Episode 10 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 10

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Charlie Ross and James Braxton hunt for antiques starting in Blairgowrie, Perthshire.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and a challenge.

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-Do I buy you or don't I?

-Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques across the UK?

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-What's he up to?

-The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

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-But it's not as easy as it looks and dreams can end in tatters.

-Do I hear 1,500?

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Will it be the fast lane to success or the slow road to bankruptcy?

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I can't keep this posture up!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's the penultimate trip for our pair of respectable gents, Charlie Ross and James Braxton.

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James Braxton, believe it or not, is an auctioneer and surveyor with an eye for antiques and fashion.

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Seasoned Charlie Ross is an auctioneer of great experience who likes to drive a hard bargain.

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-Would you take £100 for it? Or is that being rude?

-That's being rude.

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James's original £200 has increased to a meagre £234.52 to begin this day's shopping.

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After his huge win in the first auction, Charlie's £200 rocketed

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and he now has £2,433.40 to flash about.

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They're cruising through beautiful Scotland in their classy 1954 Sunbeam Alpine.

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-Where are we? Stirlingshire?

-Yes...Perthshire!

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This road trip sees our experts cruising from Cromarty in the north-east of Scotland

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over to the west before finishing up in the coastal town of Ayr.

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On this leg, they're heading for auction in Glasgow.

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First stop is the beautiful Perthshire town of Blairgowrie.

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The redstone towns of Blairgowrie and its sister Rattray lie

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on either side of the River Ericht.

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Blairgowrie, or Blair as it's known locally, is Perthshire's second largest town.

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Its centrepiece is the Blairgowrie and Rattray war memorial.

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I want you to spend up. I've thrown the gauntlet down. I want the two and a half on the table.

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You are just desperate for me to spend money, aren't you?

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Intent on spending big, Charlie is straight to work.

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A-ha!

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-Are you Mr Roy Sim?

-I am, yes.

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Greetings. Charlie Ross here. Nice to see you.

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To see you nice. Established in 1975, this refurbished showroom is a whopping 5,500 square feet

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and is stocked full of fabulous antiques.

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I'll take my coat off and have a good look round, if I may.

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I see one or two things that take my eye already.

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I love the dining table.

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Meanwhile, 12 miles west from Blairgowrie finds our poor second-placed expert

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about to land in Dunkeld.

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My approach to Dunkeld

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is to try to find items of sort of under £25.

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I've learnt my lesson. There's no reward for big money. It's just too much risk.

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So I'm going to go cheap. Cheap, cheap, cheap.

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-I'll be keeping my money in my pocket.

-What's new?

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A small picturesque town, Dunkeld is one of Perthshire's gems.

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It lies on the bank of the River Tay which, at 119 miles, is the longest river in Scotland.

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Here it is. Let's have a little squint. Oh, that looks promising.

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Housed in a converted church, Dunkeld Antiques is run by owner David

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and has been established for 25 years.

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After James's usual considered browsing, he spots a £30 Schuco clockwork mouse.

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-What about your little mouse?

-That in the right place might do OK.

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But it's a little bit loose and hasn't got a tail on it.

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-I'll be a bit loose after 100 years!

-It's getting on a bit, isn't it?

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-Does it work, Dave?

-It should do.

-Schuco was a German toymaker founded in 1912.

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They produced small felt and plush-covered mechanical tin-plate toys.

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-What a lovely motion there.

-He's just a big kid!

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Meanwhile, back in Blairgowrie, Charlie's found himself a pair of Japanese vases.

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They're eastern metal vases

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with elephant handles and birds. Well, that's correct.

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They're late Japanese.

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And they're 20th century. Not earlier than that.

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And the decoration of the gilded bronze is not particularly good.

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But they are simply bronze, attractive.

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They are £185, which...

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You know, I don't think I could be that rude to Roy and offer him £50

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because he might show me the door.

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There are some little copper jelly moulds, which are quite fun and largely...

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I was going to say largely affordable. Possibly.

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-Charlie! If anyone should be complaining about affordability it's James!

-A-ha!

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Amongst all the Mauchline ware, the Scottish souvenir ware, is a bit from nearer my home -

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Kent. Tunbridge ware.

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Ah, look. From the outside, it's this perspective cube, with all the different woods here.

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Sometimes called tumbling cube.

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It's quite a simple one. It doesn't look terribly old.

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Quite sweet. You'd expect to pay somewhere in the region of £20-£40 for something like that.

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After a lot of serious browsing, one of our chaps is finally ready to get down to business.

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I did actually look at that pair of bronze vases and then I saw the price, Roy,

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-and I closed up your cabinet and did a bit of a runner.

-Well, you know, everything's negotiable.

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-They may have come in a house clearance.

-Em...

-On the other hand, they may not.

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They came in on a deal.

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-I think if they went to auction they would probably make £60-£80.

-Well, what's your best?

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What's your best?

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I would certainly pay...

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95?

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Oh! Not if they make 60 or 80 at auction! I'm not here to lose money!

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But I'm ambitious.

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You are. I think I would like to pay you £50 for them.

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50 quid. 60, there's a deal.

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-60 quid!

-Deal.

-That's really kind of you. I appreciate that.

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-While I'm here, there's some rather pretty copper jelly moulds.

-Mm-hm.

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-I like a copper jelly mould. They've got no marks on them, but 19th century.

-They are.

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Victorian jellies were not like the sweet jellies of today.

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They were just as likely to use these for blancmanges.

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The set of four have a price tag of £48.

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-I'm going to make you one offer for these.

-Right.

-And I'm not even going to be negotiable.

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-I'd like to pay 20 quid for them.

-Deal done.

-I should have said 10!

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-Oh!

-Right.

-I knew you were a man I could do business with. Fantastic.

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And now James has found something sporting for £80.

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And this one, David, tell me. I don't know much about golf clubs.

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There is a resurgence of interest in hickory-shafted golf clubs now.

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And they are quite collectable. If you look, they've got the shape

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-of what they call the long-nosed putter. It's an Edinburgh maker.

-OK.

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-And it's a very nice piece.

-I'd like to buy that if the price is right.

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-OK.

-That would be great.

-OK.

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15 on that, 15 on that,

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25 or 30 on that

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and 25 on that.

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-You don't mess about, do you?

-No.

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-I go straight in there, David.

-You do.

-Straight in there.

-I can't get close on that one.

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-I can't get close.

-What can you get close on?

-Would you like a parcel price?

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How about £60 as a parcel price? I'd see a profit in those for you.

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-What about 45 for the three?

-That's what you suggested already!

-He's as sharp as a tack, David!

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-Sharp as a tack.

-I tell you what I'll do.

-What?

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Why don't we actually just say 60 or 45 and I'll toss you for it?

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-Oh, blimey, I hate that.

-Well, it makes it easy, doesn't it?

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-Does it?

-Yeah.

-OK.

-Right.

-OK.

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-I've got to call, have I?

-Yeah.

-I'm going to say heads.

-OK.

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Heads it is!

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You're a very kind man. I didn't think it would happen.

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-I'm not an audacious gambling man, but you're very kind.

-And you can have your 2p back.

-Thank you.

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While James has been enjoying himself, Charlie is heading east to Rait. Rait's a small village,

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barely rating a mention.

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To the east is a large farmstead, originally built in 1837.

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This has been converted to become an antiques centre with a group of 12 dealers.

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Gosh, he does look dashing in that car, doesn't he?

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Charlie's been drawn to Alistair McClelland's Antiques,

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where a fine figurine at £180 has caught his eye.

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I'm hot on Staffordshire at the moment. I had a bit of a tickle with a bit of Staffordshire.

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It's Neptune.

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That's rather delightful. Very simply modelled, isn't it?

