Episode 8 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 8

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Anita Manning and James Lewis face an auction showdown in Cirencester in the Cotswolds.


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The nation's favourite antique experts,

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£200 each and one big challenge.

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Well, duck, do I buy you or don't I?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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Sold.

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The aim is trade up and hope that each antique turns a profit.

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But it's not as easy as it looks and dreams of glory can end in tatters.

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So will it be the fast lane to success or the slow road to bankruptcy?

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That's the sweat over.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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We're in a Beetle with Scotland's Anita Manning and England's James Lewis.

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The auction score line so far reads England - 4, Scotland - 0.

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ANITA LAUGHS

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So, on the final leg, will James make it a whitewash

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or could Anita stage a thrilling comeback?

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I'm never going to catch him. I'll have a blooming good try, though.

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Actually, Anita's done not too badly at all.

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She began with £200 and now has £496.72 to spend today.

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But James Lewis, who also began with £200,

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is miles out in front, with £855.72 in his pocket.

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-So, tell me, strategy?

-I'm not telling you.

-Charming(!)

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BOTH LAUGH

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This road trip started out in Pateley Bridge and head south,

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travelling via East Anglia to the Cotswolds

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heading for Cirencester.

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This last leg kicks off in Bedfordshire at Woburn

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and ending up at our final auction for our intrepid pair

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in - you guessed it - Cirencester.

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This is Woburn's old town hall, now full of antiques.

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And Anita has grabbed the dealer Elfyn for a first peek in those cabinets.

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In these little albums of photographs,

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the men are so solemn looking.

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-He's not too bad.

-Well...

-You wouldn't have turned him down.

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-No, I don't think he's my type.

-She's definitely not my type!

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ANITA LAUGHS

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-I quite like that.

-Yeah. We're asking £45 for that.

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What if I say 35?

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Cos I should say 40, but 35.

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What I would be looking to pay for that is nearer about 20.

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No chance. No chance.

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-Is there no chance?

-No chance.

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I will go to £30 for it, cos I'm feeling that you...

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Yeah, because I like it.

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I think, at £30, you should make a few quid out of it.

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There was another wee thing here which isn't very expensive.

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Anita is getting close.

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Now, what's James up to in Elfyn's cupboard?

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He said he'd bought some new bits and bobs. Oh, that's interesting.

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That looks Chinese.

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The massive market at the moment in silver is in China.

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Chinese silver is so rare that it is making way above scrap.

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Look at this little thing. Anita bought one of these earlier on.

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A little Georgian toothpick case.

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Open it up, there's a little mirror inside

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so you can see you haven't got spinach between your teeth,

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which, I have to say, is something I should probably use more often!

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But there is the original Georgian, little silver toothpick.

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And what would you have on the other end of a toothpick

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but an ear spatula?

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So you would delve that all the way down in your ear

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and come out with a great big wodge of wax.

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And put it directly back in the box

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that you're going to pick your teeth with later on.

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I mean, really!

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The Georgians were also very fond of their ivory, but, remember,

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the trade in ivory has been strictly controlled

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by the CITES international agreement of 1947.

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That is actually copper or gold.

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If you've got something that you're thinking might be gold,

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or gold-plated, if you rub it...

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the copper starts to smell. So... Oh. That smells of copper.

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Unfortunately, it's not gold. It would have been nice.

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But, if in doubt, give it a rub.

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Let's leave him to it, shall we?

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Because Anita's deal seems to have progressed.

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Now there's a page turner involved.

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We've got 34 on the page turner.

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-Say, 50 for the two?

-50 for the two's not bad.

-It's not bad at all.

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They're nice things. You don't have to apologise for them.

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Yeah, that's right. And I like them. I'm really tempted.

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-I'm really tempted.

-Well, there we are.

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I'll go for them. I was trying to be modest.

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-Is there any further movement?

-I'm sorry.

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-Is there a tweak of a movement?

-I'm... No, I'm very sorry.

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-No, I'm going to be very hard. £50.

-You're not being very hard,

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you're being very generous, and it's a deal.

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BOTH: Thank you very much.

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Elfyn, go and see what James is rubbing up in your cupboard.

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-I see you found the bits and pieces I mentioned?

-Thank you.

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Obviously, Georgian, 18th-century, nice thing. How much could it be?

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Well, I really wanted £35 for it.

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You've got a little bit of gold on it, of course.

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Well, I think it's brass, or copper, rather. I gave it a good old...

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-If you rub... Just smell that, look.

-It is, actually, I know.

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-It is copper, isn't it?

-It's copper!

-I'll have to watch you!

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-I thought you might fall for it.

-How much is the napkin ring?

-Chinese one?

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-Yeah.

-£50.

-Is it? Is it that much?

-Yeah.

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It is Chinese, late 19th, early 20th century.

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-And you know what the market is for that sort of thing.

-Yeah.

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What could you do on it?

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-I'll let you have it for 40.

-40.

-But I'm not going any lower.

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Still a bit far for me.

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Something else? Is he bulk buying here?

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-You can have that for a tenner.

-A tenner.

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-The silver pencil cover is £10.

-What would that be?

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25, I would price that. You can have it for 20 if it helps you.

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-And the silver match case is £20.

-How much is the napkin ring?

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-It is a silver one.

-Yeah.

-A tenner.

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So we've got a cheap napkin ring, a silver pencil holder

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and a match case plus the Chinese napkin ring and the toothpick case.

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-Cor!

-It comes to £105, the parcel.

-All of that?

-Yeah.

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£100 if you take them all. I'll give you another fiver.

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-The cogs are whirring.

-I'm thinking...how about 90 the lot?

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-It's against my better judgement, but OK. Yeah.

-You've got a deal.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-That was quite something.

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Now, time to find Anita and whisk her off.

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Beetling from Woburn to nearby Buckingham,

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where Anita is heading directly to jail without picking up 200.

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-Let's hope they don't keep me in too long!

-JAMES LAUGHS

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Built in 1748 and later used as a police station, fire station

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and even an antique shop,

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the Old Gaol has, since the '90s, been a museum.

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Anita's here to see the exhibition

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dedicated to Flora Thompson, one of the area's finest chroniclers.

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Flora Thompson wrote about her life as a child growing up

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in the North Oxfordshire countryside in the late 1800s

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in Juniper Hill, which is about nine miles from here.

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-Could Juniper Hill be Lark Rise?

-Juniper Hill IS Lark Rise.

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Thompson's semi-autobiographical Lark Rise To Candleford trilogy,

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which brilliantly evokes a now-vanished rural life,

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wasn't written until the 1940s, which is amazing.

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In a way, it's a little bit of a miracle

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that a child from a grindingly poor background could aspire to be

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one of our country's most celebrated local writers.

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Young Flora became an assistant postmistress,

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and with the help of the local library,

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taught herself to be a writer.

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In 1910, she won an essay competition in The Ladies' Companion,

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and with the encouragement of her husband,

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soon began to earn a living with her stories, articles and poems.

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The fictional Candleford was partly based on Buckingham

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and also inspired by another local town,

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which is where James is heading now,

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travelling the short distance from Buckingham

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to the market town of Brackley in Northamptonshire.

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And in the Brackley Antique Cellar, James has found a cabinet

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full of goodies that he just can't take his eyes off.

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It's a really good object.

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It's silver-topped, nicely hallmarked.

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You have the WC, for William Comyns,

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which is absolutely fantastic.

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A bit of tortoiseshell in the top there, tortoiseshell pique,

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where the silver is inlaid into the tortoiseshell top.

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A lot of the time you see these called scent bottles, but they're not.

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They're for smelling salts.

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But the other thing to say, of course, is that,

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under the 1976 CITES legislation, trade in tortoiseshell,

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new tortoiseshell, is illegal, and rightly so.

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This, though, it's been well gone for over 100 years.

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-What could that be, do you think?

-I'll give him a call.

-Thank you.

