Episode 24 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 24

On day four of James Braxton and Jonathan Pratt's road trip, the duo scour local antiques shops between Wells and the auction in Crewkerne.


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Transcript


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each

0:48:020:48:04

and one big challenge.

0:48:040:48:06

-I'm going to declare war.

-Why?

0:48:060:48:09

Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

0:48:090:48:13

There's nothing in here.

0:48:130:48:14

-The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

-Disappointing.

0:48:140:48:19

But it's not as easy as you might think

0:48:190:48:21

and things don't always go to plan.

0:48:210:48:23

-Push!

-So will they race off with a huge profit

0:48:230:48:26

-or come to a grinding halt?

-I'm terribly nervous, James.

0:48:260:48:29

This is the Antiques Road Trip.

0:48:290:48:31

All of this week we're out on the road with auctioneers James Braxton and Jonathon Pratt.

0:48:350:48:41

James is an old-fashioned gent that knows his stuff.

0:48:420:48:46

A life study, I think they're known as, not a rudie-nudie, OK?

0:48:460:48:52

James' younger counterpart is Jonathon Pratt.

0:48:520:48:55

It looks like he may have found his calling.

0:48:550:48:58

Perhaps this is a turning point in my career.

0:48:580:49:01

At yesterday's auction, James suffered a huge loss on that kilim rug

0:49:010:49:06

but despite this, he's still the one with the most money in the pot.

0:49:060:49:09

-That's good.

-Mm.

-Happy with that.

0:49:090:49:12

Jonathon had a few profits but the expensive doggy page turner

0:49:120:49:16

left him out in the cold and the loser once again.

0:49:160:49:20

That was inevitable, wasn't it? I think that was inevitable.

0:49:200:49:24

From his original £200, Jonathon now has £178.22

0:49:240:49:30

rattling about in his purse.

0:49:300:49:33

Old-fashioned bargaining has enabled James to take the lead with a wonderful £269.54.

0:49:340:49:41

The chaps are not making the money of champions

0:49:420:49:45

but as they move on to the penultimate leg,

0:49:450:49:48

they have James' pride and joy, the surprisingly smooth 1952 MG,

0:49:480:49:54

to ferry them around.

0:49:540:49:56

This week, James and Jonathon are travelling over 300 miles

0:49:560:50:00

from Altrincham in Greater Manchester

0:50:000:50:02

all the way south to sunny Lostwithiel in Cornwall

0:50:020:50:06

and on today's show, they're heading for their next auction in Crewkerne.

0:50:060:50:09

First stop, is the medieval city of Wells.

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Wells is the smallest city in the UK

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and the only city in Somerset.

0:50:180:50:20

Nestling on the southern side of the Mendip Hills,

0:50:200:50:23

the history of Wells stretches all the way back to Roman times.

0:50:230:50:26

The cathedral is probably the finest example of Early English architecture

0:50:260:50:31

built between the 12th and 14th centuries.

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Beautiful.

0:50:340:50:35

The chaps roll into town, ready to start afresh,

0:50:370:50:40

determined and full of excitement,

0:50:400:50:41

to gain fast on the poor results thus far.

0:50:410:50:45

-Wow.

-Lovely-jubbly.

0:50:450:50:48

I do love all this medieval architecture.

0:50:480:50:50

Very good. Very good condition, as well.

0:50:520:50:54

-Well driven.

-Thank you very much.

0:50:540:50:56

-So what are you looking for, then?

-I hear we're going to Lawrence's.

0:50:560:51:01

It's a general sale, so I'm going to stick with all the things that I've made money out of so far

0:51:010:51:07

and ignore the stuff I've lost money on.

0:51:070:51:09

-So anything over £30...

-Forget it.

-Forget it. So think small.

0:51:090:51:13

You did well on the picture last time. I'm going to buy a picture.

0:51:130:51:17

-Anyway, good luck.

-Thank you, James. And you.

0:51:170:51:20

So, the battle plans are in place.

0:51:200:51:22

James is in jovial mood as he strides with purpose to his first shop of the day.

0:51:220:51:28

-Hello, nice to meet you. James.

-Craig.

-Hello, Craig.

0:51:300:51:33

I had a spy in your window. It all looks very good.

0:51:330:51:36

-Over how many floors?

-Over two floors.

-OK, brilliant.

0:51:360:51:39

Now, don't be fooled by James.

0:51:400:51:42

Underneath that bumbling exterior lies an expert haggler.

0:51:420:51:46

We're just having a jolly good look everywhere.

0:51:490:51:52

What have we got here?

0:51:520:51:53

So we've got a nice horn. It's been steamed and bent over.

0:51:530:51:59

You can see the crease there.

0:51:590:52:01

We've got a nice silver ferrule that is obviously quite thick.

0:52:010:52:05

The marks have rubbed but it's still survived.

0:52:050:52:08

There's a malacca cane here.

0:52:080:52:10

Early in the 20th century, malacca was referred to as the king of canes.

0:52:100:52:15

Made from rattan found on the coast of Sumatra,

0:52:150:52:18

they are the perfect material for walking sticks.

0:52:180:52:20

That's an elegant piece. It's rather nice, isn't it?

0:52:200:52:23

So that's a nice little silver fellow.

0:52:260:52:29

Yeah, that just came in yesterday.

0:52:290:52:30

It's a sort of meat skewer. Nice clear marks.

0:52:320:52:36

Sterling silver skewers were rather popular during Victorian times.

0:52:360:52:41

-How much have you got on that one?

-Mm. About 45.

0:52:420:52:46

About 45.

0:52:460:52:47

You've got a nice sort of decorative art feeling, haven't you?

0:52:470:52:51

These have been thrown in anger at some errant husband, haven't they?

0:52:520:52:56

-Beautiful, with the bronze inlay.

-Lovely inlay, isn't it?

0:52:560:52:59

-They've both got a small dint in.

-They've got dings, haven't they?

0:52:590:53:03

-But they're a pair.

-They're decorative. The dings are at the back.

0:53:030:53:06

The dings are at the back. Who's going to know?

0:53:060:53:09

I normally leave all damaged goods to my partner, Jonathon Pratt.

0:53:090:53:13

He seems to love them but you never know, I might be tempted.

0:53:130:53:17

He knows a good pair when he sees them.

