Episode 9 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 9

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Charlie Ross and James Braxton continue their Scottish antiques trail in Buckie.


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-The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each, one big challenge.

-Well, duck, do I buy you?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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-What's my wife up to?

-The aim is trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

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It's not as easy as it looks. Dreams of glory can end in tatters.

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Do I hear £1,500?

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Will it be the fast lane to success or the slow road to bankruptcy?

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-I can't keep this posture up for much longer!

-This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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We're in Scotland and on the road with two very respectable gentlemen,

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Charlie Ross and James Braxton.

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# Oh, flower of Scotland... '

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Oh, no! Please! With over 20 years' experience in antique auctioneering,

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James Braxton has a soft spot for nice items and shop assistants.

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It's nice to see something I like. It's very nice.

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It's just a nice item.

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Well-known auctioneer Charlie Ross loves a bargain.

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And at times, struggles to part with his cash.

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I was going to be very rude, but I'd better not. I was going to ask you to knock the ten off!

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Charlie may be polite, but his penny-pinching means that his pounds look after themselves.

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He bought a Staffordshire elephant for £8 and packed her off for an amazing...

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27 for the last time.

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That's £2,700!

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Crikey! After auction costs, that means Charlie's £200

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has rocketed to a wonderful wad of £2,447.96. Well done, indeed!

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Normally, James would have been on cloud nine

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when his £200 increased to £256.06,

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but his auction profits pale by comparison with Charlie's success.

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It's time to talk tactics, as they head off in their classy 1954 Sunbeam Alpine.

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I've got a lot of money now. This is something I'm not used to.

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As a rival and competitor, I would urge you to go large.

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As a friend, I would say keep that £2,000 aside

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and go mental with your £450.

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Well, he would say that. This week's road trip takes James

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and Charlie along the beautiful east coast of Scotland, before heading west,

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where they finish up in the coastal town of Ayr.

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On today's leg, they're leaving Buckie and heading for auction two in Aberdeen.

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First stop is the fishing village of Cullen.

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Cullen was established in 1189 and has a long history,

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but its main claim to fame is the local speciality that's named after the town, Cullen skink.

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Smoked haddock, potato and onion soup.

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Sounds delightful, if a little fattening.

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Toodle pip.

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Charlie's wasting no time.

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He's not even in the shop

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and he's spotted a pretty little powder compact priced at £65.

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It is really interesting. Glasgow Exhibition 1938.

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What would be your best price on that?

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-I'll make it 50 to you cos I like you.

-That's very kind of you.

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I really like that. I really like that hugely.

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I'm going to continue on round. I can't imagine I'm going to get out of this shop without spending money.

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You've got enough to buy the contents and the building,

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unlike James, who's hoping to fight back with a £30 pair of cannons. I don't think so.

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They're die-cast. They're die-cast metal. Sort of aluminium alloy.

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They're more look than substance because these are pretty light fellows.

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It's not something I'm going to buy for 8 and make 2,700 on.

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There's no time to lick your wounds, James. It's time for hard negotiation with owner Harry.

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What if I offered you a compelling £15 for those.

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£15?

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-For that one? And 15 for that one?

-OK, I was a bit cheeky there. £20.

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-Erm...

-Would you do that for 20?

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-What about 25?

-25?

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-I'd like to do it for 20.

-Would you?

-Yeah. It would really help me here.

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-Could you do it?

-As it's a nice day, they're yours.

-They're a lovely lot.

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Thank you.

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Well done, James. That's a great buy.

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But be warned, your cheeky competitor has turned to the eerie world of witchcraft!

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This is a very, very odd thing.

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-What is it?

-Well, it's African and I think that it's witch doctor's...

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That's my feeling. But it's very odd. I've never seen anything like it before.

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What would be your best price on this? These are not bed fellows.

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But this and your Glasgow 1938 compact.

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Well, the best I can do for you would be 125.

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I'll have them both! I like to take a gamble.

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Well, you've certainly done that. I just hope it pays off.

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And after Charlie's dabbling in black magic,

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James is searching for the light.

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Travelling 40 miles to the north east corner

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of the Aberdeenshire coast and the fishing town of Fraserburgh.

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The largest shellfish port in Europe,

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Fraserburgh has a busy commercial harbour.

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It's also home to Scotland's first mainland lighthouse

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and the Museum of Scottish Lighthouses,

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which is where the lucky James is spending his afternoon. Showing him round is bright spark Jim.

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This is really where it all started.

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When the lighthouse service was first formed in 1786,

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it was a man called Thomas Smith, a lamp maker in Leith,

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and he was given the task of providing lumination for lighthouses.

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And this is what he came up with. A mirror reflector.

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And the first lighthouse at Kinnaird, these were the type of things that was put on top.

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There were 17 of them, set in an array, each with an oil lamp.

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And that actually produced a light that was visible 12 miles.

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Smith's 17 lamps were positioned on top of this 16th century castle

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until 1824 when his stepson, Robert Stevenson,

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designed his lighthouse to fit inside the castle.

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Maybe on the way up, you'll notice some chains hanging down thing the centre of the tower.

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And one of those chains was this big weight.

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And it's that weight descending the tower that supplies

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the power for the machine upstairs.

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All lighthouses were clockwork driven,

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but unlike the old long case clocks

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which required to be wound every 30 hours or eight days,

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these needed to be wound every 30 minutes.

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Every half hour as the machine was running, this would ring.

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-93 turns of this handle.

-93?

-Bring the weight back up again.

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Give you another half hour's run.

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Failure to wind the handle would bring all the machinery

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to a standstill and at that point, you had a career change!

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Now for the science.

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All this is refraction. They take the light coming from the bulb

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and they bend it round in parallel to that.

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so you've got very little wasted light.

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It's a very odd sensation! Slightly out-of-worldly!

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But very beautiful. Beautifully constructed. All bronze and glass.

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This is superb.

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And all from one tiny bulb. Extraordinary!

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So while James makes his way back to Cullen, it's time to swap shops.

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Charlie's heading to Cullen Collectibles

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and still has over £2,300 to spend. So chop-chop!

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A very fine Wedgwood casket.

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No, it's not. It's tin!

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It's a Crawford's biscuit tin

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in the form of a Wedgwood casket.

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I rather like that.

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How much would you like to take for that?

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-What about £3?

-I think £3... I'm not even going to negotiate.

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I think that's a cracker. It's got enough age to excite me.

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And it's a statement and it's fab.

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At £3, it's mine!

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After that purchase, he's still got, yep, over £2,300.

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Down the road, James has arrived in Abra Antiques, as in "Cadabra".

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It's got a couple of chips.

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But after his usual carefully considered browsing,

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he's going oriental.

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I quite like this, Tom.

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So we've got a paperweight here and I'm just having a quick look at it.

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And it's nice, isn't it? I haven't really come across these before.

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It's a paperweight, rather like we have a paperweight,

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but this is a sort of tablet form. It's nice and thin.

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And just carries a very nice Chinese mythological scene on it.

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It's a dragon and a phoenix.

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In China, the dragon and phoenix are symbols of auspiciousness.

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Any sightings of a dragon and a phoenix were considered

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a lucky sign, said to herald a period of peace and prosperity

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for the country, and maybe James Braxton.

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£48, Tom.

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-The Cullen Chancer, I'll call you!

-Oh, dear!

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James, I'm not sure insulting Tom is the best way to start negotiations.

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Could you do that for me for £20?

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Oh, dear. This man's a rogue!

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He's a rogue! I don't want to pay £48 for it.

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That's for sure. I'd rather like to pay you £20 for it.

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-Well, I'd rather you paid me 25.

-25?

-I'll meet you at 25.

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Yeah. I'll have a go at 25. Thank you very much indeed.

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Nice purchase, James. But no time to dawdle.