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-Again, it needs to be...

-A lot less.

-Yeah.

-Mmm-hmm.

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This is a funny little object.

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It's made in just stamped tin, as cheap as you can find,

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but it's marked HRH Prince Albert's aromatizer.

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Isn't that great?

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There's a little sliding thing there that releases a hole,

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so I guess it's the equivalent of a 19th-century tic tac box

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and you would shake out a little mint to refresh your breath.

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All right, then, thank you, bye.

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He could do that for 55.

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55.

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-Do you think he'd take 45 for it?

-We can try him.

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-Would you give it a go for me, please?

-Sure.

-Thank you.

-OK.

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-If he would take 45, that would be... And just...

-Ask him what that is.

-Yeah.

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There doesn't seem to be any price with it. Thank you.

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£45 is fine for it.

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I mean, it's worth the 55, but, on a bad day, it might make 60.

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Right. 45.

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-OK.

-And he says you can have that.

-Really, with it in the deal?

-Yes.

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Phew, that's enough to make anyone come over all faint.

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A nice item at a good price, plus a free gift.

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Time for James to give Anita her get out of jail card, as our experts make their way to Woodstock.

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Not to be confused with the site of the 1969 rock festival,

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Oxfordshire's Woodstock - the name means "clearing in the woods",

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is an altogether different sort of place.

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Although King Ethelred the Unready did apparently

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once hold an assembly here,

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no mention ever of any hippies -

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or old rockers like Anita.

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-Copenhagen.

-Copenhagen.

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This is a sweet wee figure. I always like this porcelain.

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I love it because of the quality of the glaze,

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it's always highly glazed. The figures are wonderful.

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What I'd like to look for buying it is within

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a region of between £20, £25.

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You're not going to get it for £25.

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I'm not going to get it for 25?

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And I'm certainly not going to get it for 22?

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That's logical, Anita. You worked that one out pretty well.

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I know! I know! I've got to try. I've got to try.

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I can do 35 which is pretty good and I will, but that is it.

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-Don't come back and say 32.

-If you could bring that down to about 30.

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What did I say to you?

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35, Anita, honestly, believe me. You and I know that is all right.

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-If you are able to be persuaded...

-Anita, you are shameless.

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£32, that's it, all right? I said I wouldn't go to 32. 32.

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-Look at you!

-I'm tempted on it.

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-Could you come to 30?

-No.

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-32.

-Should I take it?

-Take a punt. You'll be all right.

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OK, I'll take your advice. You're a darling.

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You're beautiful. Thank you very much.

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Not done with Mike's shop just yet, Anita is taking a keen interest

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in some blue plates, and they're not Chinese.

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These are German so they're pre-1914.

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They're transfer printed and they don't have huge quality.

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It's the type of thing that, if you can get it for the right price,

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then it may do well in the saleroom.

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And we've got a pair. That's important.

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I love cabinets like this and I love little figures.

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I'm being immediately drawn to that sweet little clown.

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Isn't he a wee darling? He's a darling.

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Quite nicely moulded, good colour, good condition. Look at these toes.

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They are so vulnerable but they are in good condition.

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It's Rosenthal.

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-Good German make. Probably from about the 1930s.

-Watch out, Mike.

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Anita's coming back for more.

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-We've got three items here.

-Yup.

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These Victorian or Edwardian, no quality at all, churned out,

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-transfer printing.

-Absolutely.

-We have got a pair there.

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Let me see this wee guy.

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How's about... Will you sell me him for a tenner?

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HE LAUGHS

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There I was thinking, "I'm going to say yes to whatever you say, that's fair enough."

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A tenner for a Rosenthal clown?!

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Rosenthal isn't a big deal.

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And the other thing is, see these toes,

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they are in perfect condition now.

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If I buy these, I have to transport them to the auction.

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These are so vulnerable, and there are vulnerable in there

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-with all these people going in and out.

-I've heard it all now.

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So I've got to be responsible for your transporting them?!

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I'll chuck in a load of bubble wrap and do his toes up.

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You can have these two for a tenner.

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There is no damage on them, is there?

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No, no, no.

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-So you'll sell me them for a tenner?

-I will indeed.

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Will you give me the two of them for 20 quid?

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You're saying 20 and I'm saying... make it 25.

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Go on, do the both of them for 20.

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-20 quid.

-Go on. I can't be bothered.

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-It's only because it's my last buy.

-Yeah, yeah.

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Great stuff, Anita. Look, James is on his way,

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hoping to spend some of that pile of his.

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I'm looking for the town hall.

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Is this it?

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The town hall apparently has an antiques fair on.

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The great thing about antiques fairs is that many of the dealers

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don't have shops - so the stock arrives fresh to the market

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and longing for a buyer.

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Sometimes, with a bid.

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Could I see the mirror, please?

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This is a Rococo revival easel dressing table mirror.

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It's something I fell in love with because you don't see mirrors of that scale.

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What is it, 1900, 1910?

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1903, William Comyns.

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William Comyns? I've just bought a smelling salts bottle by William Comyns.

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-It's a good maker. What could that be?

-Well, I've got 695 on it.

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I'll be looking for 500.

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Gosh, £500.

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Is he about to take a huge gamble on the very last day?

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What would be your rock bottom on it?

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-425.

-It's got tiny bits of damage on the edge.

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I'd be worried if there wasn't to be honest.

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Very good point. It's 100 years old.

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400, rock bottom.

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Go on, you've got over £700, James.

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I'd be looking more around 320, something like that.

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Couldn't do it, James. Sorry.

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-No?

-No.

-340 any good?

-Sorry, I couldn't.

-Can you move a little bit?

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No, I've moved considerably on that.

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OK.

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I don't think were going to get there.

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-It's a shame because I like it.

-Yeah, so do I.

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It's a big lump.

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The best maker you're likely to find.

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Yeah, it is. There we go.

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-It's too much for me.

-You'll regret it.

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It's such a nice mirror.

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Hmm.

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I love it. I really do.

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Last offer, 380 quid.

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-Go on then.

-380 quid, you've got a deal.

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-Well done!

-What have I done?!

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Thank you very much. I'm going to have a swift gin and tonic.

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But before turning to drink,

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he has nipped into the shop that Anita almost emptied earlier.

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What's left, James?

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They are obviously silver. They're tortoiseshell. They're hallmarked 1913.

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They've got a price on them of £65. They could be yours for £30.

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£30.

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These little silver-mounted clothes brushes aren't going to make me

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a huge profit. They're not going to be anything that excites the auction room.

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I spent some whacking great money on that mirror

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and I think I need to play it a bit safe with the last purchase.

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For less than £30, they are worth buying.

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You said 30, would you do them at 20?

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Silver has just gone up and I've just checked.

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-I'll do 25.

-There's not a lot of silver on them.

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25 for tortoiseshell and silver. They're all right at that.

0:20:090:20:13

22 quid and you've got a deal.

0:20:130:20:15

-Go on. That's it.

-You've got a deal. Thank you very much. Well done, you.

0:20:150:20:19

And so, with their final purchases in the bag, let's remind ourselves what our experts have bought.

0:20:190:20:24

Anita began with £496.72, and she spent a total of £102 on five auction lots.

0:20:240:20:31

The German wall plates, the Rosenthal clown,

0:20:310:20:36

the photo album, the Copenhagen ornament, and the page turner.

0:20:360:20:41

James started out with £855.72, and he spent £537, also on five lots.

0:20:410:20:47

The William Comyns mirror, the bottle for smelling salts,

0:20:470:20:52

the mixed lot of silver and mint box

0:20:520:20:55

the toothpick and ear spoon, and the pair of clothes brushes.

0:20:550:20:58

But what do they think of each other's items?

0:20:580:21:01

Anita has done a classic Anita trick. She's been so careful.

0:21:010:21:05

There is no risk there whatsoever.

0:21:050:21:09

And she's bought some nice little buys.