0:53:170:53:19

I'm foolhardy. I've noted three things I'd quite like to walk away with here.

0:53:190:53:23

-But, Craig, let's talk turkey, shall we?

-OK.

0:53:230:53:27

Get down and dirty.

0:53:270:53:28

-I know it's fresh in. £30 for that, OK?

-OK.

0:53:280:53:34

And then I'm going to go over here.

0:53:340:53:36

I quite like your cane. Rubbed marks, I'm going to look over those.

0:53:380:53:42

I'd love that for 25.

0:53:440:53:45

Going in for the deal.

0:53:450:53:46

-And I'd like these...

-Going to tell us the ticket price, James?

0:53:460:53:49

-..for... I'm not even going to look at the label.

-Oh, thanks.

0:53:490:53:53

50 quid.

0:53:530:53:54

So that's three items. How are we doing?

0:53:540:53:57

-Am I barking mad?

-No, you've got a deal.

-Thank you, Craig.

0:53:570:54:02

Whoo! Braxton's a fast worker.

0:54:020:54:05

Really pleased with the purchases and I think I'll strike...

0:54:050:54:08

-Very debonair!

-..an elegant figure around Wells now.

0:54:080:54:11

Anyway... Ooh, dear. The old lumbago.

0:54:110:54:15

There we are. Thank you, Craig.

0:54:150:54:17

PROJECTOR WHIRRS

0:54:170:54:20

Worthy of an Oscar, that, James, anyway.

0:54:260:54:29

Let's move on to Jonathon.

0:54:290:54:31

Up to now, Jonathon has... Well, he's been pretty rubbish.

0:54:310:54:35

But this morning, he's full of fire and focus

0:54:350:54:37

and ready to buy, buy, buy!

0:54:370:54:39

Good morning. Hello, there.

0:54:410:54:43

-Jonathon Pratt. Nice to meet you.

-Hello. Pleased to meet you.

0:54:430:54:47

What have we got here, then? A big shop full of all sorts of stuff.

0:54:470:54:51

Yes, we've got 20 dealers from all over the county,

0:54:510:54:54

-selling a massive variety of things.

-OK.

0:54:540:54:57

Good, well. Where shall I start? I may as well start just here.

0:54:570:55:02

-This brooch in the corner. 19 sort of 40s.

-Yes.

0:55:020:55:06

-How much is that?

-Erm, 24.

-OK.

-Is it quite unusual. It is '40s.

0:55:060:55:12

-Yeah. I like that because it's that real sort of...

-It's got that look.

0:55:120:55:17

-Yeah. And it's evocative of the Art Deco.

-Yes but it's later.

0:55:170:55:21

-But it's later.

-Yes.

0:55:210:55:23

Because during the war, if you wore diamonds it was far too ostentatious.

0:55:230:55:27

-Absolutely.

-Polished metal was much more preferred.

0:55:270:55:30

That's kind of from the same...

0:55:300:55:32

Would you...? You're saying £24

0:55:320:55:34

but would you accept 10 or 12 or something?

0:55:340:55:37

-15.

-15, OK.

0:55:370:55:39

This is hard work but I've got to focus. Absolutely focus.

0:55:430:55:47

Jonathon's in a bit of a world of his own.

0:55:510:55:54

After all that investigating, what's he got his eye on?

0:55:590:56:03

This little chap here.

0:56:040:56:06

Because what I'm trying to think is, to sell at auction, you need novelty.

0:56:060:56:10

-Novelty sells.

-If you say so.

0:56:100:56:13

This little chap here is an ink well.

0:56:130:56:15

I know that because... HE WHISTLES

0:56:150:56:18

..inside there's a little glass reserve.

0:56:180:56:22

Actually, it's not glass, it's plastic.

0:56:220:56:24

Bakelite probably, I suppose. It fits rather snugly.

0:56:240:56:27

And if that's the case that suggests this was made early 20th century.

0:56:270:56:31

OK, there's a tree stump, sitting on top of it, a goblin

0:56:310:56:36

and around it, you've got mushrooms, toadstools.

0:56:360:56:38

It says £85. I'm going to go and see what I can get this for.

0:56:380:56:42

-Right.

-You've found something.

0:56:420:56:45

-Yeah, I like this little chappie.

-It's sweet.

-It is.

0:56:450:56:47

I've never seen this... I'm sure there's million of different types.

0:56:470:56:51

-Ink wells, yes.

-Novelty ink wells are always popular.

0:56:510:56:54

-What would be the best price?

-I'll look him up for you.

0:56:540:56:58

He's all excited.

0:56:590:57:01

-£45.

-£45.

0:57:010:57:04

Oh, no. He's all confused - again.

0:57:050:57:08

He's such a nice thing.

0:57:080:57:10

Yeah.

0:57:100:57:13

This is a gamble. Is it a gamble? I really like it?

0:57:130:57:16

James, I know, will really like it

0:57:160:57:18

but will he say, "Oh, Jonathon, that was a bit strong."

0:57:180:57:21

Anyway, I am going to be committed.

0:57:210:57:25

I'm going to take that because I think that's a nice object for £12.

0:57:250:57:29

And I'm going to take that for £45.

0:57:290:57:32

-That's 15, by the way.

-Oh, it's 15. So I can't have it for 12?

0:57:320:57:36

Huh! Nice try, Jonathon.

0:57:360:57:38

-OK, so £60.

-That's right, thank you.

-Oh, well. As long as he's happy.

0:57:380:57:41

He's only a young 'un. He'll learn.

0:57:410:57:44

That's lovely. Thank you very much.

0:57:440:57:46

-If I could have a receipt...

-You can, with pleasure.

-Wonderful.

0:57:460:57:50

Great.

0:57:530:57:54

Whilst Jonathon's being in fairy land,

0:57:540:57:57

big bad James Braxton has got the old foot on the gas

0:57:570:58:01

making his way to the ancient town of Bruton in south Somerset,

0:58:010:58:05

13 miles away.

0:58:050:58:07

Situated in the Brue Valley, the town is steeped in history,

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spanning five centuries.

0:58:100:58:12

There's even a suggestion that King Arthur may have visited the town

0:58:120:58:16

at some point in the 5th or 6th century.

0:58:160:58:18

James is going for a good old nosy in Quillon Antiques.

