Episode 17 Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 17

Charlie Ross and Charles Hanson are getting on famously as they drive the second leg of their road trip from Scunthorpe to Grantham.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 17. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

.

0:47:500:47:57

-The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge.

-War!

0:48:020:48:09

Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

0:48:090:48:14

The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit,

0:48:140:48:19

but it's not as easy as you might think and things don't always go to plan.

0:48:190:48:24

-Will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

-I'll thrash you!

0:48:240:48:29

This is the Antiques Road Trip!

0:48:290:48:32

This week we're out on the road with a pair of troublemakers -

0:48:370:48:41

actually, auctioneers Charlie Ross and Charles Hanson.

0:48:410:48:46

There was a young vicar of Prings, who professed to despise earthly things, but his secret desire...

0:48:460:48:53

That's quite enough, thank you! Charlie Ross is a leaner senior

0:48:530:48:57

and he has his moments!

0:48:570:48:59

-For 30 quid it's an absolute bargain.

-Wouldn't be bad for a tenner.

0:48:590:49:04

-Would it?

-Though he does struggle to part with his cash.

0:49:040:49:08

-I wish I had spent more money.

-So do I.

0:49:080:49:11

And this is Charles Hanson. He's an auctioneer, antiques expert and an athlete.

0:49:110:49:17

-Charles Hanson. I'm an auctioneer and author and antiques expert.

-Well, you could call it that.

0:49:170:49:23

He's called the Young Pretender, keeping his chin up despite a cruel, bruising loss yesterday.

0:49:230:49:30

I'm going to set sail and hit those high seas.

0:49:300:49:34

-60 quid.

-Add £25.

-85?

-Yes.

0:49:350:49:39

27.50.

0:49:400:49:42

Aww!

0:49:420:49:44

Charlie Ross, meanwhile, had a fairly good first outing with a few more sober purchases.

0:49:440:49:51

-You can have that for a tenner.

-Bother!

0:49:510:49:54

From his original £200,

0:49:540:49:57

Charlie now has £234.56 to flash about.

0:49:570:50:02

Not a lot, but considerably more than Hanson's got.

0:50:030:50:07

Sadly, yes.

0:50:070:50:09

Poor Charles's losses mean his £200 has shrunk

0:50:090:50:13

to a worrying £132.65 to fight back with.

0:50:130:50:19

And as the chaps launch into Round 2,

0:50:190:50:22

their vintage 1960s Ford Corsa is still serving them well as this week's wheels.

0:50:220:50:29

# Heigh ho!

0:50:290:50:32

# Heigh ho! #

0:50:320:50:34

Don't join the choir. They will travel over 300 miles down the gorgeous east coast of England,

0:50:350:50:42

all the way to Rye in East Sussex.

0:50:420:50:44

And on today's show they're leaving Doncaster, heading for Grantham.

0:50:440:50:50

First stop is North Lincolnshire's glittering jewel, Scunthorpe.

0:50:500:50:54

-I see old Fagin in you!

-You think I'm a mean buyer?

0:50:540:50:58

You pick a pocket or two in your dealings!

0:50:580:51:03

On 21st March, 1890, the first shiny white metal came out of the furnaces

0:51:030:51:09

at Frodingham ironworks

0:51:090:51:12

and Scunthorpe has ever since been a stalwart of British steel production,

0:51:120:51:18

as well as the original setting for Jack Carter's northern revenge in the novel Jack's Return Home,

0:51:180:51:24

famously filmed with Michael Caine as Get Carter, though sadly relocated to Newcastle.

0:51:240:51:31

Today Scunthorpe offers Charlie Ross his first antiques emporium.

0:51:310:51:36

Now...I've found something here that could well be relevant to where we're going to auction.

0:51:380:51:44

We're going to be very near Lincoln

0:51:440:51:47

and here we've got the Arnold and Company, Lincoln, Limited.

0:51:470:51:54

Actually, Charlie, the auction is 25 miles south from Lincoln in Grantham,

0:51:540:52:00

but I'm sure it will have its own lovers of old lemonade bottles. There, there, dear.

0:52:000:52:06

There's something that looks a bit like an industrial tape measure. It looks rather interesting.

0:52:060:52:13

Need to find the boss, I think.

0:52:130:52:16

-Hi, there.

-Hello.

-Are you the boss?

-I am, yeah. Dave.

-I'm Charlie, hi.

-Nice to meet you.

0:52:160:52:22

-There you go.

-Is that a tape measure of some sort?

-It is. An old Chesterman's one.

-A Chesterman's.

0:52:220:52:28

What a fascinating bit of kit. Would that be used by a surveyor?

0:52:280:52:33

J Chesterman and Co made tape measures and tools from the early 1900s to the 1960s,

0:52:330:52:40

eventually becoming the more famous Stanley Tools.

0:52:400:52:43

The asking price for this early model is £45.

0:52:430:52:47

Look at that.

0:52:470:52:49

Victorian doll's crib.

0:52:500:52:53

And as far as I can see,

0:52:530:52:55

it's absolutely 100%.

0:52:550:52:58

Victorian toys and dolls are highly collectable, but this ain't either

0:52:580:53:04

and at £58 it isn't cheap. I can feel a negotiation coming on.

0:53:040:53:09

What about £30 for the crib?

0:53:090:53:11

If I could tempt you at 40, that's where I'd be with it.

0:53:110:53:15

-What about the tape measure?

-It's been with us a bit longer.

-Has it?

-It's more specialist.

-Quite.

0:53:150:53:21

I think we could probably take that down to 30.

0:53:210:53:25

-You can't do the two for 50?

-I can't. That's too low.

0:53:250:53:29

-I'll do the pair for 65.

-There are two glass Lincoln lemonade bottles.

0:53:290:53:34

One is priced at £4 and one is priced at £3.

0:53:340:53:39

-I'll do the two for a fiver.