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The glazing is nice. Figure's nice. He's a bit doleful.

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Did you have to fight for him tooth and nail or did he come in the back of a cupboard?

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-Everything in here I have to fight for.

-What a terrible tragedy. It really is so unfair, Alistair.

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I was rather hoping you'd done a clearance and found this in the back of a cupboard.

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-110 to you, Charlie.

-Oh, I say!

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Would you take £100 for it, Alistair?

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-Or is that being rude?

-It's rude, but, yes, you can have it for 100.

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I'm going to buy that! I like him and the condition of him.

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I don't think it's looking £2,000-worth,

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-but I could see it making 150, 160?

-Yeah.

-I really could.

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As usual, happy with his purchase, he's popped next door into John Walker Antiques.

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Scottish pottery barrel with lid.

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19th century. Stoneware barrel.

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It says here, "AF", which means "At fault".

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It doesn't look too bad to me. Frankly, you'd expect there to be...

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What a wonderful barrel!

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Oh, it's damaged at the bottom, but you'd never use a barrel like that for putting liquid in,

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so what does it matter tuppence if it's damaged?

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It's a lovely piece, but at £125 I'm sensing a negotiation.

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-Watch out, Brian.

-Can you do that for 80 quid?

-No.

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Well, that's a simple answer.

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-Because it's damaged, I could probably bring it down to 100.

-Is it the lowest price?

-Yes.

-90?

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-No.

-Still show me the door?

-I would.

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-Sold to the man in the corner.

-Thank you very much, sir.

-Thank you.

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So far, then, a productive shopping day.

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But the boys are taking a short breaking and heading west to Perth,

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where Charlie has a prior engagement.

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-This is rather nice. Look at the river!

-Glorious!

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Lying on the banks of the River Tay,

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the fair city of Perth is located in central Scotland.

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Once considered the country's capital,

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it's also been known as the Gateway to the Highlands,

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and is home to one of Scotland's most famous regiments.

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-Museum of the Black Watch, otherwise known as the Royal Highland Regiment.

-Here we are.

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-In this beautiful spot.

-Lovely spot.

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-Various memorials here.

-Iraq, Afghanistan.

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-Very, very sobering, isn't it?

-I know.

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-I'm in for a history lesson, am I?

-You are. Very much.

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Scotland's Black Watch is an elite regiment

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with members serving most recently in Afghanistan.

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The Black Watch has a history

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that stretches back almost three centuries.

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-Major Proctor, I presume.

-Charlie, nice to meet you.

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-Thank you very much for letting us in today.

-Grateful that you're here.

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-I'm looking forward to a history lesson.

-Thank you.

-Where do we begin?

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Let's just go next door here.

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The Black Watch was raised in a unique way.

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In the wake of the 1715 Jacobite rebellion,

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companies of trustworthy highlanders

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were raised from loyal clans of Campbells, Frasers,

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Grants and Monroes.

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The government decided they required to have some form of Highland watch

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to try to keep the peace between the Lowlands and the Highlands.

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General Wade was the commander of the army in Scotland

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and he realised that he would have to have

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good intelligence and communications to be effective.

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Because of their dark tartan and their job, watching the Highlands,

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they were given the Gaelic nickname Am Frieceadan Dubh - Black Watch.

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When the First World War started in 1914,

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nobody could have foreseen the huge sacrifices of the Black Watch.

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Some 50,000 men went through the ranks of the regiment from 1914 to 1918.

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Some 25 battalions of one sort or another.

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And of that total, 8,000 were killed.

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And there on the wall you can actually see the 8,000 names,

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but apart from the 8,000 being killed, 20,000 were wounded.

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And of that 20,000, there were probably many who died later on,

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-when the war finished.

-That's virtually 50% casualty rate!

-50%.

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-That's a one in two chance of being killed or wounded.

-Correct.

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Here we have some artefacts from World War One.

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And some of the most poignant are the French prayer book and the New Testament bible.

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And the sergeant's drinking cup.

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All received direct hits and saved their owners' lives.

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You'd retain a certain belief in religion, wouldn't you,

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if your bible had saved your life?

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When war broke out with Nazi Germany in September, 1939, the Black Watch were once again called to duty.

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Charlie, you'll see in here the Roll of Honour,

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much smaller than the Roll of Honour you saw for the First World War.

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A change in fighting style and an improvement in war tactics led to fewer deaths among soldiers.

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We were in Blairgowrie the other day and the war memorial in the centre, it was very relevant.

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The number of names from the First World War and the significantly smaller number from the Second.

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And generals had learnt,

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-you know, as one said, "I won't have a large butcher's bill with nothing to show for it."

-No.

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Charlie, you've had a fascinating insight into one of the world's most celebrated regiments.

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What a privilege. Meanwhile, on the other side,

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-James is heading for Rait Antiques Centre.

-We're leaving Perth.

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I've got two in the hopper. Three!

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Three lovely buys, all at £15 each.

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I'm going to stay to my word - nothing over 25.

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Fine words, sir. And with that he's straight to work.

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-Hello?

-Pleased to meet you. Geoffrey Smith.

-Very nice to meet you.

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Always look up because there might be nice lighting fixtures and look on the top shelf.

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Very suitably, we've got this vase. Isn't that lovely?

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That is very stylish. We've got Diana the huntress.

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She's always depicted bathing or with a bow.

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In Roman mythology, Diana was the goddess of the hunt.

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Often portrayed with bow and arrow and with a deer or hounds.

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This vase has a price tag of £48.

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Geoffrey, can you make my day? Would £18 buy that?

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-You're being very rude to me.

-I know.

-£18?

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I like to do it with a smile, though.

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Double it and we might talk.

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-How about... Could you do it for 25?

-I'll split it with you.

-Oh, no, I don't want splitting.

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-Come on.

-25, Geoffrey. Come on.

-30, come on.

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-Come on. 25...

-Come on. Goddess of your hunting.

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-28, Geoffrey. Can you do 28 for me?

-Go on.

-28.

-We have a deal.

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-Thank you.

-We have a deal.

-I love that.

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-Big, stylish fellow.

-Happy hunting.

-Happy hunting.

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Just over £25, but a good purchase all the same.

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-That's very kind.

-Thank you.

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James and Charlie are back on the road.

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They're journeying 27 miles south-west to Dunblane.

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-What a lovely town! Isn't it?

-Lovely.

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A small cathedral city and former borough, Dunblane lies on the hills

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above the Forth valley and Stirling.

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The beautiful cathedral in the centre dates to the 12th century.

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-There it is.

-Ah, fabulous.

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The Old Curiosity Shop. Very Dickens.

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It's very Dickens, isn't it? Right, well, good luck.

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-Let's get in there.

-It's the last shop before the auction.

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-It's going to be a bit of a squeeze.

-The hare and the tortoise!

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-Reminds me of the Black Watch.

-But that's more your style, the big fellow, isn't it?

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-What a double act!

-What's the big fellow?

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-Price?

-Yeah.

-110, I think.

-110. My word.

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James, you can have the first shot if you want.

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-I'd rather go for the big one.

-It's probably more commercial.

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I like the big one.

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It's a very impressive side drum,

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but at £110 it's a bit pricey.

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-Could I make you a cheeky offer?

-You can, but...

-35?

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-Oh, no.

-What do you think on this, David?

-The lowest I could do that is 70.

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-70?

-Yes.

-OK.

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Fine, fine, fine. And I think that's a fair price.

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It's a lovely piece. It's doing lots of things.

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Now Charlie has spotted a rather large vase with a ticket price of £200.

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-It's very heavy.

-I bet it is.

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It's a Brannam ware pottery. One of the Staffordshire potteries.

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-It's a nice piece.