0:21:090:21:11

It may show us that the show isn't over until the fat lady sings.

0:21:110:21:17

That sounds like a battle cry if ever I've heard one.

0:21:170:21:21

After starting out in Woburn,

0:21:230:21:25

this final leg of our trip will conclude in Cirencester.

0:21:250:21:29

Anita's hopes may be faint, but because James spent so much on that mirror,

0:21:290:21:34

right now she has more cash.

0:21:340:21:37

So, James whitewash or Anita comeback?

0:21:370:21:40

-Now, she's teeing off.

-Righty-ho.

0:21:400:21:43

BOTH: Here we go!

0:21:430:21:44

The German oval pottery wall plates there.

0:21:440:21:48

£30, £40... £20 to get on, got to be £20.

0:21:480:21:50

Come on, come on!

0:21:500:21:53

-A tenner. £10, got to be £10, surely.

-Oh...

0:21:530:21:56

Anybody £10? £10 I'm bid there, the lady, at £10. £12 if you like now.

0:21:560:22:01

At £12. £15. £18.

0:22:010:22:03

£20. At £20.

0:22:030:22:06

At £20, right in front of me then still, at £20. You all sure...?

0:22:060:22:11

All that adrenaline over 20 quid.

0:22:130:22:14

I know...

0:22:140:22:16

Well, she won't topple James like that, I can tell you.

0:22:170:22:20

-I was a wee bit worried when he started off.

-So was I!

0:22:200:22:23

Now, what will this little bottle do?

0:22:230:22:26

If it makes 80, I'm happy.

0:22:260:22:28

If it makes 120, I'm ecstatic.

0:22:280:22:31

I can start you here on the book at £40 only, at £40 I have here.

0:22:310:22:36

At £45, £50. £55, £60.

0:22:360:22:39

£65, £70. At £70 with me, £75 now.

0:22:390:22:43

£80. £85, £90.

0:22:430:22:45

-£95, £100 now.

-Go on.

0:22:450:22:48

At £95... £100, thank you.

0:22:480:22:50

-£110, sir.

-Go on...

0:22:500:22:52

£110...

0:22:520:22:53

Am I going to be ecstatic?

0:22:530:22:55

At £110. £120 to me now, sir.

0:22:550:22:58

£120. £130 if you like.

0:22:580:23:02

At £120. On my left... £130.

0:23:020:23:05

-That's a good result!

-At £130, £140 now.

0:23:050:23:08

-At £130...

-Go on!

0:23:080:23:11

-£130 it is.

-Ecstatic, James?

0:23:120:23:15

That's good. I'm pleased with that.

0:23:150:23:17

Yup, that's a great result. Putting him in the lead.

0:23:170:23:20

And next...is my favourite of yours.

0:23:200:23:25

The Rosenthal figure of a clown.

0:23:250:23:29

Ah, it's lovely.

0:23:290:23:30

And I can start you on the book here at £50 only.

0:23:300:23:33

£55, £60. £65, £70. £75, £80.

0:23:330:23:37

At £80 with me. £85, £90. £95, £100.

0:23:370:23:41

-At £100...

-At the back.

0:23:410:23:43

£105, £110. £120...

0:23:430:23:45

The book's out at £120 on my right now, £130.

0:23:450:23:48

At £130, you all sure now, then, at £130...?

0:23:480:23:52

Yes! Brilliant. Well done.

0:23:520:23:55

Now, that is a cracking result, isn't it?

0:23:550:23:58

Yes! Anita's back in the race.

0:23:580:24:01

Next lot is your mixed lot.

0:24:010:24:03

Yeah, that...

0:24:030:24:05

I don't know. I think...

0:24:050:24:07

-Boring, James!

-I know.

0:24:070:24:09

Where's your confidence, James?

0:24:110:24:12

It looks like a nice little collection to me.

0:24:120:24:15

At £50 I have here, at £55...

0:24:150:24:17

£55, £60.

0:24:170:24:19

£65, £70 with me.

0:24:190:24:20

At £70, £75 now. £75, £80.

0:24:200:24:22

£85, £90.

0:24:220:24:24

£95, £100.

0:24:240:24:26

£110.

0:24:260:24:28

At £110, £120 now.

0:24:280:24:30

Here on the book then at £110...

0:24:300:24:32

-£110.

-Knew it all along.

0:24:320:24:35

I'll eat my words!

0:24:350:24:37

James is narrowly in the lead.

0:24:370:24:40

I think you managed to squirm out of that one.

0:24:400:24:44

I'm good at squirming.

0:24:440:24:46

Now for Anita's photo album.

0:24:460:24:49

Who'll start me? £50. £20? £20 I'm bid there.

0:24:490:24:51

£25, £30, £35.

0:24:510:24:54

£40, £45.

0:24:540:24:56

£50, £55.

0:24:560:24:57

At £55 on my left now, £55. £60 now.

0:24:570:25:00

At £55, on my left here, then.

0:25:000:25:02

-At £55, you all sure...?

-Go on.

0:25:020:25:06

-There was no persuading them, was there?

-Touch-and-go, touch-and-go.

0:25:060:25:10

-That's all right, James.

-Nothing to get too excited about.

0:25:100:25:14

No, I think he did well at £55. I'm happy.

0:25:140:25:17

Next, the hygienic ear and tooth picking device.

0:25:170:25:20

Toothpick and ear spoon. There we go, a combination ear spoon.

0:25:200:25:26

At £30 I'm bid there, at £30.

0:25:260:25:28

£35 if you like there, £35.

0:25:280:25:29

£40, £45.

0:25:290:25:31

£50, £55. £60.

0:25:310:25:33

At £60, and selling right in front of me here... £65.

0:25:330:25:36

£70, anyone, at £70...

0:25:360:25:37

£75. At £75, how could you do without an ear spoon?

0:25:370:25:43

At £75, you all sure...?

0:25:430:25:46

-£75.

-He did well.

-That was the right price for it.

-It was.

0:25:460:25:51

Keeps him out in front.

0:25:510:25:52

-Not a bad profit, Mr Lewis.

-No, absolutely. Happy with that.

0:25:520:25:56

Now, all the way from Copenhagen...

0:25:560:25:58

Got to start you at £18 only, at £18 on the book here.

0:25:580:26:02

At £18. Take £20 now.

0:26:020:26:03

£20. £22, £25.

0:26:030:26:06

The book's out at £25, £30 now. £30, £35.

0:26:060:26:10

At £35 on my left here, at £35, £40 now anywhere?

0:26:100:26:12

At £35, it's on my left, then, at £35...

0:26:120:26:17

Told you. Rabbit. Rabbit.

0:26:180:26:20

You'd have been better with a rabbit.

0:26:200:26:23

A loss, after commission.

0:26:230:26:25

Stop rabbiting on!

0:26:250:26:27

Will your brushes do much better, James?

0:26:270:26:29

£30 to get off.

0:26:290:26:32

£20, then. Nice pair of clothes brushes...

0:26:320:26:34

-There's no dog owners in here.

-A tenner!

-Oh, come on!

0:26:340:26:38

£10?

0:26:390:26:42

At £10 I'm bid there, thank you, madam. £12.

0:26:420:26:45

They're worth that!

0:26:450:26:47

£18... At £18, £20 if you like now, £20.

0:26:470:26:50

At £20. You all sure now?

0:26:500:26:52

-Stop laughing!

-£25...

0:26:520:26:54

At £25, go on, £30 now sir.

0:26:540:26:57

-Go on!

-£25, you all done?

0:26:570:27:00

-£25!

-£25.

0:27:000:27:03

Disaster.

0:27:030:27:04

They were a lot of junk.

0:27:040:27:08

She has a point.

0:27:080:27:10

Going off you, rapidly.

0:27:100:27:12

Anita's back in it, but could she thrash him with this?

0:27:140:27:17

Here it is.

