Episode 11 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 11

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Antiques guru David Barby and auctioneer Charles Hanson kick off their hunt for antiques in Lichfield, Staffordshire.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts. £200 each. One challenge.

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Well, duck, do I buy you or don't I?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques

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as they scour the UK?

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The aim is to trade up and hope that each antique turns a profit.

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It's not as easy as it looks and dreams of glory can end in tatters.

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I'm a loser. I'm a loser.

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Will it be the fast lane to success, or the slow road to bankruptcy?

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Oh! There's a mouse! There's a mouse!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's another Road Trip and we join antiques maestros

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David Barby and Charles Hanson on the road.

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# Greased Lightning Go Greased Lightning! #

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David, don't you feel we're like Sandy and Danny

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from Greased Lightning?

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Well, I certainly feel as though I'm stuck in the 1970s.

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They're taking the air in a classic 1959 Hillman Minx.

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I think this is so iconic as a car. We've got the lovely bent seats.

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I can rest my hand on your thigh if I really wished to,

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but I don't want to.

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-But you've done it twice already.

-By accident!

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LAUGHTER

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# ..The power you're supplying

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# It's electrifying! #

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Antiques valuer David Barby is known for his haggling style.

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The infamous Barby stare.

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But lately, he's been forced to change tack.

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I'll go 55.

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SHE LAUGHS

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How low will you stoop?

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While his rival, Charles,

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an auctioneer from Derbyshire, likes quirky things.

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Much like himself.

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The helmet is a bit greasy.

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So, equipped with £200 each,

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our experts are ready to roll with the punches

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as they buy antiques to sell at auction.

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What a price! What a price!

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On this trip, David and Charles are on one huge 300-mile road trip

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that starts in Lichfield, Staffordshire,

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stretches south to Frome in Somerset,

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heads back up to the Wirral and finally ends in Nottingham. Wow!

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On their first leg, they're only moving a few inches on the map,

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starting their shopping in Lichfield

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and heading for the auction in Coventry.

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-Shall we pull in here, David?

-OK. Let's have a look around.

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TYRES SCREECH

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Oh, do be careful! For heaven's sake!

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David, the thing is, I know Lichfield like the back of my hand.

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Well, this worries me, because, I think you have an unfair advantage.

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No need to worry, David,

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Lichfield Antiques Centre

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is packed with goodies from over 60 specialist dealers.

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So there'll be enough for both of you!

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Now, any thoughts on a strategy, Carlos?

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I really want to find out what this auction house is like,

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and I wonder if the young lady on the reception desk

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might have the Internet and I can just tap in this sale room

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and find out what the auction's like.

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Good call.

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So, here we go.

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It will be a general sale.

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That's great, that's superb.

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Which means...they sell anything from a second-hand washing machine

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to decorative candlesticks like these.

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These are very nice. A very nice pair of Maling Ware candlesticks.

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They're quite Art Deco, with this enamelled and printed design.

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They must be 1930s.

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Indeed, this was the period when Maling's Newcastle-based factory

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produced pottery with the signature lustre glaze and gilding.

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But is there a deal to be done?

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What's the best price on those, Madeleine?

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Well, you've got £14.50 on those,

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so we could do those for £13.

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Would you take £10 for them?

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-We could contact the dealer and see...

-Fine, OK, Madeleine.

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-The answer was?

-You're in luck.

-Great. That's really good.

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If I can't make money on a £10 purchase, when can I?

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Now, there's a question.

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At the other end of the shop,

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David's also spotted something decorative.

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A pair of late 19th-century silver shades, for candles, of all things.

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I see there's £80. What's the best price on those?

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-What price are you looking for?

-I'd like these at £50.

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-I could speak to the dealer.

-See what he has to say.

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See what his position is.

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-All right.

-OK.

-I'll just continue looking. OK.

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Hmm.

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Will the dealer really go for David's daring £50 offer?

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-The best price he could do would be 60.

-60?

-60.

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-That is £20 off the original price.

-£60.

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OK. Let me come back to you on those.

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All right, be coy.

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With everything to play for, Charles now steps up his buying strategy.

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His victim, Madeleine. Poor thing.

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What I quite like, which has caught my eye, Madeleine,

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is this wonderful corner cabinet here. Oak and mahogany.

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You open the doors up, there we are.

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It's missing a panel back.

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The interior isn't in the best of states,

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but it's a pretty little corner cupboard.

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I would like to make an offer of £30.

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Meet in the middle on £40?

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Would you go, Madeleine, at £35?

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Are you sure?

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-All right.

-Going once.

-Not sure.

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Not sure?! Oh, no! What have I done?

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-Going twice.

-Go on.

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-Are you sure?

-I'm sure.

-Positive?

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Oh, get on with it.

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-Going, going, gone.

-It's a bargain.

-Madeleine, thank you, you're a star.

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Thank goodness that's over.

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I thought I was going to be sick, there.

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But there's no respite for poor Madeleine.

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David now has her in his sights over the £60 on those candle shades.

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What do you think he'd come down to? What would you come down to?

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We may be able to persuade him to do another £10 off.

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-So, that's at £50 for the two.

-That's £50 for two.

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I think you've got a bargain there.

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Right, you have a sale, Madeleine. Thank you very much indeed.

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Keen on exploiting his Lichfield contacts,

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local lad Charles heads across town to another friendly dealer.

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He's on the trot.

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We could go the more scenic route, I hope you don't mind,

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I'm sure it's this way.

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Charles is off to see an old friend,

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Jim Jordan, in the hope of finding something special.

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Hello, Jim. Surprise.

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-Hello, Charles!

-How are you doing?

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This is a man I have known for a long time, James Jordan.

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-Good to see you.

-Morning, Charles, nice to see you.

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What's the best bargain which I could set sail with?

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In your opinion?

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Definitely the little fork and shovel set.

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I like it, it's £75.

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-What would be the best price, Jim?

-£65.

-Between friends?

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-Between friends, I'll let you have it for £60.

-Tempting.

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The fork and spade is in fact a novelty piece of Victorian cutlery,

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and may not be one to be missed. So, what else?

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I've got a couple of old silver pocket watches.

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What we've got here is a tired, working order, silver pocket watch.

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That's the Chester hallmark there,

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the assay city shield mark.

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Enamel dial, it's in nice condition, although it's missing its small

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subsidiary seconds dial hand.

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Likewise, this one hasn't got a glass cover.

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They're quite nice. How much would they be to buy,

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-those two watches?

-That one, £30.

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And that one, £20.

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They're nice, aren't they? There's one more thing, Jim.

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In the centre, just hidden behind, is a cut-glass slipper.

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It's just a pretty thing, isn't it?

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It's just a pretty thing.

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Almost an adornment in the cabinet, to show off the jewellery.

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Eight pounds isn't a lot for it.

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I think I shall leave the spade, fork, and knife.

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If I said four pounds for him, that's a deal,

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and with the watches,

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I must remember they're not in great condition.

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-Would you take £25 for them?

-I'll do that.

-Thanks, Jim.

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Back at the first shop, David feels there's more good fruit to be picked

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and he is getting passionate

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about this late 19th-century Arts and Crafts plate.

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It's got a nice William Morris type background,

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and then the head,

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with that very floppy collar all the way round.

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At £68, I feel a haggle coming on.

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Not surprisingly, Madeleine has left this one to colleague Mark.

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There's only so much you can take.

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£68 seems an awful lot to pay.

