Episode 16 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 16

It is Charlie Ross and Charles Hanson's first day together as they kick off their journey in Bridlington and head for an auction showdown in Doncaster.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each

0:48:020:48:04

-and one big challenge!

-I'm here to declare war.

-Why?

0:48:040:48:08

Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

0:48:080:48:12

-Gone.

-The aim is to trade up,

0:48:120:48:15

-and hope each antique turns a profit.

-Well done!

0:48:150:48:18

But it's not as easy as you might think,

0:48:180:48:21

-and things don't always go to plan.

-Push!

0:48:210:48:23

So, will they race off with a huge profit,

0:48:230:48:26

-or come to a grinding halt?

-I'm going to thrash you.

0:48:260:48:29

This is the Antiques Road Trip!

0:48:290:48:31

It's a brand-new week, and we'll be bridging the generation gap

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with a right rum pair of antiques experts,

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Charlie Ross and Charles Hanson.

0:48:420:48:45

# Large amounts don't grow on trees

0:48:450:48:48

# You got to pick a pocket or two #

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If I can be the Artful Dodger, you can be Fagin, OK?

0:48:500:48:53

Ha-ha! Seasoned Charlie Ross is an auctioneer of great experience

0:48:530:48:57

-and stature.

-Ooh, I like those.

0:48:570:49:00

And despite his advancing years, he's still got it.

0:49:000:49:03

Ah, 35. Do you have it in your power, madam, to reduce the price

0:49:030:49:08

for an old man?

0:49:080:49:10

Hot on Charlie's heels is a greener, sprightlier auctioneer, the young pretender, Charles Hanson.

0:49:110:49:16

The young pretender - that's what I'm often called by Mr Wonnacott.

0:49:160:49:20

Yeah, amongst other things!

0:49:200:49:22

Charles is a man who loves porcelain and furniture,

0:49:220:49:25

a young man with passions - a man with a dream.

0:49:250:49:28

I finished bottom in series one, and it hurt.

0:49:280:49:31

Series two, I became a man.

0:49:310:49:33

More than a man - I came fourth.

0:49:330:49:36

In this series, I want to become iconic.

0:49:360:49:38

Well, it never hurts to be ambitious,

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but first things first, Carlos.

0:49:400:49:42

Our chaps begin their adventure with £200 each,

0:49:420:49:45

the open road in front of them, and a classic 1960s Ford Corsair

0:49:450:49:48

as this week's chariot.

0:49:480:49:51

Could you just stick to the middle of the lanes

0:49:510:49:53

-rather than trying to kill me?

-I'm testing out the actual wheels.

0:49:530:49:57

Our two Charlies will travel over 300 miles in England,

0:49:580:50:02

south all the way to Rye in East Sussex.

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La destination du jour is Doncaster, but we get off to a fine start

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at the seaside - Bridlington, Yorkshire,

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is the first pin in our map.

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I want a nice firm start. I want a firm start. OK?

0:50:170:50:21

THEY LAUGH

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Bridlington grew from two towns, Bridlington Quay at the water's edge

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and the old town of Burlington before the dissolution of its monastery in 1537.

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The arrival of the railway in 1846 united the neighbouring towns

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to become the Bridlington of today.

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It's amazing! There must be six antique shops

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-within 200 metres.

-It's great. We could be here all day.

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In fact, Bridlington's crammed with arts and antiques,

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so let's not waste any time getting our bearings.

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Do I get the impression you haven't got a clue where we are?

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Um, Lincolnshire?

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We're in Yorkshire.

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But Yorkshire is down the middle of the country.

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I'm going to buy some antiques, and I'm going to thrash you.

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-I'm just going to leave you.

-Have you seen any antiques shops yet?

0:51:120:51:15

I feel a bit lost!

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Well, fortunately Bridlington's many antiques shops

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are fairly easy to find.

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-Good morning! Is this your shop?

-It is.

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-May I look in?

-Yeah, come in.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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What's this one here?

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-It's made in...

-Victory.

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Oh, these are great! Are they complete?

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-Yes. I think it's a game.

-Oh, and it's got instructions!

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-15 points. Goebbels is ten points.

-Goebbels, ten points!

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-If you kill them, you get points.

-Neville Chamberlain!

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Mr Ross has found Victory already, but it's a vintage card game

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based on World War II, with all the well known characters.

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These must have been produced either during the war

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or immediately afterwards. They've never been used, have they?

0:52:050:52:08

How much are those?

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-Only £6.

-Oh, no, no, no! That's the label price!

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Come on! Did you say four?

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-I said five.

-Did you? You got a deal!

0:52:170:52:19

Good man!

0:52:190:52:22

That's fab. Thank you very much indeed.

0:52:220:52:24

-Look! I've even got a £5 note, sir.

-That's good.

0:52:240:52:27

You know something I didn't do, though? Count them.

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If Hitler's missing, I'm lost.

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Well, Charlie, at least you're not the only one.

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-Excuse me! Are we in Yorkshire here?

-Yeah. Definitely in Yorkshire.

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-Thank you very much.

-Good luck.

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Fortunately, instinct leads Mr Hanson to his first antique shop of the day.

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-Hello, madam.

-Hello.

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Nice to see you. Fine shop you've got.

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-Thank you.

-A great mix and match. It's quite eccentric.

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What I'm looking for are things which really are quirky,

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a bit different. They might be internet-savvy.

0:52:570:53:00

-Right. OK.

-Have you ever seen one of these before?

0:53:000:53:03

Let's have a look at that. It's a gnome, isn't it?

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-It's heavy.

-Gosh, it is heavy, isn't it?

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-Isn't it heavy?

-Very.

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It's got some age to it, as well. I would have thought around 1900.

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Did you know that "gnome" stands for

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"Guarding Naturally Over Mother Earth"?

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So it's no wonder people shove 'em all over their gardens.

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How much is he? The little gnome.

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He's £50.

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Yeah. If he was £10, I would jump at the chance.

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If you said, "Go on, Charles. Take the gnome away for £10,"

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I would say, "Thank you. He'll make a profit." Food for thought.

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Here you go. THEY LAUGH

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Thanks for the memories.

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Whilst Charles considers a mythical gnome of his own,

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Charlie's gone looking for the real story of Bridlington,

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a town with a rather unique set of owners,

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the Lords Feoffees. Local historian David Mooney has kindly offered

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to enlighten Mr Ross.

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This is the oldest part of the street, and we know that

0:54:040:54:07

because the building behind there, the antiques shop -

0:54:070:54:10

when they dissolved the monastery in 1537,

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they sold a lot of the stone off for building purposes,

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and you can see in the bottoms of the buildings there,

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where the medieval stone is from the monastery.