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Charlie's waiting with all that cash.

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-Ah!

-Roscoe!

-Comment te?

-Fab!

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-Fancy a swim?

-A swim?!

-Yeah, come on!

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-Get in, man!

-I need a swim. It's been a hard old day!

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So how many items? Did you buy quite a few?

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-I couldn't spend any money though.

-Really?

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-Couldn't get in to my two-and-a-half grand!

-You want to get that wad out!

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-Get spending! Here we go.

-I'd rather have a swim.

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Go for a swim?! A swim in the North Sea?!

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Oh, surely not!

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Oh, no! They're serious!

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Is this after the watershed?

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I can't keep this posture up for much longer!

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-I'm breathing in!

-My body is normally like this!

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And they're going in! I don't believe it!

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Beach babes they are not.

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Look at them go! Look at that James Braxton. Such a man.

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Now Charlie and James have dried off and dressed - well, sort of -

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they're heading 25 miles south to Dufftown

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-This is Dufftown, is it?

-I think it must be.

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Located on the banks of the River Fiddich, Dufftown is home to several Scotch whisky distilleries

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and as such, promotes itself as the malt whisky capital of the world.

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Unfortunately, our boys must resist temptation

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and focus on the antiques, as the auction is just around the corner.

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-Thank you.

-May all your profits be small ones!

-Bye.

-Bye.

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Ha-ha! As Charlie heads off on his own little adventure,

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James goes to Collectors Cabin,

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an antique shop that also sells Scottish dress.

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You've got all your various trench art here. And the Spitfire ashtray.

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That's quite nice. I'm surprised that's still there.

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There's masses of shells everywhere. Shell casings here.

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Everybody smoked in those days,

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so there were lots of opportunities

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to make ashtrays and various other things.

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During the First and Second World Wars, these decorative items,

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known as trench art, were made by soldiers, prisoners of war

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and civilians out of brass from shell casings.

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-May I look at you rather nice white onyx fellow?

-Please do.

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-What's that? Just painted on?

-It's hand painted, yes.

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-This presumably would have been a cigarette box.

-I think so.

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I think it's a charming item.

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Onyx is the mineral that often displays different colours in multiple layers.

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This beauty is from the 1920s and has a price tag of £125.

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Well, time's ticking on, David.

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There's a couple of things I quite like the look of,

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but it's that nutty problem of price.

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Uh-oh! Here we go.

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-This was the item that sort of caught my imagination.

-Yes?

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Your rather nice Spitfire, the ashtray. David, I see that at £25.

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Ah, I think I see it at £55!

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-I do like these white onyx things. I see that at £50.

-Aha.

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-I see it at quite a bit more than that.

-I know you do!

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-Can you help me out here? A package deal.

-A package deal?

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What would be your package suggestion?

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Package suggestion would be £75.

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The Spitfire and the onyx come to £180!

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You sound like my plumber! I'll go to 30 on that.

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-Can we make it 80 for the two?

-80 for the two? She's smiling!

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-Go on, put there, David!

-Shall we?

-Well done. Thank you.

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Nice bit of negotiating, James,

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The boys wave Dufftown goodbye

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and continue travelling on 55 miles east to Clola.

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Clola is a hamlet in Aberdeenshire.

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The neighbourhood extends to a radius of a little over a mile.

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It may be small, but it's home to its very own antique emporium.

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-Spend, spend, spend.

-How many items are you searching for?

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I need lots of items, Brackers!

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I've still got far too much money left.

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Spread over three floors, with a mixture of antiques and collectibles,

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this is their final chance before auction to spend big.

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James is straight to work with owner Tom

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and has found himself a pestle and mortar.

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-Where did you find this, Tom?

-Inherited during a house clearance.

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Oh, right. OK.

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Years ago, these sort of things were very popular,

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along with pewter, and people love pestles and mortars.

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The word mortar derives from Latin mortarium,

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meaning receptacle for pounding.

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And pestle comes from the Latin pistilum, meaning pounder.

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This one's a 45 pounder.

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And then you've got... I quite like this.

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I spied this earlier, as I was walking round.

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-This is a lovely fellow.

-Yes, the bushel.

-The bushel.

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-This was a measure for...

-For grain. Wheat or barley.

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-Was it level, the bushel?

-Yes, it would have been.

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Very nice. And...there we are. It's all there.

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Now, I'm quite interested in the two.

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Could you do me a tremendous deal, Tom?

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I could probably offer you a nice deal on it.

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-What could you offer me on that?

-40?

-40. And what about this one?

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Could you go as low as say 45 on this?

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-No, I'm afraid I couldn't go as low as 45.

-What could you do on that?

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-How does 60 sound?

-60.

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Could you either do 50 on this or 35 on that?

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Yes, I could do 35, on the pestle and mortar for you. Yes.

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What about 50 on that?

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-Not quite.

-Not quite.

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I'm going to go for that one at 35, Tom.

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Well done, James. Nice buy.

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Downstairs, Charlie still has over £2,300.

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But he's on the case.

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Hello! A completely knackered garden urn.

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Reconstituted stoneware.

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I could cement that on to there, couldn't I,

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with my immense do it yourself skills.

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£10?! Look at that!

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If that isn't worth 30 or 40 quid, re-stuck together, I'll eat my hat!

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I'd give 40 quid for that if somebody stuck on.

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But when I was downstairs, I saw a broken urn.

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It says £10 on the label, and I was going to think,

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if it came in that condition, it probably came for nothing, didn't it?

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Would you like to take a five pound note for it?

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-Let's go and have a look at it.

-Have a look at it. Shall I lead on?

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I'll show you exactly where I found it. This was the object.

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-This is the object.

-Yeah.

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But I stuck the top on the bottom and it looked really nice.

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-Nice when it's put together.

-I tried you at a fiver. What's the verdict?

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-I can meet you half way, sir.

-Could you? £7.50!

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Fancy getting something to the nearest 50p!

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I think that sounds very reasonable, sir. May we shake on that deal?

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It's not going to be your biggest sale of the day.

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Last of the big spenders, eh, Charlie?

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So, with that final purchase Charlie Ross has picked up four auction lots,

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and spent a measley £135.50 of his £2,447.96.

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He spent a modest £7.50 on the broken garden urn.

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He bought a biscuit tin in the style of Wedgwood for a whopping £3.

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An enamel and chrome compact from Glasgow's 1938 exhibition

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at a more pricey £40.

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And his most expensive buy was a witch doctor's mace for £85,

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which he hopes will cast a spell at auction.

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James Braxton, on the other hand, spend £160,

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more than half his wallet, on five auciton lots.

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He spent £25 on two die-cast cannons.

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£30 on a wonderful World War II spitfire ashtray.

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A pretty but chipped white onyx cigarette box.

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For £50. An unusual pestle and mortar for £35.

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And £25 on an auspicious Chinese paperweight that he hopes

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will bring him luck at auction.

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He needs it. So, what do they really think of each other's treasures?

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That compact - I didn't have Father Roscoe down as a compact man,

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and at £40, I think that's a guaranteed loss.

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A real chancy item is that Chinese plaque.

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That just could make him a few bob.

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It's been a spectacular trip from Cullen, via Dufftown and Clola,

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and the auction in Aberdeen is in sight.

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Aberdeen - what a lovely city.

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Scotland's third most populous city, Aberdeen was historically the centre

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for the fishing and shipbuilding industries.

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However, with the discovery of North Sea oil in the 1970s,

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the fishing fleet moved up the coast and the oil industry moved in.

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Aberdeen is now famous as being the oil capital of Europe.

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But it's auction day as our two experts cruise into town.

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It looks like a saloon. Are you sure it's not a pub?

0:20:280:20:32

John Milne Auction Room in Aberdeen was founded in 1867

0:20:320:20:36

and is one of the major auction rooms in the northeast of Scotland.