-Give me a bit of your knowledge. It's got a bit of colour.

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It's got a good bit of colour. It's that treacly glaze.

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-They did a lot of that stuff for conservatories.

-Yeah.

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-Big old plant stands and things.

-Almost like early Doulton Lambeth.

-Exactly, exactly.

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That is a big fellow. Look at it.

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It's three foot something.

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Now, what kind of deal can you get?

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-160.

-Can you do it for 160?

-Yeah.

-Look at that.

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Mr Braxton, I'm going to put my neck on the block here. I'll ask you to make a decision for me.

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-I'll buy that for 160 or the small drum for 40.

-Right. You've got the budget! Play the game!

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-Play the game? Go for it?

-Yep.

-I'm going for the Brannam.

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Another big spend. Well done, Charlie. All that's left is for James to make his move.

0:20:430:20:49

-David, may I take the big drum for 65?

-You're welcome.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:20:510:20:57

James's final purchase brings this shopping trip to a suitable end.

0:20:570:21:02

Charlie Ross began with £2,433.40 - ridiculous! -

0:21:020:21:09

and spent £440 on five auction lots.

0:21:090:21:11

The four Victorian jelly moulds.

0:21:130:21:15

A pair of Japanese vases.

0:21:150:21:16

A Staffordshire pottery figurine.

0:21:170:21:20

A 19th century barrel.

0:21:200:21:22

And the large Brannam vase.

0:21:220:21:25

James Braxton started with £234.52, and spent £138 on five auction lots.

0:21:250:21:33

A 1920s golf club.

0:21:330:21:36

The clockwork mouse.

0:21:360:21:38

A Tunbridge ware box.

0:21:380:21:40

The Art Deco vase.

0:21:400:21:41

And a large decorative drum.

0:21:410:21:43

Time to hear what you boys really think.

0:21:440:21:47

Charlie, I think, has it again.

0:21:470:21:49

What a fabulous Staffordshire figure. Neptune.

0:21:490:21:52

I don't know. Is it another £2,000-£3,000?

0:21:520:21:56

The drum is fab. Love the drum. And the drum will make well over £100

0:21:560:22:01

without any doubt at all in my mind.

0:22:010:22:05

It's been a fabulous jaunt from delightful Blairgowrie,

0:22:050:22:08

via Dunkeld, Perth, Rait and Dunblane,

0:22:080:22:12

with the auction house in Glasgow finally in their sights.

0:22:120:22:16

Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and is on the River Clyde in the west central lowlands.

0:22:160:22:23

With its stunning Victorian architecture and lively vibe, it's the perfect spot -

0:22:230:22:28

-oops! - for auction number four.

-What was that?

0:22:280:22:33

-This looks a bit smart for us, Charlie.

-Too good for our goods!

0:22:360:22:40

Established in 1842, McTear's Auctioneers is one of Glasgow's largest auction houses.

0:22:400:22:47

It's the moment of truth. Let the auction begin.

0:22:480:22:52

First to go under the hammer is James's 1920s long-nose golf club.

0:22:520:22:58

£50 again. 20 again on this one. 10 again, surely. £10.

0:22:580:23:02

Got to go at 10, surely. 10 is bid.

0:23:020:23:05

-How about that?

-All done at 10? 12?

0:23:050:23:08

Any advance at 10? Going now at 10. Are you all done?

0:23:080:23:12

It's going now. £10 for that lot. And it's away to 6513 for £10.

0:23:120:23:18

-You'd have been better off putting that in your golf bag.

-Story of my life.

0:23:180:23:23

Not a great start, James. And certainly not a hole in one.

0:23:230:23:27

This is not boding well for the Schuco mouse, really, is it?

0:23:270:23:31

-Now for Charlie's four copper jelly moulds.

-Come on.

0:23:330:23:37

20 again for the set. 10 again, surely. 10 is bid.

0:23:370:23:39

12 I've got here. 15 on my left.

0:23:390:23:43

-He's got a commission bid.

-Any advance at £15? Going now...

0:23:430:23:48

All done? Going at £15. 1935 for that one.

0:23:480:23:52

That was bargain of the day.

0:23:520:23:54

Oh, dear. Another loss.

0:23:540:23:57

Next to face the music is James's clockwork mouse.

0:23:570:24:01

30 again? 20 again, surely? 20 bid.

0:24:010:24:03

Any advance? 22 bid. 22 on my left. Any advance on that?

0:24:030:24:07

-All finished now?

-Are you bidding?

0:24:070:24:10

On the left at 22. All done? Selling at 22.

0:24:100:24:14

-It's a working profit, isn't it?

-It is. It's a meagre profit.

-A meagre profit!

0:24:140:24:20

It very nearly dragged back the loss from the putter.

0:24:200:24:23

Well done, James. Finally a profit.

0:24:230:24:25

After commission, probably a slim loss!

0:24:270:24:30

Yeah, it was a narrow squeak. So far James is slightly in the lead.

0:24:300:24:35

Can Charlie's vases shake it up?

0:24:350:24:38

20 again, surely. £20 for the pair.

0:24:380:24:41

20 is bid. Any advance? At 20. Any advance at 20?

0:24:410:24:44

All done now at £20. Going now. 25 is bid now. I'll take 30.

0:24:440:24:49

25 is bid now. All done now? Any advance at 25? Going now.

0:24:490:24:54

Not quite the result you were looking for.

0:24:540:24:57

Ouch. That's two losses out of two.

0:24:570:25:01

I think I've come up short!

0:25:010:25:03

Next, it's James's Tunbridge ware box.

0:25:050:25:09

Start the bidding at £30. 20 we're bid here. Commission.

0:25:090:25:13

Commission!

0:25:130:25:15

At £20. All done now? Going with the commission at £20.

0:25:150:25:20

-Are you all done? Selling at 20.

-20. Steady work.

0:25:200:25:25

Another small profit. At least one is going in the right direction.

0:25:250:25:30

Could history repeat itself with Charlie's Staffordshire figurine?

0:25:300:25:34

For the lot, £50 on this one? 30 again? 30 bid.

0:25:340:25:39

-Any advance?

-30?!

0:25:390:25:41

What?!

0:25:410:25:43

All finished now? 35 is bid. 40. 45. 50.

0:25:430:25:47

55. 60. 65?

0:25:470:25:49

No, £60 is bid now. Anyone else?

0:25:490:25:52

At £60 for that lot. 65. At 70.

0:25:520:25:55

-Come on!

-75. 80? No, 75 is bid.

0:25:550:25:58

-Left-hand side at 75.

-80?

0:25:580:26:01

On the left at 75 for that lot. 75.

0:26:010:26:04

Oh, dear. This is not looking good.

0:26:040:26:07

If you can't get over 100 quid for an 18th-century Staffordshire figure...

0:26:070:26:12

-No big spenders in Glasgow today.

-That's made a serious dent in my 2½ grand.

0:26:120:26:19

Oh!

0:26:190:26:20

Constantly reminded.

0:26:200:26:22

Stay positive, James!

0:26:220:26:24

You're making slow, but steady progress. Next up, your vase.

0:26:240:26:28

-Lovely.

-Start bidding at £50?

0:26:280:26:31

30 again. 20 again. £20 bid. 25. 30. Against you.

0:26:310:26:36

Any advance? At £30. Any advance?

0:26:360:26:38

-Oh, come on.

-All done now? Any advance?

-Oh, no...

0:26:380:26:42

-All done now.

-Oh, Brackers...

0:26:420:26:47

£30. That was a wasted opportunity.

0:26:470:26:52

Yep, sorry, James. After commission, that £2 profit is, in fact, a loss.

0:26:520:26:57

-So instead of gaining money on that, I've lost.