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I would like to see it at about £40.

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Time to phone the dealer.

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Thank you.

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That, I liked.

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That OK? 40? Thank you very much, take care now, bye.

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You're in luck, 40, it is.

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£40, my God.

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He's done it again.

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And he's not finished yet.

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I love the engraving of the fruit and vine,

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and the dimpled effect.

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It's hand blown and a nice piece.

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Ticket price, £24.

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Can you try him for £10?

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-Yes, I will give him a call for you.

-OK.

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-That's fine, he'll do that for £10.

-Oh, that's wonderful!

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A bargain.

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I think so, as well.

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I'll say, at £10.

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Right, let me out of this shop, before I buy it all.

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I think they will only be too glad

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to see the back of David's ruthless bargaining skills.

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Charles is riding high, so decides to take a break.

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Bad idea! David looks like he's going in for the kill

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in his mate Jim's shop.

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And what's the first thing he finds?

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The very item local boy Charles was offered a £60 deal on.

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Let's see if David can do better.

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Want to put that price down.

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It's a lovely replica, isn't it?

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Isn't it nice? And Mappin and Webb, good makers.

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Mappin and Webb are a famed company of silversmiths

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and cutlery manufacturers, with roots going back to 1774.

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This sweet miniature fork and spade set is probably late Victorian.

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How lovely is that?

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I can imagine a piece of Brie on the end of there, cutting it off.

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Picking it out with the fork.

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It's very nice, but £75 is just a little bit too much.

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What's the very best price you can do on that?

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£50?

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I need it lower than £50.

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Uh-oh! Out comes the Barby stare.

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-I will do it for 42, for you.

-42?

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£42, eh? What a pro.

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Well, there's a lesson for you, Charles.

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-James, thank you.

-Pleasure.

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David is certainly the cat that got the cream.

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So, there endeth the day's shopping.

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Good night and sleep tight, road trippers.

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It's a new day on our road trip and we start again in Lichfield,

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but it appears one of our road trippers has had a rough time,

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and it wasn't down to the shopping.

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What's happened, David?!

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-Well...

-David Barby, what's happened?!

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-Look at that.

-Mate, what have you done?

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-I tripped last night.

-You didn't?!

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-Where?

-Straight into a garden bench.

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-You didn't?!

-I did, it cut me just there.

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This is a sympathy vote. I shall go in there, say, "What's the price...?

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"..Oh! Sorry, could you repeat that?"

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-Have you had stitches?

-There and there.

-How many?

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Oh, I don't know. Glue and stitches. I feel like a panda.

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And just as cuddly.

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Well, he may be a bit down in the mouth,

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but he is certainly not out, old love.

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So far, David Barby has spent £142 on four quality lots,

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leaving him just £58 to spend.

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His rival, Charles Hanson, on the other hand,

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has opted for more general items,

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parting with a mere £74 on four auction lots.

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And that's left him with a nagging regret.

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I almost regret not buying one item.

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In a cabinet was a sweet little knife and condiment spoon.

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I just saw it and I could not get him down from £60.

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Oh, very, very nice.

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Seems David's not letting on.

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Now, Charles has kindly volunteered to chauffeur poor David

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to Lichfield's Samuel Johnson Birthplace Museum

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for an early-morning tonic of local history.

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Well, in that fragile state, he can hardly be expected to drive himself.

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It wouldn't be safe! Waiting for David

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is museum curator Joanne Wilson.

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Perhaps she'll perk him up.

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-Hello!

-Hello!

-What a greeting. How are you?

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-I'm very well, thanks. Welcome to Johnson's birthplace.

-Thank you.

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Seems to be working.

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Dr Johnson made literary history in the mid-18th century

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with his dictionary of the English language.

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He was born in this very house in 1709.

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His early upbringing here laid the foundations for the monumental work.

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Wow.

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This was the Johnson family bookshop,

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where Michael Johnson, Samuel's father, had the house built.

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This was the family business and they lived above it.

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This very room was where Johnson discovered his love of reading,

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over 300 years ago.

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Johnson left the family home in his twenties

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to seek his fortune in London,

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but it wasn't until 1747,

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when he was commissioned to write the dictionary,

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that he came into money.

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Up until he started on that work, he was really quite a poor journalist.

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It was only when he was approached, in 1747, to write the dictionary

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that his fortunes changed.

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Why did they choose him?

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They chose him because he was getting known by the printers

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and publishers in the area

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as having a fantastic knowledge of literature,

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almost an encyclopaedic mind, and it was this quality which made him

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perfect for writing the dictionary.

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Have you got examples of this work, this first dictionary?

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We have, indeed! We have a first edition of his work over here.

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My, my, my!

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Johnson judged it would take three years to write.

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In fact, it took nine,

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despite having several assistants.

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This is almost a trembling moment.

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Something so part and parcel of English history.

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There are over 43,000 definitions in Johnson's dictionary,

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some of which we'd find quite quirky today.

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His definition for oats.

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A grain, which in England is generally given to horses,

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but in Scotland supports the people.

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DAVID LAUGHS

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What's rather lovely is that the six assistants

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who worked with Johnson on the dictionary were all Scottish.

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Johnson was also known for his scruffy appearance,

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and that's not been lost on the museum's costume department.

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-Gosh, it's a scrubby wig.

-Well, he was a scruffy chap.

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Was he, really?

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Yes, it was actually said he'd have the front of his wig burnt, often,

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because he'd been leaning over the candlelight to do his work.

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Oh, God, that looks terrible. Oh!

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You may need a hat, as well, to top it off.

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Oh, this looks ghastly.

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Oh, dear. I don't think he was a very good-looking guy, was he?

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DAVID LAUGHS

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Hmm. Hardly a picture of beauty, is it?

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But, joking apart, it's not his wig, but his English dictionary

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that Johnson will be best remembered for.

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A remarkable piece of writing which remained pre-eminent for 150 years

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before the Oxford English dictionary superseded it.

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And after that tonic,

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our intrepid road trippers are ready to bid goodbye to Lichfield.

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They're heading south to Balsall Common,

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a village seven miles west of Coventry.

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And here lies Old Lodge Farm Antiques,

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with Trevor and Diane on hand to meet and greet.

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Good to see you.

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-Trevor, I'll give you a call if I see anything I quite like. OK?

-OK.

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Oh! Oh, there's a mouse! There's a mouse!

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Sorry, sorry, sorry!

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Oh, for goodness' sake, Charles, settle down.

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It's a tiny shrew!

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But for good measure, let's take another look.

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Oh, there it is.

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The only way to guard against a scary shrew is to get a defence,

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and luckily, help is at hand.

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-Oh, no!

-Charles, your armour.

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-They'd be great shrew protectors.

-Yes.

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They could be yours for £65, as well! Wait...

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So your foot goes in like that.

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I might even buy them, they're quite...

0:17:270:17:29

What's the best price on them?

0:17:290:17:31

What have we got on them? £65.

0:17:310:17:34

-Um...

-55?

-55.

0:17:340:17:37

There's a helmet as well?!

0:17:370:17:38

-Yes.

-Goodness me.

-Don't put it on, in case you can't get it back off!

0:17:380:17:41

Is the helmet inclusive?

0:17:410:17:43

I don't mind seeing to a shrew for you.

0:17:470:17:49

-Do you want me to see to him for you?

-Yes.

-Great.

0:17:490:17:52

Carlos, what do you look like?!

0:17:520:17:55

Armour came in varying materials, including leather, chainmail

0:17:550:18:00

and plate.