0:20:360:20:41

It's the moment of truth. Who will win and who will lose?

0:20:410:20:44

Let the auction begin.

0:20:440:20:47

First to go under the hammer is Charlie's garden urn.

0:20:470:20:50

Will it be an earner?

0:20:500:20:51

Stoneware garden urn at 30?

0:20:510:20:53

20?

0:20:530:20:55

£10?

0:20:550:20:57

-Oh.

-Garden urn at 10?

0:20:570:20:59

-Surely... Ten I'm bid.

-Oh, madam.

0:20:590:21:02

-Be still, my fluttering heart.

-15. 18.

0:21:020:21:05

£18. All done at £18?

0:21:050:21:09

-All finished at 18?

-BANGS GAVEL

0:21:090:21:12

-814.

-Splendid.

-Splendid. Very good.

0:21:120:21:15

I'm afraid it's not the £40 you thought,

0:21:150:21:18

so are you eating your hat now or later?

0:21:180:21:20

Brackers! I'm into a profit.

0:21:200:21:24

And after the not-so-expensive garden urn,

0:21:240:21:27

it's Charlie's not-so-expensive biscuit tin.

0:21:270:21:31

Ten I'm bid, I'm bid ten.

0:21:310:21:33

To be sold, one bid at £10.

0:21:330:21:37

12.

0:21:370:21:39

£12, beside me at 12.

0:21:390:21:41

All done at £12?

0:21:410:21:43

14. 16.

0:21:430:21:46

18. 20.

0:21:470:21:49

£20. Beside me at £20, all done at £20?

0:21:490:21:52

-Oh, 22, new bid. 24.

-LAUGHTER

0:21:520:21:55

£24 on my left at 24.

0:21:550:21:59

All finished at £24? All done this time? 24?

0:21:590:22:03

-BANGS GAVEL

-Your bid, sir. 865. Thank you.

0:22:030:22:06

Do you know what's most, most pleasurable about that?

0:22:060:22:08

-What? Tell me.

-I bought that in a shop

0:22:080:22:10

-that you had been into immediately before.

-Mm.

0:22:100:22:13

That's fighting talk, Charlie.

0:22:130:22:15

But will James' model cannons blow the bidders away?

0:22:150:22:18

-They would grace any home, wouldn't they?

-Oh, they're nice.

0:22:180:22:22

We have the pair of die-cast model cannons on black metal carriages.

0:22:220:22:27

-Uh...

-40 quid.

-Cannons,

0:22:270:22:30

£80? I'm bid 80.

0:22:300:22:33

We've got £80.

0:22:330:22:35

One bid of 80.

0:22:350:22:38

-Going to be sold at that one bid of £80.

-Brackers!

-Blimey.

0:22:380:22:41

All done at 80 for the decorative cannons? All done at £80?

0:22:410:22:45

-BANGS GAVEL

-That's a fantastic £60 profit, James. Well done.

0:22:450:22:50

Braxton is back.

0:22:500:22:53

-That two and a half grand is being whittled down.

-Yeah.

0:22:530:22:56

Let's hope your luck continues.

0:22:560:22:59

The pestle and mortar are about to go under the hammer.

0:22:590:23:01

-£40.

-40.

0:23:010:23:04

20?

0:23:040:23:06

£10? Ten I'm bid, I'm bid £10 for the mortar and pestle.

0:23:060:23:11

-That's too cheap. No.

-Too cheap.

0:23:110:23:14

18. 20.

0:23:140:23:18

22. £22, lady's bid at 22.

0:23:180:23:23

-25.

-Oh, getting there, getting there.

0:23:230:23:26

£25, lady's bid at £25. All done at £25?

0:23:260:23:30

-BANGS GAVEL

-Your bid.

0:23:300:23:33

Oh, dear. Slipped back a bit, there.

0:23:330:23:34

Oh, dear, James. that's a £10 loss. not what you needed.

0:23:340:23:39

Sorely tempted to bid for it.

0:23:400:23:44

Fingers crossed for James' model Spitfire.

0:23:450:23:47

£20.

0:23:470:23:49

CHARLIE MUTTERS INDISTINCTLY

0:23:490:23:51

£10? Ten I'm bid.

0:23:510:23:56

12. 15. 18.

0:23:560:23:59

20. 25. 30.

0:23:590:24:02

£30, far back, at 30.

0:24:020:24:05

-Getting your money back.

-All done at £30?

0:24:050:24:10

-BANGS GAVEL

-388.

0:24:100:24:11

-Money back...

-Yeah, money back.

-..but not with commission, of course.

0:24:110:24:15

Yup, sorry, James, but the auction house must take its earnings,

0:24:150:24:19

so a break-even is, in fact, a loss.

0:24:190:24:22

They've decided it IS a witch doctor's mace,

0:24:230:24:27

so let's see if it's something the people of Aberdeen are looking for.

0:24:270:24:30

£30 for the wooden mace?

0:24:300:24:32

-What?

-20?

-I've got 15 here, Colin.

0:24:320:24:34

15, I'm bid 15.

0:24:340:24:36

Thanks, Steven. One bid at £15.

0:24:360:24:38

One bid at 15, going to be sold at £15.

0:24:400:24:42

Oh, madam, you must need a witch doctor's mace.

0:24:420:24:45

All finished?

0:24:450:24:47

-18.

-Bidder over there, sir!

0:24:470:24:49

20.

0:24:490:24:51

£20, with Steven at 20.

0:24:510:24:53

All done at £20 for the mace, all done at 20?

0:24:530:24:57

-BANGS GAVEL

-825. Thank you.

0:24:570:25:00

-Robbed.

-Robbed. Desperately undersold

0:25:000:25:02

Ouch. Sorry, Charlie.

0:25:020:25:05

Witch-doctoring just isn't big in Aberdeen.

0:25:050:25:08

That's really made quite a hole in my two and a half grand.

0:25:080:25:11

Hopefully, James with have more luck with his Chinese paperweight.

0:25:120:25:17

Start me at £60?

0:25:170:25:19

40?

0:25:200:25:21

£30?

0:25:230:25:25

20?

0:25:250:25:26

Oh, dear. This isn't looking good.

0:25:260:25:29

Five? Five I'm bid.

0:25:300:25:33

Six. Eight. £8, in the second row at £8.

0:25:330:25:37

All done at eight?

0:25:370:25:39

10, 12, 15, 18.

0:25:390:25:43

-Now we're going.

-£18, seated at £18.

0:25:430:25:46

All done? 20. £20.

0:25:460:25:49

-You'll get 100 yet, Brackers.

-It's a good item.

0:25:490:25:52

All done at £20? All done at 20?

0:25:520:25:55

-BANGS GAVEL

-There. My gut feelings were wrong, there, weren't they?

0:25:550:25:58

-Brackers, that was terribly bad luck.

-It was bad luck.

0:25:580:26:02

I wouldn't be too smug, Charlie. Your final lot's up next.

0:26:020:26:06

It's your chrome compact.

0:26:060:26:09

20? I'm bid 20.

0:26:090:26:11

Here, bid 20, straight in.

0:26:110:26:13

-£30 beside me.

-Come on.

0:26:130:26:17

To be sold at £30. All done at 30?

0:26:170:26:21

-35.

-Well done, madam.

-40. £40 on my left.

0:26:210:26:25

At £40. All finished at £40? All done at 40?

0:26:250:26:29

-BANGS GAVEL

-Lost opportunity there, I'd say.

0:26:290:26:32

Mm.

0:26:320:26:33

-So what's that bring you up to, then?

-I've made a small loss.

0:26:330:26:37

I'm surprised at that.

0:26:370:26:38

Here we go.

0:26:410:26:42

Now it's James' last stab at a big profit.

