Episode 2 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 2

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. Thomas Plant and Mark Hales go shopping in Ironbridge before ending up at auctions in Froncysyllte and Llandeilo.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts,

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£200 each and one big challenge.

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Well, duck, do I buy you or don't I?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques, as they scour the UK?

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Look at the colour.

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The aim is trade up and hope that each antique turns a profit.

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But it's not as easy as it looks and dreams of glory can end in tatters.

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Thank you.

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So will it be the fast lane to success or the slow road to bankruptcy?

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Bad luck for Thomas, £50 down.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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All this week, we're out on the road with the cheeky boys,

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Thomas Plant and Mark Hales.

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It's not the winning or losing, it's all about the taking part.

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It's all about the taking part and Mark winning.

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Oh, yes. Thomas Plant is a veteran road tripper

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who seems to be feeling a tad threatened by Mark.

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Don't buy too well.

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Promise me?

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Thomas, are you rattled?

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No need to be rattled.

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From his original £200,

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Thomas is racing ahead with a whopping £507.84...

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While Mark has only made a small profit

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and now has £278.15 in his pocket.

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The boys are whizzing about in this delightful 1967 Sunbeam Alpine,

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as they visit antique and curio shops across the British Isles.

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Thomas and Mark's journey will take them from Portrush, Northern Ireland,

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all the way to the beautiful village

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of Pontrilas, in South Herefordshire,

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notching up a whopping 460 miles along the way.

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On this leg of the trip, they're making their way

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towards an auction in Froncysyllte, North Wales.

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However, they need to find things to sell and first stop is Ironbridge, Shropshire.

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Ironbridge takes its name from the mighty bridge

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built in the heart of the town in 1779.

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It was the first of its kind

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and symbolises the dawn of the industrial age.

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So what will the boys get up to this time around?

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Mark and Thomas are in high spirits,

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as they approach their first shop of the day.

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-Are you excited?

-I'm up for this, Thomas.

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Hang on, why don't you wait here?

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Just give me 20 minutes.

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No, that ain't going to happen.

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I can never get out of this car.

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Come on, Thomas.

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Mark, I need to go to the back, and you can stay in the front.

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We're sharing this shop, so none...

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-All right, Thomas.

-..of you being naughty. I'm going down the back.

-No bumping into me, all right?

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The boys have been let loose in Curio Antiques.

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It's a family business owned by Simon Willcock.

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Mark's been in the business for 34 years and he's a ceramics specialist.

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As usual, Mark's raring to go,

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and before you know it, he's called on the assistance of shop owner Simon.

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-The spaniels?

-Yeah, lovely, aren't they?

-Here we are, sir.

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They are very nice.

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I don't believe there's any damage or restoration,

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they all seem to be in good order.

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These are very, very, very Mark.

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He's talking about himself, you know.

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These are what Mark's known for.

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These are Staffordshire pottery dogs.

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This particular pair are very clean, nicely modelled,

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lovely gilt collars, soft English gilding.

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Circa 1850, and...

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what's nice is that these dogs came in six different sizes

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and these are size number five.

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Size number five is harder to find than size number one.

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I wonder how much they could be, Simon?

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You're probably looking at around... 75 quid

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would be the best price on them.

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I have to be in with a chance, they just have to be very cheap.

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-That's fair enough.

-Have you got a little book you can look at?

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-Just a little book.

-Let me have a quick look for you.

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I'll see the reference number.

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I know what it's like when things come in sometimes,

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-and sometimes, they come in and they can be moved along.

-Yeah.

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Have a look for me. I'd be really grateful.

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-I'll have a quick look for you.

-Thank you, Simon.

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Fingers crossed, indeed. He really likes this little pair.

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Mark, the best price on these would be 55.

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It's tempting.

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-There's profit in that, there's got to be.

-You'd think so, wouldn't you?

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-You would.

-I'm being very, very cautious. 45.

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-I'd have a chance, wouldn't I?

-Mark, I like you.

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-I'd take them, if I could.

-You can have them for 45.

-Thanks, Simon.

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-You can have them for 45, as a deal.

-Thank you, mate, good for you.