-70 quid for the lot.

-That's right.

0:53:390:53:43

I'll get my cash out. Thank you for looking after me.

0:53:430:53:47

That's what I call a fine start, Charlie.

0:53:470:53:51

And it looks like you could hold your lead for Day 2.

0:53:510:53:56

Meanwhile, first-time hitchhiker Charles Hanson has gone on ahead.

0:53:560:54:00

Quite far ahead, actually.

0:54:000:54:03

34 miles south from sunny Scunny

0:54:040:54:07

finds our poor second-place expert about to land in Lincoln.

0:54:070:54:12

The wind's blowing an almost Force 14 gale here in Lincolnshire

0:54:140:54:19

and Hanson is, at the moment, heading downhill, almost treading water, but I'm not concerned.

0:54:190:54:25

I'm in my lucky waistcoat.

0:54:250:54:27

come on, Hanson! And off you go!

0:54:270:54:30

That's the spirit. You can't keep a good man down,

0:54:310:54:35

-although I wonder quite where is he going.

-This way!

0:54:350:54:40

Of course, there's much to see and be excited about in Lincoln.

0:54:410:54:46

Built from Roman times onwards on a gap in the Lincoln cliff,

0:54:460:54:50

it's known locally as the uphill, downhill town.

0:54:500:54:53

Its centre point is is the stunning Lincoln cathedral,

0:54:530:54:58

first built in 1092 and much of it surviving despite earthquake,

0:54:580:55:03

anarchy, civil war, tourists and, possibly, Charles Hanson.

0:55:030:55:08

Let's hope and pray opposite the church we're open.

0:55:090:55:13

Hello, madam.

0:55:190:55:21

-Your name is...?

-Suzy.

-Hi, I'm Charles.

0:55:210:55:25

Wow. Look at this.

0:55:250:55:27

It's like Aladdin's cave.

0:55:270:55:30

-And what's your name?

-Chico.

-And how much is he?

-Er...

0:55:340:55:38

-Priceless.

-Yes!

0:55:380:55:41

There's everything in here. You can barely walk around, there's so much crammed in.

0:55:410:55:46

-Is there anything a bit quirky?

-Oh, here you are. for a fisherman.

0:55:460:55:50

-What is it?

-A wine thing.

-Of course, yeah.

0:55:530:55:57

-That's £10.

-I mean, for £10...

-That's quirky.

-It's not very old, but it's quirky.

-I've never seen one.

0:55:570:56:04

What you've got is a bottle stand. A fisherman is smiling, smoking his pipe. Not very old, but collectable.

0:56:040:56:11

Today's market is so governed by quirkiness.

0:56:110:56:15

You know, we've sort of been here before, Charles, and I'm sure

0:56:150:56:21

there are some actual antiques here, no?

0:56:210:56:24

(Am I doing it?)

0:56:250:56:27

OK, it's not an antique. Suzy, what's your best price?

0:56:270:56:31

-Eight.

-£8?

-Yeah.

-I'll probably go for him. I can't make a big loss. I've had a disaster already.

0:56:310:56:37

I've lost £80 already and I'm down to barely £100.

0:56:370:56:43

-Will you take £5 for him?

-No.

-Meet me halfway - six.

-OK.

0:56:440:56:49

£6. Suzy, we're going and I'm going. I'm going.

0:56:490:56:53

-Nice to meet you.

-And gone. Thanks, Suzy, ever so much.

0:56:530:56:57

Well, it's done now. Let's hope Charles tries to sell this item with a full bottle of wine included.

0:56:570:57:04

Reputations intact, sort of, it's time for our boys to get on the road again.

0:57:050:57:11

12 miles east to Doddington where they very lucky Charlie Ross has a prior engagement,

0:57:140:57:20

dontcha know?

0:57:200:57:23

Slow down.

0:57:230:57:25

-It's just in here.

-OK.

0:57:250:57:28

No, no, not that one! The next one.

0:57:280:57:31

That's it, yes. Superb.

0:57:310:57:33

-Gently! Now very gently down here. This is a stately home.

-Sorry.

-Do be gentle.

-Sorry.

0:57:330:57:39

-Magnificent.

-Wonderful Doddington Hall has never been sold since it was built

0:57:390:57:46

in 1595 by Britain's foremost Elizabethan architect, Robert Smythson.

0:57:460:57:52

At this time, architecture was not yet a profession,

0:57:520:57:57

but Smythson was a master stonemason, creating this pile for local lawyer and landowner

0:57:570:58:03

Thomas Taylor and his descendants.

0:58:030:58:06

-How many rooms?

-Not as many as you would think.

0:58:060:58:10

My grandmother always said it was a little big house

0:58:100:58:14

-because it looks very imposing...

-Yeah.

-..but it's only one room wide.

-Relatively manageable.

-Relatively.

0:58:140:58:21

Right, come in.

0:58:220:58:24

Current owner Claire Jarvis is a descendant from the original founders of the estate,

0:58:240:58:30

a family of passionate creators, restorers and collectors.

0:58:300:58:34

A bit like our Charlie Ross, really. And the wonderful Great Hall is still used as a family dining room,

0:58:340:58:40

where each generation has left its mark.

0:58:400:58:44

-It strikes me that what's interesting is the different periods of furniture.

-Yes.

0:58:440:58:50

-It's just an amazing mix.

-I think that's the story of this house.

0:58:500:58:55

It's been never really cleared out and people have just added things.

0:58:550:58:59

These are Cromwellian chairs.

0:58:590:59:01

-What period do you think the table is?

-I would say

0:59:010:59:06

-that it was made... the turn of the last century.

-It was made about 15 years ago.

-15!

0:59:060:59:13

My father made it for their 25th wedding anniversary from wood from the estate.

0:59:130:59:19

Further into this fascinating home, the family penchant for collecting becomes both frenzied

0:59:190:59:26

and more organised.