0:26:420:26:46

All we need are two onyx-loving fishermen

0:26:460:26:49

to battle over his box and he'll be in with a fighting chance.

0:26:490:26:53

Oh. It's quality.

0:26:530:26:55

£60. Bid 60, I'm bid 60.

0:26:550:27:00

Giving me 65. 70. Five. 80.

0:27:000:27:05

-Five. 90. £90, on my right, at £90.

-Oh, go on.

0:27:050:27:10

-£95.

-CHARLIE SIGHS

0:27:100:27:13

A gentleman's bid at £95. All done at 95?

0:27:130:27:17

-BANGS GAVEL Well done, James.

-I know. Thank you.

0:27:170:27:20

Brilliant. Absolutely brilliant.

0:27:200:27:23

Great profit, James,

0:27:230:27:25

and I think it's fair to say, a well-deserved victory.

0:27:250:27:28

Summing it up, you are as good as I am bad.

0:27:280:27:32

So modest. James started with £256.06,

0:27:350:27:40

and after paying auction costs, made a profit of £45.

0:27:400:27:45

He's making slow and steady progress and has £301.06 to carry forward.

0:27:450:27:51

Charlie, meanwhile, started with a ridiculous £2,447.96

0:27:510:27:57

and made a disappointing loss of £51.86.

0:27:570:28:01

Despite his defeat,

0:28:010:28:03

he still has a huge £2,396.10. The question is, will he mend his miserly ways

0:28:030:28:09

and actually spend it?

0:28:090:28:11

-Congratulations.

-Thank you, thank you. Steady work.

0:28:110:28:14

You've got a little catching up to do, but...

0:28:140:28:17

By your calculations, when might I slip into the lead?

0:28:170:28:21

I think you'll be in the lead in January 2085.

0:28:210:28:26

The boys are now heading to Tarland,

0:28:260:28:30

before our second auction showdown in Hamilton.

0:28:300:28:35

In the 18th century, Tarland was an important trading centre.

0:28:350:28:39

It had a weekly market and six fairs throughout the year.

0:28:390:28:43

Tarland may be small, but it's home to our experts' first shop of the day.

0:28:430:28:47

What a lovely view! Well driven.

0:28:490:28:52

Another chapter, another day.

0:28:540:28:57

I've got so much money, I don't know what to do with it, but I want to spend it.

0:28:570:29:02

-Remind me, what's the figure, Charlie?

-Approximately 2,400.

0:29:020:29:06

-Plays £300.

-Yeah.

0:29:060:29:08

-Shall we go and see what they've got?

-Yeah, come on. Let's go.

0:29:080:29:11

Tarland Tower Antiques has been open for 18 years

0:29:110:29:15

and is run by owner George.

0:29:150:29:17

It has a large warehouse and four smaller rooms

0:29:170:29:20

stocked full of beautiful furniture and interiors.

0:29:200:29:23

Time for our boys to divide and conquer.

0:29:230:29:26

Oh, look at that bed!

0:29:260:29:28

-You've got the money for that bed.

-Isn't this fabulous?

0:29:280:29:32

Determined to spend his dosh, Charlie gets tactical.

0:29:320:29:36

I'm phoning the auction room, just to find out what they're good at.

0:29:360:29:41

What they sell really well. Oh, hello, is that the auction rooms?

0:29:410:29:44

It's Charlie Ross. I'm just putting a little call in,

0:29:440:29:47

do you have any specific areas which you're strong in, in the saleroom?

0:29:470:29:51

He's cheating.

0:29:510:29:54

Thanks a lot, OK. Bye-bye.

0:29:540:29:58

-Brackers, were you listening in on that?

-I was.

-You are such a sneaker.

0:29:580:30:02

Nothing gets past you, does it?

0:30:020:30:05

-Anyway, steer clear of big brown furniture.

-All right.

0:30:050:30:09

There's a shock. Small pieces of furniture, particularly good.

0:30:090:30:12

-And has he got a picture section, in his auction?

-I didn't ask him.

0:30:120:30:16

Look, we're wasting time. Brackers, I've given you all the information you're going to get.

0:30:160:30:21

With that, it's pretty clear that furniture is off the shopping list.

0:30:210:30:25

-What exactly are they?

-Are they not for sort of sake or something?

0:30:250:30:28

He's got a jolly... He looks a little bit like James.

0:30:280:30:32

Sake is a Japanese alcoholic drink made from rice.

0:30:320:30:36

The Japanese believe that in order to enjoy it to its fullest,

0:30:360:30:39

the sake cup you drink from should be as beautiful

0:30:390:30:41

or as interesting as possible.

0:30:410:30:44

This unique pair are priced at £45 each.

0:30:440:30:46

-Could you do 20 quid for the two?

-No.

-No?

0:30:480:30:50

-No, not for the two, but I think you should have a think about it.

-Yes.

0:30:500:30:55

They are a bit different and the kind of thing you might do well on.

0:30:550:30:58

Charlie, while you contemplate spending,

0:30:580:31:01

George has taken James to see an interesting 1950s print of Balmoral.

0:31:010:31:06

-I think it's an advertising poster that has been over varnished.

-Yeah.

0:31:060:31:10

-I bought it with a bunch of other stuff.

-It's lovely, really lovely.

0:31:100:31:14

Here is the artist, Kenneth Steel.

0:31:140:31:16

It's very much in the railway tradition of posters, isn't it?

0:31:160:31:19

Born in Sheffield in 1906, Kenneth Steel was a watercolour painter

0:31:190:31:24

and this is one of his prints from Royal Deeside.

0:31:240:31:26

-£25.

-£25, you've got a deal.

0:31:260:31:29

-I think you'll do OK with that.

-Thank you, thank you.

0:31:290:31:32

Well done, James, the first purchase of the day.

0:31:320:31:35

Unfortunately, Charlie doesn't have the same sense of urgency.

0:31:350:31:38

You wouldn't, would you?

0:31:380:31:39

Stop sitting on your wallet and get some money out.

0:31:390:31:42

After some tough love from James,

0:31:420:31:45

Charlie's gone back out in search of a bargain.

0:31:450:31:48

Oh, my God! Isn't that wonderful?

0:31:480:31:52

The shop IS wonderful.

0:31:520:31:54

This is a garage full of brown furniture.

0:31:540:31:57

Are the alarm bells not ringing, Charlie?

0:31:570:31:59

Hamilton is quite near Glasgow.

0:31:590:32:01

I've got an Arts and Crafts overmantle there. Cheap little lot.

0:32:010:32:05

-Is that very cheap?

-Yes.

-By Rennie Mackintosh?

0:32:050:32:07

I think it could be.

0:32:070:32:09

I think it's more likely to be Jimmy Mackintosh!

0:32:090:32:12

-£25, you can't go wrong.

-Is that all it is?

0:32:140:32:18

George, you're just beginning to come to my way of thinking.

0:32:180:32:23

What on earth is going on?

0:32:230:32:24

Now James has jumped on the garage bandwagon.

0:32:240:32:28

This is an antique assault course.

0:32:280:32:31

-Are you sure you boys are fit for this?

-That's a big picture frame.

0:32:310:32:34

There's two of them.

0:32:340:32:37

-£150.

-What, for the two of them?

-Yes.

0:32:370:32:40

-Is that good or bad?

-That's good.

-I think it's phenomenal.

0:32:400:32:43

Go on, George, they're mine.

0:32:430:32:44

Very risky buying something you can't properly see, James.

0:32:440:32:47

But if you're sure...

0:32:470:32:49

In the corner, is that a book case?

0:32:490:32:51

-Would it have had a marble top?

-Yeah, but I've got the marble top.

0:32:510:32:54

Over the top of that bed, you'll see the marble top.

0:32:540:32:58

Got it, got it.