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-Would you like me to take them out for you?

-Yes, please.

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Ah, he was after them all along.

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That's the first buy of the day.

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Meanwhile, what's that naughty Thomas Plant getting up to?

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He really loves getting into all those nooks and crannies.

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He's on his hands and knees, look.

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Brace yourselves, I think he's found something.

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What it is, it's Victorian opaque glass

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and it's in a Chinoiserie style.

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It's about 1860s, 1870s.

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It's in marvellous condition.

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Personally, I think it's worth £30. I'll ask.

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-Simon, is this one of yours?

-It's not mine, no, it's my mum's.

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The best price, to you, would be 55.

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55 is a bit rich for me, I was going to offer you 40.

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I think you should take 40, it's a good price.

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I could do 50.

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No, 40 is what I've got, what I'd like to offer.

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-Go on.

-Go on then.

-Yeah?

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-Deal?

-Yes, deal.

-Thank you very much.

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Thank you.

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I'd better give you some money.

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This always hurts, this.

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Thank you very much.

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I'm going to leave it there, I'll be back to pick it up. Wish me the best.

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-All the best.

-Thank you.

-Great stuff, Tom, all the best.

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-Thank you, bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

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Thomas, where have you been?

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-Well, you know.

-You're smiling, Thomas.

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-In the loo.

-Yes, that's what I said.

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It's funny, I said that earlier. In the loo.

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Did you lose some cash?

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-A little bit of cash, I lost.

-Right.

-Not too much.

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A bit cautious?

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Erm, no, not really.

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So where are we going now?

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Ah, it's pretty good, I've started.

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Lots of things I could have bought, but £5 or £10 profit.

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I'm looking for more, Thomas.

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-Are you?

-Oh, gosh!

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I'm looking for more, Thomas, whilst you drive happily over...

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I think it was an old lady, actually, Thomas.

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A plant pot.

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Oh, dear, Thomas.

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Perhaps Mark needs to drop you off at the nearest optician,

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or garden centre!

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-Is it all right?

-It's fine. Thank you... Sorry.

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He can't drive anything.

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He was brought up on a farm.

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He's only good in tractors.

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You were talking to me, that was the problem.

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-You were talking to me.

-Are you trying to infer that I talk too much, Thomas?

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-Yes, yes.

-We are going to buy some more antiques.

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Now, come on, Thomas, easy does it there.

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Less arguing and keep your eyes on the road.

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And the Road Trip moves swiftly on.

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Plant pot safely removed from the back wheel.

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Anyway, next stop is Broseley,

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just a couple of miles down the road.

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Thomas is going to visit the town's clay pipe museum.

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-Lovely.

-Very nice.

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Clay tobacco pipe museum. You treat her well.

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-Treat her well.

-Oh...

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This handbrake's not too good.

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Don't buy too well. You promise me?

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-Thomas, are you rattled?

-No, I'm not rattled.

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You did spend a long time in that shop, just a little bit rattled?

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-I spent a long time because you were faffing on, asking about different things.

-Rubbish.

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-Nonsense.

-Get in, before I slam this door on your leg.

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Five, four, three, two... Oh, there you are, look.

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-My poor baby, what have you done to her?

-Nothing.

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What have you done to her?

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Stop your carrying on, boys.

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It looks like it's a good idea they're having a breather from one another.

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Call it a trial separation.

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Now, Broseley was a major centre

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for clay pipe making for several hundred years.

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They were making pipes here as far back as 1613,

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and in the mid-Victorian era, the three pipe factories in Broseley

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were producing as many as six million clay pipes a year.

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-Stick that in your pipe and smoke it.

-Hello.

-Hello, I'm Thomas.

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Pleased to meet you, Thomas, I'm Rex, Rex Key.

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Welcome to Broseley Pipeworks Museum.

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It's the only Victorian pipeworks there is left in the country.

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Rex has lived in Broseley for over 40 years

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and is something of a clay pipe enthusiast.

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This factory was set up in the 1880s,

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and in use up until the late 1950s,

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when clay pipe smoking went out of fashion

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and cigarettes took over.

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And who was working in the factory?