0:58:190:58:22

-Hello.

-Hello! Made it at last.

-I have.

0:58:240:58:28

-Very good.

-My magic carpet has brought me here.

0:58:280:58:31

What are you talking about? It's an MG.

0:58:310:58:33

Peter has crammed the shop full of unusual treasures.

0:58:330:58:37

After buying three items, just remember your budget, James.

0:58:370:58:40

-What sort of price are they?

-We're looking at about 800 for the pair.

0:58:410:58:45

-The price of a nice box?

-5,000.

0:58:450:58:49

A piece in perfect order would be around 1,200.

0:58:490:58:52

-Nice, isn't it?

-You've got great taste but with great taste comes money.

0:58:530:58:59

-Could that be very cheap, then?

-I'm afraid not, James.

0:58:590:59:02

LAUGHTER

0:59:020:59:03

OK, we get the message.

0:59:030:59:06

It's all too pricy but it's unusual for James to leave empty-handed.

0:59:060:59:11

Has he lost his mojo?

0:59:110:59:13

So back to Jonathon.

0:59:130:59:15

He's still in Wells and en route to the exquisite Bishop's Palace.

0:59:150:59:20

This splendid medieval palace has been the home of the bishops of Bath and Wells

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since the 13th century.

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Wells gets its name from a series of springs

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found in the gardens here.

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The palace welcomes visitors all year round.

0:59:310:59:34

Jonathon is meeting up with interpretation consultant Kate Rambridge.

0:59:340:59:39

Don't they call them guides any more?

0:59:390:59:41

-Hi, there.

-Hello.

0:59:410:59:44

-You must be Kate.

-I'm Kate. And you're...?

-Jonathon.

-Nice to meet you.

0:59:440:59:49

-Wow, this is wonderful, isn't it?

-It is a really lovely space.

0:59:490:59:52

What can you tell me about it?

0:59:520:59:54

This is a 13th century chapel.

0:59:540:59:57

It is one of the oldest parts of the palace to survive

0:59:571:00:02

and it was built as a private chapel for the Bishop of Bath and Wells.

1:00:021:00:08

-Wow.

-So this is where his own staff of clerics and chaplains

1:00:081:00:14

-would have performed services, probably daily.

-Lovely.

1:00:141:00:19

The size of the windows gives you a clue that this is a very, very prestigious chapel.

1:00:191:00:25

Bishops of Bath and Wells have lived here ever since 1206,

1:00:251:00:30

so with so little time and so many things to look at, let's press on.

1:00:301:00:33

Come with me.

1:00:331:00:34

-Wow, this is a nice room.

-This is the Long Gallery.

1:00:431:00:46

It's a Victorian space, as you can tell,

1:00:461:00:49

and the collection of portraits was put together

1:00:491:00:53

by one of the Victorian bishops

1:00:531:00:55

and they're all still hung in exactly the same order as he placed them.

1:00:551:00:59

How wonderful.

1:00:591:01:00

Out of many of the bishops who have lived here,

1:01:001:01:04

Bishop Peter Mews was particularly fascinating.

1:01:041:01:07

He would regularly take part in battles

1:01:071:01:09

and suffered over 30 wounds, one of which was a blow to the face,

1:01:091:01:13

hence the black silk patch on his cheek.

1:01:131:01:16

Before we leave, there's one final item we simply cannot ignore.

1:01:181:01:22

This is the... This is what a bishop holds, his staff.

1:01:221:01:26

This is the Bishop's crosier, which is his staff of office.

1:01:261:01:30

So this is used in ceremonies which the Bishop is officiating.

1:01:301:01:37

This particular crosier is still used from time to time

1:01:371:01:41

but it's well over 100 years old

1:01:411:01:44

and it really is, I think, the most magnificent piece of Episcopal bling

1:01:441:01:50

-that you could hope to find.

-Absolutely.

1:01:501:01:52

It's very, very top-heavy, as you can imagine.

1:01:521:01:55

-Can I have a go? Am I allowed to touch it?

-Erm, yes, by all means.

1:01:551:01:59

-I have to put gloves on, do I?

-I only handle it with gloves.

1:01:591:02:02

What a responsibility.

1:02:021:02:04

And I think it can be a little bit loose in the socket, so...

1:02:041:02:09

That's all I need, is to sort of break it.

1:02:091:02:11

Steady!

1:02:111:02:13

This spectacular and opulent artwork

1:02:131:02:16

was made by silversmith John Dando Sedding.

1:02:161:02:19

The intricate figures standing shoulder to shoulder

1:02:191:02:22

are the elite spiritual figures of the time.

1:02:221:02:26

I feel very grand holding this.

1:02:261:02:27

Perhaps this is a new turning point in my career.

1:02:271:02:30

Bless you, my child. Maybe.

1:02:301:02:31

Perhaps it's for the best, if this week's auctions are anything to go by.

1:02:311:02:35

All good things, though, must come to an end

1:02:351:02:37

and night is fast approaching

1:02:371:02:39

and it's time to leave the peaceful palace.

1:02:391:02:41

Another busy day awaits tomorrow.

1:02:411:02:44

It's early morning and a new day of shopping beckons.

1:02:481:02:52

So far, Jonathon has totted up a bill of £60 on two lots,

1:02:521:02:57

the gold-plated bow brooch and that goblin ink well.

1:02:571:03:00

He has a total of £118.22 for his second day of shopping.

1:03:001:03:05

James has spent £105 on three lots - the malacca cane, the bronze vases

1:03:061:03:12

and the silver skewer,

1:03:121:03:13

leaving a healthy £164.54 for the day ahead.

1:03:131:03:17

The chaps have travelled just under 40 miles

1:03:181:03:21

to the idyllic town of Shaftesbury.

1:03:211:03:24

-By 'eck!

-MUSIC: "Hovis" theme

1:03:241:03:26

Feels like you're on the top of t'world, 'ere.

1:03:261:03:30

This is Gold Hill, the steep cobbled hill

1:03:301:03:32

made famous by Ridley Scott's 1973 Hovis ad

1:03:321:03:37

and as you'll notice, it's nowhere near Yorkshire.

1:03:371:03:40

Shaftesbury is one of the oldest towns in England.

1:03:401:03:44

James is starting the day with a good old nosy in the antiques shop called Leanings.