0:32:580:33:00

-It's an open fronter, is it?

-Yes.

0:33:000:33:03

-These aren't gilt metal, are they?

-No, they're wooden.

0:33:030:33:06

-Will you take 100 quid for it?

-Yeah.

0:33:060:33:09

-I'll have it.

-Right.

0:33:090:33:11

I'd love to congratulate you on finally making a purchase,

0:33:110:33:15

but I think it's a bit of a risk.

0:33:150:33:17

Finally, back outside, and Charlie's on a roll.

0:33:180:33:21

He's spotted an Edwardian mahogany writing desk.

0:33:210:33:23

How much is that?

0:33:230:33:26

-I couldn't do it for less than 220.

-How much?

-220, that would be me.

0:33:260:33:30

Let's pull that out.

0:33:300:33:32

They did say, the saleroom, small pieces of furniture.

0:33:320:33:37

This is a little lady's writing table,

0:33:370:33:40

leather top and it's got a little compartment here.

0:33:400:33:42

It has two drawers. One and a half?

0:33:420:33:46

I wouldn't move, that's a bargain at 220.

0:33:460:33:49

Could you do 200?

0:33:490:33:50

I could restore this piece, as you know, and I'd sell it no problem.

0:33:500:33:55

So I'm going to stick...

0:33:550:33:56

Go on, shake on it, I think that's very fair.

0:33:560:33:59

I was being a bit of an old cheapskate there.

0:33:590:34:02

-I think it's worth every penny.

-It is, it's worth it.

0:34:020:34:05

And now he's started spending, he just can't stop.

0:34:050:34:08

There was an overmantle in the top shed there, got a hint of Mackintosh.

0:34:080:34:12

-It does.

-A very small hint of Mackintosh.

-And it's the right money.

0:34:120:34:17

-What was it, I can't remember what you quoted me?

-£25.

0:34:170:34:20

You did. At 25 quid, even I won't argue with that.

0:34:200:34:24

With £2,076.10 still to spend, I should hope not.

0:34:240:34:29

What about those unique sake cups?

0:34:290:34:33

That is the thing you should be going out of here with.

0:34:330:34:36

-I'll do the two for 50 quid.

-50?!

-For the two.

0:34:360:34:40

It's the right time for that oriental stuff at the moment.

0:34:400:34:43

They're a bit different, huge characters, just like you.

0:34:430:34:45

You're an absolutely wonderful salesman.

0:34:450:34:48

I think the two of them, the two of you...

0:34:480:34:50

-I'll tell you what, George, let's shake on that.

-Sure.

-Four things.

0:34:500:34:53

-Yes.

-It's been an absolute dream here, it's been fantastic.

0:34:530:34:57

But the excitement's not over yet.

0:34:570:35:00

Charlie is heading 32 miles east, to Blairs,

0:35:000:35:03

where he has a prior engagement.

0:35:030:35:06

St Mary's College was founded in 1829,

0:35:090:35:12

when John Menzies of Pitfodels,

0:35:120:35:14

the last member of an old Aberdeen Catholic family,

0:35:140:35:17

donated his mansion and estate of 1,000 acres to the Catholic church.

0:35:170:35:23

Today, it's known as Blairs Museum

0:35:230:35:25

and it gives a unique insight into

0:35:250:35:27

Scotland's Catholic history and heritage.

0:35:270:35:30

Showing him round is former pupil, teacher and now museum manager Ian.

0:35:300:35:35

Well, Blairs is basically what used to be our junior seminary.

0:35:350:35:39

So basically, a boarding school for boys of secondary school age

0:35:390:35:42

who were thinking about becoming a Catholic priest.

0:35:420:35:45

-Right.

-I was one of them a long time ago, back in the 1960s.

0:35:450:35:48

And that's where your thoughts were at that time?

0:35:480:35:51

At that time, yes, but I've now been married for 33 years...

0:35:510:35:53

So you obviously took a different course.

0:35:530:35:56

It changed. After that, I was actually here

0:35:560:35:58

and my wife taught here as well,

0:35:580:36:01

for the last nine years before the college closed 25 years ago now.

0:36:010:36:04

From its establishment, Blairs College was recognised

0:36:050:36:08

as a safe place to receive and preserve artefacts

0:36:080:36:12

relating to Scotland's Catholic heritage.

0:36:120:36:15

Their collection of paintings spans more than four centuries,

0:36:150:36:18

featuring some of Scotland's most renowned historical figures.

0:36:180:36:21

Today, Charlie has come to see the highlight of the collection,

0:36:210:36:25

a full-length memorial portrait of Mary Queen Of Scots.

0:36:250:36:29

Mary had been imprisoned in England for something like 19 years.

0:36:290:36:33

-It was basically house arrest in various castles.

-Yes.

0:36:330:36:36

With no direct heir, Mary was the closest successor to the English throne.

0:36:360:36:41

Perceived as a threat, Elizabeth had her arrested,

0:36:410:36:44

and after 19 years, she was tried and executed for treason,

0:36:440:36:47

a decision that has caused much speculation.

0:36:470:36:51

-Some pressure on Elizabeth to have her executed.

-Yes.

0:36:510:36:54

-Is it true that she didn't want to have her executed?

-Yes.

0:36:540:36:59

We actually have a copy of the death warrant over here,

0:36:590:37:03

You can see Elizabeth's signature there on the top right hand corner.

0:37:030:37:06

Some people believe that she was given it in a pile of papers

0:37:060:37:10

and signed it, not realising what she had signed.

0:37:100:37:13

Other people believe that she meant to sign it,

0:37:130:37:15

but she didn't mean it to be carried out immediately.

0:37:150:37:18

But then her ministers do exactly that.

0:37:180:37:20

Within days, Mary is executed and they come back and tell her

0:37:200:37:23

that it's been carried out. Supposedly, Elizabeth was furious

0:37:230:37:27

-and, at the same time, in floods of tears.

-Yes.

0:37:270:37:31

Almost her last act, it's very, very symbolic, because

0:37:310:37:35

she is wearing this scarlet underclothing,

0:37:350:37:38

and that colour is the same colour of vestments a priest would wear

0:37:380:37:42

on the feast day of a martyr.

0:37:420:37:44

So Mary, almost in her last act, is saying, I'm being executed

0:37:440:37:48

because of my faith and not because I'm a traitor against Elizabeth.

0:37:480:37:51

-Strong statement, isn't it?

-That's right.

0:37:510:37:55

After that religious reflection, Charlie and James are back on the road and on the hunt for antiques.

0:37:550:38:00

Have we creeped over to the west coast now?

0:38:000:38:03

We can't have got quite to the west coast.

0:38:030:38:06

No, sorry, we've crept down the coast, there we are.

0:38:060:38:08

They're leaving Tarland behind and travelling 40 miles south

0:38:080:38:14

to Montrose, where James hopes to bag himself a bargain.

0:38:140:38:18

-Montrose, have you ever been to Montrose before?

-I haven't.

0:38:180:38:22

Montrose is the northernmost coastal town in Angus and, in 1777,

0:38:230:38:28

was the birthplace of doctor

0:38:280:38:30

and Radical MP Joseph Hume.

0:38:300:38:33

For 30 years, he was a leader of the Radical Party

0:38:330:38:36

and became the self-appointed

0:38:360:38:37

guardian of the public purse.

0:38:370:38:39

-Smoothly done, Brackers.

-Slippery smooth.

0:38:400:38:43

-I don't even need to get out here, I can just shuffle across.

-Can you?

0:38:430:38:46

-Good luck, old chum.

-Thank you.

-Spend, spend, spend.

0:38:460:38:50

George Eaton Antiques is James Braxton's first port of call.

0:38:520:38:55

Morning.

0:38:550:38:57

-Hi.

-James.

-George. Nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you, George.