0:59:260:59:28

You probably noticed a lot of porcelain in the cabinets.

0:59:280:59:33

It was collected by a predecessor of mine called George Edwin Jarvis.

0:59:330:59:37

And he created this fantastic catalogue of all the things he collected.

0:59:370:59:43

Every single piece that he bought or found or collected,

0:59:430:59:47

-he actually painted and wrote all the information.

-Amazing!

-So beautifully done.

0:59:470:59:53

What a labour of love. Isn't that magnificent?

0:59:530:59:56

Claire is now the curator of her own family history. Doddington Hall is a living, vibrant museum

0:59:561:00:03

utilising local volunteers to research and catalogue its many wonderful objects.

1:00:031:00:10

This is rather an interesting room. We call it the Forgotten Room because it's full of bits and pieces.

1:00:101:00:17

-What an extraordinary room!

-Well, quite.

1:00:181:00:22

This amazing room contains everything that was ever kept by or somehow missed being thrown out

1:00:221:00:28

as the years, decades and centuries passed. As there's no strict criteria to what resides here,

1:00:281:00:36

-the family has merely named it the Forgotten Room.

-We had to clear out a lot of rooms

1:00:361:00:42

-and there was just junk in them.

-But it's not junk, is it?

-It's not.

-It really isn't.

1:00:421:00:48

-There's very little we threw away. We have a great collection of irons. This wonderful '50s iron.

-Splendid.

1:00:481:00:54

Still with the label. And another. Then some really early irons here.

1:00:541:00:59

-It's really fun for children to see.

-It's an education, isn't it?

1:00:591:01:03

-Do you know what that is?

-No, but it's for gripping something.

1:01:031:01:08

-Why is that sprung?

-It should spring back and snap.

-Ah.

1:01:081:01:12

-Oh, I see.

-What if we put some jam on there?

1:01:121:01:17

-Bzzz!

-Oh, no!

1:01:171:01:19

-Really?

-It's a wasp trap.

-A wasp trap!

1:01:191:01:23

A wasp gun.

1:01:231:01:25

This is a fun thing, too.

1:01:261:01:28

That's an old hoover! How often do you use that?

1:01:281:01:33

-It gets the dust.

-Vacuum cleaner. Wonderful.

1:01:351:01:40

-These are fun. Victorian roller skates.

-Victorian roller skates.

1:01:401:01:44

-Have you tried them?

-No. I think I'd break my leg.

1:01:441:01:49

I think you would. You'd think it was a new invention, but it's Victorian. Thank you for that.

1:01:491:01:55

-I feel quite exhausted.

-Oh, Mr Ross, you poor old love!

1:01:551:02:00

Sadly, your indulgences garner no sympathy here.

1:02:001:02:05

For pure, dynamic, all-action, go get 'em, antiques shopping, I put my money on Team Hanson.

1:02:051:02:10

Doddington Hall is just a memory now as the road trip dances merrily

1:02:141:02:19

15 miles south-east to the lovely village of Navenby.

1:02:191:02:23

-Good morning. How are you?

-Very well.

-I'm Charles Hanson.

-Laura Conway.

1:02:261:02:32

What I do like is this one here. Birmingham, 1907.

1:02:361:02:40

-Martha, David and Morris Davis. It's a sugar sifter.

-Yes.

1:02:401:02:44

With your lidded cover

1:02:441:02:47

This would fetch between £60 and £100. What's your retail price?

1:02:471:02:52

-It's quite a lot more than that.

-Yeah.

-We've got that on at 225.

1:02:521:02:56

-Yeah.

-But it has been here for a year and a half.

-Don't tell him it's languishing!

1:02:561:03:02

This is a delightful, decorative antique item, rather than a boat-shaped cocktail bar!

1:03:021:03:09

Could we be seeing Charles Hanson about to buy an actual antique?

1:03:091:03:13

-I can let you have it at 100.

-Oh, crikey.

1:03:131:03:18

Laura, £100 is a really, really good offer for me to buy it at,

1:03:181:03:23

so I'll think about it.

1:03:231:03:26

That's sweet.

1:03:291:03:32

This tiny oval box reads "A trifle from Bath"

1:03:321:03:37

and what we've got here is something which was a lady's patch box.

1:03:371:03:41

Ladies back in the 1760s, 1780s, had warts on their faces

1:03:411:03:45

or they may have had scars and blisters. It was a very unhygienic time.

1:03:451:03:51

This you would have kept your cream in to cover patches on your face.

1:03:511:03:55

In the Georgian period, the health of England's upper classes was often threatened by smallpox.

1:03:551:04:01

If you survived the disease, it could leave your face pock-marked

1:04:011:04:05

and as a woman you needed the patches to cover up the craters in your skin.

1:04:051:04:10

-The asking price is 145.

-145?

-It is, yes.

1:04:101:04:14

-For you, Charles, I think we could do that at £50.

-Commercially, am I being savvy? Maybe not,

1:04:141:04:20

but when you handle history that tells a great story...

1:04:201:04:25

Sounds like someone needs a moment of "me time" to weigh up the pros and cons.

1:04:251:04:31

They will want about £100 for the sifter.

1:04:311:04:35

If I can go in at 70 and buy it,

1:04:351:04:38

buy the oval box at 25, that's 95...

1:04:381:04:42

It gives Hands On Hanson still £35 to play with...

1:04:421:04:47

and back in the game. I'm feeling back in the game. I feel good.

1:04:481:04:52

I'm going now to make my offer and see what comes of it.

1:04:521:04:56

Laura, I've arrived at a decision which I hope you're agreeable to.

1:04:561:05:00

-I'd like to offer about £25 for the enamel box...

-Wow!

1:05:001:05:05

That's half of what Laura was hoping for on the patch box.

1:05:051:05:09

Let's hope Charles can pay the £70 for the sugar sifter without causing offence.