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-So we can date that house from about 1540.

-Gosh!

0:54:200:54:23

-The landowners around here, the...

-The Lords Feoffees.

0:54:230:54:26

I was talking to somebody who's just started a shop.

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How do you afford the rent on a property like this?

0:54:300:54:33

They said they were realistic. They wanted a business in there,

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and therefore the rent is very affordable.

0:54:360:54:39

That's right. I'm actually Lord Feoffee,

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and it's a very ancient organisation. Now, when the monastery closed down -

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-So, there IS a Lord Feoffee.

-There is.

-And you are he.

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You're talking to one. I'm one. There's actually 13 of us.

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-13 of you, yeah.

-And when the monastery closed down,

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there was no work for nobody. The harbour was in disrepair.

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The place was in a mess, and going downhill very quickly.

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So these businessmen got together, and they bought the manor of Bridlington,

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and these businessmen invested in the town.

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This fascinating democratic system has remained unchanged

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for over 300 years, where landowning citizens

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become elected lords of the town for a limited period.

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It's a charity, really,

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and we send students away to university every year.

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We have about 40 students we pay the fees,

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-or pay towards the fees.

-How wonderful!

0:55:270:55:30

The Feoffees also maintain

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Bridlington's centuries-old high street,

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with its interesting shapes and sizes.

0:55:350:55:37

That house is 13 foot wide,

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and most of the houses in the street are based on 13.

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And the idea with that was that they started with a market stall,

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and your stall plot was 13 foot wide,

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and over the years, people built on the plot where the stall was,

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and that's why the house is 13 foot wide.

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-There's a lot of pubs still here.

-There's a lot of pubs, yeah.

0:55:560:55:59

In the old days we had two banks, a brothel and 26 pubs.

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-Where was the brothel?

-Further up the marketplace.

0:56:020:56:05

-You must point that out.

-It isn't there now. Sorry.

-Oh!

0:56:050:56:09

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

-Bad luck, Charlie.

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Fortunately, Bridlington's high street has mostly been a channel of progress.

0:56:110:56:15

The eminent 18-century architect and furniture designer

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William Kent grew up right here before achieving great fame

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down in London.

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I knew William Kent was a Yorkshireman,

0:56:230:56:26

-but I didn't know he was born here.

-He was about two when he moved here.

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His father was something of a good joiner and wood carver.

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He couldn't get on in Bridlington, so he went down south

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to London, and made his name with Lord Burlington.

0:56:360:56:39

Yes, Burlington. Tell me, did he design Burlington Arcade?

0:56:390:56:43

Actually, no, he didn't. But, whilst studying in Italy,

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Kent met Richard Boyle, the Third Earl of Burlington,

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for whom he would create his most famous works,

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including Burlington House in Piccadilly,

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which now houses the Royal Academy of Arts.

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The other thing I didn't know about Burlington Arcade

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is the shops are on the ground floor,

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and they had the ladies of the night on the first floor,

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so that what happened was, you went shopping -

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your wife did the shopping, you nipped upstairs for a quick one,

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and when you'd finished, off you went.

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Brothels again, Charlie?

0:57:160:57:18

Actually, this street has some lovely arts and antiques to look at,

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in case you forgot.

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It's encouraging to know, from my point of view,

0:57:240:57:27

there's still several antiques shops here.

0:57:270:57:29

We live in an age where antiques shops are closing

0:57:290:57:32

left, right and centre.

0:57:320:57:34

Well, you'd better hurry up with your shopping, then, Charlie.

0:57:340:57:37

Heroic Hanson, meanwhile, is searching hard for...

0:57:370:57:40

a cup of tea.

0:57:400:57:43

-The antiques upstairs, are they?

-They are, yes.

-Fine.

0:57:430:57:46

It's quite nice having a tea room downstairs, antiques upstairs.

0:57:460:57:49

Wow! Hello, sir.

0:57:500:57:53

-Hello.

-Is it your emporium here?

0:57:530:57:55

-It is.

-And do you specialise in certain things, or...

0:57:550:57:58

Yeah, eclectic items, interesting items.

0:57:580:58:02

That sounds what I like. Something quirky, bit eclectic,

0:58:020:58:06

bit different.

0:58:060:58:08

What we've got here are a very nice pair

0:58:080:58:10

of Edwardian silver oval salts, pierced,

0:58:100:58:13

-and in fact they are in the Neoclassical style.

-They are.

0:58:130:58:16

It's evocative of the 1780s, when we were discovering Pompeii, Herculaneum.

0:58:160:58:21

Pompeii and Herculaneum, near Naples,

0:58:210:58:24

were near-perfect buried Roman towns,

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rediscovered in 1599 and 1738 respectively,

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stimulating a Europe-wide resurgence in ancient architecture

0:58:310:58:34

and decorative arts, now known as the Neoclassical style.

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And these table salts, made in 1908, hark back to that style.

0:58:380:58:45

My guide price is between 30 and 50.

0:58:450:58:49

Would I be cheeky in saying "Andy can go at 30"?

0:58:490:58:52

£30. It's a deal.

0:58:520:58:55

Would you offer any small discount, or is 30 the best price?

0:58:550:58:59

-Between friends.

-I could go to...

0:58:590:59:02

Where are we? 30? I could go to 27.

0:59:020:59:06

If I said 26 and I said 25, would you go 25?

0:59:060:59:10

Go on, then. 25.

0:59:100:59:13

-If I said 24...

-No.

-..would you come back?

0:59:140:59:17

Andy, you're a great sport.

0:59:170:59:19

You can keep them yourself and enjoy them.

0:59:190:59:21

Well, I can't do that, Andy,

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you know, because I've got to beat the old bean.

0:59:240:59:27

"Old bean"?!

0:59:270:59:29

What a terrible disrespect for your elders, Mr Hanson!

0:59:290:59:32

Now, what is the old bald eagle up to?

0:59:320:59:35

More shopping!

0:59:350:59:37

Hello! Hiya!

0:59:370:59:39

-How are you?

-Fine, thank you. And you?

-Good.

0:59:390:59:41

-Very well indeed. I'm Charlie.

-Hello. I'm Andrew.

0:59:410:59:45

I've come to spend some money with you, Andrew, I hope.

0:59:450:59:47

I would imagine, and I'm not being rude here,

0:59:470:59:50

that is probably as unsaleable a thing as you've got.

0:59:500:59:53

Absolutely. We've had it a long time now.

0:59:530:59:55

-It's so beautiful.

-Fabulously made.

0:59:550:59:58

For 30 quid, it's an absolute bargain.