-You've lost.

0:26:570:27:01

Under the spotlight next is Charlie's 19th century barrel.

0:27:010:27:05

Now please hold it up! Come on, hold it up.

0:27:050:27:09

He's not doing it.

0:27:090:27:11

Start me a £50 on this one. 50 is bid.

0:27:110:27:14

-50.

-Oh, he's...

-50 is bid.

-Come on!

0:27:140:27:18

-65.

-70.

-65.

0:27:180:27:21

-70. 75.

-Come on!

0:27:210:27:23

70 is the lady's bid. Any advance?

0:27:230:27:28

All done and selling at 70. Any more at 70?

0:27:280:27:31

Sold at 70 and away to 415.

0:27:310:27:34

Roscoe...

0:27:340:27:36

-It could have been worse.

-You're absolutely right. Could be less.

0:27:360:27:41

Dearie me. That's another big loss, Charlie. It's just not your day.

0:27:410:27:47

Now it's James's last stab at a big profit. It's the drum.

0:27:470:27:51

It was a risky purchase, but will it play off?

0:27:510:27:55

£100 again on this one? 80? 50 bid.

0:27:550:27:58

-50 bid! Straight in!

-£60 is bid. Right-hand side.

0:27:580:28:03

70 here. 80 if you wish. 90, sir. 100.

0:28:030:28:06

-110? £100 is bid now.

-Brackers is back!

0:28:060:28:10

I'll take 110. At £100. Going now. Sold at 100.

0:28:100:28:16

-Well done, old bean.

-I've broken that three-figure mark.

-You've made a profit overall.

0:28:160:28:22

You saved the best till last. Well done, James. A great profit.

0:28:220:28:27

There's a fortune for me to be made in the dealing world, isn't there?

0:28:270:28:31

Last, but not least is Charlie's most expensive lot,

0:28:310:28:35

the large stoneware vase. Can it pull him out of despair?

0:28:350:28:40

-Lift it up, man!

-80 again there? 50 bid. Any advance? At 50.

0:28:400:28:45

60 here. Any more? 60. 70 if you wish. 60 is bid.

0:28:450:28:49

At 70. 80. 90. 100. 110?

0:28:490:28:54

-£100 is bid.

-We can do better!

0:28:540:28:57

-110 if you wish there. Any advance?

-Oh, buying it for £100(!)

0:28:570:29:02

-All done at 100? £100.

-Roscoe...

0:29:020:29:05

-Another arrow!

-Cheer up!

0:29:050:29:08

Oh, dear, Charlie. Your game plan well and truly backfired on you today.

0:29:080:29:14

Well, a comprehensive victory.

0:29:140:29:18

James started this leg with £234.52.

0:29:180:29:22

After paying auction costs, he made a small profit of £11.24.

0:29:220:29:27

Despite being victorious, he has a rather small £245.76 to carry forward.

0:29:270:29:34

Charlie, meanwhile, is way out ahead.

0:29:340:29:38

He started with £2,433.40 and despite making a devastating loss of £206.30,

0:29:380:29:45

he still has a hefty £2,227.10 to spend.

0:29:450:29:49

Oh, look at this. This is service. Thank you, my man.

0:29:510:29:56

-Thank you.

-Such a pleasure to work with you, Mr Braxton, sir.

0:29:560:30:00

This Antiques Road Trip has taken our experts from Cromarty

0:30:030:30:06

down the stunning north-east of Scotland over to the west,

0:30:060:30:09

to their final destination in Ayrshire.

0:30:090:30:13

On this last leg, they're heading for the final auction in Ayr.

0:30:140:30:18

First stop is the village of Kilbarchan.

0:30:180:30:21

SPLUTTERING Oh! My hat's come off.

0:30:210:30:24

There must be easier ways to make a living, mustn't there.

0:30:240:30:27

A village in the west Central Lowlands,

0:30:290:30:32

Kilbarchan's church steeple dominates the village skyline.

0:30:320:30:37

Built in 1755, it houses a bronze statue

0:30:370:30:40

of Robert 'Habbie' Simpson,

0:30:400:30:43

Kilbarchan's famous left-handed piper.

0:30:430:30:46

Not a lot of people know that!

0:30:460:30:47

(SCOTTISH ACCENT) There's plenty for you to get your teeth into.

0:30:470:30:52

Established in 1950,

0:30:530:30:55

Gardner's Antiques has a vast array of antiques and collectables.

0:30:550:30:58

And with its strict "no haggling" policy,

0:30:580:31:02

I wonder how the chaps will get on.

0:31:020:31:05

-It goes a long way.

-Goodness me.

-Look up there!

0:31:050:31:08

Oh, oh, oh, God.

0:31:080:31:10

-Good luck, Brackers.

-Good hunting.

0:31:100:31:12

And with that, Charlie gets straight to work with owner, David.

0:31:120:31:16

-That's rather a sweet, very sweet little propelling pencil.

-Mm-hmm.

0:31:170:31:22

Tell me,

0:31:230:31:25

it would be too much for me to expect that to be gold, wouldn't it?

0:31:250:31:28

-I think probably.

-It looks gold to me.

-I'll have a look.

0:31:280:31:31

-I certainly don't see any marks on it.

-It's not priced, no.

-It's not priced as gold, certainly.

0:31:310:31:35

-It isn't but I was just wondering whether it might be!

-I don't see any marks on it.

0:31:350:31:40

Perhaps I should be taking a little gamble.

0:31:400:31:43

Lets do a bit of Sherlock Holmes work on here.

0:31:430:31:45

I think that's absolutely charming.

0:31:450:31:48

And the price of that is...

0:31:500:31:53

£20.

0:31:540:31:56

This would've been kept in a small purse belonging to a lady,

0:31:560:32:00

perhaps if she went out dancing and had a little dance card

0:32:000:32:03

and wanted to write down the names

0:32:030:32:06

of the people that she had been chosen to dance with.

0:32:060:32:10

That's the sort of thing you'd find in a smart purse.

0:32:100:32:13

I think it's a charming little lot.

0:32:130:32:16

-I'd like to make an investment, if I may?

-Absolutely welcome to do that.

0:32:160:32:20

It's not a big one but hopefully, I'm going to find more.

0:32:200:32:22

£20 well spent, Charlie.

0:32:220:32:25

David's "no haggling" policy sure makes for speedy negotiations.

0:32:250:32:28

This looks interesting.

0:32:280:32:31

I'm going to sit down. Look at this!

0:32:310:32:33

Oh, 'ello! Ha!

0:32:330:32:36

All damages to be paid for. Oh!

0:32:360:32:38

Slightly vulnerable to damage, this one.

0:32:380:32:41

Erm, but what a piece!

0:32:410:32:44

Ahem! Damage caused by you, I think, James.

0:32:440:32:47

This is what the impressionists and the Victorians,

0:32:470:32:51

that 1850 period to 1900, this is what they love.

0:32:510:32:55

We've got some deterioration, like a sort of dry rot, there.

0:32:550:32:59

Putting the dry rot, the cracks and the other damage aside,

0:32:590:33:04

this is still quite a nice piece, isn't it?

0:33:040:33:07

-Yeah, OK then, James. So what is it?

-What have we got on this?

0:33:070:33:10

£68?!

0:33:100:33:13

This is my first purchase.

0:33:130:33:15

I love this piece and it's going to make me a large profit.

0:33:150:33:19

I really hope so, James.

0:33:190:33:21

This rare early Meiji period Japanese container

0:33:210:33:23

could've been used to house kimonos or even Japanese jim-jams.

0:33:230:33:27

David, can you tell me about this fellow?

0:33:270:33:30

It's rather taken me eye.