0:27:170:27:19

£20... £10 to get on, got to be a tenner.

0:27:190:27:21

£5, then, £5 I'm bid there, £7. At £7, £10.

0:27:210:27:24

£12, £15.

0:27:240:27:26

At £15 at the back now, £15. £18 if you like now.

0:27:260:27:29

Go on!

0:27:290:27:30

-£18. £20, £22.

-Yes...

0:27:300:27:33

£25. £28.

0:27:330:27:35

£28, £30 now. At £28, £30.

0:27:350:27:38

£35, £40.

0:27:380:27:40

At £40 it is. £45.

0:27:400:27:43

At £45. At £50 now.

0:27:430:27:45

At £45, you all sure?

0:27:450:27:48

-£45 it is.

-Well done.

0:27:480:27:52

-I think you helped it along, James.

-Well... That's double your money.

0:27:520:27:56

A good turn. But will it be enough?

0:27:560:27:58

Do you know, whatever happens,

0:27:580:28:00

this road trip has been the best time ever. I've loved it, you know.

0:28:000:28:06

Absolutely loved it.

0:28:060:28:07

-It's been great fun. You've got lipstick!

-Don't care.

0:28:070:28:11

Really enjoyed it.

0:28:110:28:13

That's enough canoodling, it's all down to James's biggest ever spend.

0:28:130:28:17

Even a modest return on the mirror will give him overall victory.

0:28:170:28:21

Start me £305 to get on.

0:28:210:28:23

£300. For the mirror, the William Comyns mirror there, for £300 only.

0:28:230:28:29

£200... £200 I'm bid, thank you. At £200.

0:28:290:28:32

-£220 now if you like, £220.

-Go on!

0:28:320:28:36

£240 if you like, £240. £260...

0:28:360:28:39

At £260 here. £260, £280...

0:28:390:28:42

At £280, £300 if you like now.

0:28:420:28:44

-At £280. £300 now then, at £280...

-No way!

0:28:440:28:48

It's selling here. £280, £300. £320.

0:28:480:28:51

It's selling here at £320.

0:28:510:28:53

£340... £360.

0:28:530:28:55

£380. £400.

0:28:550:28:58

-At £400, it's selling,, though.

-Go on!

0:28:580:29:01

You all sure?

0:29:010:29:03

£400 it is.

0:29:030:29:05

Well, it's a loss...

0:29:060:29:08

Yes - after commission, someone has got themselves a huge bargain.

0:29:100:29:14

Knew it was a gamble.

0:29:140:29:15

James wins the war, but today's little battle goes to Anita.

0:29:170:29:21

After paying auction costs,

0:29:230:29:24

Anita's made a profit of £131.70,

0:29:240:29:28

so she has a very respectable final total of £628.42.

0:29:280:29:33

James, on the other hand, made, after auction costs,

0:29:330:29:38

just £69.80 today,

0:29:380:29:40

but he's finished up with an excellent £925.52 for the whole trip.

0:29:400:29:46

And, remember, all those profits go to Children In Need.

0:29:460:29:49

-The last auction. Dear me.

-It's been great fun.

0:29:490:29:52

I've enjoyed every minute, you know.

0:29:520:29:55

-Every single minute.

-Yeah.

0:29:550:29:57

Aw. What a lovely couple they make.

0:29:570:30:00

-A cup of tea now, James?

-A cup of tea? I could do with a pint!

0:30:000:30:05

-Aw, well, I'll take you to the local hostelry, darling.

-Come on, then.

0:30:050:30:09

As Anita and James head off for a well-deserved tipple,

0:30:090:30:12

we join Road Trip veterans and antique experts Charlie Ross and James Braxton

0:30:120:30:18

on an exciting new adventure.

0:30:180:30:22

I can't see where we are going!

0:30:220:30:24

Charlie Ross is the daddy of auctioneering.

0:30:240:30:27

He ran his own auction house for over 25 years

0:30:270:30:30

and has conducted auctions around the world.

0:30:300:30:32

-And this is James Braxton.

-Lovely feeling of calm.

0:30:320:30:35

A seasoned auctioneer and qualified surveyor, I'll have you know.

0:30:350:30:39

Our chaps begin their antique adventure with £200 each

0:30:390:30:42

and a rather nice set of wheels.

0:30:420:30:44

Do you know,

0:30:440:30:46

there is no finer place on earth than the Highlands of Scotland.

0:30:460:30:50

It's just gorgeous.

0:30:500:30:52

Their sporty 1954 open-top Sunbeam Alpine is the perfect car

0:30:520:30:58

for our dashing duo,

0:30:580:31:00

but perhaps not the best choice considering their location.

0:31:000:31:04

Never had a better view of the Highlands!

0:31:040:31:07

James and Charlie will travel over 300 miles down the stunning

0:31:080:31:12

east coast of Scotland, before zipping over to the west

0:31:120:31:16

and finishing in the seaside town of Ayr.

0:31:160:31:20

Today we are kicking things off in the Highlands,

0:31:200:31:22

driving from Cromarty, along the Moray Firth coastline

0:31:220:31:26

and finishing up with an auction extraordinaire in Buckie.

0:31:260:31:31

I knew I was going to enjoy this trip!

0:31:330:31:35

It's not long before our Charlie tries his luck with antique shop owner Helen.

0:31:350:31:41

You've got an original Monet here. Oh, no, it's Mitchell.

0:31:410:31:45

-Doesn't that look like a Monet scene?

-I think that's...

0:31:450:31:48

It's got that colouring. "An October afternoon (Scotland)."

0:31:480:31:53

This beautiful oil painting is by artist Mary Mitchell, from Aberdeen.

0:31:530:31:57

And you got that for nothing, didn't you?

0:31:570:32:00

-Not exactly nothing.

-But very nearly.

0:32:000:32:02

-I didn't pay an awful lot for that.

-Is that a 20 pounder?

0:32:020:32:05

No, I'm afraid it's not a 20 pounder.

0:32:050:32:07

Do you know, you took that remarkably well.

0:32:070:32:09

Charlie, you cheeky so-and-so. It's priced at £85.

0:32:090:32:14

-I'd love to buy that but...

-Since I've taken a fancy to you,

0:32:140:32:16

you can have that for £65. That's the death.

0:32:160:32:19

Oh, Helen, don't tell him that.

0:32:190:32:20

Who knows what he'll come out with next!

0:32:200:32:23

-Would 30 be any good, Helen?

-No, I'm not interested, no.

0:32:230:32:27

Glad you've come to your senses, Helen.

0:32:270:32:29

Give Charlie an inch and he'll take a mile. And probably kiss you!

0:32:290:32:33

-Could you do 40 quid?

-No.

-Are you sure you couldn't do it?

0:32:330:32:35

-I'd give you two crisp £20 notes for that.

-No.

0:32:350:32:38

But since you've been such good fun, 50 quid. But that's it.

0:32:400:32:43

-You are what they call a temptress.

-50 quid and it's yours.

0:32:430:32:48

My heart tells me buy, my heid tells me put it back on the chair.

0:32:480:32:55

But I'm not a head man, I'm a heart man.

0:32:550:32:58

So, Charlie, make-your-mind-up time!

0:32:580:33:04

-IN BAD SCOTTISH ACCENT:

-Frankly, gae with my heart and not my head.

0:33:040:33:07

50 notes, now take me out of here. Come on.

0:33:070:33:11

What a terrible, terrible Scottish accent.

0:33:110:33:14

I thought it was really good.

0:33:140:33:16

No, Charlie, it really, really wasn't!

0:33:160:33:19

Meanwhile, James is a man on a mission.

0:33:210:33:24

Travelling ten miles south,

0:33:280:33:30

James has arrived in the Highland town of Fortrose.

0:33:300:33:33

Located on the Moray Firth,

0:33:360:33:38

Fortrose is known for its ruined 13th century cathedral.