0:59:581:00:00

Wouldn't be bad for a tenner... would it?

1:00:001:00:04

Art Deco silverware has those modernist, clean lines

1:00:041:00:08

we expect from that exalted pre-World War II period.

1:00:081:00:12

Food for thought, but Charlie's strangely drawn to his first love -

1:00:121:00:16

furniture.

1:00:161:00:18

There's something about that corner cupboard,

1:00:181:00:21

apart from the fact that it's knackered.

1:00:211:00:23

-HE LAUGHS

-That's an old English expression.

1:00:231:00:26

It's only 30 quid.

1:00:261:00:29

Ooh, you old tempter!

1:00:291:00:31

Presumably this comes out. The hinges look as if they're missing.

1:00:311:00:34

You get anything in this shop. You don't even get the hinges!

1:00:341:00:37

THEY LAUGH

1:00:371:00:39

Nor, may I say, do you get a back to it!

1:00:391:00:44

Is there anything of this corner cupboard?

1:00:441:00:47

Now, let's offer up the door the right way round,

1:00:471:00:52

and ipso facto...

1:00:521:00:55

we have...

1:00:551:00:58

the Georgian corner cupboard.

1:00:581:01:00

-And now it's 40 quid.

-I thought you were going to say,

1:01:001:01:03

"Now it's a tenner cos I've noticed the back's missing!"

1:01:031:01:06

I love furniture. I'll give you a tenner and take it away for fun,

1:01:061:01:11

-but I think...

-Yeah.

1:01:111:01:13

-Yeah.

-You can have that for a tenner.

1:01:131:01:15

Bother! It's a deal. Thank you very much indeed.

1:01:151:01:19

-Of course, the hinges are extra.

-Yes, but I'll leave you with those.

1:01:191:01:23

Looks like someone might be intending

1:01:231:01:26

to take a restoration project to auction. Risky!

1:01:261:01:28

That is known as a gamble lot.

1:01:281:01:31

If there's a furniture restorer in the saleroom,

1:01:311:01:34

it's worth 30 or 40 quid to him,

1:01:341:01:37

because, after all, it is a Georgian piece of furniture.

1:01:371:01:40

But if nobody in the sale wants it, it's Hanson one, Ross nil.

1:01:401:01:45

Well, Hanson's not won the day yet.

1:01:451:01:49

But up the road, he's seeing red

1:01:501:01:53

with a pair of Bohemian glass lustres

1:01:531:01:55

and a ticket price of £70.

1:01:551:01:58

What we have here

1:01:581:02:00

are a pair of flushed red or ruby-tinted lustres,

1:02:001:02:04

of course, which you would set on a dining table,

1:02:041:02:07

or on a sideboard, with the fruiting vine.

1:02:071:02:10

Would date to around 1880, 1890.

1:02:101:02:13

I like them. They're Bohemian,

1:02:131:02:15

and the fashion amongst London collectors,

1:02:151:02:18

the trade in London, they go wild for these.

1:02:181:02:21

Lustres are designed with pendant glass drips and drops

1:02:211:02:25

to create optical effects. A candle is placed inside,

1:02:251:02:29

so that the light glitters from within.

1:02:291:02:31

But these have bits of damage.

1:02:311:02:34

On the strength of their decorative merit,

1:02:341:02:37

and the possibility that they could be 1930s,

1:02:371:02:40

would you accept 20?

1:02:401:02:43

If I gave you a really good chance of, say... Come on, Charlie Ross!

1:02:431:02:47

How about 25?

1:02:471:02:49

I think, Andy, at £25...

1:02:491:02:52

I'll throw the shirt in off my back as well.

1:02:521:02:54

Careful what you offer! Charles will definitely take the biscuit.

1:02:541:02:58

Charlie Ross, meanwhile, will take the teapot.

1:02:581:03:01

In fact, he's got a couple of items in mind.

1:03:011:03:04

You know you said I could have that for a tenner?

1:03:041:03:06

-Can I have those two for 20?

-Definitely.

1:03:061:03:10

THEY LAUGH

1:03:101:03:12

Definitely!

1:03:121:03:14

HE LAUGHS

1:03:141:03:16

You're very difficult to read, you are.

1:03:161:03:19

20 quid. I'll have those two. There we go, sir.

1:03:191:03:22

There's that... Thank you very much indeed.

1:03:221:03:25

And this rather splendid oak...

1:03:251:03:27

Well, I'd like to call it a salad bowl.

1:03:271:03:30

I shall sell the two items together

1:03:301:03:32

and hopefully make a thumping profit.

1:03:321:03:35

There's optimism for you!

1:03:351:03:37

Now Andy's got something to sweeten the deal.

1:03:371:03:40

-What have you got for me now?

-Two beautiful hinges.

1:03:401:03:43

-£10, please.

-Don't charge me for them! That's horrible!

1:03:431:03:46

HE GROANS

1:03:481:03:51

I don't know what to do now.

1:03:511:03:53

-I tell you what, Charlie...

-What?

-To you, five quid.

1:03:531:03:55

Well, I suppose it would be extremely rude if I, er...

1:03:551:03:59

didn't say yes.

1:03:591:04:02

How much is your gnome, by the way?

1:04:021:04:04

Gnome?

1:04:041:04:06

-Seriously.

-To you, £30.

1:04:061:04:09

Ah, it's that little fellow again.

1:04:091:04:12

Could Ross succeed where Hanson failed?

1:04:121:04:15

Other fella offered me £20. I said no.

1:04:151:04:18

Well, frankly, if Hanson offers you 20 quid...

1:04:181:04:20

it's probably only worth a tenner.

1:04:201:04:23

30 quid, 1920s,

1:04:241:04:27

cast-iron doorstop.

1:04:271:04:30

It's good fun. Give you 20 quid for it.

1:04:301:04:32

-30.

-No.

1:04:321:04:34

Look, I've had such a lovely time in this shop,

1:04:341:04:37

I will make a final offer of 25 quid.

1:04:371:04:40

Here we go again. Thank you very much, sir!

1:04:411:04:44

You are such a clean-up merchant!

1:04:441:04:46

And let's hope Charlie's feeling happy now he's bought half the shop.

1:04:461:04:50

You have just witnessed why Ross is so hopeless at dealing.

1:04:501:04:54

He really gets to like someone,

1:04:541:04:57

gets on a roll, and carries on buying and buying

1:04:571:05:01

and buying and buying, and then gets outside the shop

1:05:011:05:04

and thinks, "Why? Why? Why?"

1:05:041:05:08

"Why?"

1:05:081:05:10

Well, I don't know if you don't know, Charlie.