0:18:000:18:01

This suit, however, is a modern decorative version.

0:18:010:18:04

Diana, he won't go to 30, will he?

0:18:040:18:07

30 would be my price, if he would.

0:18:070:18:09

I know it's half price,

0:18:090:18:11

but I just think it would give me a good chance.

0:18:110:18:15

-What do you think? £30.

-All right, yes.

0:18:150:18:17

I came into an antique shop expecting to find

0:18:170:18:20

a glorious Royal Worcester vase, or a fine pair of silver pepperettes.

0:18:200:18:23

What have I bought?

0:18:230:18:25

An armour to protect myself from a shrew. Amazing what you come across.

0:18:250:18:28

So, with his new backseat passenger,

0:18:310:18:33

Charles heads nine miles east on a return visit to Coventry.

0:18:330:18:37

This time, he's got shopping on his mind.

0:18:370:18:41

Now, just as the proprietors of the Antiques Emporium have got rid

0:18:440:18:48

of one cheeky haggler, here comes another one.

0:18:480:18:52

Hello!

0:18:520:18:53

With two black eyes, maybe David needs a suit of armour too.

0:18:530:18:56

Unlike Charles, David only has eyes, be they a little sore,

0:18:560:19:02

for traditional antiques

0:19:020:19:04

like these attractive watercolours by local artist G Hammond.

0:19:040:19:09

The quality is quite good.

0:19:090:19:12

The artist, G Hammond, rings a bell there.

0:19:120:19:15

Either it's a local artist from the Leamington Spa, Warwick area,

0:19:150:19:18

or I have had his work before, coming through the salerooms.

0:19:180:19:23

-You've got £85, is that the pair?

-No, that's £85 each.

0:19:230:19:27

That's £85 each.

0:19:270:19:28

Is that the very best you can do on that one?

0:19:280:19:30

I can do £75 on that.

0:19:300:19:32

I was thinking something like 40.

0:19:320:19:35

No, I couldn't do 40.

0:19:350:19:36

The very, very best, I'll do 65.

0:19:360:19:40

Could you do 48?

0:19:400:19:43

I am not moving off 60.

0:19:430:19:46

Crikey, Moses!

0:19:460:19:48

The famous Barby stare has failed on Diane.

0:19:480:19:52

Maybe because it's so black.

0:19:520:19:54

It's just that I think I've only got £58.

0:19:540:19:57

I would have given it to him for nothing

0:19:570:20:00

just to get him out of the shop.

0:20:000:20:02

Anyway, he is on his knees - could this be a proposal?

0:20:040:20:10

I can go up to £55. That's my max.

0:20:100:20:13

£55.

0:20:130:20:15

I'll go £55, but...

0:20:150:20:19

SHE LAUGHS

0:20:190:20:21

Just when we all thought the deal was sealed...

0:20:230:20:27

This knock on my head, I can't remember the price we agreed.

0:20:270:20:30

-Was it 45?

-No, 55 was the final figure.

0:20:300:20:35

55. Let me give you £55.

0:20:350:20:38

Thank you very much indeed.

0:20:380:20:40

It must be tough handing over that last bit of cash.

0:20:400:20:44

So, with David all spent up,

0:20:440:20:46

it's left to Charles to wind up the shopping,

0:20:460:20:48

at Antiques of Earlsdon. The owner is Steve.

0:20:480:20:52

Looking for anything in particular?

0:20:520:20:55

Something a bit interesting, something that's highly decorative,

0:20:550:20:59

that's going to go down well.

0:20:590:21:01

Nothing like a bit of a desk set,

0:21:010:21:02

which we could do you a nice little...?

0:21:020:21:04

-That's the whole set there?

-A whole set, marble.

0:21:040:21:07

Yeah, it's nice, isn't it?

0:21:070:21:09

Sets like this would have taken pride of place

0:21:090:21:12

on a gentleman's desk,

0:21:120:21:14

made of solid striated marble.

0:21:140:21:18

You get a blotter, two inkwells and a stationery rack.

0:21:180:21:22

The whole lot would cost you £38.

0:21:220:21:25

It's missing its glass wells, isn't it?

0:21:250:21:27

It is missing its glass wells.

0:21:270:21:29

It's a bit tired, I like the style.

0:21:290:21:31

It's striking, it's quite jazzy,

0:21:310:21:33

but, Steve, they're difficult things to sell.

0:21:330:21:35

If I was going to buy this from you, I would buy it for five pounds.

0:21:350:21:39

I can't give it to you for a fiver, Charles. Sorry.

0:21:390:21:42

I was going to say, a tenner.

0:21:420:21:44

OK. Meet me halfway, at eight pounds.

0:21:440:21:46

Right, deal. Eight quid.

0:21:480:21:49

Go on! At eight pounds.

0:21:490:21:51

That was cheap.

0:21:510:21:54

Well, shopping over, let's recap on what our chaps have bought.

0:21:540:21:57

Charles has spent £112 exactly

0:21:570:21:59

on a glass slipper,

0:21:590:22:01

a pair of Victorian pocket watches,

0:22:010:22:03

a corner cabinet,

0:22:030:22:05

a pair of candlesticks,

0:22:050:22:07

a suit of armour, and a black marble desk set.

0:22:070:22:11

David, meanwhile, has parted with £197

0:22:110:22:14

on a pair of candle shades,

0:22:140:22:16

an Arts and Crafts plate,

0:22:160:22:18

a 19th-century vase,

0:22:180:22:20

a miniature spade and fork,

0:22:200:22:22

and a drawing of a hunt.

0:22:220:22:24

So what do they think of each other's goodies?

0:22:240:22:29

The vase, at £10, with the little dimples

0:22:290:22:32

and that wonderful included body is a wonderful find.

0:22:320:22:35

But I think David's bought with his mind in the clouds,

0:22:350:22:39

with what he likes, and he hasn't really bought for the saleroom.

0:22:390:22:42

So, hopefully, they might come unstuck, slightly.

0:22:420:22:45

I think Charles Hanson's items

0:22:450:22:47

was a huge eclectic mixture of goodies.

0:22:470:22:52

I think he is trying to back every avenue,

0:22:520:22:55

that he expects to find in the auction room.

0:22:550:22:57

So, after kicking off in Lichfield,

0:22:590:23:01

the first leg of this road trip

0:23:010:23:03

comes to an end in Coventry.

0:23:030:23:06

Their destination - Warwick Auctions.

0:23:060:23:09

Time to see if they've made the right choices.

0:23:090:23:12

Let the auction begin!

0:23:120:23:15

I feel apprehensive.

0:23:150:23:17

Positive, deep breathing, you're with me.

0:23:170:23:20

DAVID BREATHES DEEPLY

0:23:200:23:23

Right, are we ready now?

0:23:230:23:25

So, David's quirky candle shades are the first to face the bidders.

0:23:250:23:30

Lovely quality things, commission bids with me at £40.

0:23:300:23:34

-Wow! Fantastic.

-Five, anywhere? Five, I've got.

0:23:340:23:37

50 with me, five, sir, 60,

0:23:370:23:39

five, 70, five.

0:23:390:23:42

80, the bid is with me at £80.

0:23:420:23:44

Five, anywhere? And selling for £80.

0:23:440:23:49

And the sale room loves them! Well, who wouldn't?

0:23:490:23:53

That's a relief.

0:23:530:23:54

David's second item, the art pottery plate,

0:23:550:23:59

and another one he haggled hard for.