1:05:091:05:15

I'd like to offer you... 25 plus 70.

1:05:151:05:20

That makes £95.

1:05:201:05:22

And I'm asking your hand... for a sale.

1:05:221:05:27

-Oh, for you, Charles.

-Are you sure?

-Go on, then. For you.

1:05:321:05:36

£95. Laura, thanks ever so much.

1:05:361:05:39

She fancies him. Well, the Hanson antiques arsenal is improving.

1:05:391:05:43

He has a renewed sense of optimism.

1:05:431:05:47

Charlie Ross, watch out. I'm coming to get you.

1:05:471:05:52

Well, always nice to end the day with a threat! It's been a good hunt so far, though.

1:05:521:05:58

Now Navenby must give our road trippers a bed for the night. Sleep tight.

1:05:581:06:04

Dawn breaks across Lincolnshire and our chaps are straight back at it.

1:06:061:06:12

You know, the word's on the street that a) you're back and b) you were a Dick Turpin yesterday!

1:06:121:06:20

-Ha ha!

-I'm going to call you Dick Hanson! You were wearing a mask yesterday!

1:06:201:06:25

So far, Charlie's spent £70 on three lots.

1:06:251:06:30

The surveyor's tape, the Victorian crib and the Lincolnshire pop bottles,

1:06:301:06:37

leaving £164.56 for the day ahead.

1:06:371:06:41

Charles, meanwhile, hit the first day's shopping running, literally,

1:06:411:06:46

spending £101 also on three items.

1:06:461:06:49

The Edwardian sugar sifter, the Georgian box

1:06:501:06:54

and the bottle thingy. Charles has just £31.65 left to carry on with.

1:06:541:07:01

# You've got to pick a pocket or two, boys

1:07:021:07:08

# You've got to pick a pocket or two. #

1:07:081:07:12

So our angelic, sooty-faced street urchins continue on.

1:07:121:07:16

356 miles east from Navenby to the market town of Alford,

1:07:161:07:22

once home to the eminent thinker Thomas Paine,

1:07:221:07:26

the man who first suggested the name United States Of America

1:07:261:07:31

and the idea of the constitution from his famous essays, The Rights of Man and The Age of Reason.

1:07:311:07:37

-Could these lofty ideals inspire that mild-mannered revolutionary Charles Hanson?

-Here we go.

1:07:371:07:45

-Good morning, sir. I'm Charles Hanson.

-Hi.

-Your name is...?

-Mel.

1:07:451:07:50

Are there any other objects I can look at at all?

1:07:551:08:00

-The brass bed...is that for sale?

-I can do that for 20, 30 quid.

1:08:001:08:05

And we are missing the slats? Here's your headboard.

1:08:051:08:10

-It would have been a nice bed, probably from, oh, about 1900.

-Yeah, I would say so.

1:08:111:08:18

Nice. But it's no time for a lie down just yet.

1:08:181:08:22

Now these are fairly crude Japanese earthenware satsuma-esque vases, aren't they?

1:08:221:08:29

From the 1920s, made for export, really quite crude.

1:08:291:08:33

Really quite ugly. But people do collect them.

1:08:331:08:37

I've had a very difficult time. I've got to be a bit more... sombre in my purchases

1:08:371:08:44

rather than going so gang-ho. Could I call this lot 25?

1:08:441:08:49

And give you 6 for the brass bed?

1:08:491:08:52

-Go on.

-Sure?

-Yeah, go on.

1:08:561:09:00

Gone. Thanks, Mel. Good man.

1:09:001:09:02

Hats off to the Young Pretender. He's got just 65p left in his pocket

1:09:021:09:07

and a whole lot of wares to take to auction.

1:09:071:09:11

Oh, I'll let you go that way.

1:09:131:09:16

I just hope Charles can remember where he parked. Oh, dear.

1:09:171:09:22

# Mamma mia, here I go again

1:09:221:09:26

# My, my, how can I resist you

1:09:261:09:29

-# Blue since the day we parted... #

-And here we go again.

1:09:291:09:34

We fondly wave Alford goodbye and continue on,

1:09:341:09:38

journeying 25 miles south-west to Boston.

1:09:381:09:42

As the shopping hours draw to an end,

1:09:431:09:46

Bismark Antiques offers Mr Ross a last stab at victory.

1:09:461:09:50

Sylvia and son Matthew run this fine den of antiquity.

1:09:501:09:55

Pair of silver sauce boats.

1:10:031:10:06

No price. I love things without a price. It always gives you a chance.

1:10:061:10:11

I think they're going to be about 1920. They're in an earlier style.

1:10:111:10:15

They're in an 18th century style, but they have got a good weight to them.

1:10:151:10:20

How much are the pair of sauce boats?

1:10:201:10:23

They can be 180.

1:10:231:10:25

180...

1:10:251:10:27

OK, but...

1:10:271:10:30

The main problem I have is that I've only got 160 quid.

1:10:301:10:35

Ah, yes. Too much.

1:10:371:10:40

Best forget all about them.

1:10:401:10:42

There's no point in me trying to steal them off you. Or is there?

1:10:421:10:46

You wouldn't take 160 quid for those, would you?

1:10:461:10:50

-I would take 160.

-Would you?

-To help you out.

1:10:501:10:52

I can't think of any reason why I shouldn't buy those,

1:10:521:10:56

other than...

1:10:561:10:58

..it will spend me out completely against that Hanson.

1:10:591:11:03

I wouldn't worry. There's no way you've bought anything as ridiculous and risky as Charles Hanson.

1:11:031:11:10

Have you got anything for £4.56?

1:11:101:11:14

-Cos if you have, I will buy it.

-I'll find you this.

1:11:141:11:17

If you can find me something for £4.56, I will spend every penny I have in life.

1:11:171:11:23

But what is it exactly?

1:11:231:11:26

-It would have been for your sugar, then to hang your snips...