1:03:461:03:51

David and Rebecca Leanings first opened for business a couple of years ago.

1:03:511:03:56

-Hello, I'm James.

-Hello. Hi. Rebecca.

-Nice to meet you.

1:03:561:03:59

-Hi, James. David Leaning.

-Hello.

-Pleased to meet you.

1:03:591:04:02

Very nice. I'm intrigued by your portrait behind, there.

1:04:021:04:05

-Thank you.

-You two?

-Yes.

1:04:051:04:08

-It was a wedding gift.

-Oh, fabulous.

1:04:081:04:10

-Well, if I may, I'll have a look around.

-Of course.

1:04:101:04:14

Thank you.

1:04:141:04:15

There's certainly plenty to choose from. It's bursting at the seams.

1:04:151:04:20

What I want to do is find a picture.

1:04:201:04:22

They sell 50 or 60 lots of pictures.

1:04:221:04:24

It would be quite nice to be in each category,

1:04:241:04:27

just in case something's hot at that time.

1:04:271:04:30

So much stuff.

1:04:301:04:31

Pictures have always been a failsafe for the boys

1:04:311:04:34

and it looks like that's the route for James.

1:04:341:04:37

Look at this.

1:04:371:04:39

What have you got there, then?

1:04:391:04:42

A painting.

1:04:421:04:43

# You're just too good to be true... #

1:04:431:04:46

-Sounds romantic...

-# Can't take my eyes off you... #

1:04:461:04:50

-Looks romantic...

-A life study, I think they're known as,

1:04:501:04:55

not a rudie-nudie, OK?

1:04:551:04:57

Might not be nude to you but it looks nude to me.

1:04:591:05:03

# And I thank God I'm alive... #

1:05:031:05:06

-I think he likes it.

-# You're just too good to be true... #

1:05:061:05:10

-What's going on now?

-# Can't take my eyes off you.

-#

1:05:101:05:13

-Oh, I know.

-It's got merit. It's good.

1:05:131:05:16

I'll make an offer for this.

1:05:161:05:18

HE SIGHS

1:05:181:05:20

-That's a big sigh.

-I think that's it, then.

1:05:201:05:23

# The sight of you leaves me weak... #

1:05:231:05:25

Better get the glasses on, just to make sure.

1:05:251:05:28

# But if you feel like I feel

1:05:301:05:33

# Please let me know that it's real... #

1:05:331:05:37

Been away from home a bit.

1:05:371:05:39

# You're just too good to be true... #

1:05:391:05:41

-Quite a few days, I'd say.

-# Can't take my eyes off you. #

1:05:411:05:44

Right.

1:05:441:05:45

-I've pored all over your lovely shop.

-Good, thank you.

1:05:451:05:49

How long has it taken you to gather all these items?

1:05:491:05:53

-We've been open just over two years.

-Two years?

-Two years.

1:05:531:05:57

You've got a problem, you two, haven't you?

1:05:571:06:00

Anyway, I've spotted a picture here I quite like the look of.

1:06:001:06:03

-It's a rather nice lady.

-Mm-hm.

-It's not terribly old. 1992.

1:06:031:06:08

Erm, and what I'll do and you can say, "James, get out of this shop immediately,"

1:06:081:06:15

but I'd like to offer you £15 for that.

1:06:151:06:18

-Well, we won't take 15.

-You won't take 15?

-No.

1:06:181:06:21

-No. What would you take on this?

-I would take 25 on that.

1:06:211:06:25

-25.

-Mm.

1:06:251:06:26

-Would you meet me halfway at 20?

-OK.

1:06:261:06:31

Nudie lady in the bag, all the charm and mojo seem to be back in force.

1:06:311:06:36

That's very kind. Thank you.

1:06:361:06:37

Jonathon, meanwhile, is making his way to that famous hill.

1:06:371:06:42

He's going for a spot of shopping in Gold Hill Gallery.

1:06:421:06:45

-Hello.

-Good morning.

-Nice to meet you. Jonathon Pratt.

1:06:481:06:52

-Hi, Jonathon.

-What a location you've got.

-I'm very lucky.

1:06:521:06:55

-You've got a mixture of things.

-A very eclectic mixture.

1:06:551:06:58

I just sort of seek things out.

1:06:581:07:00

-It's a very pretty shop, actually.

-It's a girly shop.

1:07:001:07:03

It's a girly shop, I can see.

1:07:031:07:05

Maggie is the proprietor

1:07:051:07:06

and it's looking likely that our very chipper Jonathon

1:07:061:07:09

is in the mood to buy.

1:07:091:07:11

Quite a useful little stool.

1:07:121:07:15

Upholstered in a Persian rug.

1:07:161:07:19

It makes quite a nice little fashionable object.

1:07:191:07:22

It's got some age, actually.

1:07:221:07:24

You can look at the underside of it and it's a 19th-century frame

1:07:241:07:28

and then upholstered with a late 19th-century rug.

1:07:281:07:33

Quite useful, quite decorative.

1:07:331:07:35

It's quite a reasonable price.

1:07:351:07:37

The ticket says £40. Can Jonathon get it for less?

1:07:371:07:41

I rather like that, actually. Would you take £20 for it?

1:07:411:07:44

-I don't think so, no.

-No.

-No. Possibly 35.

1:07:461:07:50

I did tell myself I wasn't going to buy anything over £30, you see.

1:07:511:07:55

I haven't got a lot of money.

1:07:551:07:57

Crikey! Straight in with a price and a sob story to boot.

1:07:581:08:02

I don't know whether it's working with Maggie.

1:08:021:08:04

Even the dogs aren't interested.

1:08:041:08:07

Have another think, Jonathon. There's plenty to see here.

1:08:071:08:10

Actually, where is he? Jonathon? Coo-ee!

1:08:101:08:14

Oh, there you are.

1:08:141:08:15

That's the ticket, Jonathon. Get stuck in, old boy.

1:08:151:08:19

Crikey. Been quite well polished, hasn't it?

1:08:241:08:28

-I think it was originally Sheffield plate.

-I think it might have been.

1:08:281:08:32

-The plate's worn off.

-Would you take an offer?

-Try me, yes.

1:08:321:08:36

-£10.

-I knew you were going to say that.

