final lot of the day, Charles' duck pen wipe.

0:41:200:41:24

If I'd been in this jacket from the beginning, I'd have made a profit.

0:41:240:41:27

-It's a good jacket, Charlie.

-Goes well with the tie.

0:41:270:41:30

Shall I get you one?

0:41:300:41:31

I have four bids altogether.

0:41:310:41:34

And I need to start to clear the sheets at £80. I'll take 85.

0:41:340:41:38

85.

0:41:380:41:39

-90. At £90.

-Come on. Keep going.

0:41:390:41:42

I have commission still. 95, just in time. 100 still with me.

0:41:420:41:45

-At £100, anyone else? Going to sell.

-All done.

0:41:450:41:47

Fair warning at 100.

0:41:470:41:49

A "quacking" success which means that today's victor is...

0:41:500:41:55

Charles Hanson!

0:41:550:41:57

Do you know what? The jacket is not unlucky, Charlie.

0:41:570:42:00

The jacket is built with pedigree and pride.

0:42:000:42:03

-Well done, old bean.

-Thanks, buddy.

0:42:040:42:05

-I have had a thrashing.

-Until next time, Charlie.

0:42:050:42:09

Thanks for the memories!

0:42:090:42:11

Charlie started today's show with...

0:42:120:42:15

..and, after paying auction costs,

0:42:190:42:21

actually made a loss of £65.

0:42:210:42:24

Charlie has just...

0:42:250:42:27

to carry forward.

0:42:270:42:30

Charles, meanwhile, started with...

0:42:300:42:33

..and made a bumper profit of £131.30.

0:42:350:42:39

He has a whopping...

0:42:390:42:42

..to take forward.

0:42:420:42:45

Charlie, I think it's been my day throughout today,

0:42:470:42:49

and Suffolk has been so prosperous for me, I think we'll stay around here.

0:42:490:42:53

With your blessing. Let's try Sudbury. Let's try Lavenham.

0:42:530:42:57

-Long Melford, sir?

-Indeed.

0:42:570:42:59

-Let's stay local.

-If you insist, sir. I'll show you out.

-Thank you, Charlie.

0:42:590:43:03

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, the chaps' fancy car plays up again.

0:43:030:43:09

And it all seems like child's play!

0:43:090:43:12

Come on, Charlie, come on! Let's go!

0:43:120:43:14

And after a long search for antiques in Suffolk, their friendship has certainly blossomed.

0:43:140:43:20

Why don't we bring our wives over here for a joint holiday together?

0:43:200:43:23

I think that's a really good idea. Cracking idea.

0:43:230:43:26

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:280:43:32

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:320:43:36