-You hang your snips over the edge.

1:11:261:11:32

I think that's fantastic.

1:11:321:11:34

-Matthew...

-Great.

-Congratulations.

1:11:351:11:38

-I now have absolutely...

-Penniless.

-..nothing!

1:11:381:11:43

I am penniless.

1:11:431:11:45

This is ridiculous.

1:11:451:11:47

You've spent your entire budget, beating Mr Hanson by a full 65p.

1:11:471:11:51

Thanks a lot. I can't even afford a sandwich!

1:11:531:11:56

Cash or no cash, Charles has decided that lovely Boston can offer him one final treat today.

1:11:561:12:04

Windmills have existed in Britain for an awfully long time.

1:12:101:12:14

And these vertical models became particularly iconic in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire

1:12:141:12:20

from the 13th century onwards.

1:12:201:12:22

Maud Foster Mill is a working business once more,

1:12:221:12:25

though its historical fortunes have changed with the winds.

1:12:251:12:30

-James Waterfield.

-Good to see you. Charles Hanson.

-Pleased to meet you.

1:12:311:12:35

As a young boy, I always wanted to wander into a windmill

1:12:351:12:39

and it's great to be here in Boston and to see it. It's a wonderful building.

1:12:391:12:44

Hmm. 192 this year as well.

1:12:441:12:47

The mill was built for brothers Thomas and Isaac Reckitt,

1:12:471:12:51

paying a princely sum of 1,826 pounds, ten shillings and sixpence.

1:12:511:12:57

From 1819, grain arrived by canal, was winched to the top floor

1:12:581:13:05

and squeezed through millstones, grinding into fine flour.

1:13:051:13:09

After changing owners, Maud Foster Mill closed for business in the 1940s

1:13:091:13:14

and was saved as a landmark by the Reckitt Family Charitable Trust in 1953.

1:13:141:13:20

So, James, when you took this windmill over in 1987,

1:13:231:13:27

what was the passion for you in a windmill?

1:13:271:13:31

I'd started when I was a schoolboy at another mill for a Saturday job,

1:13:311:13:35

then I went off and did it for a museum, then I did it for a family business with a water mill.

1:13:351:13:41

Then I came here in a roundabout sort of a way.

1:13:411:13:44

It was more fun in those days because no-one else was doing organic flour and things like that.

1:13:441:13:50

-We were weird hippies for making that.

-I often dreamt about being strapped to a sail.

1:13:501:13:55

-There's probably therapy for that.

-Yeah, I think there would be.

1:13:551:14:00

-Shall we go outside?

-Yes, yes, feel free.

1:14:031:14:07

It's a bit high, isn't it?

1:14:071:14:09

Gee whizz!

1:14:091:14:11

-What's this big chain for?

-We've got the control chains for the sails to stop and start the mill.

1:14:111:14:17

The sails seems to be going quite slowly.

1:14:171:14:20

-Do you want a bit of raw muscle to give you a hand?

-Yes, go on then.

1:14:201:14:25

If you pull that down, that will put a bit more cloth on, that will close up the sails more.

1:14:251:14:30

-If I pull it too hard, it won't break?

-No, it'd need to be a better man than you to break it.

1:14:301:14:36

-Derbyshire men, strong in the arm!

-Strong in the arm, thick in the head.

-Thanks(!)

-Just steady and hard.

1:14:361:14:42

You don't need to yank it. Just pull it.

1:14:421:14:45

-That's it. You've gone as far as it will go.

-Look, can you see?

1:14:451:14:49

-That's full cloth, so it should go a bit better.

-I've given a windmill full cloth. I feel so proud.

-Yeah.

1:14:491:14:56

-Watch your head.

-Sorry.

-Gee whizz! Fantastic, isn't it?

1:15:011:15:06

Careful, Hanson. These amazing machines are as dangerous as they are beautiful.

1:15:061:15:12

One of the millers was killed in the 1920s.

1:15:121:15:15

He climbed over the balcony rails to retrieve his cigarettes and got hit on the head as he climbed back up.

1:15:151:15:22

The last miller in the '40s would go round on the sails for a shilling.

1:15:221:15:26

-He wouldn't?

-Yeah. I won't, but he would.

1:15:261:15:29

# And the world is like an apple whirling silently in space

1:15:291:15:34

# Like the circles that you find

1:15:341:15:37

# In the windmills of your mind... #

1:15:371:15:41

This is wholemeal, just milled today, fresh out of the finest windmill in Lincolnshire.

1:15:411:15:47

We need to stitch it up. Shall I stitch one and show you?

1:15:501:15:55

You can have a go if you want.

1:15:551:15:57

-You wouldn't want to make a suit with that.

-And that's hand-stitched, ready for off?

1:16:031:16:08

Yeah, hand-stitched by a machine!

1:16:081:16:11

Hanson, you stupid boy!

1:16:111:16:13

James and his father have restored this marvellous building

1:16:131:16:17

and created a successful business.

1:16:171:16:20

In 1988, Basil Reckitt, great-grandson of Isaac Reckitt,

1:16:201:16:24

proudly performed the re-opening ceremony.

1:16:241:16:28

-Thanks ever so much, James. I really enjoyed it.

-Right.

1:16:281:16:31

I'm covered in flour. I'm completely covered in flour.

1:16:351:16:39

Unbelievable! Time to pick yourself up, dust yourself off and show Charlie Ross your wares.

1:16:391:16:46

I'm going to say, Charlie, bring it on!

1:16:491:16:51

Oh, they're nice.

1:16:511:16:53

Aren't they lovely?

1:16:531:16:55

Aren't they quality?

1:16:551:16:57

-Because look what they say on them!

-Oh, how nice...

-Lincoln!

1:16:571:17:01

I would value them between £10 and £20.

1:17:011:17:04

-Paid a fiver.

-Oh, well played. That to me is a good start.