1:05:101:05:13

But now the shops are shutting and lovely Bridlington must provide shelter for our weary experts.

1:05:141:05:20

Nighty-night!

1:05:201:05:22

It's a brand-new day in Bridlington,

1:05:281:05:31

and Charlie Ross wants to sample just one more shop

1:05:311:05:34

before the unstoppable road trip moves us on.

1:05:341:05:36

So far, Charlie's spent £65 on four lots -

1:05:381:05:42

the Victory playing cards, the Georgian cupboard,

1:05:421:05:45

plus hinges,

1:05:451:05:47

the cast-iron gnome, the Art Deco kettle,

1:05:471:05:50

and the salad bowl,

1:05:501:05:53

leaving a comfortable £135 at his disposal.

1:05:531:05:57

Charles, meanwhile, has limped into the first day's shopping,

1:05:571:06:00

spending just £50 on two items -

1:06:001:06:03

the Edwardian silver salts and the dazzling ruby lustres.

1:06:031:06:07

Charles has a tempting £150 left to wow us with.

1:06:071:06:12

Could Mr Ross be smelling victory today?

1:06:141:06:17

A twinkling collection of scent bottles has caught his eye.

1:06:171:06:21

-I just saw these little jars here.

-Yes.

1:06:211:06:25

That little one there, that's rather sweet.

1:06:251:06:28

-That looks more like perfume.

-I think that's perfume.

1:06:281:06:32

That little one there, hobnail cut. Another screw top.

1:06:321:06:35

Little bit bashed, but when I'm that old,

1:06:351:06:38

I'll be a bit bashed, I expect.

1:06:381:06:40

But I would think, looking at all these,

1:06:401:06:42

they are between 1910 and 1920. They look Edwardian, don't they?

1:06:421:06:46

-Right.

-You know what's coming up, don't you?

1:06:461:06:49

I have a feeling, yes.

1:06:491:06:51

THEY LAUGH

1:06:511:06:53

What about a price for the lot?

1:06:531:06:55

I'd be looking for £25, and I'll throw the three glass ones in

1:06:551:07:00

-as well.

-£25 the lot?

1:07:001:07:02

-Yes.

-Do you know,

1:07:021:07:04

I think that is the best deal I've had in my life.

1:07:041:07:07

-I think that's sensational. Are you really happy with that?

-Yes, I am.

1:07:071:07:11

Put it there, Andy! Here it comes. Oh, dear. Have you got change?

1:07:111:07:15

-There we go.

-Ooh, real coins! Thank you very much.

1:07:311:07:35

That's really kind. Thank you. I love those!

1:07:351:07:38

Blimey! Do you know, I even missed some more, didn't I?

1:07:381:07:42

-Could I have the other two for a fiver?

-Yes.

1:07:421:07:44

When I tell Hanson I bought ten things for 30 quid,

1:07:441:07:48

he'll call me a rogue.

1:07:481:07:51

Amongst other things, no doubt!

1:07:511:07:53

But finally the road trip can get going,

1:07:531:07:56

as our chaps hit the highway. There's no stopping them now!

1:07:561:07:59

-Yeah!

-Wheel-spin!

1:08:001:08:03

Real wheel-spin!

1:08:031:08:06

What were you driving in the '50s?

1:08:101:08:12

In the '50s? I was not old enough to drive!

1:08:121:08:15

I don't know how many times I have to tell you,

1:08:151:08:17

I was not old enough to drive.

1:08:171:08:20

I was born... I'm not going to tell you. You can guess.

1:08:201:08:23

But I wasn't driving till...

1:08:231:08:25

ENGINE COUGHS

1:08:251:08:28

Oh, dear! Perhaps this fragile classic

1:08:281:08:31

needs more careful handling. I mean the car, not Charlie!

1:08:311:08:36

There's not a dicky.

1:08:361:08:37

It's not going to go. I'll give you a push.

1:08:371:08:40

No! Leave it. When I get up to a certain speed,

1:08:401:08:43

-I'll say, "Now"...

-Do you want your jacket off first?

1:08:431:08:46

-No, I'm quite happy.

-Sure?

-I'm English.

1:08:461:08:48

OK, well, just watch yourself. Be careful!

1:08:481:08:51

-I'm all right!

-Watch yourself, Bean. Come on!

1:08:511:08:53

-I'm hardly moving!

-I can't...

1:08:531:08:57

-Come on, Bean.

-Ah, yes!

1:08:571:08:59

-Push! Push!

-No, don't use the battery!

1:08:591:09:02

-Really?

-Take your foot off the clutch!

1:09:021:09:04

Oh, nearly!

1:09:041:09:07

-I'm absolutely knackered.

-Do you want to have a go?

1:09:071:09:10

So, Charlie's now leading from the front,

1:09:101:09:13

and Charles is bringing up the, er...rear.

1:09:131:09:15

-Push!

-Bean, just be careful.

-Push!

1:09:151:09:18

Push! That's good! I like it!

1:09:181:09:22

Love it!

1:09:221:09:24

-Oh... Bean!

-I'm not hanging around.

1:09:241:09:27

Hold on! Let me make a call now.

1:09:271:09:29

Not happy. If Bean goes, I'm on my own.

1:09:291:09:32

I'm lost in Lincolnshire. In fact we're in Yorkshire here.

1:09:321:09:35

Bean! I'm going to get Bean.

1:09:351:09:38

Don't worry! It's our first time together!

1:09:391:09:43

Fortunately the local mechanics manage to find our blighted experts,

1:09:441:09:50

-so they can finally get going.

-Cheers!

1:09:501:09:52

CHARLES AND CHARLIE CHEER Thank you!

1:09:521:09:55

Further down the road, a full 20 miles south

1:10:021:10:04

from Bridlington to Skirlaugh,

1:10:041:10:06

the very lucky Charles Hanson has a date with the Constable family.

1:10:061:10:10

CHARLIE SINGS "CHARLIE HANSON" TO TUNE OF "HALLELUJAH CHORUS

1:10:101:10:14

SONG: "Hallelujah Chorus" by Handel

1:10:181:10:21

Burton Constable Hall has existed here for over 500 years,

1:10:211:10:26

and is the ancestral home of the Constable family,

1:10:261:10:29

descended from Norman knights,

1:10:291:10:32

but no relation to Constable the painter, sadly.

1:10:321:10:34

Although Catholics themselves,

1:10:341:10:36

the Constable family bought cheap church land

1:10:361:10:39

made available by Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries

1:10:391:10:43

in the 1530s, and displaced an entire village of locals

1:10:431:10:47

to make room for these lovely, finely trimmed gardens.