1:08:361:08:38

20.

1:08:391:08:41

-In the middle?

-In the middle.

1:08:441:08:46

£15.

1:08:461:08:47

OK. £15. Great. I've bought my first object today.

1:08:491:08:54

I do like this stool as well.

1:08:541:08:57

That's a nice little object. It hasn't been messed about with.

1:08:571:09:00

30 would be the best on it, though.

1:09:001:09:02

-30 would be your best?

-Yes.

1:09:021:09:03

I really like it. And it is on my budget now, isn't it?

1:09:051:09:09

£30 is on my budget. I told myself not to spend more than £30.

1:09:091:09:12

I think I am going to buy it.

1:09:141:09:19

-Thank you very much, Jonathon.

-Thank you.

1:09:201:09:23

-I hope you do well with them.

-Thank you.

1:09:231:09:25

Well done, Jonathon. That's another two items in the bag.

1:09:251:09:29

Let's catch up with James now.

1:09:311:09:33

He's all spruced up for a prior engagement 20 miles down the road

1:09:331:09:37

at Longleat, Wiltshire.

1:09:371:09:39

What a view.

1:09:391:09:41

Incredible house.

1:09:411:09:43

Longleat House is widely regarded as one of the best examples

1:09:431:09:48

of Elizabethan architecture in Britain.

1:09:481:09:51

Sir John Thynne, an experienced builder,

1:09:511:09:54

purchased Longleat in the 16th century when it was a run-down priory.

1:09:541:09:58

The house has remained within the Thynne family ever since.

1:09:581:10:03

Ruth Charles, visitor manager, is on hand

1:10:031:10:06

to give James a personal tour.

1:10:061:10:08

-How nice to meet you. Come and have a look at Longleat House.

-Thank you.

1:10:081:10:13

Come into the Great Hall, which is pretty magnificent, isn't it?

1:10:131:10:17

It's the biggest room in the house.

1:10:171:10:20

-And was this part of the original plan?

-Yes.

1:10:201:10:23

This is part of the original house that was completed in 1580.

1:10:231:10:27

A lot of what we're going to see hereafter has been added to

1:10:271:10:30

and changed by various generations of ownership.

1:10:301:10:33

Yeah, so the.. Quite.

1:10:331:10:35

-The riches and the status continued through many centuries.

-Yes, yes.

1:10:351:10:39

If John Thynne, the chap that built the house, were here today,

1:10:391:10:43

-he wouldn't recognise it.

-Really?

-Yes.

1:10:431:10:45

All that maybe he would recognise are features in the Great Hall,

1:10:451:10:48

such as the Elizabethan fireplace.

1:10:481:10:50

You've two gauges, a clock and the other?

1:10:501:10:54

And a wind dial showing the direction the wind is blowing,

1:10:541:10:57

so that when you're out hunting, shooting and fishing...

1:10:571:11:00

-Very important.

-..you knew which way was that wind.

1:11:001:11:03

And we're surrounded by stags' heads.

1:11:031:11:06

-Venison was the meat of choice for the aristocracy, wasn't it?

-Yes.

1:11:061:11:10

-Any interesting bits in here?

-Oh, lots.

1:11:101:11:12

I think one of my favourites must be the Charles I costume.

1:11:121:11:16

A wonderful piece of history.

1:11:161:11:19

Very macabre. The costume, the doublet, that Charles I wore

1:11:191:11:22

at his execution in 1649, complete with bloodstains.

1:11:221:11:26

Several buttons are missing because people took them as souvenirs

1:11:261:11:30

-at the execution.

-Really?

-Yes.

1:11:301:11:32

They were dipping handkerchiefs in his blood

1:11:321:11:35

and taking it back with them because it was such a momentous occasion.

1:11:351:11:38

People would grab what they could.

1:11:381:11:41

The story goes that it was a cold January day

1:11:411:11:44

and he didn't want the crowd to think he was shivering out of fear,

1:11:441:11:48

so he wore several garments to stop him shivering on the freezing January day.

1:11:481:11:55

What a grisly but fascinating tale.

1:11:551:11:58

Let's move on. A visual feast for the eyes awaits our Mr Braxton.

1:11:581:12:03

Not only a popular visitor attraction,

1:12:031:12:05

it is also the family home of Lord Bath,

1:12:051:12:08

the seventh and current Marquis of Bath.

1:12:081:12:10

The ornate ceilings were created by the firm John Dibblee Crace

1:12:101:12:16

in the mid 1800s.

1:12:161:12:18

They were fifth generation designers and known as the royal decorators.

1:12:181:12:22

The fourth Marquis of Bath worked closely with Crace

1:12:221:12:26

to produce the exquisite and ornate ceilings and interiors

1:12:261:12:29

that we see today.

1:12:291:12:32

-OK, so...

-So what room is this, Ruth?

1:12:321:12:35

-This is the Red Library.

-Red Library.

-One of seven libraries in the house.

1:12:351:12:39

This is quite a big one. About 5,000 books in here.

1:12:391:12:42

5,000 books. And how many books in all in Longleat?

1:12:421:12:45

44,000, give or take a few.

1:12:451:12:47

-One of the biggest private collections in Europe.

-Goodness me.

1:12:471:12:51

And this room is remodelled by your famous Crace?

1:12:511:12:55

Indeed, indeed, along with the direction of the fourth Marquis.

1:12:551:12:58

He was very hands-on in the design of the house.

1:12:581:13:01

He had been ambassador to Venice

1:13:011:13:04

-and so...

-Ah!

-..had been surrounded by the beauty of Italian art and architecture.

1:13:041:13:08

Then when he returned home, he employed Dibblee Crace

1:13:081:13:11

to work under his direction

1:13:111:13:13

and between them they made these fabulous ceilings.

1:13:131:13:17

Alas, dear James, the clock is ticking

1:13:171:13:20

and you must tear yourself away from the wonders of Longleat.

1:13:201:13:23

Back to Shaftesbury for you. There's still shopping to do.

1:13:231:13:27

The boys are swapping shops

1:13:271:13:29

and it's now Jonathon's turn to visit Leanings,

1:13:291:13:32

owned by lovebirds David and Rebecca.

1:13:321:13:34

Here we are. Look at all this. Good morning.

1:13:341:13:37

-Pleased to meet you.