0:33:380:33:42

In the Middle Ages, it was the seat of the Bishopric of Ross.

0:33:420:33:46

Fortunately, we don't have to see Mr Ross in his robes,

0:33:460:33:50

as this is Mr Braxton's shopping debut.

0:33:500:33:53

Straight to work, and James has taken a fancy to Patricia's Pakistani rug.

0:33:530:33:58

Ethnic again.

0:33:580:33:59

-Bukhara.

-Yes.

0:33:590:34:02

Turkmen in design.

0:34:020:34:04

Has it been loved or mothed?

0:34:040:34:06

Well spotted, James.

0:34:060:34:08

These rugs are beautifully made, with many patterns and colours,

0:34:080:34:12

but the most typical is that of the octagonal elephant's footprint

0:34:120:34:16

with red background.

0:34:160:34:19

That is a nice style. It's nice to see something I like.

0:34:190:34:23

I'll put that down there.

0:34:230:34:25

It is Chinese rosewood.

0:34:280:34:30

It's got this stylised cloud thing,

0:34:300:34:33

but it's just a nice item.

0:34:330:34:34

Yes, James, there are lots of nice items.

0:34:360:34:38

Meanwhile, back in Cromarty,

0:34:380:34:40

Charlie's drawn to a lovely pair of silver salts.

0:34:400:34:44

Are those salts English hallmark?

0:34:440:34:46

I think they are.

0:34:460:34:47

They are. Absolutely English.

0:34:470:34:51

And they are Victorian.

0:34:510:34:53

-Have you dated them?

-I haven't.

0:34:530:34:55

-They have the Victoria head on them.

-I haven't even cleaned them.

0:34:550:34:58

They have to be between 1837 and 1891.

0:34:580:35:04

In the late 17th century, small individual salt cellars

0:35:040:35:08

were created and used by the wealthy to hold their salt.

0:35:080:35:12

Get away!

0:35:120:35:13

Aren't they sweet?

0:35:130:35:14

The good news is they don't have a price on them.

0:35:140:35:16

-So if I sell you these for...

-60 quid.

0:35:180:35:21

-No.

-No? 50 quid then.

-No.

0:35:210:35:23

You're doing yourself down.

0:35:230:35:26

-60 quid, they're yours.

-60 quid, they're mine?

0:35:260:35:28

There's a bargain. 60 quid.

0:35:280:35:30

-Could you not really take 50 quid?

-No.

0:35:300:35:33

You said no so quickly, I couldn't believe it.

0:35:330:35:36

I like them.

0:35:360:35:37

-Have we got a deal?

-Ross likes them. 60 quid.

0:35:370:35:41

Thank you very much indeed. I've spent money.

0:35:410:35:44

Another great buy, Charlie.

0:35:440:35:46

I hope James is making progress.

0:35:460:35:49

It's rather nice, it's pressed glass.

0:35:490:35:52

It's this diamond cutting here. But it's not cut, it's pressed.

0:35:520:35:56

Pressed glass is made using a plunger

0:35:560:35:59

to press molten glass into a mould.

0:35:590:36:01

Its introduction revolutionised the way in which glass was mass-produced.

0:36:010:36:06

It's a celery vase. You'd stick sticks of celery in it.

0:36:060:36:10

During the 19th century, celery became incredibly popular.

0:36:100:36:13

One problem was retaining freshness,

0:36:130:36:15

and immersion in water was the best method before refrigeration.

0:36:150:36:21

I love a bit myself with cheese. Talking of which...

0:36:210:36:25

I quite like that, a malting shovel.

0:36:250:36:27

This malting spade would have been used to turn the malting barley

0:36:270:36:31

to release any pockets of heat.

0:36:310:36:34

But it has been split and that has been re-glued. Chipped there a bit.

0:36:340:36:38

But it's a lovely piece, isn't it? That's fun.

0:36:380:36:42

Yes, James, there's lots of nice items.

0:36:420:36:45

And while you decide if you're buying today,

0:36:450:36:49

back in Cromarty, Charlie's set Helen a bit of an antiques challenge.

0:36:490:36:53

Have you got something of any age for a fiver?

0:36:530:36:56

-Can I find you something?

-Yeah, something for a fiver.

0:36:560:36:58

Because you've been such good fun, you can have that for a fiver!

0:36:580:37:03

Now, you'll probably make money on that. Perfect.

0:37:050:37:09

-To commemorate the investiture.

-I'll tell you what, you are such a sport.

0:37:090:37:13

-Do I get the two for a fiver?

-No, a fiver each.

0:37:150:37:17

Oh, well, worth a try!

0:37:170:37:20

-Three items bought.

-Thank you.

-Job done.

0:37:200:37:23

£115 lighter, Charlie is off to a great start.

0:37:230:37:27

-But what's become of James?

-I'd like to make you an offer.

-OK.

0:37:270:37:33

-So I'd like to buy...

-The Chinese table.

0:37:330:37:36

The Chinese table, the rug and the shovel.

0:37:360:37:40

I'll give you £100 for it.

0:37:400:37:42

-You want to give me £100 for...?

-For the three.

0:37:420:37:46

-The shovel, the table and the rug?

-Correct.

0:37:460:37:49

-Let me go and get the shovel and bring it. How about that?

-Thank you, thank you, thank you.

0:37:490:37:54

-And we'll talk about it.

-OK.

0:37:540:37:57

That sounds ominous.

0:37:570:37:58

I have 68 on the shovel.

0:37:580:38:01

-I never look at a price tag, Patricia.

-Well, I have to.

0:38:010:38:04

-It's one of my rules.

-OK.

-My own personal rules.

0:38:040:38:08

-And I've got 68.

-68.

0:38:080:38:10

Funny enough, there seems to be a running theme in this shop, 68.

0:38:100:38:15

-And I said 80 to start with on this.

-And I said 30, didn't I?

-Well...

0:38:150:38:21

-Now, what could you do?

-Well, if I took that down to...68.

0:38:210:38:27

If I took that down to 45 and 45, that's 90.

0:38:270:38:31

Then you're only saying £10 for my rug which I think that's just a little bit...

0:38:310:38:36

Light, Patricia?

0:38:360:38:38

-Well, what are you thinking for the three?

-About 140.

0:38:380:38:42

I don't like 140.

0:38:420:38:44

You don't like 140?

0:38:440:38:45

OK, I'll tell you what I'll do. I'll do it for 120.

0:38:450:38:50

-And that really is...

-120, 120.

0:38:500:38:55

I would very happily do it for 120 if you throw in that.

0:38:550:38:59

Cheeky monkey!

0:38:590:39:01

-Throw in the celery vase?

-So that's the four items for 120.

-OK.

0:39:010:39:05

That's a great buy, James.

0:39:050:39:08

James and Charlie are hopefully heading 40 miles southeast

0:39:110:39:13

to the village of Auldearn.

0:39:130:39:18

Auldearn Antiques has been a family run business for more than 30 years.

0:39:180:39:23

-It looks like there are two distinct areas here.

-Are they?

0:39:230:39:26

-Are you on the lower rate?

-I think so. You go in the chapel.

0:39:260:39:29

-I'll go in the chapel.

-I'll go in the shop.

0:39:290:39:31

# And, I'll be in profit before ye... #

0:39:310:39:35

Tip number one, always look up as well as down.

0:39:410:39:45

Where to begin?

0:39:480:39:49

Be logical, start as far away from the door and work outwards.

0:39:490:39:54

While Charlie attempts logical, James has gone

0:39:540:39:58

from Pakistan to India.

0:39:580:40:00

These are very kind to me, these lovely Indian peacock chairs.

0:40:000:40:05

You sit in them. There's a lovely feeling of calm in these.

0:40:050:40:09

Oh... I feel nicely cocooned.

0:40:090:40:13

It's lovely. Lovely.

0:40:130:40:16

They're always quite cheap, they're quite fun.

0:40:160:40:19

What is it priced at?