0:33:300:33:32

Erm, Japanese. Probably early 20th century, possibly a bit earlier.

0:33:320:33:37

Quite a lot of Japanese import brought into Glasgow.

0:33:370:33:40

With it being a bit port city.

0:33:400:33:42

A lot of ships' captains and crews bring back, brought things home.

0:33:420:33:46

-You haven't got the lid for it?

-We don't have the lid to that.

0:33:460:33:49

This one's as it stands, I'm afraid.

0:33:490:33:50

-A few wee knocks and bumps but a bit unusual.

-Yeah.

0:33:500:33:55

-I know the terms. There you are, my good man.

-Thank you.

0:33:550:33:57

I shall take the ticket off it, then.

0:33:570:33:59

£68 spent. Well done, James.

0:33:590:34:01

What about Charlie?

0:34:010:34:04

There's something rather ornate and small.

0:34:050:34:10

I imagine an inkwell.

0:34:100:34:14

Yes, it is an inkwell. French.

0:34:140:34:18

Champleve enamel.

0:34:180:34:20

Not brilliant enamelling, but really not bad quality.

0:34:200:34:25

And then we've got a little porcelain plaque at the bottom, here.

0:34:250:34:30

It's really quite a charming object. It is... £54.

0:34:300:34:36

I think this is worth more money than £54. I really do.

0:34:360:34:42

Champleve is a technique in which troughs or cells

0:34:420:34:46

are carved out with a metal object and filled with enamel.

0:34:460:34:50

-I think that's really quite sweet. I'll have that, sir, if I may.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:34:500:34:55

So, while Charlie's been enjoying himself,

0:34:550:34:58

James has headed 15 miles south-west to Kilbirnie.

0:34:580:35:02

Kilbirnie is a small town in North Ayrshire.

0:35:070:35:10

Amongst many old buildings stands the Walker Hall,

0:35:100:35:14

a memorial hall dedicated to Dr Walker,

0:35:140:35:17

one of the first physicians in the town.

0:35:170:35:19

But there's no time for sightseeing.

0:35:190:35:22

James has got some shopping to do.

0:35:220:35:23

Stirrup Cup Antiques opened five years ago

0:35:230:35:26

in this rather lovely barn conversion,

0:35:260:35:29

and James is hoping owner Greta may have a couple of bargains for him.

0:35:290:35:34

-Greta Logan.

-Greta. Very nice to meet you.

0:35:340:35:37

I like this, though. Very nice art nouveau sort of like a table centre.

0:35:370:35:42

It's definitely art nouveau, very continental colouring, the green and the gilt.

0:35:420:35:46

So it's definitely French.

0:35:460:35:49

Nicely finished underneath. I rather like that.

0:35:490:35:52

It's got a good look to it. It's got £45 on it.

0:35:520:35:56

Let's see if I can get something off on that.

0:35:560:35:59

Before he gets down to the nitty gritty,

0:35:590:36:01

something else catches his eye.

0:36:010:36:03

-Look at these bottles.

-Well they're Drew of Piccadilly, 1905, I think.

0:36:030:36:08

-Drew.

-Something like 1905.

0:36:080:36:11

They look it. They are fittings out of a travelling case, aren't they?

0:36:110:36:14

-I would say so.

-Yeah.

0:36:140:36:16

In your leather travel case, around the edges,

0:36:160:36:18

you had these sort of pockets and they fitted into these things.

0:36:180:36:23

Those five, there, and I like your stand there, your nouveau stand.

0:36:230:36:31

What sort of price could you do for the two sort of lots there?

0:36:340:36:39

Well...

0:36:390:36:41

-Very difficult...

-Yeah, uh-huh!

0:36:410:36:44

The two at the back, I had £120 on just on the two.

0:36:440:36:47

Good on you, Greta.

0:36:470:36:49

For all five silver bottles, James is looking at a total price of £245.

0:36:490:36:53

That's £67.24 more than he's got to spend.

0:36:530:36:58

Are you going to put your hand in your pocket for over £300, James?

0:36:580:37:02

-No, I haven't got 300.

-You haven't got 300. Here we go, here we go!

0:37:020:37:05

-How much have we got left?

-I think she's got the mark of you, James.

0:37:050:37:10

£250 on the lot.

0:37:100:37:12

I won't buy all of them.

0:37:140:37:17

Haven't really got the money and all that sort of thing,

0:37:170:37:21

but that's pretty.

0:37:210:37:22

Greta, would you take 140 for that, that, that and that?

0:37:240:37:30

-160?

-160...

0:37:320:37:35

-In the middle?

-OK, then.

-Ha ha ha!

0:37:370:37:40

£150 lighter, and James is still spending.

0:37:400:37:44

I'll tell you what, I've hardly got a penny left,

0:37:440:37:47

and I forgot about these.

0:37:470:37:49

I saw your rather nice, your sort of Hercules doorstops.

0:37:490:37:54

What do you call these? Is this a Scottish thing?

0:37:540:37:57

I think that's got to be for tying a horse.

0:37:570:38:00

You'd put them in the field, and it was just for tethering an animal?

0:38:000:38:04

-They did come out of a coach house.

-How much are you selling these for?

0:38:040:38:08

-30 for the two.

-30 for the two?

-Yeah.

0:38:080:38:12

-Greta, would you take a tenner for this one?

-20.

-20. I can't do 20.

0:38:130:38:18

15, then.

0:38:180:38:20

Could you do 12?

0:38:200:38:23

-OK, James.

-12. That's really kind. Thank you.

0:38:230:38:27

-Three items!

-Are you happy now?

-You need some cash!

0:38:270:38:31

-I would like some cash, thank you.

-Take me to your till.

0:38:310:38:33

The road trip is moving us on once more, leaving Kilbirnie

0:38:330:38:37

and burning a short 10 miles west to Fairlie,

0:38:370:38:40

where James has given himself a little treat.

0:38:400:38:44

Here we are. Lovely. Nice big gates. This is more me.

0:38:440:38:48

-Ah!

-This is more me.

-Oh, it's a bit like going home for you!

0:38:480:38:52

Situated fairly near Fairlie,

0:38:520:38:54

Kelburn Castle is James Braxton's first port of call.

0:38:540:38:57

What a great, great morning! This will look superb, won't it?

0:38:570:39:01

Originally built in the 13th century, Kelburn Castle is the seat of the Earl of Glasgow,

0:39:010:39:07

and is thought to be the oldest castle in Scotland

0:39:070:39:09

to have been continuously inhabited by the same family.

0:39:090:39:14

The present 10th Earl of Glasgow

0:39:140:39:16

is meeting the lucky James Braxton to show him round,

0:39:160:39:19

and tell him more about two of his extraordinary relations.

0:39:190:39:22

Now, who's your fine fellow here?

0:39:230:39:26

Oh, I see. This, in fact is my great-grandfather,

0:39:260:39:29

and he was a naval captain, and near the end of his career,

0:39:290:39:34

-he was made governor of New Zealand.

-Oh, fabulous!

0:39:340:39:37

He was loved. He had a huge family and he was loved by the Maoris,

0:39:370:39:40

and he went round and visited all these various Maori communities all over New Zealand.

0:39:400:39:45

Well, he looks a very splendid fellow, doesn't he?

0:39:450:39:47

He does. I think he was painted to look splendid.

0:39:470:39:50

-Did he bring anything back from New Zealand?

-Yes, he brought a lot back.

0:39:500:39:54

One of the most interesting ones was this one, which is a Maori cape.

0:39:540:39:58

This is... One of the Maori chiefs gave this to my great-grandfather,

0:39:580:40:03

and it actually doesn't look particularly interesting,

0:40:030:40:07

but it is unique, and this is all made out of kiwi feathers,

0:40:070:40:11

and I don't think you'd be able to do that now.