-Nice to meet you.

1:13:371:13:39

-You're David, is that right?

-I am.

-And...?

-Rebecca.

-David and Rebecca.

1:13:391:13:43

-This is eclectic. I'm free to roam, am I?

-Please do.

1:13:441:13:48

Thank you very much.

1:13:481:13:50

Jonathon really needs to pick up the pace.

1:13:501:13:53

He's had too many losses and not enough profits.

1:13:531:13:56

I thought it was silver but it's porcelain,

1:13:561:13:59

silvered porcelain.

1:13:591:14:00

This was an interesting method of firing silver or gold onto porcelain.

1:14:001:14:04

It's a thrifty way of filling the parlour with rather more valuable looking items.

1:14:041:14:10

A really strong Art Deco shape.

1:14:101:14:12

If you had the tea pot and the milk jug to go with it,

1:14:121:14:15

it would be a great tea service, very fashionable.

1:14:151:14:18

It's probably with it for a couple of pounds.

1:14:181:14:21

There's no price on it.

1:14:211:14:23

What do you think of that?

1:14:231:14:24

Little Art Deco silvered pottery sugar bowl and cover.

1:14:241:14:28

There's no price on it.

1:14:301:14:32

-Six.

-Fiver?

1:14:321:14:34

OK.

1:14:341:14:36

Ooh, a whole pound off, Jonathon. Steady!

1:14:361:14:39

I love the colour. I think it's a very tranquil colour.

1:14:441:14:48

It's probably only about 40 years old.

1:14:481:14:50

But the base, crikey, I mean, it's a phenomenal amount of wear

1:14:521:14:56

but to me, it's a lovely shape, lovely colour

1:14:561:14:59

and the other appealing thing is it said £25 on it.

1:14:591:15:03

Would you take £15?

1:15:031:15:05

Wow. We've upped the ante but will they accept a tenner off?

1:15:051:15:09

-How about 17?

-£17.

1:15:091:15:12

Do I like it for £17?

1:15:121:15:14

Well, you love it at 25, so you have to like it at 17.

1:15:141:15:18

If you don't buy it, somebody else will

1:15:181:15:21

and it will go quickly.

1:15:211:15:22

CUCKOO CLOCK STRIKES

1:15:221:15:25

Is that an omen? You're cuckoo unless you do?

1:15:251:15:30

Jonathon, subliminal message - buy, buy.

1:15:301:15:33

-I'll have it.

-Thank you very much.

1:15:331:15:36

And there we have it. The cuckoo clock has called time

1:15:361:15:39

on Jonathon's last shop of the day.

1:15:391:15:42

Meanwhile, James has made it back to Shaftesbury

1:15:441:15:46

and is visiting Gold Hill Gallery.

1:15:461:15:49

-Hello. James.

-Hello.

-Hello.

-Nice to meet you.

1:15:491:15:54

-And, sorry, your name is?

-Maggie.

-Maggie. Very nice, too.

1:15:541:15:57

-What a fabulous street, isn't it?

-I feel privileged to be here.

1:15:571:16:00

-May I have a look round?

-Yes, please do.

1:16:001:16:03

He's not under a great deal of pressure to buy

1:16:031:16:06

but knowing James, he'll probably sniff something out.

1:16:061:16:09

Bottle coasters or slides or stands.

1:16:101:16:14

This is very much a sort of 18th-century thing,

1:16:141:16:18

sort of the Georgian, er, lifestyle.

1:16:181:16:23

And you'd stand a decanter in it.

1:16:231:16:25

Look at all the service they've done and they're still intact.

1:16:251:16:28

You know, quality of craftsmanship, isn't it?

1:16:281:16:31

That's nice.

1:16:321:16:34

Porcelain. Chinese. Not a great deal of age to it.

1:16:341:16:39

You know, people love them in conservatories.

1:16:391:16:41

Everybody has a conservatory these days.

1:16:411:16:44

Why not fill it with nice things?

1:16:441:16:46

And it's a very practical seat.

1:16:461:16:49

Don't sit there too long, James.

1:16:491:16:50

It looks rather dainty and, well, you're quite a big fellow.

1:16:501:16:55

They're two quite nice items.

1:16:551:16:57

Maggie, I have not a huge amount of money

1:16:571:17:01

but would £40 buy either the pair of coasters or the garden seat?

1:17:011:17:09

I'm not really bothered what I buy.

1:17:091:17:11

SHE SIGHS

1:17:141:17:15

I could do the coasters for £45.

1:17:151:17:19

For 45. And what could you do the garden seat for?

1:17:191:17:23

I make it a policy never to sell anything for less than I've paid for it.

1:17:231:17:26

-That's my rule of thumb.

-That's quite a good rule.

1:17:261:17:29

-So I would say 60 for the garden seat.

-60.

1:17:291:17:32

I'm going to make my money squeeze a little further.

1:17:361:17:39

-Maggie, I'm going to buy those.

-I think they're a good buy.

1:17:391:17:42

-Yeah. Thank you.

-Thank you.

1:17:421:17:44

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you, James.

1:17:441:17:47

One, two, three, four, five.

1:17:471:17:50

45.

1:17:501:17:52

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

1:17:551:17:57

I hope you do well with them.

1:17:571:17:59

And there we have it. Shopping is now over

1:17:591:18:01

and it's time for the boys to discover what the other has bought.

1:18:011:18:06

-First object. Keen to see it?

-Absolutely. Fire away.

-First one.

1:18:061:18:10

Okey-dokey.

1:18:101:18:11

Run your hands over that one.

1:18:111:18:14

-It's a malacca cane with a horn handle, silver mount.

-Yeah.

1:18:141:18:18

-Say what you see, Jonathon.

-Marks are a bit worn

1:18:181:18:21

-but probably about 1915.

-Yeah.

1:18:211:18:24

I'd say for that you're going to have paid £20-£30.

1:18:241:18:27

-Yeah, 25 I paid.

-Good. Well done.

1:18:271:18:30

-What about you?

-I'm going to go with my largest object.

-Fire away.

1:18:301:18:33

Ooh, look at that.

1:18:351:18:36

Gosh, this is combining a lot of disciplines, isn't it?

1:18:361:18:40

It is.

1:18:401:18:41

So you've got a Turkish carpet on top and some nice bun feet.