1:10:471:10:50

The trouble with you aristocracy is, you just don't know when to stop.

1:10:501:10:54

When you got it, you're going to flaunt it.

1:10:541:10:56

I know. I just wish I had it. I've never had it.

1:10:561:11:01

In the 1560s, Sir John Constable tore down

1:11:011:11:04

most of the original manor house to create this Elizabethan mansion,

1:11:041:11:08

very much in the style of big 'Enry's beloved Hampton Court.

1:11:081:11:12

Wow! It's almost like a Hampton Court of the north.

1:11:121:11:16

It's just so spectacular, and before me,

1:11:161:11:19

there are no signs of modern homes, nothing at all.

1:11:191:11:22

We are caught back in the 1550s.

1:11:221:11:24

It's absolutely momentous.

1:11:241:11:27

-Ah, good morning, sir!

-Hello! David Connell.

1:11:271:11:30

David Connell is the director here,

1:11:301:11:32

and welcomes Charles into a world of opulence.

1:11:321:11:36

Oh, wow!

1:11:361:11:38

It was a parlour in the Elizabethan house,

1:11:381:11:42

converted to a dining room in the 18th century,

1:11:421:11:45

when this new interior was put in. I think it tells you everything,

1:11:451:11:48

when the theme of the plasterwork is Bacchus.

1:11:481:11:51

-Revelry, wine...

-Absolutely, yes.

1:11:511:11:53

..over the top. It's ostentatious.

1:11:531:11:56

It wasn't just the interior design that went over the top.

1:11:561:11:59

Some fairly strange ideas bounced around these walls in the 18th century.

1:11:591:12:04

William Constable fancied himself a worldly man of the Enlightenment,

1:12:041:12:09

with a keen interest in the emerging vogue of scientific discovery.

1:12:091:12:13

The squeamish might wish to avert their eyes now.

1:12:131:12:16

We now go into the cabinet of curiosities of William Constable.

1:12:171:12:22

It's an 18th-century gentleman's museum.

1:12:221:12:24

Anyone who was anyone in 16th-century Europe

1:12:241:12:27

had themselves a Wunderkammer, or cabinet of curiosities,

1:12:271:12:30

and by the 18th century, many landowning families

1:12:301:12:33

had managed to create a room in their house

1:12:331:12:36

with a small collection of the weird and wunderbar

1:12:361:12:38

from around the world.

1:12:381:12:40

Some is pure science of the 18th-century sort.

1:12:401:12:44

This room is full of electrical machines, a rather fine telescope,

1:12:441:12:48

and then some of the things go off into fantasy.

1:12:481:12:52

William Constable tried breeding experiments,

1:12:521:12:56

cross-breeding chickens and rabbits,

1:12:561:12:59

and there's an account of him trying to do this in his menagerie.

1:12:591:13:03

-Cross-breeding rabbits with chickens?

-Yes, although he did say

1:13:031:13:07

-they all looked a bit like chickens.

-And it worked?

1:13:071:13:10

No, of course not.

1:13:101:13:12

-You stupid boy, Charles!

-Incredible.

1:13:121:13:14

William Constable's collection has been lovingly restored

1:13:141:13:17

since the 1970s, in its original display cabinets,

1:13:171:13:20

and is the most complete original Wunderkammer

1:13:201:13:23

of its type in Britain.

1:13:231:13:25

What got him on this way of experimenting

1:13:271:13:30

and trying things and collecting peculiar things, David?

1:13:301:13:34

Well, he considered himself a man of the Enlightenment,

1:13:341:13:37

and he had the time and the money to be able to do this.

1:13:371:13:41

It was by no means unusual.

1:13:411:13:43

What's unusual is this collection surviving

1:13:431:13:46

-into the 21st century.

-Was he a married man?

1:13:461:13:49

Did he have a good life? Was he a good boy?

1:13:491:13:51

He was going to get married in the 1750s,

1:13:511:13:55

but the prospective bride's father called off the marriage

1:13:551:13:59

because he wasn't going to Mass often enough.

1:13:591:14:02

He wasn't a good Catholic.

1:14:021:14:03

Before gaming, internet, television and radio,

1:14:031:14:07

a cabinet of curiosities was the must-have home entertainment system

1:14:071:14:11

for the very wealthy.

1:14:111:14:13

You know, that appears to be some sort of foetus in there.

1:14:131:14:16

-It is.

-Do we know what it is?

-No.

1:14:161:14:19

-Small mammal.

-That's it. Good description.

1:14:191:14:21

They imported exotic pets, for instance.

1:14:211:14:25

A pet monkey you could buy in London,

1:14:251:14:27

and when it died, you thought it was worth keeping its skull

1:14:271:14:31

as part of your collection. So this is entertainment for after dinner.

1:14:311:14:35

-Yeah.

-Ladies read, and gentlemen came and played with their toys.

1:14:351:14:39

Going back, 1760s,

1:14:391:14:41

your blokes would be entertained with these skulls and bones.

1:14:411:14:45

Well, I think you blokes have been entertained enough.

1:14:451:14:49

Bye-bye. All the best to you. See you, David. Bye. Bye.

1:14:491:14:52

Time to get this show back on the road.

1:14:521:14:55

Charles and Charlie have a further date with destiny,

1:14:551:14:58

and a final opportunity to bag some killer antiques.

1:14:581:15:01

Skirlaugh is behind us in the dust,

1:15:011:15:04

as we journey nine miles east

1:15:041:15:06

to the bustling market town of Beverley.

1:15:061:15:08

And, for the benefit of slightly dazed Charles Hanson,

1:15:081:15:12

that means we're now in North Humberside,

1:15:121:15:15

cows and all.

1:15:151:15:17

Wonderful Beverley Grammar is the oldest state school in the country,

1:15:171:15:21

founded around 700 AD.

1:15:211:15:23

Its historical alumni include infamous gunpowder plotter

1:15:231:15:27

Thomas Percy, in the 1570s,

1:15:271:15:30

and former England goalkeeper Paul Robinson

1:15:301:15:33

in the 1990s. Not a lot of people know that!

1:15:331:15:35

Still, time is marching on. Let's shop!

1:15:351:15:39

You want objects to talk to you, to say, "Come on, Hanson. Find me."

1:15:401:15:44

I find it very difficult to focus when there are so many things

1:15:441:15:47

in so many cabinets. It all becomes a bit of a blur.

1:15:471:15:51

This cocktail little desk is quite nice, isn't it?

1:15:551:15:58

SONG: "My Heart Will Go On" by Celine Dion

1:15:581:16:01

Look at this. A 1950s boat-shaped bar.

1:16:081:16:11

Isn't that glorious? This wonderful bowed front...