0:40:110:40:13

I think legally, it would be impossible to have a cape like that.

0:40:130:40:17

-So this is all feathers?

-Absolutely. All kiwi feathers.

0:40:170:40:21

A national symbol of New Zealand, the kiwi is a flightless bird

0:40:210:40:26

that holds a special significance for the Maori.

0:40:260:40:29

It is symbolic of their elder brothers and sisters,

0:40:290:40:32

representing protective spirits.

0:40:320:40:34

And is this one of many in the world?

0:40:340:40:36

There was a Maori who came here to see it,

0:40:360:40:39

and he said there were less than a dozen of these in the world.

0:40:390:40:42

My great-uncle Alan

0:40:450:40:47

was one of those magnificent men in their flying machines,

0:40:470:40:50

and he was one of the pioneers of aviation in the very early days,

0:40:500:40:54

and he held the record for three weeks when he'd flown his aeroplane

0:40:540:40:58

something like 400 yards, and that was the record,

0:40:580:41:01

-but the record was broken three weeks later by somebody else who did it better than he did.

-Oh, no!

0:41:010:41:07

-So they were accumulating...

-So he had a glorious three weeks.

0:41:070:41:11

Alan Reginald Boyle was born on 8th October 1886,

0:41:120:41:16

and was the son of the seventh Earl of Glasgow.

0:41:160:41:19

What really fascinates me about it is the fact that

0:41:190:41:22

the wheels are just like sort of bicycle wheels.

0:41:220:41:25

They're tiny, aren't they? You can see how treacherous they were,

0:41:250:41:30

but you can imagine them hitting something and just pitching.

0:41:300:41:33

Well, I think that's actually what happened to my great-uncle.

0:41:330:41:36

Unfortunately, his aeroplane turned over, and he landed on his head,

0:41:360:41:41

and from that moment on, he had a slight memory problem,

0:41:410:41:44

so it was jolly dangerous, as you can see, they were hardly protected.

0:41:440:41:48

-It must've been a very exciting period if you had the courage.

-Yeah.

0:41:480:41:52

-Those pioneering Edwardians.

-That's right.

0:41:520:41:55

The castle is steeped in history, both inside and out,

0:41:550:41:59

but one of the more modern aspects is on the south side of the place.

0:41:590:42:03

This is a great departure from your normal Scottish castle, isn't it?

0:42:030:42:07

Yes, well, it was actually the idea of my son and daughter,

0:42:070:42:11

who got to know these Brazilian graffiti artists

0:42:110:42:14

who were longing to paint a Scottish castle and do a...

0:42:140:42:20

It's a mural, isn't it? We call it graffiti, but it's really a mural.

0:42:200:42:23

They came and stayed here.

0:42:230:42:25

Anyway, they managed to persuade Historic Scotland to let them do it,

0:42:250:42:29

which surprised me.

0:42:290:42:30

-Were you rather hoping they might be turned down?

-Yeah, I was.

0:42:300:42:34

Anyway, he wasn't turned down, and they went ahead with it.

0:42:340:42:37

But now that it's been done,

0:42:370:42:38

I actually think it's really very, very good.

0:42:380:42:40

It's tremendously imaginative.

0:42:400:42:42

So, James, a mixture of old and new.

0:42:420:42:46

Meanwhile, Charlie is cruising 15 miles south to Kilwinning.

0:42:460:42:50

Situated just outside Kilwinning

0:42:500:42:53

is the beautiful Dalgarven Mill.

0:42:530:42:55

Rising through four floors and powered by a six-metre waterwheel,

0:42:550:43:00

this is one of the oldest and tallest grain mills surviving in Scotland.

0:43:000:43:05

It's a beautiful rural location,

0:43:050:43:07

and it's also home to Byre Antiques And Collectables.

0:43:070:43:10

Nice to see you. It's Shane, isn't it? Now, this looks interesting...

0:43:120:43:16

What appears to be a leather volume...

0:43:160:43:20

I'm going to open it up and see what's what.

0:43:200:43:23

Gosh!

0:43:240:43:25

Ah, that's good, it's instructions.

0:43:250:43:29

This looks a really interesting compendium.

0:43:290:43:33

Roulette.

0:43:330:43:35

Cribbage boards, chessboard.

0:43:350:43:38

Fantastic!

0:43:380:43:39

And I suspect here we will have the roulette table.

0:43:390:43:45

It's fantastic! And the pack of cards. I think the pack of cards is probably original.

0:43:450:43:49

What date is this?

0:43:490:43:51

1920s.

0:43:510:43:53

I notice, Shane, that it hasn't got a price on it.

0:43:530:43:56

It's just in, in actual fact.

0:43:560:43:58

-Oh, is it?

-It is, it's a new piece in.

-What sort of money's that?

0:43:580:44:02

My best trade on it for you, Charlie, would be £40.

0:44:020:44:06

-And that, the £40 is the absolute death...

-Absolutely.

0:44:060:44:10

-Leave the door if you don't pay.

-Exactly.

0:44:100:44:13

-Sold.

-Thank you very much.

0:44:130:44:14

Thank you very much indeed. I think that's great.

0:44:140:44:17

-I love it.

-I'm glad you like it.

0:44:170:44:18

-I think all your furniture's been restored, hasn't it?

-It has.

0:44:180:44:22

-I'm a furniture restorer.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:44:220:44:24

Have you got anything that's waiting to be restored?

0:44:240:44:27

The one piece I have got is the Georgian washstand.

0:44:270:44:30

-It doesn't really look as if it needs restoration.

-Just tidying.

0:44:300:44:34

-If you see the beading...

-Oh, yes, I can see.

0:44:340:44:39

The drawer fronts...

0:44:390:44:40

This lovely piece of Georgian mahogany is being sold

0:44:400:44:44

without the bowl and the jug.

0:44:440:44:46

Well, I'd better ask, I'm not intending to buy any furniture,

0:44:460:44:49

-but that might be irresistible.

-I could make it very appealing.

0:44:490:44:53

-Could you make it very appealing?

-I could.

0:44:530:44:55

If I could do it for £50?

0:44:550:44:57

CHARLIE SIGHS

0:44:570:44:59

I... It's...

0:44:590:45:01

-I can see you're struggling with it.

-It's a great price.

0:45:010:45:05

I mean, I would say I'd give you £35 cash for it,

0:45:050:45:08

and if it could be done for that...

0:45:080:45:10

Well, if I said to you, if you met me halfway

0:45:100:45:13

and we do it for £40, for a piece of Georgian furniture?

0:45:130:45:16

I couldn't actually say no, could I?

0:45:160:45:19

I think it would be rude to say no.

0:45:190:45:21

I think it would be very rude to say no!

0:45:210:45:24

This has got to be the deal of the day. Well done, Charlie.

0:45:240:45:28

With the auction just around the corner,

0:45:280:45:30

our chaps are back on the road, heading north to Largs.

0:45:300:45:34

This is glorious, isn't it?

0:45:340:45:36

Very Scottish Riviera.

0:45:360:45:38

A former cinema, Narducci Antiques has been open since 1969

0:45:380:45:44

and is the scene for our final show-stopping showdown.

0:45:440:45:47

-Are you feeling lucky, Mr Braxton?

-I am. Oh, look, there's a staircase.

0:45:480:45:52

Do you think there are things up there?

0:45:520:45:55

Oh, that's where the bargains will be! Unseemly rush there.

0:45:550:45:59

What have you got for £15.76?

0:46:010:46:03

Well, we cater for most pockets so, nothing take your eye?

0:46:030:46:07

It hasn't, really.