0:23:590:24:01

-£30 to start him...

-Sell it!

-Come on.

0:24:010:24:06

35 with me, 38, 40. Five takes me out. Bid is in the room at £45 only.

0:24:060:24:12

50, I've got. Five. Make no mistake, the bid is in the room at £55.

0:24:120:24:16

-And selling for £55...

-Down there!

-£60, he's back in, five.

0:24:160:24:22

Well pointed, Mr Barby.

0:24:220:24:24

And it's selling for £60.

0:24:240:24:27

And that's another profit.

0:24:270:24:31

Charles's turn now.

0:24:310:24:32

Can his glass slipper find its Cinderella?

0:24:320:24:36

Where do you want to bid for it?

0:24:360:24:38

-£100 for it?!

-Oh, brilliant!

0:24:380:24:40

Five pounds to start him off.

0:24:400:24:42

Must be worth £5. Eight pounds, I've got. 10.

0:24:420:24:45

-One more!

-10, I've got. £12.

-Great.

0:24:450:24:48

£15, £18?

0:24:480:24:50

-I don't believe this.

-And selling for £15.

0:24:500:24:55

Well, would you believe it?

0:24:550:24:59

If that can sell, surely David's in the money with his next lot!

0:25:000:25:04

A lovely, quality glass vase.

0:25:040:25:06

Where do you want to bid for that?

0:25:060:25:09

Five pounds to start him. Eight, 10, 12, 15, 18,

0:25:090:25:12

20, 22, 25.

0:25:120:25:15

28, anywhere?

0:25:150:25:16

Selling for £25...

0:25:160:25:20

Disappointing, but still a profit, David.

0:25:200:25:25

I can't believe you make £11 on the glass slipper,

0:25:250:25:29

and on the wonderful, wonderful glass vase, I only make £15.

0:25:290:25:34

Charles now needs a £55 profit to steal a lead.

0:25:340:25:39

Can his locally made watches seduce the bidders?

0:25:390:25:44

20 for them? Must be £20-worth of scrap.

0:25:440:25:46

£20, I've taken. 30, 40.

0:25:460:25:49

Gentleman standing up at £45. 50, anywhere?

0:25:490:25:52

Selling for £45...

0:25:520:25:54

-50, I've got on the internet.

-Yes, 50!

-God!

0:25:550:25:58

Five in the room.

0:25:580:25:59

-One more!

-60?

0:25:590:26:01

That's a good buy, Charles.

0:26:010:26:03

60 on the internet, five?

0:26:030:26:05

65, in the room.

0:26:050:26:07

Selling for £65.

0:26:070:26:10

Thank you, David. Thank you.

0:26:110:26:13

Now for David's star buy. Eat your heart out, Charles!

0:26:160:26:19

Commission bids start me at £45.

0:26:190:26:22

50, anywhere? 50, I've got.

0:26:220:26:24

Five with me, 60. Five with me, 70. Five, 80, five.

0:26:240:26:29

-The bid's with me at £85.

-Come on, come on, come on!

0:26:290:26:32

Selling for £85...

0:26:320:26:35

And I was so nearly tempted to buy them.

0:26:360:26:39

Yes, but you didn't...

0:26:390:26:41

Now, can Charles pull himself out of second place

0:26:410:26:45

with this battered half a cupboard?

0:26:450:26:48

If I was going to be nervous on any item

0:26:480:26:51

with you, David, this is it.

0:26:510:26:55

-Once, this would have been the best part of £200-300.

-Hear, hear!

-Ssh!

0:26:550:26:59

Where do you want to bid for it? £40 for it? 20 for it?

0:26:590:27:02

-Five pounds for it?

-Oh, my God.

0:27:020:27:05

-Oh, please!

-Hammer down! Come on, hammer down!

0:27:050:27:07

£10, I've got in the room.

0:27:070:27:09

I've got 12 on the Internet. 15, sir? 15, I've got.

0:27:090:27:12

-18?

-Oh, it's painful.

0:27:120:27:13

I've got 18, I've got, there. 20, two, 25. 28, anywhere?

0:27:130:27:18

Selling for £25...

0:27:180:27:23

Ouch! I bet that hurt.

0:27:230:27:25

-So, what's that? A loss of £10?

-I can't believe it.

0:27:250:27:27

Plus the commission you've got to pay.

0:27:270:27:30

Right. Let's hope David's picture can cheer us all up.

0:27:310:27:35

£20 to start him off?

0:27:350:27:37

22, I've got. £25, £28, £30, 40,

0:27:370:27:41

50, five, £60?

0:27:410:27:44

Any more? A cheap lot for £55.

0:27:440:27:46

60 is back in.

0:27:460:27:48

I've got 60 in the room. 65.

0:27:480:27:50

70, at the very back. Five, 80, 90.

0:27:500:27:55

Oh, somebody appreciates it.

0:27:550:27:56

95 on the Internet.

0:27:560:27:57

100. 110, on the net.

0:27:570:28:00

Selling for £110...

0:28:000:28:04

That's put David firmly ahead by £122, before auction costs.

0:28:040:28:10

-What a price!

-That was good. It was touch and go, Charles.

0:28:100:28:13

Can Charles's Maling candlesticks dent that lead?

0:28:150:28:18

Perfect condition.

0:28:180:28:19

£30 to start them?

0:28:190:28:20

10 for them?

0:28:200:28:21

-Five to start?

-I don't believe it!

-Five!

0:28:210:28:23

Five, I've taken.

0:28:230:28:25

Eight on the Internet.

0:28:250:28:27

10? I've got £10 in the room.

0:28:270:28:28

12, anywhere?

0:28:280:28:30

12, the hand. 15, 18,

0:28:300:28:32

20, on the Internet. Two?

0:28:320:28:35

Selling for £20.

0:28:350:28:37

Going, going, going, gone.

0:28:370:28:39

That's plus-ten Charles. You're good.

0:28:390:28:42

That's OK. I'm doubling up, David. I am on my way.

0:28:420:28:44

Ever the optimist!

0:28:440:28:47

I think, David, it all rests on my armour.

0:28:470:28:50

An interesting part suit of armour, ideal for a night out in the town(!)

0:28:500:28:54

Ha-ha-ha!

0:28:540:28:57

£20, I've taken. Two, anywhere?

0:28:570:28:59

22, I've got. 25, 28, 30, two?

0:28:590:29:04

32, I've got. 35, 38, 40, 42.

0:29:040:29:09

Selling for £40.

0:29:090:29:11

That's OK, £10 profit, David.

0:29:130:29:15

I'm nibbling, like that shrew almost nibbled me, David.

0:29:150:29:18

You need bites, not nibbles, to win this lark, Charles.

0:29:180:29:21

Now it's all down to that lump of a desk set.

0:29:210:29:24

Lord help us!

0:29:240:29:26

Where do you want to be for it? 10 for it?

0:29:260:29:30

£10, I've taken. The lady.

0:29:300:29:33

12, 15, 18, 20, two, 25, 28.

0:29:330:29:39

-Lady's bid of £25.

-Wonderful thing.

-Chipped.

0:29:390:29:42

Selling for £25...

0:29:420:29:47

Well, no surprises, there.

0:29:480:29:50

The winner...

0:29:500:29:52

is David Barby.

0:29:520:29:53

Congratulations, a good start. We're on the road.