1:16:111:16:14

Don't worry, it's not glass. It's plastic.

1:16:141:16:17

If you were living in London in your really quite cool flat,

1:16:171:16:20

and you're a hip, happening youngster,

1:16:201:16:23

this would be ideal for your home.

1:16:231:16:26

However, we're selling in, um, Doncaster.

1:16:261:16:30

And, do you know what? It could completely destroy me at auction.

1:16:301:16:33

It could wreck me. We're on the coast. I've learned that way now.

1:16:331:16:37

But this has a certain style about it.

1:16:371:16:40

It could make 250. However,

1:16:401:16:42

believe it or not, it could make 20.

1:16:421:16:45

-I'm Charles Hanson. Good to see you.

-Good to see you.

1:16:451:16:49

I'm panicking a bit, because I've got about 15 minutes

1:16:491:16:52

-to try and find something glorious...

-Right.

1:16:521:16:55

..which will capture an audience at auction in Doncaster.

1:16:551:16:58

Have you heard of Doncaster? It's south.

1:16:581:17:01

Would there be much opportunity of negotiation, do you think?

1:17:011:17:05

-I can do ten percent on it.

-No more?

-No.

1:17:051:17:08

Oh, Charles! At £85, that's a big gamble.

1:17:081:17:12

Put this silly ship of dreams out of your head, boy, and move on!

1:17:121:17:17

I might just ask Chris how much this caddy is,

1:17:221:17:25

because it has a nice quality. Tea caddy, mahogany, 1830.

1:17:251:17:30

But it's a bit boring, and it's not really me.

1:17:301:17:33

We want to go for something... HE SIGHS

1:17:331:17:36

..like the bar.

1:17:361:17:38

I'm going to set sail. I'm going to hit those high seas.

1:17:391:17:44

I'm going to take on the waves...

1:17:441:17:47

and say, "Charlie Ross,

1:17:471:17:49

it's this or nothing."

1:17:491:17:52

Oh, dear! Really, Charles?

1:17:521:17:55

Really?

1:17:551:17:57

What do you drink, Chris - shaken or stirred?

1:17:571:18:00

-I'm more a pint-of-bitter man.

-Are you a shaken man?

1:18:001:18:03

No. I will be. Come on.

1:18:031:18:05

Well, I'm shaken and stirred, for the wrong reasons.

1:18:051:18:09

I might live to regret it. If you don't try these things in life...

1:18:091:18:13

For better or worse, it's too late now.

1:18:141:18:17

You stupid boy!

1:18:171:18:19

Shopping done, it's time to see what Charlie and Charles

1:18:191:18:23

make of each other's purchases.

1:18:231:18:26

-It's like Christmas!

-I love it. It's the most exciting part.

1:18:271:18:30

-Oh, my word! Bohemian glass!

-He likes Bohemian glass.

1:18:301:18:35

And, oh, they're... Oh. I wish I hadn't put my glasses on.

1:18:351:18:38

-Why say that?

-The quality of the gilt decoration

1:18:381:18:42

isn't all that it might be, to be honest.

1:18:421:18:45

No. They cost me £25.

1:18:451:18:46

-What?!

-£25, Charlie.

1:18:461:18:48

Going once! Going once! Hanson's away.

1:18:481:18:51

Oh, wow!

1:18:511:18:53

-Yeah, that's nice.

-It's knackered, but it could be something,

1:18:531:18:57

-couldn't it?

-What did it cost you?

1:18:571:18:59

-Ten quid.

-Oh, it didn't! No, it... Did it really?

1:18:591:19:03

It didn't!

1:19:031:19:04

Now, I bought these delightful little salts...

1:19:041:19:08

Why I like them

1:19:101:19:12

is because you've got the swags, you've got the ribbon-tied husks.

1:19:121:19:16

You've also got period matched-up salt spoons.

1:19:161:19:20

-Very nice!

-They cost me £25.

1:19:201:19:23

You can't buy things like that...

1:19:231:19:25

That's absolute... That is criminal...

1:19:251:19:27

-Yeah.

-..criminal deception!

1:19:271:19:29

There's more silver in that than £25.

1:19:291:19:32

-You could melt those for more than...

-I think so.

1:19:321:19:34

So, you bought these two together as one lot?

1:19:341:19:37

Well, they were bought as one lot eventually.

1:19:371:19:40

I just wonder whether those two have always been together.

1:19:401:19:44

-They have gone together.

-I think so.

-It fits perfectly.

1:19:441:19:47

It's a marriage, like you and I, made in heaven, OK?

1:19:471:19:51

But...

1:19:511:19:52

It might not be. This, I think, is decorative,

1:19:521:19:55

and the two together, you probably paid about £25.

1:19:551:19:58

-20 quid!

-Good.

1:19:581:19:59

-I bought a game called Victory.

-As you do.

-It's a card game.

1:19:591:20:03

-Are you trying to say something to me?

-Yeah, victory!

1:20:031:20:06

It is a statement. And it's 1940,

1:20:061:20:11

and it's original. It's full, complete,

1:20:111:20:14

with instructions. The asking price was £6

1:20:141:20:16

and I paid £5 for them.

1:20:161:20:18

-Tell me what you think of these.

-They're very good.

1:20:181:20:22

-And this is silver also, Charlie?

-Yeah, there's lots of silver.

1:20:221:20:26

-Will you sell them as one big lot?

-I'll have to, yes.

1:20:261:20:29

-What a good lot!

-But for 30 quid...

1:20:291:20:31

-Close your eyes!

-OK.

-I know you'll recognise this,

1:20:311:20:35

because I bought this in a shop where you had been,

1:20:351:20:38

-and I have a feeling you asked the price.

-Oh, no!

1:20:381:20:40

Yes! It's gnome time! Remember it?

1:20:401:20:43

Yes. Oh, and I was offered this, and... £50, he said to me.

1:20:431:20:47

-Did he?

-Yeah. How much?

-I bought it for 25.

1:20:471:20:50

Oh, no! Come on! HE LAUGHS

1:20:501:20:52

-I did!

-No!

-Yes!

1:20:521:20:54

MUSIC: "My Heart Will Go On" by Celine Dion

1:20:541:20:57

If my father or mother had had one of those,

1:20:591:21:02

I would have left home at the age of six.

1:21:021:21:05

Sometimes, Charlie, in life, you must speculate.

1:21:051:21:08

-What did it cost?

-Have a guess.

1:21:081:21:10

I don't have a clue. I can't believe you paid money... 30 quid.

1:21:101:21:14

-Double it.

-60 quid.

1:21:141:21:16

-Add £25.

-85 quid.