1:18:411:18:46

-Yeah. A bit of rosewood, I think, actually.

-A bit of rosewood.

1:18:461:18:49

Let's feel the weight.

1:18:491:18:50

Ooh, yeah, a good weight, isn't it?

1:18:501:18:53

But will it make a weighty profit at auction?

1:18:531:18:55

-I'd say it's worth around £50.

-I paid 30.

1:18:551:18:59

-OK, over to you, James.

-Hefty, right.

1:18:591:19:02

My next item is probably a nice little cabinet bit.

1:19:021:19:06

Oh! It's another lump of silver. There's about an ounce there.

1:19:061:19:11

Good.

1:19:111:19:13

Sheffield mark.

1:19:131:19:14

It will, I'm sure, perform.

1:19:141:19:17

So, again, you've paid... £25 for it.

1:19:171:19:21

-No, I paid 30.

-You paid 30.

-Come on, reveal all.

1:19:211:19:24

This is the highest investment I've made in the lots.

1:19:241:19:28

Oh, a nice little goblin.

1:19:291:19:32

Gives me the willies.

1:19:321:19:34

I think that's a really fun, novelty ink well.

1:19:341:19:36

-Good weight.

-It dates from the early part of the 20th century.

1:19:361:19:40

-How much did you pay for that?

-£45.

-Nice item.

1:19:401:19:44

-I like it. Anyway, take it away.

-Thank you.

-Next item.

1:19:441:19:47

Here we are.

1:19:471:19:49

-Ooh.

-What do you think to that?

1:19:521:19:55

Feeling jealous?

1:19:561:19:58

Nice piece of late 19th century Japanese bronze

1:19:581:20:01

-with a bit of silverwork on it.

-A bit of silverwork.

1:20:011:20:04

-Do you think it's gold as well, or not?

-Probably is, yeah.

1:20:041:20:07

It's a tiny little bit worn but it's a good shape, too.

1:20:071:20:11

-Nice condition, James, isn't it?

-Yeah, not bad condition.

1:20:111:20:15

Apart from the dent.

1:20:151:20:17

And they do benefit from a signature. One of them is signed.

1:20:171:20:20

They are nice quality but they are worn,

1:20:201:20:23

so I'd say you've paid, for the pair, £40.

1:20:231:20:25

-50.

-Well, that does get me a little bit on the edge.

1:20:251:20:28

-Does it?

-Yeah. I think those are game on, really.

1:20:281:20:31

-My third.

-That's rather fun, isn't it?

1:20:311:20:35

-Originally plated. Nice drinks, tea tray.

-Yeah.

1:20:351:20:38

I reckon you paid, without being plated,

1:20:381:20:41

anywhere between £10 and £20.

1:20:411:20:43

£15. I also bought that.

1:20:431:20:46

-Nice Deco shape.

-Yep.

1:20:461:20:49

Good.

1:20:491:20:50

Oh! Goodness, I thought it was going to be plate but it's ceramic.

1:20:501:20:53

It's ceramic, yes.

1:20:531:20:55

-Absolute tut.

-Thank you.

-Pleasure.

1:20:551:20:59

-I paid an extra fiver for that.

-You did?

-Yeah.

1:20:591:21:02

-Is there a profit in it, James?

-I doubt it.

1:21:021:21:05

Oh, rubbish, rubbish.

1:21:051:21:08

Number four is my nudie... rudie-nudie lady.

1:21:081:21:12

-Oh, you like a nude lady, don't you?

-There you are.

1:21:121:21:15

-Excellent.

-She's called Judy.

1:21:151:21:17

-Nicely painted.

-Yes.

1:21:171:21:19

It's no great age. Painted in 1992 by Sue McDougal

1:21:191:21:23

but it's just a nice scene.

1:21:231:21:25

Of course, I didn't look at the lady,

1:21:251:21:26

I looked at the Victorian balloon-backed chair.

1:21:261:21:29

Oh, yeah, James!

1:21:291:21:30

The ticket says 40. I hope to God you didn't pay £40 for it.

1:21:301:21:33

-I paid £20.

-You managed to get them to halve prices? Crikey.

1:21:331:21:38

-They were never that generous with me.

-Really?

1:21:381:21:41

I don't look at prices. I just make offers.

1:21:411:21:44

Go on. Oh, look at that.

1:21:441:21:47

That looks very smart.

1:21:471:21:48

-What is this? '50s, '60s?

-'40s.

1:21:481:21:51

-And material?

-It's gold plated.

1:21:511:21:54

-And how much did you pay for that?

-I paid £15.

1:21:541:21:58

That seems a very good buy to me.

1:21:581:22:00

So this is a pair of Sheffield plated bottle coasters.

1:22:001:22:03

-They're good for the dining table.

-They're fun, aren't they?

1:22:031:22:07

In a good market, a good sale, you'd get £30-£50 for them.

1:22:071:22:11

-I'm hoping I would get more.

-Do you?

-Yes.

1:22:111:22:13

I paid £45 for them.

1:22:131:22:15

-Oh!

-I saw that.

-Big green glass vase.

1:22:151:22:18

You can tell he's an antiques expert, can't you?

1:22:181:22:21

I like the stepped body. Nice sort of Deco feel to it, isn't there?

1:22:211:22:26

-£17.

-That looks like a good buy to me.

1:22:261:22:30

Having seen each other's purchases, what do our experts really think?

1:22:301:22:34

Jonathon, where are the bashed bits? You had no broken bits this time.

1:22:351:22:39

I think they're all nice sound items

1:22:391:22:43

and I think that helps at auction.

1:22:431:22:45

I'm actually quite reassured that I've bought well

1:22:451:22:48

and I think that it's a good game now, actually.

1:22:481:22:51

Without further ado, it's time to get back on the road

1:22:511:22:54

and head to auction.

1:22:541:22:56

It's been a competitive fourth leg.

1:22:561:22:58

The boys started off in Wells, via Bruton, Longleat and Shaftesbury

1:22:581:23:03

to their final destination of Crewkerne in Somerset.

1:23:031:23:06

Crewkerne is a busy market town

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that retains much charm from the bustle of previous centuries

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and has some very attractive Georgian architecture.

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It's auction day as our experts roll into town.