0:29:530:29:57

David started this first leg of the Road Trip with £200

0:29:570:30:02

and, after auction costs, made a profit of £98.20.

0:30:020:30:06

Which means he ends this leg with £298.20.

0:30:060:30:12

Charles started on £200, but only made £43.80,

0:30:150:30:21

leaving him with £243.80 going into round two.

0:30:210:30:26

David, I've had enough of buying tat.

0:30:280:30:30

I am determined now that I'm either going out with a bang,

0:30:300:30:34

or I'm going to go out there and find the Rolls-Royce of antiques.

0:30:340:30:38

Job done. The gents are now leaving Coventry

0:30:380:30:41

and heading off into Worcestershire.

0:30:410:30:44

We are like Man Utd and Arsenal

0:30:440:30:46

competing for the trophy in series four.

0:30:460:30:50

-You are the Wayne Rooney of the Road Trip.

-Oh, dear.

0:30:500:30:54

This leg of the Road Trip

0:30:540:30:56

is a huge 300 mile sprint from Lichfield, south to Frome,

0:30:560:30:59

back up north to the Wirral Peninsula,

0:30:590:31:02

and ending in Nottingham for the final showdown. Gosh!

0:31:020:31:05

We're going to turn on our engines in Malvern and, if all goes well,

0:31:070:31:11

should end with the auction down in Pewsey.

0:31:110:31:14

-MUSIC: "Pomp and Circumstance"

-Ah. Elgar.

0:31:160:31:19

A bit of Pomp and Circumstance seems only fitting for Malvern

0:31:190:31:24

as the famed British composer lived much of his life here.

0:31:240:31:28

The town's also famous for its spring water, believed to have rejuvenating powers. Lucky David!

0:31:280:31:35

-We're here, David!

-What an adventure!

-I'm so excited

0:31:350:31:40

because I feel Malvern, with its spa feel, and its ambience of polite society, is my sort of place.

0:31:400:31:47

And you need to be rejuvenated, you've been talking too much.

0:31:470:31:51

We'll go and get some water. It's kill or cure.

0:31:510:31:54

-OK.

-There's the water.

-The Malvern water! This is it?

-Yes.

0:31:540:31:59

-Tell me about it.

-This is the whole basis of the fortune of Malvern.

0:31:590:32:03

It was rather like a watering place, like Bath or Tunbridge Wells or Cheltenham,

0:32:030:32:09

-and people came here to take the waters.

-So the purity...?

-You actually drink it!

-OK.

0:32:090:32:15

So by drinking it, it might just give me the strength to go out there and find these star lots?

0:32:150:32:22

-I hope not.

-I hope so! I'll drink some more now!

0:32:220:32:26

So, while Charles bounces off to the shops, newly invigorated...

0:32:260:32:31

Having had that water, I'm feeling quite lucky.

0:32:310:32:35

..David is in the car park thinking strategy and sensibly phones the auction house about the sale.

0:32:370:32:44

But there's a problem.

0:32:440:32:45

They start the viewing at half past eight, so we just have an hour and a half for our goods to be seen.

0:32:450:32:53

My immediate inclination is not to go for expensive items, but I don't want to buy rubbish.

0:32:530:32:58

Oh, dear! So with hardly any viewing time at the auction,

0:32:580:33:03

our experts will have to pull something special out of the bag.

0:33:030:33:07

And Charles is already in Promenade Antiques,

0:33:070:33:10

determined to spend his £243.

0:33:100:33:13

They call me Hawkeye Hanson, but thus far, nothing.

0:33:130:33:17

Well, it looks like the Hanson's radar's locked on to something

0:33:170:33:20

and Leslie's there to clear the decks.

0:33:200:33:23

It's a sweet table, but a bit tired.

0:33:230:33:26

-It does have this.

-Nice little birdcage action.

0:33:260:33:29

And there we go. And you can see

0:33:290:33:32

-it has got some filler here.

-Some repair.

-Repairs as well.

0:33:320:33:36

So a very nice little snap-top tea or occasional table,

0:33:360:33:41

in oak,

0:33:410:33:44

that will date to around 1790.

0:33:440:33:47

I would probably, Leslie, say to you £30.

0:33:470:33:50

-No, that's not enough.

-Going, going...

-Not enough.

0:33:500:33:53

-And the best price would be...?

-45 at the most.

0:33:530:33:57

-Would you take £40 for it, madam?

-I will.

0:33:570:34:00

-Thank you. Bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

0:34:000:34:04

Meanwhile, David is down the road in Foley House Antiques.

0:34:040:34:08

The lovely Sid has the job of showing him round. Poor thing.

0:34:080:34:12

She looks so young, too...

0:34:120:34:15

Oh!

0:34:150:34:16

-Steady! You'll have the whole lot down.

-It's all right.

0:34:160:34:21

I like the Wedgwood mug. The 1969 mug.

0:34:250:34:30

There you go.

0:34:300:34:32

This is probably the best commemorative wares you ever buy.

0:34:340:34:38

It's Wedgwood. They're not producing this sort of ware.

0:34:380:34:42

It's all detailed on the bottom. Investiture of the Prince of Wales.

0:34:420:34:46

Most commemorative ware is made to mark a Royal event,

0:34:460:34:50

but sometimes it'll honour a noteworthy national occasion,

0:34:500:34:54

like the visit of a Pope. Unfortunately, Royal memorabilia is hard to shift.

0:34:540:34:59

-Is that yours?

-It's not mine. I could do it for 30.

0:34:590:35:03

Is that the lowest?

0:35:030:35:05

-£28 is the lowest.

-Is that the very best you can do?

-It's the very best, I'm afraid.

0:35:050:35:10

-The very best. Well, £28.

-Included with the box.

0:35:100:35:15

-Oh! Is that extra?

-It comes supplied.

-Thank you! That's lovely of you.

0:35:150:35:22

Elsewhere in the shop, Charles has some startling news.

0:35:220:35:26

I've found a bargain. I can't believe it!

0:35:260:35:30

-I've found a bargain.

-OK, Mr Hawkeye. What have you found?

0:35:300:35:34

I love it.

0:35:340:35:37

The whole voyage of my trip is about handling history.

0:35:370:35:42

And here you have got a true teapot which dates to around 1770.

0:35:420:35:48

Look at the handle. It's been broken and re-stuck.

0:35:480:35:52

The spout has long since gone.

0:35:520:35:55

But that silver spout would date to around 1800, 1810.

0:35:550:36:00

And this Chinese Chien-Lung Ching Dynasty teapot

0:36:000:36:05

with a Georgian silver spout is described as "an old Chinese teapot, very damaged".

0:36:050:36:12

It doesn't do this baby justice, does it?

0:36:120:36:16

No!

0:36:160:36:18

You're quite right.

0:36:180:36:20

-I found this in a cabinet.

-OK.

-It's priced at £8.50.

0:36:200:36:24

A very nice old Chinese teapot.

0:36:240:36:27

It's damaged, it's a bit tired, but it tells a story. Best price?

0:36:270:36:32

Em...

0:36:320:36:33

I could do it for £6.

0:36:330:36:36

I like it a lot. It's just the condition, it's slightly tired.

0:36:360:36:40

Take £4 for it?

0:36:400:36:42

-£5.50?

-Meet me at £5.

-Yeah, go on.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

0:36:420:36:48

-Great. £5. That's great.

-Would you like it wrapped?

-Wonderful. Thank you very much.

0:36:480:36:54

It was a good deal at £8.50, but an even better one at £5.