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At its peak, in the 1880s, 1890s, between 30 and 35 people

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would be working here.

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30 and 35?

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They'd all be women, women and young girls.

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Girls from the age of about 12 would work here in the factory.

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Women and young girls. Why no men?

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The men would be employed in the heavy industry,

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in the iron foundries in the area.

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In the coal mines and on the river.

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What about the guys sorting this stuff?

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They did have two or three men at the factory here,

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but most of them were women.

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The life of a clay pipe would be about ten days,

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and it could be said that they were the start of the throwaway disposable culture

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that we know and hate today.

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The workers here would make up to 600 or 700 pipes a day.

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That works out at roughly one every 54 seconds.

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In the 1870s, a clay pipe would cost you a farthing.

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The art of pipe smoking is the oldest method of tobacco consumption

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and was regarded as a sophisticated form of smoking.

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Time to have a go at clay pipemaking, Thomas.

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Come on in, Thomas, we'll make a clay pipemaker of you.

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Oh, very exciting.

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So we have Thomas Plant from Bristol.

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Special talents include looking for antiques and reversing cars into plant pots.

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The idea is to make one of those,

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-a half church warden.

-Right.

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You need to break off a lump of clay

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and roll it into roughly the shape of a pipe,

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with a lump at the one end that's going to form the bowl.

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Keep on rolling.

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Longer and longer stem.

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You're getting off to a good start.

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-Thread this wire down the stem to make the hole.

-This here?

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-Yes, that's right.

-How do you make it true?

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That's the skill, that's the practice.

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Take your time now.

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I've already done it on a slope already. Oh, no.

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Nearly there.

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And again, there.

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Put the clay into the one half of the mould.

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Like that, yeah?

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Yes, indeed. Put the two halves

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of the mould together.

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-On there.

-Now, squeeze the two halves

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of the mould together in the device.

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-Like that?

-Yes, turn the handle

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to squeeze the two halves together.

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Keep squeezing, keep squeezing.

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-Go on.

-Oh, yes.

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Oil this stopper with some more oil.

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Don't forget, these ladies did this in 54 seconds.

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Yeah, all right, all right. All right, Rex.

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Don't make me feel any worse than I do already.

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Bring down the gin press,

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so that the stopper forms the bowl

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at the end of the pipe.

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Push the gin press away now.

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Get your knife and trim off the excess clay, in that knife slot.

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Now, you carefully push the wire the last little bit,

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so the wire goes fully into the mould,

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just long enough to break through into the bowl,

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so you've got your hole all the way through,

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which is vital, of course.

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-Da-da-da!

-Now you can carefully remove the wire.

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Oh God, this is so difficult.

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It is quite tricky.

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I'm going to break the pipe.

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Pull.

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Oh, my God, it's going to break.

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-Oh, no, what a shame!

-It broke.

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Just shows how tricky it can be.

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God, it is tricky, isn't it?

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So you're ready now to make your next pipe,

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-and when you've made another 699...

-I can go home?

-You can go home.

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What do you think about marks out of ten?

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Well, Thomas, as you are a newcomer to it, you've made an effort,

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-I think you showed promise, I'll be generous and give you three out of ten.

-Three?!

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-Is that all I get?

-For a first attempt, it's a valiant effort.

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Right, we'll leave Thomas to make the rest of his daily 699 batch

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and catch up with Mark.

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He's back behind the wheel of his beloved Sunbeam Alpine.

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What could be nicer on a day like this,

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to sit in a 1967 Sunbeam Alpine and just soak up the view,

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purring along the country lanes?

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Wonderful!

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Mark's travelling just under 17 miles

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to the historic market town of Shrewsbury,

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set amidst glorious countryside and near to the Welsh border.

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Mark's next shop on the list is Manser's Antiques.

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The shop now is owned by Mark Manser

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and the business was established, in the mid-'40s, by his dad

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Gordon Manser, who I knew very, very well in the old days.

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-Mark, hi.

-Hi.

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Can I just ask you, could I possibly have a look at the blue jasper jugs?

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-Yeah.

-They look rather nice.

-0K.

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Carefully, carefully. That's it.

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-Thank you.