0:38:570:39:01

This is my sort of shop. It's a foraging shop.

0:39:010:39:04

This is lovely, a domino set,

0:39:040:39:06

and it's made with bone.

0:39:060:39:09

Bone faces, with ebony backing.

0:39:090:39:11

Here's a more interesting set.

0:39:110:39:13

They're up to nine,

0:39:130:39:15

-which is rarer. Usually, they're only up to six.

-Oh, I see.

0:39:150:39:19

-It's a set and a half.

-That's very good.

0:39:190:39:21

So you've got another three numbers to conjure with, haven't you?

0:39:210:39:24

Generally, the most commonly used dominoes sets are double six

0:39:240:39:30

and double nine, although double 12, 15 and 18

0:39:300:39:34

are popular for games involving several players.

0:39:340:39:36

-How much are these then, George?

-Erm, 25.

0:39:360:39:40

Really? That's a lovely lot.

0:39:400:39:44

OK, what other curios have you got for me, George?

0:39:440:39:48

-Is that a sort of Continental piece, that?

-It's WMF.

0:39:480:39:51

-Oh, it is WMF?

-Yes.

-And how much have you got on that, George?

0:39:510:39:55

That had 150 on it, but as with everything...

0:39:550:40:01

Everything is negotiable in life, isn't it?

0:40:010:40:03

It looks as though it has the most beautiful polished glass liner.

0:40:030:40:07

Isn't that a lovely piece of glass?

0:40:070:40:10

Grr!

0:40:100:40:11

Wurttembergische Metallwarenfabrik, or WMF,

0:40:110:40:17

is a German Art Nouveau producer specialising in metalwork

0:40:170:40:20

from the late 19th and into the 20th century.

0:40:200:40:23

A lovely stylised border, sort of beech, almost like a beech leaf.

0:40:230:40:28

I suppose it's a stylised vine leaf or something.

0:40:280:40:32

-Vine, it's got grapes on it.

-Grapes, hasn't it?

0:40:320:40:35

Give grapes to somebody in hospital, that would restore their spirit,

0:40:350:40:38

wouldn't it?

0:40:380:40:40

Lovely, beautifully modelled. That's a lovely item.

0:40:400:40:44

Yes, you are modelling it rather beautifully.

0:40:440:40:47

And while James continues his search for lovely items,

0:40:470:40:50

Charlie is heading

0:40:500:40:52

15 miles inland to Letham.

0:40:520:40:54

The largest village in Angus, Letham is famous for its Victorian market,

0:40:540:40:59

which takes place in early July.

0:40:590:41:01

I'm absolutely chipper!

0:41:020:41:05

I phoned up the man in the antiques saleroom where we're going to.

0:41:050:41:10

He said, don't buy furniture, it doesn't sell very well.

0:41:100:41:13

So I ripped straight into buying three pieces of furniture.

0:41:130:41:17

Never listen to the experts, that's what Winston Churchill said.

0:41:170:41:21

Never listen to the experts.

0:41:210:41:24

Time will tell, Charlie.

0:41:240:41:26

Let's see what gems you can uncover in Lovejoy Antiques.

0:41:260:41:29

-It sounds promising.

-Is it Barbara?

-Yes, it is.

-I'm Charlie.

0:41:290:41:33

Housed in a converted stable,

0:41:330:41:35

Barbara and her husband have been in the business for over six years.

0:41:350:41:40

Barbara, there's an extremely jolly person down here,

0:41:400:41:43

-looking at me...

-Yes.

0:41:430:41:46

..who looks like a Chinese bronze...

0:41:460:41:48

-It IS bronze!

-Yes.

0:41:480:41:50

Look at that, pretty miserable,

0:41:520:41:54

laughing, and...

0:41:540:41:58

I think that's James Braxton.

0:41:580:41:59

-Quite jolly.

-Yeah. How much is this object?

0:41:590:42:03

-Hundreds and hundreds of pounds?

-No, no, just 100.

0:42:030:42:06

Would £50 buy him?

0:42:060:42:09

No, 70 might.

0:42:090:42:12

-You've got me tempted here.

-Yes.

-I think he's absolutely splendid.

0:42:120:42:16

I wish I knew more about these things.

0:42:160:42:18

These faces must be the four faces of man, or whatever,

0:42:180:42:23

but I don't know quite what they signify.

0:42:230:42:26

Actually, the four faces of a Chinese Buddha represent

0:42:260:42:31

pleasure, anger, sorrow and joy.

0:42:310:42:35

It's believed that a Chinese Buddha will both protect and bring good luck.

0:42:350:42:40

-50 won't buy him?

-No. 70.

0:42:400:42:43

-70 will.

-Mm-hm.

0:42:430:42:46

-Sold.

-Well done.

0:42:460:42:48

Sold. I knew I'd find something in the end.

0:42:480:42:51

I think that's a cracker. Look at that.

0:42:510:42:53

-The four faces of James Braxton.

-Oh, Charlie!

0:42:530:42:58

Meanwhile, James has been drawn to

0:42:580:43:00

art deco...and red trousers.

0:43:000:43:02

Where do they come from? Do you remember the building?

0:43:020:43:05

They were from Montrose picture house.

0:43:050:43:06

A great '30s feel to those flowers, isn't it?

0:43:060:43:09

Very art deco. I really like those.

0:43:090:43:12

-How much have you got on those?

-£30.

-£30, and you get the two for 30?

0:43:120:43:16

-Yes, it's a sash window.

-Sash window.

0:43:160:43:19

-Operated, one above the other.

-One in front of the other. I see.

0:43:190:43:23

In a frame and they slide down.

0:43:230:43:24

They look good together, don't they?

0:43:240:43:26

I like those.

0:43:260:43:28

-George, I'm going to have those.

-OK.

0:43:280:43:30

Very nice, James! And feeling confident,

0:43:300:43:33

he strides on to haggle on the dominoes, priced at £25,

0:43:330:43:37

and the WMF grape dish at £150.

0:43:370:43:41

Is there any chance, George, I could do those two for £95?

0:43:410:43:45

It's a struggle.

0:43:450:43:48

-If that's all you've got.

-It's all I've got, bar the pence.

0:43:480:43:52

George, thank you very much indeed.

0:43:520:43:54

Well done, James, that's an amazing £80 saving.

0:43:540:43:56

And after spending £95, you've got £1.06 to your name.

0:43:560:44:02

I'd like you to have the £1.06 as a bit of luck money.

0:44:020:44:05

-Thank you very much. It's been a pleasure.

-It's been really great fun.

0:44:050:44:08

While James donates his last pennies,

0:44:080:44:11

Charlie's making his way to Barry.

0:44:110:44:14

A small village in Angus, Barry lies at the mouth of the River Tay.

0:44:140:44:17

It's Charlie's last chance to flash his cash

0:44:170:44:22

and Anderson High Antiques is his final shop of the day.

0:44:220:44:25

Open for two years, it's located in part of a 19th-century school.

0:44:250:44:29

Owner Kate and husband Ed have been in the business for 15 years.

0:44:290:44:35

After browsing,

0:44:350:44:37

Ed shows Charlie a set of six Royal Doulton coffee cups,

0:44:370:44:40

handpainted by May Wilson and priced at £48.

0:44:400:44:44

MW? Who is...?

0:44:440:44:46

MW is May Wilson, who is one of the ladies that

0:44:460:44:49

we collectively refer to as the "Scottish lady artists",

0:44:490:44:54

who bought the pottery blanks.

0:44:540:44:57

They were all artists, mostly associated with

0:44:570:45:00

either the Glasgow School of Art or the Edinburgh School of Art.

0:45:000:45:02

-How interesting.

-They painted these beautiful...

0:45:020:45:06

That's interesting.