1:17:041:17:08

It's a surveyor's tape, Sheffield-made.

1:17:101:17:14

-Yes.

-By Chesterman.

1:17:141:17:17

I'm going to stick my neck out and say you probably paid £45.

1:17:171:17:21

-I paid 30.

-That's good, Charlie.

-It's a gamble.

1:17:211:17:24

-Be honest.

-I'd like to give that Victorian, 1900.

-What's it worth?

1:17:251:17:30

-£50 to £80.

-Yeah, I paid 46.

1:17:301:17:33

-50 to 80.

-Take the 4 off...

1:17:341:17:36

-And you paid 6?

-£6.

-£6?!

-Yes, Charlie Ross!

1:17:361:17:41

Oh, Dick Turpin you are!

1:17:411:17:44

You ought to wear a mask!

1:17:441:17:46

-What do you think?

-I think you've got a serious profit there!

1:17:461:17:50

-We're talking what age, Charlie? 1870, 1890?

-Yeah.

1:17:501:17:54

And I'm really hoping, buddy, that you paid more than...50 for it.

1:17:541:18:00

-No, I paid less than 50.

-Oh, no.

1:18:001:18:03

-Don't tell me it was less than 25?

-35.

-That's good.

1:18:031:18:06

Un, deux, trois, go!

1:18:061:18:09

Oh, I say!

1:18:091:18:11

Yes!

1:18:111:18:13

-You know, Charlie, what a lot!

-I must say you've got quantity.

1:18:131:18:18

I would estimate that at 80 to 120.

1:18:181:18:20

-OK, yeah, they cost me 75.

-Yeah. You can't go wrong.

1:18:201:18:24

Charlie, take 25 off.

1:18:241:18:27

Oh, you're such a stinker!

1:18:271:18:29

-What did they cost? A fiver?

-£25.

1:18:291:18:32

Oh, they're good.

1:18:331:18:36

-On my side, I hope they're not silver, and they are silver.

-Yes.

1:18:361:18:40

I can see they're delightfully marked, they're heavy.

1:18:401:18:44

-They are weighty.

-Oh, you cheeky guy!

1:18:441:18:46

-I reckon you probably paid £125.

-Well, I paid £160 for them.

1:18:461:18:51

-There, voila!

-That's gorgeous.

1:18:511:18:54

It's a nice, bayonet-fitted caster.

1:18:541:18:58

-Silver.

-If you bought it for 60 or 70, you have got a creamy little profit.

-Yeah, £70.

1:18:581:19:04

Yeah.

1:19:041:19:05

It's a sugar bowl for cubed sugar and your sugar tongs hang over the edge.

1:19:051:19:10

-It'll make about £20.

-I'd be very happy with that.

-Yeah.

1:19:101:19:14

"A trifle from Bath."

1:19:141:19:16

Oh, isn't that sweet?

1:19:161:19:19

-A lady's patch box...

-You paid...

-£25.

-I was going to say 20.

1:19:191:19:24

-When the weather is fine and you know it's a sign, go fishing, maybe in...

-That's dreadful.

1:19:241:19:31

Well, now we're in Boston and look at that.

1:19:311:19:33

What we've got, Charlie, is a very, very nice bottle stand,

1:19:331:19:38

beautifully made, beautifully cast with this fisherman with his rod,

1:19:381:19:42

and, of course, he is mounted with nuts.

1:19:421:19:46

OK? He's got lots of nuts.

1:19:461:19:48

That is the worst thing I have ever seen in my life!

1:19:481:19:53

-And he agrees. Charlie, what I would say...

-I've lost it.

1:19:531:19:57

I've lost it. I can't believe you bought that.

1:19:571:20:01

-It's fun.

-No.

-It's frivolous.

-No.

-You're a man of great dining room stature.

-Yes.

1:20:011:20:07

I'm sure you and your wife Sal would be delighted to have this on your cocktail bar. No?

1:20:071:20:12

You didn't honestly pay money for that, did you?

1:20:121:20:16

Well, Charlie, I gambled.

1:20:161:20:18

I paid £6.

1:20:181:20:20

Between friends.

1:20:201:20:22

Fine. I think you'll...

1:20:221:20:24

I don't know what you've done.

1:20:241:20:27

Yes, it's difficult to know what to say, but do try.

1:20:271:20:31

Let's forget about that repulsive bottle holder, but he's done well.

1:20:311:20:36

I think Team Hanson is feeling fine, is feeling merry.

1:20:361:20:40

It's been a long day, but my God, it's been a great one.

1:20:401:20:44

The gap will narrow. He might even overtake me.

1:20:441:20:47

Stranger things have happened.

1:20:481:20:50

It's been a spectacular second leg from Scunthorpe,

1:20:501:20:54

via Lincoln, Doddington, Navenby, Alford and Boston

1:20:541:20:59

with the final destination of Grantham in their sights.

1:20:591:21:03

Grantham is a town of firsts,

1:21:041:21:07

especially for the ladies.

1:21:071:21:10

The world's first female police officers were trained and stationed in Grantham in 1914.

1:21:101:21:16

And on the 13th of October, 1925,

1:21:161:21:20

the first female Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, was born here,

1:21:201:21:24

although the town's folk sometimes keep quiet about the latter.

1:21:241:21:29

It's auction day as our couple of Charlies arrive in town.

1:21:291:21:34

-Are you coming or not?

-Anyone would think you bought something worth selling!

1:21:341:21:39

Welcome to the theatre of dreams.

1:21:391:21:42

George W Golding, one-time Mayor of Grantham,

1:21:441:21:48

opened Golding's Auction House in 1900, becoming Golding Young in 1994.

1:21:481:21:53

Sales here go live online,

1:21:531:21:56

so there's plenty of potential international competition for the assembled hopeful buyers.

1:21:561:22:02

Town crier Colin Young is our auctioneer for the day

1:22:021:22:07

and has kindly cast his eye over our experts' purchases.