-Lovely.

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-I think one's slightly bigger than the other.

-Ah. Oh, yes.

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-They're not sort of a matched pair.

-Right.

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We've got two single... It does say a pair here.

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Ooh, maybe I could adjust the price a little bit, then?

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We could do something.

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You've got £40 on those.

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I'm not into all this big, silly, hard haggle nonsense...

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What are you going to say?

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You think of a number and I'll see if it works for me.

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They are two single jugs, they're not a pair, are they?

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They're not a pair, no.

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Um...

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Shall we say...

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..£20?

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-£20, for the two?

-For the two.

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-I'm not going to argue with that. That's a tenner each, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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What are they going to fetch in the rooms?

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Oh, they are nice quality, those, I think that...

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-I might double up?

-I think so.

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In Wales, do they want blue jasper in Wales?

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Do they not want blue jasper in Wales?

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-I think you're just about to find out.

-That's a really good deal.

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-Thank you for that. No, I'll take them.

-0K.

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-For that sort of money, I'll always have a go.

-Lovely.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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Let me shake your hand on that, then, it seals the deal.

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0K, thank you very much.

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Nice little bargain there, Mark, but tell us more about them.

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I'm rather pleased with these, they're good, clean examples.

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Blue jasperware with white applied figures,

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classical subjects, but they're not a pair.

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They're different sizes.

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So it's more likely they were two of a graduated set

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of three different sizes.

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They're very good examples.

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They're not going to set the world alight, but I'm very pleased anyway.

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I think they're a jolly good buy for the money.

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Mark and Thomas have met up and are back on the road,

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travelling the 40 miles

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to delightful Leominster in Herefordshire.

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Leominster is a bustling market town, dating back to the 7th century,

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and boasts some delightful architecture.

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We're starting off with Thomas in Minster House Antiques Centre.

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-I'm Thomas.

-Hello.

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-Hello, what's your name?

-It's Jeremy.

-Jeremy, very nice to meet you.

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-This looks nice.

-We've got five floors and the garden, so please look around.

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Oh, I will, I'll have a good look.

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Thomas is rather a rich man at the moment.

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He's got a large wad weighing down his wallet.

0:16:340:16:38

Just think of all the lovely things he could buy.

0:16:380:16:41

Or not.

0:16:410:16:42

What a bit of kitsch. I think this is absolutely ghastly.

0:16:420:16:46

I mean, it is just something which is, it's so lustrous,

0:16:460:16:49

it's so in-your-face, but people love fishing.

0:16:490:16:53

It's probably 1930s, that's what I think.

0:16:530:16:56

I think it's hilarious. It's a good thing

0:16:580:17:01

and I'm trying to sell to the right market.

0:17:010:17:03

So what will he get for this little beauty?

0:17:030:17:06

-Ah.

-It's a love or hate job.

0:17:090:17:13

Now, Jeremy, £39 is on it

0:17:130:17:16

and there's a little nick on the tail, just there.

0:17:160:17:21

-What do you reckon?

-Well, I mean, usually, we're guided by ten percent.

0:17:210:17:26

I know, I know.

0:17:260:17:28

But £28, I'm afraid.

0:17:280:17:30

-Yeah, definitely, I'm going to go for it. It's worth it.

-Yeah.

0:17:320:17:36

-It's worth every penny.

-Yeah, I think so too.

0:17:360:17:39

-Because it is so...

-It's so horrid that it will probably do really well.

0:17:390:17:42

It's so horrid!

0:17:420:17:45

It's so horrid, but it's lovely.

0:17:450:17:47

Well, there's one deal hooked.

0:17:490:17:51

But he's not finished yet.

0:17:510:17:53

He's happened upon a rather lovely lady.

0:17:530:17:56

Wow. I can't not look at her, can I?

0:17:570:18:00

An interesting carved figure in wood,

0:18:010:18:04

of a naked female.

0:18:040:18:06

-That's rather nice.

-Easy, tiger.

0:18:060:18:09

I like it. Well, that's a definite ask.

0:18:090:18:13

Let's have a look at this. It's nice.