0:45:060:45:09

I think they bought the glazed object, by the looks of things.

0:45:090:45:13

-Painted over the glazing?

-Precisely.

-Why are they so cheap? He said, shooting himself in the foot!

0:45:130:45:18

There is one cup which has had a repair on it.

0:45:180:45:21

Here it is, here. The little handle has been glued.

0:45:210:45:26

It could be better repaired.

0:45:260:45:28

-I actually find them really charming.

-They are nice, aren't they?

0:45:280:45:31

The thing is, in the central belt of Scotland,

0:45:310:45:33

people who collect these things will know who that is.

0:45:330:45:38

-Fantastic.

-Might be quite an interesting one.

-Sold.

-Excellent.

0:45:380:45:41

I said sold without even talking about the price.

0:45:420:45:46

I'm happy to do for you what we would do for the trade, basically,

0:45:460:45:50

which might be to make it, say, £43.

0:45:500:45:53

-£43.

-Is that all right?

-I think I've probably got £43 for it.

0:45:530:45:57

Lovely final buy, Charlie. So, shopping finished,

0:45:570:46:00

James has spent his entire £301.06 on five lots.

0:46:000:46:04

£25 on the heavily varnished Balmoral print.

0:46:040:46:08

£15 on the rare, ebony-backed domino set.

0:46:080:46:12

Two arts and crafts style stained glass windows for £30.

0:46:120:46:17

An Art Nouveau WMF bowl for £80, and £150 on two large gilt frames.

0:46:170:46:23

Charlie's combined the four-faced Buddha, bought for £70,

0:46:230:46:27

with the £50 sake cups.

0:46:270:46:29

He spent £43 on the May Wilson porcelain set,

0:46:290:46:32

£25 on the over mantle mirror,

0:46:320:46:35

£100 on the bookcase, and splashed out £220 on the lady's writing desk.

0:46:350:46:42

But what do they think of each other's purchases?

0:46:420:46:45

I think he's let himself down a bit with the sake cups.

0:46:450:46:50

One of them's chipped, £50.

0:46:500:46:52

I think Father Roscoe may struggle to get out of that one,

0:46:520:46:56

but knowing his luck, he might get away with it.

0:46:560:46:59

His best buy - undoubtedly the large frames.

0:46:590:47:01

They are great, I think they'll double his money.

0:47:010:47:05

Our experts have been on a voyage of discovery

0:47:050:47:07

from Tarland to Montrose,

0:47:070:47:09

Letham to Barry,

0:47:090:47:10

finally crossing to the west

0:47:100:47:12

and arriving in Hamilton.

0:47:120:47:14

Hamilton is a town in South Lanarkshire,

0:47:140:47:17

in the west central lowlands of Scotland,

0:47:170:47:20

and it's home to Hamilton auction market,

0:47:200:47:23

one of the biggest auctioneers in Lanarkshire.

0:47:230:47:26

Do you think, when you see your frames, they'll only be three-sided,

0:47:260:47:30

that they will have rotted away?

0:47:300:47:33

I don't know how long my bookcase is, because I could only see one end.

0:47:330:47:37

You both certainly took a gamble with your rather large purchases,

0:47:370:47:41

but it's auction day and we'll soon find out if it's paid off.

0:47:410:47:44

LS Smellie & Sons Ltd were established in 1874

0:47:440:47:50

and are a sixth-generation family-run business.

0:47:500:47:53

Oh, look! In all their splendour.

0:47:540:47:57

Fabulous. And yours.

0:47:570:48:00

-Oh, good Lord, so it is!

-What a fine piece, what a fine piece.

0:48:000:48:04

-A decorator's piece, isn't it?

-Very much so.

0:48:040:48:08

-Will they appreciate it up here?

-Of course they will.

0:48:080:48:10

-Shall we find our other things?

-Yes, come on.

0:48:100:48:13

The boys have left the back room for the auction room, and a nail-biting finale.

0:48:130:48:16

-First under the hammer is Charlie's bookcase.

-What's it worth, £100?

0:48:160:48:20

100, for it now. 100. To get it off, 50... 30 then, for it now.

0:48:200:48:25

Oh, dear, this isn't looking good.

0:48:250:48:29

30 bid, surely one more? 30 bid.

0:48:290:48:33

30, five, 35, and 40.

0:48:330:48:36

45. Come on, sir.

0:48:360:48:38

45 and 50, 50 bid, 55, and 60 now.

0:48:380:48:43

At 60. At 60 bid.

0:48:430:48:46

60 bid, it's too cheap.

0:48:460:48:49

-At 60 bid, five, 65...

-Keep going!

0:48:490:48:52

70 bid, 70 bid,

0:48:520:48:55

-70 bid, 70 bid.

-One more.

-70 bid...

0:48:550:48:58

All done at £70.

0:48:580:49:00

Roscoe. You only fell a little.

0:49:020:49:05

Never listen to the experts, eh?

0:49:050:49:07

Oh, Brackers!

0:49:070:49:10

James, next in the spotlight are your rather large frames.

0:49:120:49:16

£100, 100 for them,

0:49:160:49:18

for the pair, 100, £50.

0:49:180:49:21

Straight in.

0:49:210:49:23

50 I'm bid, a 50 bid...

0:49:230:49:27

There must be some opposition.

0:49:270:49:30

At 55, 60, and five, 65, and 70...

0:49:300:49:33

70 bid, 70 bid.

0:49:330:49:36

Come on!

0:49:360:49:39

-70 bid...

-A bit more.

0:49:390:49:41

All done at £70.

0:49:410:49:44

-A steal, Brackers, a steal.

-I thought I had the deal of the century.

0:49:440:49:49

Ouch, not what you were expecting, eh?

0:49:490:49:52

-Do you know what I am now thinking?

-What?

0:49:520:49:56

Thank God I let you buy them!

0:49:560:49:59

Next in the line of fire is Charlie's lady's writing desk.

0:49:590:50:03

150, 100 I'm bid, at 100 I'm bid...

0:50:030:50:07

110, at 110...

0:50:080:50:10

120, at 120, 130, at 140...

0:50:100:50:15

150, 160, 170, 180, 190, 200...

0:50:150:50:22

200 I'm bid, at 210.

0:50:220:50:25

210, at 210, I'm bid.

0:50:250:50:29

220 now, 230.

0:50:290:50:31

I'm sort of getting my money back.

0:50:310:50:34

-At 230...

-Come on!

-230...

0:50:340:50:38

-230... All done?

-Try one more.

-230.

0:50:380:50:42

-Well done, Roscoe.

-Well...

-Could have been a lot worse, couldn't it?

0:50:430:50:46

-Brave move, wasn't it?

-It could have been a picture frame.

0:50:460:50:49

Very lucky, Charlie.

0:50:490:50:51

Before commission, that's a small £10 profit.

0:50:510:50:54

Your turn, James. What will Hamilton make of your 1950s print?

0:50:540:50:58

30 for it now. 20, ten, £10, surely now?

0:50:580:51:02

-Ten I'm bid. Thank you, sir.

-Ten?

0:51:020:51:04

-Go on.

-There's a lady bidding now.

0:51:040:51:07

12, 14, at 14, 16...

0:51:070:51:10

At 16, 18. At 18, 20, at 22, five...

0:51:100:51:17

At 25 and eight, 30 now, 32, 32 I'm bid.

0:51:170:51:22

At 32, 32...

0:51:220:51:25

-Another bidder.

-Five now. 35 and eight.

0:51:250:51:28

Brackers, you're on fire now!

0:51:280:51:31

38, eight, 38...

0:51:310:51:34

-All done at £38?

-38.

0:51:340:51:36

I feel as though

0:51:390:51:40

I've almost painted it myself!

0:51:400:51:42

Well done, James, it might be small, but at least it's a profit.