0:36:540:36:59

Someone's very happy. And a little skip, too. How sweet.

0:36:590:37:03

David has abandoned Malvern

0:37:030:37:07

and hit the road for Tewkesbury, leaving Charles on his tod.

0:37:070:37:11

What's striking about this Gloucestershire town

0:37:120:37:16

is its black and white Tudor buildings

0:37:160:37:18

and its famed Norman abbey,

0:37:180:37:21

which was saved from dissolution in the 16th century

0:37:210:37:25

when the townspeople bought it for £453.

0:37:250:37:29

A bargain in anybody's money.

0:37:290:37:32

David's first port of call - Annie's shop.

0:37:330:37:37

Measuring just 18 feet by 9 feet, it's a squeeze, but everything's within stretching distance.

0:37:370:37:44

It's quite small, that one.

0:37:470:37:50

It's not me, is it?

0:37:530:37:55

I'll now look at myself... Oh, no! I look like something out of Laurel and Hardy!

0:37:550:38:02

-He's nodding in approval!

-Do you know, he really does?

0:38:020:38:06

Oh, and another. I'm not so sure. I prefer the bowler hat,

0:38:060:38:11

but these are hardly the eye-catching antiques you want.

0:38:110:38:16

Ah, but maybe that is!

0:38:160:38:18

What I like about it is it's 1960s. It has that sort of molten feel about it.

0:38:180:38:24

This is cased glass - you have a clear crystal glass and inside it that ruby glass.

0:38:240:38:31

And when the light's on it, it's very good indeed. People do collect this coloured glass.

0:38:310:38:37

This, he thinks, is a piece of 1950s Murano glass,

0:38:370:38:41

named after the Venetian island of Murano. The ruby interior with clear casing is typical

0:38:410:38:47

of the island's glass factory and others.

0:38:470:38:51

What's the best you can do on this?

0:38:510:38:53

Um...what's on there now?

0:38:530:38:56

An horrendous £16.

0:38:570:38:59

Um, that's not mine, so I can only really take off 10%.

0:39:000:39:06

My hands are tied. She'd probably go to 14. That would be the best.

0:39:060:39:12

-Wouldn't go to 12, would they?

-All right, 12, yes. I'll risk it.

0:39:130:39:17

Annie, you have a sale.

0:39:190:39:22

-Wish me luck.

-I will. Who are you up against?

-Charles Hanson.

0:39:220:39:27

All right, OK. Oh, no contest.

0:39:270:39:29

Well, we'll see.

0:39:290:39:32

Charles is taking a break from shopping to indulge his ferocious passion for history.

0:39:320:39:38

Oh, don't be misled by the house. There's a museum behind it.

0:39:380:39:42

-Steve!

-Charles!

-Charles Hanson. May I come in?

-Come on in.

0:39:420:39:47

Behind this ordinary-looking bungalow is an 80-foot shed,

0:39:470:39:51

and it houses Steve Wheeler's very unusual collection.

0:39:510:39:55

-Unbelievable, Steve.

-A lot of bottles from virtually everywhere, I suppose.

0:39:560:40:01

They are, in fact, milk bottles.

0:40:010:40:05

About 17,500 of them.

0:40:050:40:09

That's some 14 tonnes of glass.

0:40:090:40:12

The different sizes, shapes, and advertising on the bottles,

0:40:120:40:16

each tells a story of bygone days.

0:40:160:40:20

Can I ask one really important question? It's fundamental - why?

0:40:200:40:25

Because people throw them away.

0:40:250:40:27

There's social history in a milk bottle. It goes back and forwards from a milkman to a dairyman.

0:40:270:40:33

And then people just throw them out.

0:40:330:40:36

So how did it all begin, really?

0:40:360:40:39

Finding milk bottles on walks. If a bottle was found, I put it in the rucksack and took it home

0:40:390:40:45

to find out where it had come from.

0:40:450:40:48

That was 30 years ago. Since then he's got them from the strangest of places.

0:40:480:40:54

-How do you find these bottles?

-I'd say, "Who delivered your milk?" You'd say, "It was such and such."

0:40:540:41:00

I would then track down any family, was the dairy still going?

0:41:000:41:04

I would talk to electricians.

0:41:040:41:06

When they rewire a house, they find old milk bottles under the floor.

0:41:060:41:12

Ladies will find me an old milk bottle underneath the sink, used as a pint measure.

0:41:120:41:18

And I suppose size-wise we've got pints, half-pints, two pints.

0:41:180:41:24

Pint-and-a-halfs, quarter-pints, a third of a pint for a school.

0:41:240:41:27

I've even got gallons.

0:41:270:41:29

One of the stars of Steve's collection is this brown bottle.

0:41:320:41:36

It was the first ever British milk bottle, produced in the 1880s by Express Dairies,

0:41:360:41:43

and designed to ultimately replace the less hygienic milk churns.

0:41:430:41:47

Is this what most homes had their milk in, back in the 1880s?

0:41:470:41:52

-Yes, they would have had bottles like that.

-Right.

0:41:520:41:56

And aqua-green glass.

0:41:560:41:58

-A special patent bottle, Kilner's.

-Right.

0:41:580:42:02

The reason behind the colouring here was because the milk wasn't treated. It came straight from the cow.

0:42:020:42:09

They thought if it was on the doorstep in sunlight, it would last longer if the glass was tinted.

0:42:090:42:15

-Absolute rubbish.

-Yes, of course.

0:42:150:42:17

And a bottle for you. I have a spare one.

0:42:190:42:22

-Are you serious?

-Absolutely.

0:42:220:42:24

You're giving me a milk bottle that is named after me -

0:42:240:42:27

Hanson and Sons.

0:42:270:42:29

Model Dairy, Edge Lane. Steve, I'm absolutely blown away.

0:42:290:42:35

Back in Malvern, the day is drawing to a close

0:42:400:42:45

and David has one last visit to make -

0:42:450:42:48

Abbey Antiques and proprietor Tony.

0:42:480:42:51

With the auction day looming fast and no time to show off their items,

0:42:530:42:57

David wants to snap up something eye-catching.

0:42:570:43:02

It looks like he's found a lump of marble and a crystal ball.

0:43:020:43:07

It's either a carpet bowl - it goes along the carpet in one of those long halls.

0:43:090:43:15

Carpet bowls are a version of the indoor game, but what makes it distinct from other types

0:43:150:43:21

is the 30-foot-long bowling mat.

0:43:210:43:24

Date-wise, probably 19th century, early part of this century.

0:43:240:43:29

That is a stonemason's art.

0:43:290:43:32

At £10, that layered marble bowl

0:43:320:43:35

seems a bargain and it turns out the clear crystal jobby

0:43:350:43:39

is also a carpet bowl.

0:43:390:43:42

But David is still hunting for that attention-grabbing buy.

0:43:420:43:45

-I just want to put it over my face.

-Yes. Oh, good.

0:43:450:43:49

Don't say it's going to be an improvement!

0:43:490:43:52

I want to see where the eyes are placed. If I can see through it, then it's a genuine mask,

0:43:520:43:58

not one made as a tourist souvenir.

0:43:580:44:01

And that is brilliant.

0:44:040:44:06

Some would say an improvement. I can't tell.

0:44:060:44:10

-I can see everything that's going on. What does it look like?

-Fantastic.

0:44:100:44:15

A mask like this is traditionally used in ritual dances

0:44:150:44:19

and usually has a spiritual or religious meaning.