0:18:130:18:15

I've been dreaming about a musical box. Push button for three seconds.

0:18:150:18:20

This looks like Sorrento ware, which is

0:18:230:18:25

inlaid tessellated little cubes to make this beautiful pattern on the top

0:18:250:18:29

in olive wood.

0:18:290:18:31

It's probably dateline

0:18:310:18:33

late 19th, early 20th century.

0:18:330:18:35

It's marked Swiss there, the clockwork movement is Swiss.

0:18:350:18:39

I mean, yeah, it's in a good, original condition.

0:18:390:18:42

-Jeremy.

-Ah.

0:18:420:18:44

My lady...

0:18:450:18:47

and this sweet thing here.

0:18:470:18:50

Yes.

0:18:500:18:52

-The lady, you've got 32 on.

-OK.

0:18:520:18:56

-This, the music box, you've got 88 on.

-Right.

0:18:560:19:01

I could offer you...

0:19:010:19:04

£70.

0:19:040:19:06

80.

0:19:060:19:08

Go on, Jeremy, give me 70.

0:19:080:19:10

I can't, I can't.

0:19:100:19:12

Halfway?

0:19:120:19:15

75, go on, then.

0:19:150:19:17

-Definitely, 75.

-Good, OK.

0:19:170:19:20

I love those two.

0:19:200:19:23

Mark, meanwhile, is just a hop, skip and a jump away

0:19:230:19:26

in Leominster Antiques Market.

0:19:260:19:28

-Good morning. I'm Gavin.

-How do you do, Gavin?

0:19:280:19:32

Mark's off to explore and hopefully, bag a bargain to sell at a profit.

0:19:360:19:41

This is rather nice. I do like bowls.

0:19:470:19:49

It's spirally fluted all the way round.

0:19:490:19:53

Pretty decoration.

0:19:530:19:55

Flower sprays.

0:19:550:19:57

Several hairlines.

0:19:590:20:00

What I like is the fact that we have a date here of 1857.

0:20:000:20:05

People love porcelain with a date on.

0:20:050:20:08

I like porcelain with a date on.

0:20:080:20:10

It becomes a reference piece. Now, here comes the good part.

0:20:100:20:14

It says no trade here. No trade.

0:20:140:20:16

Not even a pound off, nothing,

0:20:160:20:19

but we don't mind, do we?

0:20:190:20:21

Because it's £9.

0:20:210:20:23

So we're going to go and see Gavin and we're going to buy this.

0:20:230:20:27

OK.

0:20:270:20:28

So no trade means no haggling.

0:20:280:20:33

-Hello, Gavin.

-Hi.

-Hi, look, I've found this, it's absolutely lovely.

0:20:330:20:37

-Right.

-I really like this.

0:20:370:20:39

Quite a bit of damage, quite a lot of stress cracks.

0:20:390:20:42

-Is that NT, is that no trade?

-It means no trade.

0:20:450:20:49

Absolutely no, I can't squeeze a pound off it, or something?

0:20:490:20:52

-Do you know who it belongs to?

-It belongs to a lady called Judith.

0:20:520:20:56

I don't like to be mean, but...

0:20:560:20:58

-No.

-Every penny counts, doesn't it?

0:20:580:21:01

-It does.

-Do you think she'd knock a pound off?

0:21:010:21:04

I'll give her a ring and ask her.

0:21:040:21:07

Let me get this right, Mark, we're phoning the owner

0:21:070:21:09

to try and get £1 off?

0:21:090:21:10

The call will cost more than a quid.

0:21:100:21:12

Judith, you have a large bowl here,

0:21:120:21:15

you have £9 on it, what would be your very best on it?

0:21:150:21:20

I'm sure that will be fine. Thanks, bye-bye.

0:21:200:21:23

-A fiver?

-£7.

0:21:230:21:25

-Lovely. Even better, that's really nice.

-£7.

0:21:250:21:29

You know, I'd love that at home for £7.

0:21:290:21:31

-It's nice, isn't it?

-It really is nice. Thank you very much, Gavin.

0:21:310:21:35

Thank you.

0:21:350:21:36

Crikey, a whole £2 off.