-Yes.

1:21:161:21:19

HE CHUCKLES

1:21:201:21:22

We're in it together, aren't we? OK?

1:21:221:21:25

I think the owner of that went...

1:21:251:21:27

and got a little bit of a nibble.

1:21:271:21:29

Do you know, if you make a profit on that,

1:21:291:21:32

I will buy you a drink.

1:21:321:21:34

Wow! And just in case anyone pulled their punches,

1:21:341:21:37

let's hear what our chaps really think.

1:21:371:21:39

There's one thing about Charlie I really, really admire,

1:21:391:21:44

and I mean I admire -

1:21:441:21:46

he has the courage to just go out on a whim

1:21:461:21:50

and make the most ridiculous purchase.

1:21:501:21:53

I'm feeling a bit like the Titanic - doomed.

1:21:531:21:56

The iceberg has just hit me.

1:21:561:21:58

Perilous waters ahead!

1:21:581:22:00

And now it's time to set sail once more in the Corsair.

1:22:001:22:04

It's been a cracking first leg.

1:22:041:22:06

The road trip has brought us from Bridlington

1:22:061:22:08

through handsome Skirlaugh and brilliant Beverley,

1:22:081:22:11

finally arriving in South Yorkshire's proud Doncaster,

1:22:111:22:15

known affectionately as Donny.

1:22:151:22:17

It's also birthplace of actor Brian Blessed

1:22:201:22:23

and crooner Tony Christie.

1:22:231:22:26

Doncaster is also arguably home

1:22:271:22:30

to some of Britain's most beautiful women,

1:22:301:22:33

and rolling up the street today to our auction

1:22:331:22:35

are our gorgeous experts.

1:22:351:22:37

Well, frankly, if your things sell as badly as you drove,

1:22:371:22:41

I won't have any problems at all. Give me the keys!

1:22:411:22:44

I'm not letting you drive again, that's for sure.

1:22:441:22:47

-After you, old chap.

-Thanks.

1:22:471:22:50

So polite!

1:22:501:22:52

The Tudor auction rooms have been selling fine wares

1:22:521:22:54

for over 30 years, specialising in porcelain and clocks.

1:22:541:22:58

Today is the general sale - perfect for the mixed bunch of items

1:22:581:23:02

our two boys have gathered together.

1:23:021:23:04

George is today's auctioneer, and would like to be kind

1:23:041:23:08

to Charlie and Charles's hopes and dreams.

1:23:081:23:11

The scent bottles are OK - collectable little items,

1:23:111:23:14

silver, hallmarked,

1:23:141:23:17

and same as the salts. They're pretty good.

1:23:171:23:19

The Edwardian cast-iron gnome, it's a little bit naff,

1:23:191:23:22

is what I can see. We never know. Some collectable person out there

1:23:221:23:26

might be OK with that.

1:23:261:23:28

Um, it's got to be good, clean stuff,

1:23:281:23:30

like the bar, for example.

1:23:301:23:33

Well, at least someone likes the look of the Hanson ship of dreams.

1:23:331:23:37

Charlie Ross started the day with his full allowance of £200,

1:23:371:23:41

and spent a proud £95 on four lots.

1:23:411:23:44

Charles Hanson took his £200 starter pack

1:23:441:23:47

and spent just a little bit more -

1:23:471:23:49

£135 on a mere three lots.

1:23:491:23:53

Buckle up and hang on to your collectables!

1:23:551:23:57

The auction is about to begin.

1:23:571:24:00

My heart is going boom-boom-boom-boom-boom.

1:24:011:24:04

You want some rhythm and you want some action, Charlie.

1:24:041:24:08

First up is Charlie's doer-upper prospect,

1:24:081:24:12

the £10 Georgian corner cabinet, plus £5 worth of hinges.

1:24:121:24:16

Ten to start me on the piece of period oak.

1:24:161:24:19

Five bid, he says. Five bid. Any advance?

1:24:191:24:22

Ten. 15.

1:24:221:24:24

20. Five. 30. Five.

1:24:241:24:28

40.

1:24:281:24:29

Cap's in at 40.

1:24:291:24:31

45 bid. 45.

1:24:311:24:34

He's going halfway. 47.50.

1:24:341:24:36

Any more? Have you all done?

1:24:361:24:39

Well done.

1:24:401:24:42

-At 50. He's back in.

-Oh...

-Hang on!

1:24:421:24:44

-55.

-55!

1:24:441:24:46

Any more? All done?

1:24:461:24:48

At £55. The buyer.

1:24:481:24:52

And Ross is off to a flyer with a fine early profit.

1:24:521:24:55

Next we have those Hanson ruby lustres.

1:24:561:25:00

They might be 1920s and worth a small fortune,

1:25:001:25:02

but there again, they may not.

1:25:021:25:04

50. 40. 30.

1:25:041:25:06

20, on the pair of lustres. Ten. Bid.

1:25:061:25:10

£10 bid. Any advance on ten?

1:25:101:25:13

Any more? 15. 20.

1:25:131:25:16

20? Oh!

1:25:161:25:18

25 bid. Lady's in at 25. Any advance on 25?

1:25:181:25:20

-No more!

-Go on!

1:25:201:25:22

Any more? All done at £25...

1:25:221:25:25

THEY SIGH That's OK. I've broken even.

1:25:261:25:28

-No. You've got to pay commission.

-Oh, yes.

1:25:281:25:31

Yep! Sadly, the auction house must take its hard-earned crust,

1:25:311:25:35

so a break-even is, in fact, a loss.

1:25:351:25:38

Who do you think you're kidding, Mr Hanson?

1:25:381:25:41

The 1940s playing cards.

1:25:411:25:44

Rather nice game, that one. There's Chamberlain,

1:25:441:25:47

all the early greats in there, ladies and gentlemen.

1:25:471:25:50

Can we see 20?

1:25:501:25:51

-Ten to start.

-Here we go.

-Five anywhere?

1:25:511:25:54

You don't see very many of them about.

1:25:541:25:56

£2 anywhere? Two bid. £2 bid.

1:25:561:25:59

Four bid. Six bid. Eight bid. £8 bid.

1:25:591:26:01

-Profit.

-£8 bid.

1:26:011:26:03

Should make more. Never seen one before.

1:26:031:26:05

-Ten bid.

-Ten.

-That's OK.

1:26:051:26:07

11 bid. He's back in. 11 bid.

1:26:071:26:09

I like it. Come on, George!

1:26:091:26:11

You're all out. You're done at 11.

1:26:111:26:14

Well, let's hope the sweet smell of success continues.

1:26:141:26:19

Charlie's scent bottles are next.