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Who will be the victor this time round?

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Lawrence's of Crewkerne have been conducting auction sales since the late 1950s

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and Richard Kay is our auctioneer for the day.

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He has a few thoughts to share about our featured lots.

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I think the item that I'm expecting the best result for

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would be the little pair of Japanese vases.

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They're the sort of things that we have buyers for here,

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so I'm optimistic about their prospects.

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It's awful to single something out but the copper tray might not be an easy seller.

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I'm not optimistic about its prospects.

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Jonathon Pratt started today with £178.22

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and spent £127 on five auction lots,

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leaving him with £51.22 in his back pocket.

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James Braxton began with £269.54 and has spent £170 on five lots,

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leaving him with £99.54 in his hand.

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Right, settle down. The auction is due to commence.

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First up we have every dandy's favourite accessory,

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the malacca cane.

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Bids start me here at £20. £20 I have.

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25, 30, 35 now and I'm out. At £35.

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In front of me at £35. And I'm selling.

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At £35...

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I take it back. It's marginally nicer than I thought.

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A tenner profit isn't that great but it's certainly better than nothing.

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Next up it's Jonathon's gold-plated bow brooch.

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-£20 for it?

-15.

-15 is bid.

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£15 is bid. Spoken bid at 15.

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I'll sell at 15. Maiden bid at £15. Are we done?

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It's £15 and I'm selling.

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-At £15.

-GAVEL BANGS

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-Oh, dear.

-That washed its face.

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That was pretty uneventful.

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It's his first lot of the day

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and well, let's be honest, it's not a great start.

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A break even is still a loss

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because the auction house must take their hard-earned commission.

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It's James' second item,

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the one that he started off calling a silver skewer

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and is now creatively titled a letter-opener.

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A silver letter-opener. Sheffield, 1935. £20 for it?

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£20 for it? £20 is bid. Can I say five anywhere?

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At £20, then. I'm selling at 20.

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For the last time at 20. All done at £20.

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Just happens so quickly, doesn't it?

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A notional profit is soon expunged.

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Just goes to show, it doesn't matter how you dress it up,

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a skewer, letter opener, it still made a tenner loss.

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Hopefully, Jonathon's funny little goblin can enchant the bidders

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of Crewkerne.

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This is the cast brass ink well modelled as a hobgoblin.

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Bids start me here at £25.

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25, 30, 35, now and I'm out.

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35, 40. Five.

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£45. In the room at £45.

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The gentleman's bid is at £45. I'm selling at £45.

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Are we done? At £45.

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Disaster strikes.

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45. Washing your face again.

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-Oh, dear.

-Oh, Jonathon, don't worry.

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Oh, dear, indeed. It's another break even,

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which again means yet another loss.

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Well, it's not a great start so far

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but perhaps James' eye for a good pair

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will turn up the profit margin.

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Interest here starts me at 90. 100, I'm bid.

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-Oh!

-£100 I have. 110, 120.

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130, 140.

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150. I'm out. It's £150 in the room.

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And I'm selling at £150 now. At 150.

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For the last time at 150.

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I'm not smiling.

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Now, that's more like it. £100 profit is wondrous news for James.

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Now, this is an interesting little item.

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Jonathon sorely needs some profit.

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It's a Victorian square footstool upholstered with a Persian rug

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-and I'm bid £32 on this. £32 is bid.

-Huh!

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-All right.

-£32 is bid.

-Someone stick their hand up.

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At 32. It's on commission.

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I'll sell at £32 if you're all done in the room.

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For the last time at £32.

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A small profit.

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Er, £15 starts me here...

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A very small profit but it's a loss after commission.

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It's the nude oil next. Will James streak ahead with yet more profit?

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Oil on board, nude study by Sue McDougal.

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£20 for that. £20 for it?

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At £20 for it. £15? 15 is bid. At £15 I have.

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At £15 and I'm selling.

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At £15.

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Ah! No rudie-nudies here.

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Yet another loss. Sadly, Lady Luck seems to have left your side.

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I wonder if this interesting lot can beef up your coffers, Jonathon?

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This is the oval gallery tray and a silvered porcelain sugar bowl.

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Both in the same lot. £20 for them?

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-£20 for these?

-Come on.

-There's a ring of optimism in his voice.

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£15 if you will. £10, then.

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At £10.

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At £10?

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Five, then. Five is bid. Are you bidding now?

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Eight, ten. £10 on my left. It's at ten.

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Selling at £10. At £10 only.

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-No!

-That was lucky. That was almost unsold.

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That would have been a blessing, James.

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Profits are sadly lacking, Jonathon.

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We're nearly at the end.

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It's Braxton's final lot, the silver decanter stands.

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A pair of Sheffield plated decanter stands.

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£20 for these? 20 is bid.

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25, 30.

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Five, 40, five, 50.

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£50. Standing to my left. I'm selling at 50 on this one.

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At £50. Are we done? It's £50 and I'm selling.

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At 50, now.

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So it washed its face.

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Another small success for James. OK, it's only a fiver

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but it's better than Jonathon's run of luck.

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Jonathon's last hope lies with the green glass vase.

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It's a Whitefriars ribbed green glass vase.

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Tapered design. £15 I'm bid.

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18, 20, five now. At £25. I'm out. It's in the room at 25.

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-And selling at £25.

-No. No, no, no.

-At £25.

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Doesn't look like James has much sympathy.

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Well, Jonathon, £8 profit isn't exactly the lofty heights of success

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but it's been your highest profit so far.

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The runaway success of the pair of bronze vases

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means James is today's winner.

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Jonathon started today's show with £178.22

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and after paying auction costs made a loss of £22.86.

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The loser yet again, he has a paltry £155.36 to carry forward

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to the final leg of the competition.

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James, meanwhile, started with £269.54

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and after costs, made a small profit of £51.40

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but it's enough to make James victorious once again.

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He has a lovely £320.94 to take forward.

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Oh, well, there's always another leg.

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I'll get you, Braxton...

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if it's the last thing I do. LAUGHTER

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It may be.

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Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

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it's the final showdown in sunny Cornwall.

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The pressure's on for Jonathon.

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I'm quite nervous now.

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James is weak with excitement.

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I don't know if... Have I got the strength?

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I didn't have the full English this morning.

1:31:401:31:42

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