0:46:070:46:08

Well, maybe Franco here can inspire you

0:46:080:46:12

with this rather large Ayrshire glazed salt box

0:46:120:46:15

with a broken lid. You might even get a deal on it, James.

0:46:150:46:18

-I can do that for a tenner, if it's any good?

-It's quite fun, isn't it?

0:46:180:46:22

You say a salt box.

0:46:220:46:23

-Just for keeping the salt dry, keeping the dampness from it.

-Yeah.

0:46:230:46:28

What about a fiver, Franco?

0:46:280:46:31

-Eight quid. I'll meet you in the middle.

-Seven and I'll do it.

0:46:310:46:34

-On you go, we're here to sell.

-Thanks.

0:46:340:46:37

Excellent piece of negotiating there, James, and very clever

0:46:370:46:41

taking Ayrshire pottery to an Ayrshire auction.

0:46:410:46:43

A pair of quite fancy wall brackets over here.

0:46:430:46:47

They look as if they're brass.

0:46:470:46:50

They are. They're pretty blooming stylish. Chunky!

0:46:500:46:58

I think they are originally made for electricity,

0:46:580:47:02

but early electricity. They're early 20th century and I like those.

0:47:020:47:06

God, I'd love to buy those for less than 100 quid. Ho-ho!

0:47:070:47:12

Well, if anyone can seal the deal, you can, Charlie.

0:47:120:47:14

-They're nice, aren't they?

-Yeah, early 20th century, I suppose.

0:47:140:47:17

-What sort of money are they?

-£60?

0:47:170:47:21

I quite like your opening gambit there. They've got good weight.

0:47:210:47:26

-Good look too.

-And they're a very good look, aren't they?

0:47:260:47:29

If I pulled out 40 Scottish notes, would that do the deal?

0:47:290:47:33

-No, but if you put a friendly 50, you can have them.

-A nifty 50?

0:47:330:47:37

-A nifty 50 and it's a deal.

-I think they're fantastic.

-Thanks.

0:47:370:47:40

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

0:47:400:47:43

-You look spent up.

-I am almost spent up. And you?

0:47:440:47:48

-You find something?

-Yes, I did, and I'm very pleased with what I bought.

0:47:480:47:53

And with that, it's time to go,

0:47:530:47:55

and see what our two good-natured gents are so pleased about.

0:47:550:47:58

James started this last leg of the road trip with £245.76

0:47:590:48:03

and spent £237 on five auction lots.

0:48:030:48:07

He bought a lacquered Japanese box,

0:48:090:48:11

an art nouveau mirrored platter,

0:48:110:48:13

a stone horse tether,

0:48:130:48:15

an Ayrshire glazed pottery salt box,

0:48:150:48:17

and spent a substantial £110

0:48:170:48:20

on the collection of silver bottles.

0:48:200:48:23

Charlie began with £2,227.10.

0:48:230:48:27

He spent £204, and also has five final auction lots -

0:48:270:48:32

a games compendium,

0:48:320:48:35

a pair of brass wall sconces,

0:48:350:48:37

a champleve inkwell,

0:48:370:48:40

the delicate propelling pencil,

0:48:400:48:41

and a Georgian mahogany washstand.

0:48:410:48:44

I liked his washstand, and at £40, that was daylight robbery, I think.

0:48:440:48:49

You know, dear old Roscoe,

0:48:490:48:51

he likes to pretend he's a sort of bumbling old idiot,

0:48:510:48:55

but he's on the money, isn't he?

0:48:550:48:58

James has bought some really great lots.

0:48:580:49:00

I like his stoneware trough.

0:49:000:49:03

Cost noth...£7?! Robbery!

0:49:030:49:07

It's been an eventful final leg for our two excited experts,

0:49:070:49:12

from Kilbarchan via Kilbirnie,

0:49:120:49:14

Kilwinning and Largs.

0:49:140:49:16

Auction day is here, and it's the final showdown

0:49:160:49:19

for James and Charlie in Ayr.

0:49:190:49:20

Now, I've been chasing furniture down for some decades now.

0:49:200:49:26

Every time I see something, I say I'm never going to buy any more English brown furniture.

0:49:260:49:30

Then a piece comes in so cheaply

0:49:300:49:33

that you really think that there is a profit, and there never is.

0:49:330:49:36

Established in 1933, Thomas R Callan

0:49:370:49:40

is a family-run business of auctioneers and valuers,

0:49:400:49:45

selling over 25,000 lots every year.

0:49:450:49:48

So, for the last time, let the auction begin.

0:49:500:49:52

First to go under the hammer is James's Ayrshire lead-glazed bin.

0:49:520:49:56

-Look at that.

-It looks gorgeous.

-Lovely.

0:49:560:49:59

Is there 60 for it? £60.

0:49:590:50:02

40? £40?

0:50:020:50:04

40 I'm bid in the corner.

0:50:040:50:06

At 40, any advance? 45. 50.

0:50:060:50:09

Cost seven.

0:50:090:50:11

Any advance on the 50? Corner at 50. Are we all out at 50?

0:50:110:50:14

I think he's over-egging it a bit.

0:50:140:50:16

All finished, then, at £50?

0:50:160:50:18

-GAVEL BANGS

-Well, well, well.

-Mr Braxton!

0:50:180:50:22

That's very nice. Sensational.

0:50:220:50:24

It certainly was, James.

0:50:240:50:26

That's a brilliant profit to start on.

0:50:260:50:29

-That's wonderful.

-That's good, isn't it?

0:50:290:50:33

Now for Charlie's inkwell.

0:50:330:50:35

Decorative wee piece with a hand-painted porcelain base,

0:50:350:50:38

with its cherubs.

0:50:380:50:39

30. £30.

0:50:400:50:41

30 I'm bid. 35. 40. 45. 50.

0:50:410:50:44

55. 60.

0:50:440:50:46

At 60. Any advance on 60?

0:50:460:50:49

65. 70.

0:50:490:50:51

75. 80. 85. 90.

0:50:510:50:54

95. At 95, behind me at 95. At £95.

0:50:540:50:59

Any advance on 95? All finished, then, at £95.

0:50:590:51:03

Well done, well done, my word.

0:51:030:51:07

-My word.

-95.

0:51:070:51:09

I didn't think that was going to happen, did you?

0:51:090:51:12

Oh, ye of little faith.

0:51:120:51:14

Fantastic result, Charlie. Just £2, now, behind James.

0:51:140:51:18

-We've got a battle on today, Brackers, haven't we?

-I know.

0:51:180:51:21

We are in lot 103, then. A lovely late-19th century propelling pencil.

0:51:210:51:26

There you are. For the pencil, 50 for it?

0:51:260:51:28

£50? 40? £20?

0:51:280:51:31

£20?

0:51:310:51:34

20 I'm bid. 25.

0:51:340:51:36

30. 35. 40.

0:51:360:51:39

At 40, any advance on 40?

0:51:390:51:41

# Double your money and try to get rich... #

0:51:410:51:44

At 40. Are you all out? All finished, then, at £40.

0:51:440:51:48

-GAVEL BANGS

-449.

-Very good. Very good.

0:51:480:51:51

I'm warming to this auctioneer on every lot he sells.

0:51:510:51:55

You're on to a winning streak here, Charlie,

0:51:550:51:57

and are edging out in front.

0:51:570:51:59

Oh, I tell you what - they look the business.

0:51:590:52:02

Let's see if James's silver bottles can shake things up.

0:52:020:52:05

£100. £100 for three. 100 I'm bid. At 100.

0:52:050:52:09

110. 120. 130.

0:52:090:52:13

At 130, any advance on 130?

0:52:130:52:15

140.

0:52:150:52:16

At 140, any advance on 140?

0:52:160:52:19

-At 140, any advance?