0:44:190:44:21

-What's the price on this?

-£90.

-Oh! I can't afford it.

0:44:210:44:27

-Would you do it at 50, please?

-No, certainly not.

0:44:270:44:32

-60, then.

-57.

0:44:320:44:35

-It'll just give me a chance.

-All right.

-At 57.

0:44:350:44:39

Thank you very much. I'd love to purchase that. Thank you.

0:44:390:44:42

Don't forget your balls, David.

0:44:420:44:43

-Now...

-Ah.

-I like these.

0:44:430:44:46

-What's the very best you can do?

-I'll do it for eight.

-For £8. The two for £8.

0:44:460:44:50

-Don't drop it! It's a deal.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:44:500:44:55

So far, Charles has barely spent a penny.

0:44:560:44:59

£40, actually, on a tea table and £5 on a Chinese teapot,

0:44:590:45:04

tea being the theme of the day.

0:45:040:45:06

One lump or two, then, lads?

0:45:060:45:08

David, however, spent £105 and came away with four items,

0:45:080:45:13

including that scary African mask and those carpet bowls.

0:45:130:45:18

So, with the pressure on to buy something with a bit of va-va-voom to sell at a challenging auction,

0:45:180:45:24

our boys had better get cracking.

0:45:240:45:27

-Particularly you, Charles.

-See you.

0:45:270:45:30

Shirt's coming out.

0:45:300:45:32

-Come on.

-Silly boy. He's making a beeline for Attica Antiques.

0:45:320:45:37

Hello, how are you? Is it your shop?

0:45:370:45:41

-No, it's a dog, you fool. Mark's the owner.

-These are sweet.

0:45:410:45:45

They are a pair of late-Edwardian ladies pincushion boots.

0:45:450:45:50

If they were silver, they would fetch £1,000.

0:45:500:45:53

-It's very hard sometimes, knowing what to go for.

-For you, yes.

0:45:530:45:58

I always buy too much.

0:45:580:46:01

This picture on the wall. What do you think of it?

0:46:010:46:05

I think that is a genuine Louis Wain. Condition lets it down.

0:46:050:46:09

Louis Wain was a Victorian painter best known for his human-like cat drawings,

0:46:090:46:15

sometimes portrayed smoking or fishing.

0:46:150:46:18

-His work is popular and often forged.

-I don't know.

0:46:180:46:22

You look so closely...

0:46:220:46:24

It takes a specialist to say if a picture is the real thing.

0:46:240:46:29

A genuine Louis Wain could change hands for more than £1,000.

0:46:290:46:33

The ticket price on this piece is 70. Miaow!

0:46:330:46:38

It's a difficult one. The one issue with it, Mark,

0:46:380:46:41

is its condition,

0:46:410:46:42

but it's a picture which has a good look about it.

0:46:420:46:45

-What's the best price, Mark, on it?

-Well, I'd say 70.

0:46:450:46:50

I would probably want to offer... maybe half that. 30?

0:46:500:46:55

-Go on, then.

-Thanks, Mark.

-I'm vaguely happy.

0:46:550:46:57

£30.

0:46:570:46:59

Mark, if it can go back in the frame, that would be great.

0:46:590:47:02

-I'll have the other one.

-Thanks.

0:47:020:47:06

Charles is on a high, but he still needs something extra

0:47:060:47:10

if he's ever going to beat David at this selling game.

0:47:100:47:13

Let's pray Annie's tiny shop can spring a surprise.

0:47:130:47:16

What we've got here is a very nice little Doulton jardiniere, plant pot.

0:47:180:47:26

Marked Doulton, Lambeth. What I like is this delightful detail of gilding,

0:47:260:47:31

and opaque turquoise and white jewelling.

0:47:310:47:36

Again, we have got two chips here which will affect value greatly,

0:47:360:47:41

but it's only £12 and quite rightly when it is so cheap, it's being used for its function still.

0:47:410:47:48

And there's a plant.

0:47:480:47:50

Annie, what's in here? This is where you often find some real gems.

0:47:500:47:56

We've got a lovely little ivory ring rattle.

0:47:560:47:59

Also a very nice silver vesta case, which is hallmarked,

0:47:590:48:04

hallmarked for Birmingham with a date code - it's George V.

0:48:040:48:09

This is around the First World War, it's heavy, it's silver.

0:48:090:48:14

Silver's at a fairly strong level.

0:48:140:48:16

There are collectors of vesta cases and if you were a gent going to light a fag or cigarette,

0:48:160:48:24

you'd take your match out here, then you'd close that, strike it on there and then...off you go.

0:48:240:48:32

-All right, isn't it?

-It is. I like it.

-Silver vesta cases are collectable,

0:48:320:48:38

and at £38 is there a double deal to be done with the jardiniere?

0:48:380:48:43

-What's the best price on the jardiniere? Priced at 12.

-I could do five on that.

-£5.

0:48:430:48:50

-And on your decorative silver vesta case?

-30. 30 is the best.

0:48:500:48:56

-I do like it.

-35 for the two.

0:48:560:48:59

I would need to really pay about 20 for the vesta case and about five for the jardiniere.

0:48:590:49:07

I'll agree to 25. I don't like customers to escape.

0:49:070:49:11

£25. So I'm all set. See you, Annie! Bye-bye!

0:49:120:49:17

David, however, is taking the day in his stride like the master he is.

0:49:170:49:23

Our veteran antiques bloodhound is at Attica Antiques

0:49:230:49:27

and has found those very same shoe pincushions Charles spotted earlier.

0:49:270:49:32

-They're collectable, aren't they?

-They are attractive.

0:49:320:49:36

But there's so many reproductions, but these are quite genuine.

0:49:360:49:41

And those laces have been made for these shoes.

0:49:410:49:46

These little beauties date from around 1915, judging from the style of the shoe,

0:49:460:49:52

so fairly modern,when you think pincushions first emerged in the 15th century.

0:49:520:49:59

-They've got £24 on those.

-Mm-hm.

-What's your very, very best?

0:49:590:50:04

16.

0:50:040:50:06

I think that's a good price.

0:50:090:50:12

-You wouldn't do them for 12, would you?

-No. 14.

0:50:120:50:17

-£14.

-14.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:50:170:50:21

There we are, Mark. That's 10 and that's 5. Thank you very much.

0:50:210:50:26

That's the shopping all over, so let's see what they've bought.

0:50:270:50:31

David has spent £119 on a Wedgwood tankard,

0:50:310:50:36

A 1950s Murano vase,

0:50:360:50:38

an African mask, a pair of carpet bowls,

0:50:380:50:42

and a pair of shoe pin cusions.

0:50:420:50:44

Charles, meanwhile, has splashed out exactly £100 on an oak table,

0:50:440:50:49

a teapot, a watercolour of a cat taking tea,

0:50:490:50:52

a silver vesta case, and a jardiniere.

0:50:520:50:55

So what do they think of each other's goodies?

0:50:550:50:58

I thought his picture after Louis Wain was dreadful.

0:50:580:51:02

Absolutely dreadful.

0:51:020:51:04

It's blatantly a forgery, a fake, a faux.

0:51:040:51:07

His only real problem might be with that little African mask head,

0:51:070:51:12

which could just falter at £57.

0:51:120:51:15

David's big success will be the delightful Murano vase.

0:51:150:51:19

It will also do well.

0:51:190:51:21

It's the day of reckoning.