0:40:190:40:21

£20, that's tempting.

0:40:210:40:22

Let's see if I can secure it for slightly less.

0:40:220:40:25

This could be a winner.

0:40:260:40:28

Really, James? Well, we'll see at the auction.

0:40:280:40:31

I see Braxton lurking outside the door.

0:40:320:40:35

You stay out, Braccer's, old boy.

0:40:350:40:38

This is Roscoe's domain in here.

0:40:380:40:41

Where is that Rossco? Let's hide it around here.

0:40:410:40:43

James, while you play hide and seek,

0:40:430:40:46

Charlie's found a rather unique looking elephant.

0:40:460:40:50

I like that.

0:40:530:40:55

I just like Staffordshire.

0:40:550:40:57

And, I've never seen anything quite like that.

0:40:570:41:00

Staffordshire is a generic modern term for humble earthenware figures

0:41:000:41:05

made in the county of Staffordshire in the 18th and 19th centuries.

0:41:050:41:09

They often recalled Victorian histories,

0:41:090:41:12

scenes of everyday life, from pets to politicians,

0:41:120:41:15

to circus performers and their exotic animals.

0:41:150:41:17

Some being very much rarer than others.

0:41:170:41:21

MUSIC: Nellie The Elephant

0:41:210:41:23

It's not a reproduction.

0:41:260:41:27

It's definitely 19th century.

0:41:270:41:29

It's got damage.

0:41:290:41:33

But, you know, Staffordshire is...

0:41:330:41:35

crude anyway. I don't think the damage matters too much.

0:41:350:41:40

After all, they're only asking £12.

0:41:400:41:42

Oh! He's looking at me.

0:41:420:41:45

Can I show you something?

0:41:450:41:46

This is the item I found, I quite like the look of.

0:41:460:41:49

Can I offer you ten?

0:41:490:41:51

-I'm afraid not...

-Oh, hello.

0:41:510:41:53

THEY LAUGH

0:41:530:41:55

Oh, it's still intact, that's all right.

0:41:550:41:57

That's all right. That's all right.

0:41:570:41:59

I thought it was going to be 20, then.

0:41:590:42:01

HE LAUGHS

0:42:010:42:03

-I could help and meet you in the middle at 15.

-15?

0:42:030:42:06

What about £12.50? My offer, your offer.

0:42:060:42:10

My offer, your price, sorry.

0:42:100:42:12

I think I'm pretty tight on the £15.

0:42:120:42:16

I think there's still money in that.

0:42:160:42:18

-I can't squeeze you?

-No.

-Are you sure, Roger?

-No.

0:42:180:42:21

Go on, put your hand there. Put your hand there.

0:42:210:42:24

I'm going to give you 15, don't worry.

0:42:240:42:26

-Thank you very much, indeed.

-Deal done!

0:42:260:42:29

Do you know, the trouble is when someone's rude about your purchases,

0:42:290:42:32

it puts your off, but...

0:42:320:42:34

Oh, nothing ventured, nothing gained.

0:42:340:42:37

Very true, Charlie.

0:42:370:42:39

And, at £12, it's not exactly breaking the bank, is it?

0:42:390:42:42

-Roger...

-Yes?

-Could I borrow you for a second, sir?

-Of course.

0:42:420:42:45

May we go in here because Mr Braxton is spying on me today.

0:42:450:42:50

HE LAUGHS

0:42:500:42:51

There's not much left of it.

0:42:510:42:54

I can't find many bits that aren't broken.

0:42:540:42:56

-I love the simple... It has to be 19th century.

-Yep.

0:42:560:42:59

-And it's English and it's Staffordshire.

-Mm-hm.

0:42:590:43:02

-I'm not sure I've ever seen the like, really.

-No.

0:43:020:43:04

I mean, Staffordshire clock figures are really quite common

0:43:040:43:08

but I've never seen a Staffordshire clock, in the form of a howdah,

0:43:080:43:12

on top of an elephant before!

0:43:120:43:13

I mean, he's missing his tusk and everything.

0:43:130:43:16

It's £12. Presumably it came in a clearance in a box full of something?

0:43:160:43:20

Exactly! I'm afraid the back of a cupboard.

0:43:200:43:22

Sadly, sadly misused...

0:43:220:43:25

I know, but it's got a certain charm.

0:43:250:43:27

It's got £12 on it, presumably it cost nothing?

0:43:270:43:30

I'd be willing to help you a little bit on it.

0:43:300:43:32

Really, it's... it's only a few pounds.

0:43:320:43:35

I was going to be very rude, but I better not be very rude,

0:43:350:43:38

I was going to ask you to knock the ten off.

0:43:380:43:40

-I could do it for £8 for you.

-£8, sir?

0:43:400:43:42

-Thank you.

-Consider it bought.

0:43:420:43:45

I like that. Mr Braxton will be extremely rude about it,

0:43:450:43:49

but I think we'll have the last laugh.

0:43:490:43:52

I think that could make some money at auction.

0:43:520:43:54

Back on their merry way,

0:43:550:43:57

Charlie wants to sample just one more shop,

0:43:570:44:00

so James is dropping him off

0:44:000:44:02

while he visits the famous Johnstons of Elgin,

0:44:020:44:05

who manufacture the finest cashmere cloth, knitwear and accessories.

0:44:050:44:10

Established in 1797, Johnstons of Elgin

0:44:100:44:13

is the UK's last remaining vertical woollen Mill,

0:44:130:44:16

and the only one still to carry out all the processes

0:44:160:44:19

from raw material to finished garment.

0:44:190:44:22

Our fabric comes from Inner and Outer Mongolia.

0:44:220:44:25

-It comes direct to Johnstons.

-All ready to be dyed.

0:44:250:44:29

Before the end of the 19th century, dyeing was carried out using natural materials such as

0:44:290:44:34

berries, seaweed and even insects.

0:44:340:44:37

So you're going to see the raw fibre gets transported into these vats.

0:44:370:44:40

They are then lifted into the big stock dyeing pots

0:44:400:44:42

and the dyes are then mixed together

0:44:420:44:44

to create the vast array of colours that we offer.

0:44:440:44:48

The threads are then vertically put on to the warp mill.

0:44:480:44:53

-So that is the bones of the garment?

-It is, exactly.

0:44:530:44:58

Then the threads are inserted horizontally,

0:44:580:45:02

so you've got your warp and weft that creates plane weaves,

0:45:020:45:06

whatever we want to create.

0:45:060:45:08

From the warp, you don't see much of a pattern, do you?

0:45:080:45:11

You don't, you see stripes.

0:45:110:45:13

Then suddenly, when you start inserting the weft,

0:45:130:45:17

suddenly it all becomes clear.

0:45:170:45:19

You see the pattern, correct.

0:45:190:45:21

It's rather like the bones of the garment and the flesh of the garment.

0:45:210:45:24

Steady, James.

0:45:240:45:26

Once woven, the cloth is washed to soften

0:45:260:45:29

and give it that beautiful cashmere touch

0:45:290:45:31

that's loved by people around the world.

0:45:310:45:33

What a treat, James, you've been thoroughly indulged.

0:45:330:45:37

Quite right. Unlike Charlie,

0:45:370:45:39

who's back at Logie, trying to find his last item.

0:45:390:45:42

I saw the monocular there, it doesn't look a theatrical piece, does it?

0:45:420:45:48

It's a sweet object.

0:45:480:45:50

I have to confess, I was a bit put off by the price.

0:45:500:45:52

I think it's a charming thing.

0:45:520:45:54

£85.

0:45:540:45:56

What do I think that would make at auction?

0:45:560:45:59

Well, I'd take £40.

0:45:590:46:01

Can you take £30 for it? Crispy, Scottish notes?

0:46:010:46:04

-Oh, all right, go on then.

-Are you sure?

0:46:040:46:06

I don't want to walk out of here and you say,

0:46:060:46:09

"That miserable Charlie bought my fine object for £30."