1:26:191:26:21

Now, here we go, ladies and gentlemen.

1:26:211:26:24

Lovely collection of silver-topped scent bottles.

1:26:241:26:27

Can we see £100 to start me? £50 to start me?

1:26:271:26:31

Ten to start me, and I'm ten bid.

1:26:311:26:33

£10 bid. 15. 20.

1:26:331:26:36

Five. 30. Five. 40.

1:26:361:26:39

-Well played.

-£40 bid.

1:26:391:26:41

Any advance on 40? Any more? Got to be worth more.

1:26:411:26:44

That's a good price. Call it there.

1:26:441:26:47

-£40 bid. 45 bid.

-Oh, get out of here!

1:26:471:26:49

-Cheap. They're cheap!

-45 bid.

1:26:491:26:52

All done at 45!

1:26:521:26:56

Well played. Brilliant.

1:26:561:26:58

And Mr Ross comes up smelling of roses again.

1:26:581:27:01

Hanson needs to start catching up. His Edwardian silver salts

1:27:011:27:06

are the next contenders.

1:27:061:27:08

Can we see 50? 40? 30?

1:27:081:27:11

20? Ten to start me.

1:27:111:27:14

-Go for it!

-Ten bid.

-Come on!

1:27:141:27:17

£10 bid. 15. 20.

1:27:171:27:19

25 in the shades.

1:27:191:27:22

30 bid. He's back in. In at 30.

1:27:221:27:24

At £30... The buyer, number nine.

1:27:241:27:28

Well, a small profit is still a profit.

1:27:281:27:31

And now a little man steps forward for Charlie Ross.

1:27:311:27:35

Here we go, ladies and gentlemen. Look at this little fellow!

1:27:351:27:39

Can we see 20? Ten to start me. Five anywhere.

1:27:391:27:42

£2. Two bid.

1:27:421:27:44

£2 bid. Four bid. £4 bid. The bid's there at four.

1:27:441:27:47

Keep it down. We like this.

1:27:471:27:49

Any more? Six bid. Eight bid.

1:27:491:27:51

Ten bid.

1:27:511:27:53

Ten bid. 12. He's back in.

1:27:531:27:55

Keep going, George! Keep going!

1:27:551:27:58

Any advance on 12? Have you all done? At £12 only...

1:27:581:28:02

-George!

-Going to go.

-At £12.

1:28:021:28:05

-It's gone.

-HE GROANS AND LAUGHS

1:28:051:28:08

Sadly, the heavy metal gnome carried little weight

1:28:081:28:11

with the buyers of Doncaster.

1:28:111:28:13

-Oh! I feel like a knife in the ribs!

-I'm slowly back in the game.

1:28:131:28:18

Mr Ross has one last shot at a big profit today.

1:28:181:28:22

One lump or two?

1:28:221:28:24

Collectable, these. You've got the spirit kettle

1:28:241:28:27

that goes with this one,

1:28:271:28:29

-the rather nice shield-plated...

-They look lovely from here.

1:28:291:28:33

Can we see 40? 30? 20?

1:28:331:28:35

Ten to start me. Five anywhere? Five bid.

1:28:351:28:39

Lovely set. Five bid. Ten bid.

1:28:391:28:41

15. 20. 25.

1:28:411:28:44

30. 35. 35, in the seats in the middle of the room.

1:28:441:28:49

35, seated. Any more?

1:28:491:28:51

Going at £35.

1:28:511:28:53

Not bad, but I think Charlie had higher hopes.

1:28:541:28:58

Finally, it's time to raise the bar!

1:29:001:29:02

Or could that be Charles's ship of dreams?

1:29:021:29:06

This is what you've all been waiting for, ladies and gentlemen.

1:29:061:29:09

-It's iconic!

-It's the retro bar in the back

1:29:091:29:12

in the shape of a boat. Got the anchors on it.

1:29:121:29:15

50. 40.

1:29:151:29:17

-30. 20.

-Ooh, it's coming down!

1:29:171:29:20

Oh, no! Anybody else getting that sinking feeling?

1:29:201:29:24

Ten bid. £10 bid. Ten bid. Any more? 15.

1:29:241:29:28

-20.

-20!

1:29:281:29:30

-Five.

-Five!

-25 bid. Any more? You won't get one as cheap as that.

1:29:301:29:34

-Go on!

-27.50.

1:29:341:29:37

-27.50!

-27.50 bid.

1:29:371:29:40

At 27.50.

1:29:401:29:43

Ohhh!

1:29:431:29:46

Sadly, Hanson's dreams of auction glory have sunk,

1:29:461:29:49

but I believe that the road trip goes on.

1:29:491:29:52

That's life, you know?

1:29:521:29:54

-I'm down...

-I admire you for your courage.

1:29:541:29:56

-..but I'm not forgotten.

-And also for your extreme stupidity.

1:29:561:30:00

-That's a big loss, isn't it?

-But other than that,

1:30:001:30:02

I'm with you all the way, baby.

1:30:021:30:05

So, someone has taken an early lead,

1:30:051:30:08

and someone else is off for an early bath.

1:30:081:30:10

Our chaps started today's show with £200 each.

1:30:101:30:14

After paying auction costs, Charlie made a small profit

1:30:141:30:18

of £34.56.

1:30:181:30:20

Mr Ross has a reasonable £234.56 to carry forward.

1:30:201:30:25

Poor Charles, meanwhile, made a bruising loss

1:30:251:30:29

of £67.35.

1:30:291:30:31

Mr Hanson has just £132.65 to start the next show.

1:30:311:30:37

Of course, it's only day one,

1:30:371:30:40

and there will be much to learn this week

1:30:401:30:42

about antiques buying and about each other.

1:30:421:30:45

Do you wear a gold chain at all or anything like that?

1:30:451:30:48

No, no. Charlie, do I look like a medallion man?

1:30:481:30:52

THEY LAUGH

1:30:521:30:54

-If you can't... Oh, your driving is horrendous!

-Sorry!

1:30:541:30:58

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

1:30:581:31:01

Charlie and Charles head for Lincolnshire,

1:31:011:31:03

and auction round two in Grantham.

1:31:031:31:06

Charlie tries for some understanding.

1:31:061:31:08

You really have to concentrate, put a lot of work in.

1:31:081:31:11

Charles tries for our sympathy.

1:31:111:31:14

I've had a disaster already. I've lost £80 already,

1:31:141:31:18

and I'm down to barely £100.

1:31:181:31:21

And they both try their luck on the road ahead.

1:31:211:31:24

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

1:31:301:31:34

E-mail [email protected]

1:31:341:31:39

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1:31:391:31:39