0:51:420:51:47

-13 in the pot.

-Charlie, it's time for your overmantle mirror.

0:51:470:51:51

£50. 30 then, 30 I'm bid.

0:51:510:51:53

Your buyer.

0:51:530:51:55

30 bid and five, 40, five, 50...

0:51:550:52:00

At 50 bid, five, and 60, 60 bid.

0:52:000:52:03

Come on.

0:52:030:52:05

60 bid, 60...

0:52:050:52:08

Five now, at 65, at 70, at 70 bid.

0:52:080:52:11

At 70 bid...

0:52:110:52:16

All done at £70?

0:52:160:52:18

£45 is a great profit.

0:52:210:52:24

James, the pressure's on, can your sash window slash your losses?

0:52:250:52:29

£20 for them, ten then, £10.

0:52:290:52:32

Your man's at it again.

0:52:320:52:34

Ten I'm bid, ten...

0:52:340:52:37

12 now, 14, 16, 18, 20...

0:52:370:52:42

And two, and five, and eight. At 28.

0:52:420:52:47

-Go on.

-28 I'm bid. 28 I'm bid...

0:52:470:52:50

At £28, at 28, 28...

0:52:500:52:55

All done? At £28. 30 now, just in time.

0:52:550:52:58

-Oh, 30.

-30.

-30 bid, two now.

0:52:580:53:02

At 32, 35, 38, at 38.

0:53:020:53:07

At 38, 38 I'm bid...

0:53:070:53:09

Well done, my man.

0:53:090:53:11

Brackers, you're working them from behind.

0:53:110:53:14

All done at £38...

0:53:140:53:16

-Well done, the auctioneer.

-You've slipped out of that one.

0:53:160:53:19

I did slip out of that one.

0:53:190:53:22

I'm afraid, after commission, that's not a whole lot.

0:53:220:53:25

Next on show is Charlie's set of

0:53:260:53:28

Royal Doulton coffee cups.

0:53:280:53:30

£30, 30 for them now.

0:53:300:53:33

20, ten. A bid at ten. Ten I'm bid...

0:53:330:53:39

12, 14,

0:53:390:53:42

16, 18, 20,

0:53:420:53:44

two, five, at 25,

0:53:440:53:48

eight, at 28, and 30. 30 bid...

0:53:480:53:54

-Fresh bidder, two, 32 and five, at 35, and eight, at 38, and 40.

-Ooh.

0:53:540:54:01

At 40 now. 40 bid...

0:54:010:54:03

Nearly getting my money back now.

0:54:030:54:05

-Two, at 42, at five.

-Come on!

0:54:050:54:09

-At 48 and 50, now.

-Yes, that's the way.

0:54:090:54:12

50 bid...

0:54:120:54:15

All done at £50...

0:54:150:54:17

Thank you, sir.

0:54:170:54:19

-Well, got me out of trouble.

-£50, well done.

0:54:190:54:22

Another close call, Charlie, but still a profit.

0:54:230:54:27

Next to face the music

0:54:270:54:28

are James's dominoes.

0:54:280:54:30

-Lovely lot.

-Unusual set.

0:54:300:54:32

-20, £20 for them.

-You're in at 20, you're in at a profit.

0:54:320:54:36

At £20 I'm bid. At 20, bid, two now.

0:54:360:54:39

At 22, and five, 25 and eight,

0:54:390:54:42

at 28, at 30 bid, at two,

0:54:420:54:45

32, at five, 35 I'm bid.

0:54:450:54:48

-At 35...

-A result.

0:54:480:54:53

Eight now, at 38, at 40, 40 bid...

0:54:530:54:58

Brackers, this is stellar galactic.

0:54:580:55:01

40 bid, all done at £40...

0:55:010:55:05

Well done, mate. You're a canny man, Braxton!

0:55:050:55:08

-Canny man.

-What a relief, James, you're back in the game.

0:55:080:55:12

Time for Charlie's combined lot -

0:55:120:55:15

his bronze Buddha and a pair of sake cups.

0:55:150:55:19

£80 surely? £50, no less. 50 bid.

0:55:190:55:21

Hang on, look.

0:55:210:55:24

At 60, and five, and 70, and five.

0:55:240:55:28

You see, I told you that lady would be up for it.

0:55:280:55:30

100, at 110, at 110, 120, 120,

0:55:300:55:36

130, at 140, at 140 bid.

0:55:360:55:39

At 140, 140. At 150 now, fresh bidder.

0:55:390:55:44

-I'm into a profit.

-160.

0:55:440:55:45

I'm into a profit!

0:55:450:55:46

At 170, 180, at 190.

0:55:460:55:50

-You're a money machine.

-220, at 220,

0:55:500:55:53

240, at 240...

0:55:530:55:56

Try one more.

0:55:560:55:58

240 I'm bid. At 240...

0:55:580:56:01

-Five, at 245.

-245.

0:56:010:56:05

All done at £245...

0:56:050:56:09

Well done, Roscoe, what's that?

0:56:110:56:14

That is an amazing price.

0:56:140:56:17

Fantastic result, Charlie,

0:56:170:56:19

your Buddha certainly brought you

0:56:190:56:21

luck and prosperity.

0:56:210:56:22

That is very good. Well done, well done.

0:56:220:56:26

Thanks, Brackers.

0:56:260:56:28

It will take a lot,

0:56:280:56:29

but can James's WMF grape dish turn it in his favour?

0:56:290:56:32

30 for it now. £30, 30 I'm bid.

0:56:320:56:36

30 bid, five, at 35, at 40,

0:56:360:56:39

and five, 50, bid of 50.

0:56:390:56:43

-Go on.

-50 bid.

-Come on, come on.

0:56:430:56:47

-Five, 55.

-55, get in there.

0:56:470:56:49

At 55, at 60.

0:56:490:56:52

-Well done.

-At 60 bid, five, and 70.

0:56:520:56:57

-70 bid.

-He's working on it.

0:56:570:56:59

-Well done.

-Working on it.

-80, and five, 90.

0:56:590:57:03

-Well done.

-100...

0:57:030:57:07

100, 100, 100...

0:57:070:57:11

All done at £100...

0:57:110:57:13

I tell you what, I thought it was dying at 50.

0:57:160:57:19

-You came with a late burst.

-I thought it was dying at 30.

0:57:190:57:22

That was a good profit to end on, James,

0:57:220:57:25

but I'm afraid it just wasn't enough for auction victory.

0:57:250:57:29

To drop 80...

0:57:290:57:32

The one thing... And if you'd said,

0:57:320:57:35

"No, after you, Father Roscoe, you have the frames,"

0:57:350:57:38

I would have lost the money and you'd have been all right.

0:57:380:57:41

-You're a canny fella! Aye, canny fella.

-Pure luck.

0:57:410:57:46

-Come on, let's go for a curry.

-Good idea!

0:57:460:57:49

James started the trip in Tarland with £301.06

0:57:490:57:54

and, after paying auction costs, made a disappointing loss of £66.54.

0:57:540:58:02

He's now got £234.52 in his wallet.

0:58:020:58:06

Charlie, on the other hand, started today's leg with £2,396.10.

0:58:060:58:11

He spent wisely and made a small profit of £37.30 at auction,

0:58:110:58:17

meaning he has a sizable £2,433.40 left to spend.

0:58:170:58:21

-Well done, Father Roscoe.

-I suppose I'm driving?

0:58:210:58:25

You are. Winner takes all. It's rather like golf, you're teeing off.

0:58:250:58:30

I'm teeing off, yes.

0:58:300:58:32

-Well, another one down.

-Another one down. It was fun, wasn't it?

0:58:320:58:36

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:470:58:52

Charlie Ross and James Braxton continue their Scottish antiques trail in Buckie, ending up at auctions in Aberdeen and Hamilton.