0:46:090:46:13

-That's fine.

-Are you sure?

0:46:130:46:17

Great final purchase, Charlie.

0:46:170:46:20

With shopping done, let's recap on what the boys are taking to auction.

0:46:200:46:25

Our experts began this journey with £200 each.

0:46:250:46:28

Charlie has spent a total of £153 on five auction lots:

0:46:280:46:31

the Mary Mitchell painting, the Staffordshire elephant,

0:46:310:46:37

the silver salts, the monocular and the Prince of Wales tankard.

0:46:370:46:42

As for James, he took his £200 allowance

0:46:420:46:44

and spent a little bit less:

0:46:440:46:46

£135 on five lots, including the Chinese stand,

0:46:460:46:51

the wooden shovel, the rug, the celery vase

0:46:510:46:55

and the peacock chair.

0:46:550:46:56

But what do they think of each other's wares?

0:46:560:46:59

I think the peacock chair, frankly, is hugely cheap.

0:46:590:47:02

The one item that might fly a bit is the Chinese hardwood stand,

0:47:020:47:05

I think it's a nice item and Chinese things sell well at the moment.

0:47:050:47:08

His elephant, I think, is superb.

0:47:080:47:12

I was being very rude at Roger's place, teasing him,

0:47:120:47:16

but it's a lovely item, it's very well painted and should do well.

0:47:160:47:20

It's been a cracking first leg.

0:47:210:47:24

The Road Trip has brought us from Cromarty

0:47:240:47:28

along the beautiful Moray coastline to Buckie.

0:47:280:47:30

It's auction day and our experts are cruising to Cluny auction house,

0:47:300:47:35

hoping their catch makes their fortune.

0:47:350:47:37

-Very smooth!

-Are you nervous?

0:47:370:47:41

No, I'm looking forward to it. Are you?

0:47:410:47:44

-I'm mildly nervous.

-You shouldn't be.

0:47:440:47:48

-We bought well, at the right prices.

-You think we have?

-Definitely.

0:47:480:47:51

-And are we going to sell at the right price?

-Well, I hope so.

0:47:510:47:54

Strap yourselves in and hold on tight,

0:47:540:47:57

the auction is about to begin.

0:47:570:47:59

Are you going to give me a mincing today?

0:48:000:48:03

No. I think it's quite the reverse.

0:48:030:48:05

First up, it's James's Chinese rosewood stand.

0:48:050:48:09

-Oh, that's nice.

-I can feel a twitter in the room.

0:48:090:48:13

We'll start at £40. 40. £10, then.

0:48:130:48:15

Let's get going.

0:48:150:48:17

10, bid. 12 bid, at 12 bid. At 12. 15. 18, 18, now.

0:48:170:48:21

20. At 22.

0:48:210:48:23

22, at 22. Five, 25, I'm bid. 28.

0:48:230:48:27

-40.

-Profit, Braccers.

-Phew.

0:48:270:48:31

At £48. One more? £48.

0:48:310:48:34

GAVEL FALLS

0:48:340:48:36

-I think it was 48.

-48, I'm happy with that.

0:48:360:48:39

£13 profit, James.

0:48:390:48:41

That's not a bad start.

0:48:410:48:43

Now it's bottoms-up for one of Charlie's more unusual purchases.

0:48:430:48:48

-A tankard.

-£10, then. Must be worth 10.

0:48:480:48:52

I'll take a bid of five, if you must. Five, I'm bid. Thank you, sir.

0:48:520:48:56

Eight online, now. Eight. 10, in the room, now. £12, the lady.

0:48:560:49:00

-Well done, madam!

-At 12. 15 is online, 18 is in the room.

0:49:000:49:06

-18. All done?

-Put it down! GAVEL FALLS

0:49:060:49:09

-200. Now, now, James.

-18. Very good.

0:49:090:49:14

Do you know what, for an investment of five, that's a bit of a spanker.

0:49:140:49:19

That's very good.

0:49:190:49:20

You're both off to a fighting start.

0:49:200:49:23

Next up is James's malting spade.

0:49:230:49:25

-Ah!

-10, I'm bid. 12, bid.

0:49:250:49:28

At 15, at 15. 18.

0:49:280:49:30

Rush of hands, rush of hands.

0:49:300:49:34

32, bid. 35. 38.

0:49:340:49:36

42, 45.

0:49:360:49:38

-Here you are, he's bidding.

-New bidder. 50, I'm bid, now.

0:49:380:49:42

-At 50, at £50. All done at 50?

-You won't go five?

0:49:420:49:46

GAVEL FALLS Well done. Well done, that man.

0:49:460:49:49

Good work. Very happy with that.

0:49:490:49:52

Great result, James.

0:49:520:49:54

Now for your peacock chair.

0:49:540:49:56

I think they saw you coming, to be honest.

0:49:560:49:59

What was the ticket price? 10?

0:49:590:50:01

£20 for a peacock chair. 20, I'll take 10.

0:50:010:50:04

-Well done, that man. Phew!

-Saved your bacon.

0:50:040:50:07

I'm bid 12.

0:50:070:50:09

12, I'm bid. 15. Now at 15.

0:50:090:50:11

-At 15. 18, I'm bid.

-Profit, Braccers!

0:50:110:50:15

£18, at 18. Are we all finished?

0:50:150:50:17

-Done at £18?

-GAVEL FALLS

0:50:170:50:21

£18. I think, to coin a phrase, that's washed its face.

0:50:210:50:26

It's washed its face.

0:50:260:50:28

Great expression, but after commission,

0:50:280:50:30

that £3 profit isn't going very far.

0:50:300:50:32

Three selling opportunities and they've been, I think,

0:50:320:50:36

slightly squandered.

0:50:360:50:38

-Next up it's Charlie's big gamble, the Mary Mitchell painting.

-£20.

0:50:390:50:45

-20, surely.

-HE LAUGHS

0:50:450:50:49

-They can't see it.

-I have you online.

-LAUGHTER

0:50:490:50:51

Saved online.

0:50:510:50:53

LAUGHTER

0:50:550:50:58

Sit down, Charlie. That's not auction etiquette and you know it.

0:50:580:51:02

LAUGHTER Thank you, sir.

0:51:020:51:05

Naughty. Dear, oh dear.

0:51:050:51:07

-That should've killed it.

-LAUGHTER

0:51:070:51:11

Online, at 30. £30, online.

0:51:110:51:14

-Are we all done at £30, then?

-There's another one.

0:51:140:51:19

-32.

-Oh! LAUGHTER

0:51:190:51:22

32. 35. 38, the lady.

0:51:240:51:27

-This man deserves an OBE.

-50 is online. 50. At 50.

0:51:270:51:32

Don't lose it for a few pounds.

0:51:330:51:35

-55. 55.

-55!

-At 55.

0:51:350:51:39

-All finished, now?

-GAVEL FALLS

0:51:390:51:42

-There we are, 300.

-APPLAUSE

0:51:420:51:45

Well done, 55.

0:51:450:51:47

Sorry, Charlie, after commission, that's not much of a profit.

0:51:470:51:52

165 is a small George III brass telescope monocular.

0:51:520:51:57

I'll take £10 to start. £10.

0:51:570:52:00

12. Online at 15. At 15.

0:52:000:52:03

18, now. 18. 20.

0:52:030:52:06

There we are. It's warming up, the lady over there, she's loving it.

0:52:060:52:09

Do I see 45?

0:52:090:52:12

45, now. 48. At 55, then.

0:52:120:52:15

Are you all finished and done online at £55?

0:52:150:52:18

60, just in time.

0:52:190:52:21

-Oh!

-£60, just in time. Is that a bid? 65.

0:52:210:52:24

The room's my bidder at 65, for the last time, then.

0:52:240:52:27

GAVEL FALLS

0:52:270:52:29

-Well done. Really pleased with that, James.