-140 plus the premium...

0:52:190:52:22

All finished then, at £140?

0:52:220:52:25

GAVEL BANGS You got a profit. Got a profit.

0:52:250:52:28

-A couple of quid...

-Yeah.

-..after commission.

0:52:280:52:30

Yes, James. The auction house must take its earnings,

0:52:300:52:34

but chin up - it's still a profit.

0:52:340:52:36

Lot 177, the games compendium.

0:52:360:52:38

Up next is Charlie's games compendium.

0:52:380:52:41

80 for it? 80? £60.

0:52:410:52:43

£60, compendium?

0:52:430:52:45

40? £40?

0:52:450:52:48

20, then. 20. 25. 30. At 30.

0:52:480:52:53

35, behind me at 35.

0:52:530:52:55

40. 45.

0:52:550:52:57

At 45, behind at 45. All finished?

0:52:570:53:00

-Selling, then, at £45...

-GAVEL BANGS

0:53:000:53:03

475 at 45.

0:53:030:53:06

-Wiped its face.

-Yeah, I'm not wildly thrilled about that.

0:53:060:53:10

I thought it was a good lot.

0:53:100:53:11

What a pity. I really thought that would do better.

0:53:110:53:15

Time for your mirrored platter next, James.

0:53:150:53:19

This is your chance to race into the lead.

0:53:190:53:21

-80 for it. 80?

-Ooh, that's lovely.

0:53:210:53:23

40? £40? Beautiful condition. £40?

0:53:230:53:28

Giving me the heebie-jeebies, this is.

0:53:280:53:31

-£20.

-But that's ridiculous.

0:53:310:53:33

At 20. 25. At 30.

0:53:330:53:36

35. At 35, are we all out?

0:53:360:53:39

All finished, then, at 35...

0:53:390:53:42

-GAVEL BANGS

-477, 35.

0:53:450:53:47

-James, I'm disappointed with that.

-So am I.

0:53:470:53:50

Chin up, James. Despite the £5 loss, you're still out in front.

0:53:500:53:55

-Cor, it's coming down to the wire, this one, Brackers.

-I know.

0:53:550:53:59

Next on display are Charlie's brass wall sconces.

0:53:590:54:03

80 for them, 80? £40?

0:54:030:54:06

40 I'm bid. 40, any advance on 40?

0:54:060:54:08

45. 50.

0:54:080:54:10

At 50. Corner at 50. Any advance on 50?

0:54:100:54:13

At £50 for the pair.

0:54:130:54:15

They're cheap, aren't they?

0:54:150:54:17

-At £50, it's the corner, 55, new bidder.

-55, new bidder.

0:54:170:54:20

At 55, any advance on 55? Are we all out?

0:54:200:54:22

Middle at 55, finished, then, at £55.

0:54:220:54:27

-GAVEL BANGS Oh, dear. I really had confidence in those.

-A squandered opportunity.

0:54:270:54:31

Another opportunity gone.

0:54:320:54:34

And to think, it started off so positively.

0:54:340:54:37

Next is James's horse-tetherer.

0:54:380:54:41

It's an ancient throwing stone from the Highland Games.

0:54:410:54:43

-THEY LAUGH

-I'll take 40 for it? £40?

0:54:430:54:46

20. £20, a tether?

0:54:460:54:50

10. At 10, I'm bid, at 10.

0:54:500:54:52

15.

0:54:520:54:54

Bidding? 20 in the corner.

0:54:540:54:56

25. At 25, lady at 25. Any advance on 25?

0:54:560:55:00

-Good investment.

-Are you all out?

0:55:000:55:03

All finished, then, at £25.

0:55:030:55:05

-GAVEL BANGS

-Well done, that lady.

0:55:050:55:08

-Well done, madam.

-Well done.

0:55:080:55:10

What are you going to tie on to it?

0:55:100:55:13

Your husband?

0:55:130:55:15

Behave yourself, Roscoe. James, that was a very good investment.

0:55:150:55:19

James is currently in the lead, and his Japanese box is up next.

0:55:190:55:23

-Oozes quality.

-Oozes quality - it's a bit like its owner.

0:55:230:55:27

£100 for it? 100?

0:55:270:55:29

80?

0:55:290:55:31

£40?

0:55:320:55:33

£40?

0:55:350:55:37

40 I'm bid, at 40. Any advance on 40?

0:55:370:55:40

You're away. 45.

0:55:400:55:41

50. 55. 60.

0:55:410:55:43

65.

0:55:430:55:45

70.

0:55:450:55:46

-75. 80. 85.

-Brackers!

-90.

0:55:460:55:50

On my left at 90, any advance on 90?

0:55:500:55:53

Keep going.

0:55:530:55:54

At £90, any advance on £90? Are we all out?

0:55:540:55:58

All finished, then, at £90.

0:55:580:56:00

GAVEL BANGS Oh...

0:56:000:56:03

It's not a bad result, Brackers, to be honest.

0:56:030:56:05

JAMES LAUGHS But compared with your purchase price?

0:56:050:56:08

-Come on, it's a profit, old boy.

-I know, I know. I'm pleased.

0:56:080:56:11

-Chin up, Brackers.

-I am pleased.

0:56:110:56:14

James, you've ended on a high. With one lot to go, you're in the lead.

0:56:140:56:17

Charlie, it all comes down to your washstand, mate.

0:56:170:56:20

You'd need to make a profit of £36

0:56:200:56:22

to be able to declare victory in today's show.

0:56:220:56:25

80? 50, then.

0:56:250:56:28

-50, I'm bid.

-£50.

-At 50. 55.

0:56:280:56:31

60. 65.

0:56:310:56:33

At 65. 70.

0:56:330:56:35

75. 80.

0:56:350:56:38

85. 90. 95.

0:56:380:56:39

-Well done.

-100. 110.

0:56:390:56:42

120.

0:56:420:56:43

-130.

-Oh, Brackers!

-130, any advance on 130?

0:56:430:56:47

At £130, any advance? It's the back at 130.

0:56:470:56:50

Are you all out? All finished then, at £130.

0:56:500:56:55

-GAVEL BANGS

-Well done. Well done. £130.

0:56:550:56:58

Down to wire, though, Brackers. Absolutely down to the wire.

0:56:580:57:02

What a result, Charlie, and a fantastic profit

0:57:020:57:05

to end this road trip adventure.

0:57:050:57:07

-Well done, Roscoe. A deserved winner.

-Gosh.

0:57:070:57:12

-Down to the last lot though. Doesn't come closer than that, does it?

-No.

0:57:120:57:16

James began his last voyage with £245.76.

0:57:160:57:21

After paying auction costs, he made a profit of £41.80.

0:57:210:57:26

He ends this week with a not-to-be-laughed-at £287.56.

0:57:260:57:31

The legendary Charlie Ross

0:57:310:57:33

was always going to be a tough nut to beat.

0:57:330:57:36

He started this leg with £2,227.10 and made a healthy profit of £95.30.

0:57:360:57:42

Charlie wins in spectacular fashion with an enormous £2,322.40,

0:57:420:57:48

and all monies raised will go to Children In Need.

0:57:480:57:52

-I feel rather deflated now, Brackers.

-Where's everybody gone?

0:57:520:57:56

-I don't know.

-Is it all over? Your last lot was that.

0:57:560:58:00

Do you think we can go up to the Black Isle and start again?

0:58:000:58:02

JAMES LAUGHS

0:58:020:58:04

Yeah, I'll be buying Staffordshire.

0:58:040:58:06

THEY LAUGH

0:58:060:58:08

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:300:58:33

Charlie Ross and James Braxton hunt for antiques starting in Blairgowrie, Perthshire and ending with a final auction showdown in Ayr.