0:51:230:51:25

After kicking off in Malvern, this leg comes to an end in Pewsey,

0:51:250:51:30

a pretty Wiltshire town

0:51:300:51:33

which sits on a stretch of the 87-mile Kennet and Avon Canal.

0:51:330:51:38

The Jubilee Auction Rooms

0:51:400:51:42

will be the backdrop for our trippers, and the tension is building.

0:51:420:51:45

-Shall we hold hands for good luck?

-Just not too long, please.

0:51:470:51:52

Steady, lads.

0:51:520:51:54

So it's David's ruby glass vase to start.

0:51:550:51:58

-Lot 162.

-Come on, David.

0:51:580:52:01

It's the 1950s Murano clear and ruby glass vase.

0:52:010:52:05

£30 for this. 30? 20?

0:52:050:52:07

10, then?

0:52:070:52:10

10, thank you. At £10, at £10. Take 12 now.

0:52:100:52:15

At £12, seated. At £12. 14.

0:52:150:52:18

-That's a good price.

-At £14, then. Lady's bid down here. All done at £14.

0:52:180:52:25

Well, it's a profit, but David's not happy.

0:52:250:52:29

-It's unbelievably disappointing.

-I think we're in for a bloodbath,

0:52:290:52:33

but if we go down together, we go down together fighting, OK?

0:52:330:52:38

Oh, crumbs. Let's hope David's Wedgwood mug can put a smile back on his face.

0:52:380:52:44

-£20 for this.

-Come on.

-10 away.

-Come on.

0:52:440:52:47

-10 somewhere, surely.

-A couple of pounds?

-10 I've got.

0:52:470:52:51

-At £10 for the Queen's ware.

-Absolutely devastating.

0:52:510:52:56

At £12, then, in the doorway at 12.

0:52:560:53:00

Oh, dear. That's giving it away.

0:53:000:53:03

Now for that controversial Louis Wain picture.

0:53:040:53:08

Very, very, very attractive little picture in the style of Louis Wain.

0:53:080:53:12

It might make £5. If it does, c'est la vie, David. We're in it together.

0:53:120:53:17

-I've got commission bids and open the bidding at £20.

-£20! Come on!

0:53:170:53:22

At £20. Take 2. 22. 22.

0:53:220:53:25

-24, commission.

-Come on. Keep going.

-I can't believe it!

-26, sir. Outside at 26.

0:53:250:53:31

28, commission. At £28.

0:53:310:53:33

A commission bid against you all at £28.

0:53:330:53:38

That's a shame, but thanks for coming.

0:53:380:53:41

If only you'd gone with your gut feeling, Charles.

0:53:410:53:45

I'm getting rather excited now.

0:53:450:53:48

This is my major piece coming up. It's the Mali mask.

0:53:480:53:51

20 I'm bid. 22 now. 22.

0:53:510:53:55

-24, sir. At 24.

-Come on.

0:53:550:53:58

At £24. The bid's on my left at £24. All done.

0:53:580:54:03

Oh, no! A £33 loss and David's feeling the pain!

0:54:030:54:09

I'm just collapsing.

0:54:090:54:10

-So, can Charles get lucky with the vesta case?

-20 I've got.

0:54:110:54:15

-Oh, come on! It's worth that.

-25. 28. 30.

0:54:150:54:19

Take 2, sir. 32. 32.

0:54:190:54:22

At £32, then. Seated at 32.

0:54:220:54:25

Well done, Charles. You made a profit of £12. That's excellent.

0:54:260:54:31

Charles is all smiles.

0:54:310:54:33

Now David's got to hit the jack with his carpet bowls.

0:54:330:54:38

-10 I've got, commission bid. At £10.

-That's profit.

-A profit!

0:54:380:54:43

16. At 16. £18, commission.

0:54:430:54:46

-At £18...

-One more!

-Well done.

0:54:460:54:48

All done at £18.

0:54:480:54:51

-You made £10.

-£10 profit.

0:54:510:54:54

Yeah, but David's still slipping behind.

0:54:540:54:58

Can he stitch a comeback with these pincushions?

0:54:580:55:02

I almost bought these. Please don't make too much.

0:55:020:55:06

£30? 10?! Does anyone like them?

0:55:060:55:09

At £10 I'm bid. 12, sir, thank you.

0:55:090:55:12

Come on! One more bid!

0:55:120:55:15

-14. At 14. 16.

-I can't believe this!

0:55:160:55:20

At £16. And finished. 16.

0:55:200:55:25

Ha! A small profit, but will it be enough to take the lead?

0:55:250:55:29

The way the auction's going, with things falling so far short, this teapot could make £10.

0:55:290:55:35

Will I be upset? Yes, I will be.

0:55:350:55:39

I hope there won't be tears.

0:55:390:55:42

£20? 10, then. Thank you, sir. 10 I'm bid. £10 only.

0:55:420:55:47

At £10. At 10. 12. 14.

0:55:470:55:50

Come on! This is crazy.

0:55:500:55:53

At £14. At 14. 16. 18.

0:55:530:55:57

At £18. At £18 and I'm going to sell it at £18.

0:55:570:56:02

You made a profit. I'm making losses. So don't grumble.

0:56:020:56:06

You tell him, David!

0:56:060:56:09

Now for Charles's jardiniere with the hairline crack -

0:56:090:56:13

and minus the plant.

0:56:130:56:15

It could be yours. Doulton, Lambeth. There it is. Have a go.

0:56:150:56:19

-It could be yours!

-I'm up here, you're down there. For a reason.

0:56:190:56:25

-My apologies, sir.

-Thank you. 10 I've got. £10 bid.

0:56:250:56:28

At £10. 12, thank you. That worked.

0:56:280:56:31

14 with me. At 14. 16 in the room.

0:56:310:56:35

At £16, then. I'll sell for 16.

0:56:350:56:38

Charles is scenting blood.

0:56:380:56:41

I am now £34 profit.

0:56:410:56:44

-And still got your table to come.

-And here it is.

0:56:440:56:48

The apparently 226-year-old tripod table.

0:56:480:56:51

Is victory at hand for Charles?

0:56:510:56:53

If this table can at least break even, we're almost neck and neck.

0:56:530:56:58

-40.

-You're in.

-45.

0:56:580:57:02

-That's good.

-One more.

-At 50.

0:57:020:57:04

At £50. Bid's on my left.

0:57:040:57:07

Good!

0:57:070:57:09

And the winner is...Charles!

0:57:090:57:13

I think we deserve a cup of tea.

0:57:130:57:16

Yes, we do. Come on, David. Well done. I'm delighted.

0:57:160:57:19

David started this leg with £298.20

0:57:190:57:25

and after auction costs made a loss - ooh - of £50.12,

0:57:250:57:29

leaving him with £248.08.

0:57:290:57:33

Charles began with £243.80 and made £18.08 after costs,

0:57:350:57:42

putting him in the lead with £261.88 going into the next leg.

0:57:420:57:46

He still looks a bit moody, though.

0:57:460:57:49

-Congratulations.

-Can you believe it?

-I shall chauffeur you...

-I'm now ahead of David Barby!

0:57:510:57:58

-I've been in your position many a time.

-How does it feel?

-What?

-Losing to me.

-I want to cry.

0:57:580:58:05

Ha-ha!

0:58:050:58:07

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:140:58:17

Antiques guru David Barby and auctioneer Charles Hanson kick off their hunt for antiques in Lichfield, Staffordshire and end up at auctions in Coventry and Pewsey, Wiltshire.