-I would be.

0:52:290:52:34

I think it's a good price.

0:52:340:52:35

Well done, Charlie. That's a £35 profit.

0:52:350:52:38

Now for your silver salts.

0:52:380:52:41

£60. At 60. £60. At 60. At 60.

0:52:410:52:45

-Do I see five?

-I think you said they were about on the money, didn't you?

0:52:450:52:50

65 online, now, at 65.

0:52:500:52:52

At 65. And 70.

0:52:520:52:54

-That's better.

-At 70.

0:52:540:52:56

Now at 70. At £70. 75, a new bidder. At 75.

0:52:560:53:00

-And 80.

-£80. 80!

0:53:000:53:02

You are into profit now, Charlie.

0:53:020:53:05

£80. 85. Lady is my bid at 85.

0:53:050:53:07

-And 90.

-It's a good day, this.

0:53:070:53:11

-At 90. Are we all done, then?

-GAVEL FALLS

0:53:110:53:14

Another great profit, Charlie.

0:53:140:53:15

Ross has come home, hasn't he?

0:53:150:53:18

James, it's over to you and your magic carpet.

0:53:210:53:24

-Oh!

-Oh!

0:53:240:53:26

I can start the bidding at 40, £42. With me at £42.

0:53:260:53:31

£45 with me, 45. At 45. 48, now.

0:53:330:53:37

48. 50. 52. 55.

0:53:370:53:40

58. 60. 60's with me.

0:53:400:53:44

-Against you. One more? 65? And 70.

-Not bad!

0:53:440:53:49

I will take another wee nibble, if you like. £70. At 70.

0:53:490:53:53

-And five's with me.

-75!

-At 75.

0:53:530:53:56

He says it's a flying carpet but I've no guarantee with it.

0:53:560:54:00

-It's currently grounded.

-LAUGHTER

0:54:000:54:03

Bid's with me at £75, then.

0:54:030:54:05

And 80. £80.

0:54:050:54:08

What can I do? £80.

0:54:080:54:10

Do I see five? 85. At 85.

0:54:100:54:14

At 85, £85.

0:54:140:54:16

-Thank you very much, sir.

-Result.

-At £85.

0:54:160:54:19

-GAVEL FALLS

-331.

0:54:190:54:21

-Very good result. Excellent.

-Thank you.

0:54:230:54:26

Well done, James. That's a profit of £45.

0:54:260:54:30

With one lot each still to go, Charlie is only £7 ahead.

0:54:310:54:36

Next up is his Staffordshire elephant

0:54:360:54:38

and the auctioneer thinks it could go for a couple of hundred.

0:54:380:54:41

£80 is online. Thank you, online.

0:54:410:54:43

-80.

-Crikey, Charlie!

0:54:430:54:46

That's 10 times what you paid for it.

0:54:460:54:49

130 online. That's OK.

0:54:490:54:51

-At 130.

-It's jumped to 130, John!

-140 is on the phone.

0:54:510:54:56

This is getting really interesting. There are no more bids in the room

0:54:560:54:59

but the phone and internet bids are really picking up.

0:54:590:55:02

-380. 400. 420.

-Sorry? LAUGHTER

0:55:020:55:06

-600.

-HE GASPS

0:55:090:55:11

-Are you hearing this?

-I am!

0:55:110:55:14

It's quite exciting, isn't it?

0:55:140:55:17

-On the phones!

-850.

-LAUGHTER

0:55:170:55:19

This is ridiculous.

0:55:200:55:23

-1,000.

-1,000! GASPS

0:55:230:55:25

1,200, online.

0:55:260:55:28

-1,200, Braccers!

-It's all over!

0:55:280:55:32

This is unbelievable.

0:55:320:55:34

-1,800.

-1,800!

0:55:350:55:38

-1,900.

-1,900!

-2,000.

0:55:380:55:41

A bit ridiculous, now.

0:55:410:55:43

At 2,100.

0:55:430:55:45

Unheard of on the Road Trip.

0:55:450:55:48

2,100, Barbara.

0:55:480:55:50

He's going to have a heart attack.

0:55:500:55:53

-2,200, 2,300, on the phone.

-I'm crying!

0:55:530:55:55

2,300. On the phone at 2,300.

0:55:570:55:59

Look at this, the magic of the auction.

0:55:590:56:02

Who would ever have thought this?

0:56:030:56:05

Are we all done online at 2,500?

0:56:080:56:10

-Yes?

-He told me, this could make a few hundred quid.

0:56:100:56:13

-2,600.

-I am speechless.

0:56:130:56:17

I fear my Road Trip is already over.

0:56:170:56:21

2,700.

0:56:210:56:22

For the last time, £2,700.

0:56:220:56:26

The bid is on the phone at £2,700, then.

0:56:260:56:29

Are we all finished online at 2,700? For the last time?

0:56:300:56:34

GAVEL FALLS

0:56:340:56:36

APPLAUSE

0:56:360:56:38

Take a bow, take a bow.

0:56:380:56:41

Never in the history of the Road Trip

0:56:410:56:43

have we ever had a sale like that.

0:56:430:56:45

What an amazing result, Charlie!

0:56:450:56:48

I'm leaving. I think my Road Trip is over.

0:56:480:56:51

LAUGHTER

0:56:510:56:53

Thank you. Thank you, bye!

0:56:530:56:56

Please don't go, James, you never know,

0:56:580:57:00

your celery vase might just swing it for you.

0:57:000:57:04

Shame it was damaged, really!

0:57:040:57:06

LAUGHTER

0:57:060:57:09

-That's absolutely extraordinary.

-That is extraordinary.

0:57:090:57:13

There we are, the celery vase, there. £40, for it?

0:57:130:57:16

30. £10, then.

0:57:160:57:19

£10 for a celery vase. £10.

0:57:190:57:21

-Do I hear 1,500? Sorry.

-LAUGHTER

0:57:210:57:25

Marvellous!

0:57:270:57:30

-10, I'm bid. 12. 12 bid, at 12 bid.

-We're away.

0:57:300:57:33

Come on, Buckie. Dig deep and help James out.

0:57:330:57:36

He needs it.

0:57:360:57:39

-At 32 for the last time, then.

-GAVEL FALLS

0:57:390:57:42

-The lady down here.

-Well done.

0:57:420:57:44

-Well done, Braccers.

-On a normal day James, £22 is a good profit.

0:57:440:57:49

But today is not a normal day.

0:57:490:57:51

That was a good result, that.

0:57:510:57:55

You've made a good, working profit today, haven't you? No, you have.

0:57:550:57:58

I've made an obscene one but you have made...

0:57:580:58:01

You certainly did, Charlie.

0:58:010:58:03

After paying auction costs, James has made a healthy profit of £56.06.

0:58:030:58:09

He has a respectable £256.06 to carry forward.

0:58:090:58:15

Charlie, on the other hand,

0:58:150:58:17

we can hardly get his profit to fit in the piggy!

0:58:170:58:21

He's had a mighty win.

0:58:230:58:26

He has a whopping £2,447.96 to start the next leg.

0:58:260:58:32

I think my tactic now should be to put Mr Roscoe into some very

0:58:330:58:37

large-ticketed items,

0:58:370:58:40

that's the only way he's going to make some substantial losses.

0:58:400:58:42

Anyway, Road Trip history has been made. Well done, Mr Ross.

0:58:420:58:47

-Bye-bye, Buckie.

-Bye-bye, Buckie!

-Love you, Buckie!

0:58:470:58:51

Love you, Clunie! Love you Staffordshire!

0:58:510:58:56

Love you, Braccers!

0:58:560:58:58

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:59:000:59:03

It is the final leg for Anita Manning and James Lewis, with an auction showdown in Cirencester in the Cotswolds. The antiques baton is picked up by Charlie Ross and James Braxton, who begin their trip in Cromerty in the Scottish Highlands.