1:22:071:22:11

What stands out is the Bilston enamel. That's the best of the bunch, really, Good, true antique item.

1:22:111:22:17

The fisherman's bottle is brand-new, knocked up yesterday in the Far East. There's millions of them out there.

1:22:171:22:24

You're always going to have a market for the lemonade bottles.

1:22:241:22:28

There will be plenty of people that will want them.

1:22:281:22:32

Charles Hanson's got the speculatively good item and the spectacularly bad item.

1:22:321:22:37

No change there then.

1:22:371:22:40

Charlie Ross started today's show with £234.56

1:22:401:22:45

and spent exactly £234.56

1:22:451:22:49

on five auction lots.

1:22:491:22:51

Extraordinary!

1:22:511:22:54

Charles Hanson began with £132.65

1:22:541:22:58

and spent £132 also on five lots.

1:22:581:23:01

Also extraordinary!

1:23:011:23:03

That 65 pence must be burning a hole in his pocket!

1:23:041:23:08

Now eyes front, mouth shut, the auction is about to begin.

1:23:081:23:12

First up, Charlie's local pop duo, the Lincolnshire lemonade bottles.

1:23:121:23:17

Who's going to start me at £30 for 'em? I'll take 20 to go? 10 to go?

1:23:171:23:21

-£10 for them? 10?

-Down.

-£5, anybody?

1:23:211:23:24

-5? 5 in the room.

-I don't believe it.

1:23:241:23:27

6 now surely? 6 now do I see?

1:23:271:23:29

6. 8. £8 bid. 10. 10 bid. 12 now? At 10 bid.

1:23:291:23:33

12? Your bid of 10, sir. I'll take 11 because we're desperate.

1:23:331:23:36

At 10. 11 anywhere else?

1:23:361:23:38

It's your bid, sir, selling at £10...

1:23:381:23:41

-Well done.

-And a nice double bubble to get us going.

1:23:411:23:45

Even after commission, there's a profit!

1:23:451:23:48

Next we have Charles's Satsuma vase combo.

1:23:481:23:51

High in quantity, but possibly low in quality.

1:23:511:23:54

Who's going to start me at £100 for them? £100? 80?

1:23:541:23:57

50? £50, anybody? £30 to go then, surely?

1:23:571:24:00

-There's a lot of pot for not a lot of money.

-Come on!

-£20 in the room. 25.

1:24:001:24:05

28 now? 28 bid. At £30.

1:24:051:24:08

I know they're dreadful, but Mr Hanson is a lovely person. 32 now?

1:24:081:24:13

32, thank you, madam. 35 now do I see?

1:24:131:24:16

-32 in the front then, going at £32...

-Thank you very much.

1:24:161:24:21

So despite everyone's attempt to queer the pitch,

1:24:211:24:24

the Satsumas did rather well.

1:24:241:24:27

£7 - not to be sniffed at!

1:24:271:24:29

Now the silver sauce boats offer a dollop of profit for Charlie.

1:24:291:24:34

Straight in, 120. 125. 130.

1:24:351:24:38

And 5. 140. 145.

1:24:381:24:40

150. 155?

1:24:401:24:42

Yes? I've got 155 on the book anyway. 160 if you like? 160. 5.

1:24:421:24:46

170? 170. 175. 180. 5.

1:24:461:24:49

190. 5. 200. 210.

1:24:491:24:52

215 if it helps? We're selling this time, all done and finished at 210...

1:24:521:24:57

A very wise investment, Charlie.

1:24:581:25:00

And now... Well, I don't know.

1:25:001:25:03

Good luck, Carlos.

1:25:031:25:05

-Look at it, it's lovely.

-It's awful.

-Come on, Mr Young.

1:25:051:25:09

Start me at £20 for it? 20?

1:25:091:25:11

-10 to go then?

-Have a go.

1:25:111:25:13

10? Thank you, £10 bid. 10.

1:25:131:25:16

12 anywhere else now? At 10 bid. 12 bid. 15 do I see?

1:25:161:25:19

Have another one. 15. 18 there. 20 bid. 22 bid.

1:25:191:25:23

25 bid. 28 bid? I have 25 in the front row. 28 now?

1:25:231:25:27

-Was that a bid? You look like you're about to expire, sir.

-I am!

-28 bid.

1:25:271:25:32

30 or not now then? Selling at £28...

1:25:321:25:36

Hanson, you are the man!

1:25:361:25:38

Excellent.

1:25:381:25:39

I don't think anyone ever doubted the chance of a profit there(!)

1:25:391:25:43

How on earth did you do that?

1:25:431:25:46

Charlie spent his last £4.56 in the world on this prospect.

1:25:461:25:50

Fingers crossed.

1:25:501:25:53

Who's going to start me at £10? 10. 12 now?

1:25:531:25:55

12 bid. 15 surely? 15. 18. And 20? £20 bid, sir.

1:25:551:26:00

22 bid. Surely 25?

1:26:001:26:02

23? 23. £23 bid.

1:26:021:26:05

Last call then. We're selling in the middle at £23...

1:26:051:26:09

A very good profit from a speculative purchase.

1:26:091:26:13

Now I think I need a little lie-down.

1:26:131:26:16

Who's going to start me for the single bed ends? £80 for them? 80?

1:26:161:26:20

-50?

-Come on.

-50?

-Come on.

-£30?

1:26:201:26:23

A tenner, anybody? Surely £10?

1:26:231:26:26

A fiver? Thank you, £5 bid at the back. 6 now do I see?

1:26:261:26:30

This one certainly isn't the sleeper. 5 bid. 6 now do I see?

1:26:301:26:34

6. Late surge in the bidding! 6 bid. 7.

1:26:341:26:37

-Can we contain our excitement? 8 bid, sir.

-8 bid.

-8 bid.

1:26:371:26:41

9 bid. 10. Late surge in the bidding. Fresh bidder.

1:26:411:26:44

At £10 bid. We go this time then at £10...

1:26:441:26:47

-And no-one can say I don't try.

-Hear, hear!

1:26:471:26:50

A little disappointing then on the life-sized bed.

1:26:501:26:54

How about this sweet Victorian resting place for a child's toy?

1:26:541:26:58

Very good-looking piece. 30? 20 to go then surely?

1:26:581:27:02

£20 bid. I'll take 5? 22 on the net.

1:27:021:27:05

22. 25. 28 now? 28.

1:27:051:27:07

28 bid. 30. 32. 35.

1:27:071:27:09

38 bid. 40? 38 bid. 40? £40 bid. 42. 45? 45.

1:27:091:27:13

48 now? 48 bid. 50 bid. 5. 60. At 60 bid.

1:27:131:27:17

-65.

-Well done.

-68.

1:27:171:27:20

Bid 70.

1:27:201:27:22

72 now? 72. At 72.

1:27:221:27:24

75? 75. 78 now? 78 bid. At 78 bid.

1:27:241:27:27

80 bid. 2 now. 82. 85. 88 now?

1:27:271:27:31

At £85 we go this time.

1:27:311:27:33

Selling to Australia at £85...

1:27:331:27:35

It's going Down Under, Charlie. Well done.

1:27:351:27:38

-AUSTRALIAN ACCENT:

-I don't mind if I do, you know?

1:27:381:27:42

A Staffordshire Bilston enamel box, oval design with green base.

1:27:431:27:46

-We have to start the bidding on this one at £25.

-Oh, no.

1:27:461:27:50

25. 30. At 30 bid. 35 bid. 40 bid.

1:27:501:27:53

45. 50. 55. 60. 65.

1:27:531:27:55

70. 5. 80.

1:27:551:27:57

5. 90. 5. 100.

1:27:571:28:00

110. 120. 120 bid.

1:28:001:28:02

-120 with me on the book.

-The internet bids are coming in thick and fast.

1:28:021:28:07

No wonder Charles looks pleased!

1:28:071:28:09

-130.

-Yes!

-40.

-I'm back!

1:28:091:28:13

150 now. Thank you, 150 with you.

1:28:131:28:15

160 with me.

1:28:151:28:17

It's your last chance. All done and finished then, we'll sell...

1:28:171:28:21

Somebody hovering on the net. Are you going to bid 170?

1:28:211:28:25

-Suspense, but we're sold at 160.

-Yes!

-Well done.

1:28:251:28:29

Hats well and truly off, Mr Hanson.

1:28:291:28:32

You are certainly back in the game.

1:28:321:28:35

Give me a kiss, give me a kiss. Give me a kiss.

1:28:351:28:38

Only just. Now...

1:28:401:28:42

No more kissing, boys. Not on my road trip!

1:28:421:28:45

Now it's Charlie's last stab at a big profit.

1:28:451:28:48

Is there a surveyor in the house?

1:28:481:28:52

Chesterman of Sheffield, 50-foot surveyor's tape, Bakelite handle.

1:28:521:28:56

Who's going to start me at £30? 20 to go? 10 to go then?

1:28:561:29:00

£10 bid. At 10 bid. 12 then surely?

1:29:001:29:03

At £10 bid. Nobody else got a handle on this one?

1:29:031:29:06

And selling at £10...

1:29:061:29:09

Ouch!

1:29:091:29:11

Bad timing for a loss, Mr Ross.

1:29:111:29:14

It's so important to buy right and play to the crowd at auction.

1:29:151:29:19

Like Hanson's lovely sugar dredger, for example, today's final lot.

1:29:191:29:24

Cracking-looking piece. Start me at 100 for it? 50 to go?

1:29:241:29:28

50 bid. 60. And 70 now? 70.

1:29:281:29:30

80. 90. At 90. 100. 110.

1:29:301:29:32

120. 120 bid. 130 do I see now?

1:29:321:29:35

-120 bid. Any more now?

-Come on!

-125?

1:29:351:29:38

-Come on, one more.

-Selling at £120...

1:29:381:29:41

He speculated and he accumulated, and then some!

1:29:421:29:46

Mr Hanson wins the day.

1:29:461:29:48

-How are you feeling?

-Much, much worse than I felt earlier.

1:29:481:29:52

-You've nearly caught me up.

-Can I say one thing? Thanks for coming today.

1:29:521:29:57

It's been an immense pleasure.

1:29:571:29:59

Not!

1:29:591:30:00

Charlie started today's show in the lead with £234.56

1:30:001:30:07

and after paying auction costs, today made a small profit of £42.60.

1:30:071:30:12

Charlie has a curmudgeonly £277.16 to carry forward.

1:30:121:30:19

Charles, meanwhile, started down with £132.65

1:30:201:30:25

and made a bumper profit of £155.

1:30:251:30:28

Mr Hanson has a whopping £287.65 to start the next show.

1:30:281:30:35

Well done, Carlos.

1:30:351:30:37

Where would you like to go, Mr Hanson, sir? Allow me, sir.

1:30:371:30:42

Allow me to take you. Where would you like to go?

1:30:421:30:45

-Why don't we go for a drive east?

-A privilege to be your chauffeur, sir.

1:30:451:30:50

We say farewell to a very fine saleroom.

1:30:501:30:52

You would say that! Next time on The Antiques Road Trip, our pair of Charlies head for Norfolk.

1:30:521:30:59

-Charlie takes a spin on his own.

-You have to rely on your nose and where the sun is.

1:30:591:31:04

Charles takes a spin with someone else.

1:31:041:31:07

Go carefully. I'm only young.

1:31:071:31:09

And they both spin the wheel of fortune.

1:31:121:31:15

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2011

1:31:341:31:38

Email [email protected]

1:31:381:31:41