0:21:360:21:39

Last of the big spenders, eh, Mark?!

0:21:390:21:41

Meanwhile, Thomas has travelled north

0:21:410:21:44

to the ancient town of Welshpool,

0:21:440:21:46

in Powys.

0:21:460:21:48

He's visiting Lamp Lite Antiques, owned by Heather.

0:21:480:21:52

-Hello.

-Hello.

-I'm Thomas.

-Pleased to meet you, Thomas.

0:21:520:21:56

And as usual, he's getting his hands on everything.

0:21:560:22:00

HONK!

0:22:040:22:06

What's this he's found now?

0:22:060:22:08

They're from a hotel. The C&A would stand for a hotel, I would have thought.

0:22:080:22:13

They're good things, they're 1930s.

0:22:130:22:16

Very art deco in style.

0:22:160:22:18

They're for ice cream.

0:22:180:22:20

The reason why they are called hotel plate is because they're very thick, thick copper and plated,

0:22:200:22:24

in a heavy silver plate.

0:22:240:22:26

They are quite sweet and are very decorative.

0:22:260:22:30

The ticket price is £10.

0:22:300:22:34

-Fiver?

-Fiver, yeah.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:22:340:22:37

-Go on. Yes, £5.

-Thank you very much.

0:22:390:22:43

And as quick as a flash, he's spent a whole £5.

0:22:430:22:47

He's certainly hanging on to his big wad of cash.

0:22:470:22:51

Shopping's done. Let's recap on what our experts have bought.

0:22:510:22:55

Mark started out with £278.15

0:22:550:22:57

and spent a paltry £72 on just three auction lots.

0:22:570:23:02

He bought a duo of Staffordshire dogs,

0:23:020:23:05

a porcelain pedestal bowl

0:23:050:23:07

and a fine pair of jugs.

0:23:070:23:09

Thomas, bless him, began with £507.84 and has spent £148 on five lots, consisting

0:23:090:23:16

of the Victorian glass vase,

0:23:160:23:19

the musical box,

0:23:190:23:21

the Art Deco bowls,

0:23:210:23:23

the 1930s lady carving

0:23:230:23:24

and the pottery pike.

0:23:240:23:27

But what do our chaps think of each other's purchases?

0:23:270:23:31

I don't think Mark really rates my fish.

0:23:310:23:33

I think Mark, if he was doing this now, Mark would say,

0:23:330:23:36

"Thomas's fish is extraordinary, why did he buy it?

0:23:360:23:39

"Why did he buy it?" But again,

0:23:390:23:43

I am so disappointed in his very cautious buying.

0:23:430:23:47

72 quid, wow, what's that all about?

0:23:470:23:50

Thomas bought some very interesting things, actually.

0:23:500:23:53

Some very, very interesting things.

0:23:530:23:56

Actually, I liked all of them.

0:23:560:23:58

I can see why he bought them.

0:23:580:24:01

I do like them, although the fish,

0:24:010:24:03

I think the fish cost too much money.

0:24:030:24:05

It's been an interesting leg,

0:24:050:24:07

with the boys battling it out

0:24:070:24:10

from Ironbridge, Shropshire,

0:24:100:24:11

via Broseley, Shrewsbury,

0:24:110:24:13

Leominster, Welshpool,

0:24:130:24:15

and finally,

0:24:150:24:16

the village of Froncysyllte,

0:24:160:24:19

North Wales.

0:24:190:24:21

Froncysyllte is a pretty village in Wrexham

0:24:250:24:28

and stands on the banks of the River Dee at the Llangollen Canal.

0:24:280:24:33

Cooper Barrington is an antiques and fine art auction house,

0:24:330:24:35

located in a former chapel,

0:24:350:24:38

and has been established since the middle of 2010.

0:24:380:24:42

-Come on, then.

-OK. OK.

0:24:420:24:45

-Faffing on.

-You are, honestly.

0:24:450:24:48

-Thomas, today, I am going to win.

-Are you now?

-Yes, I am.

0:24:480:24:53

-You've only spent £72.

-You won't let that go, will you?

-No, I won't let that go.

0:24:530:24:59

Let the auction commence!

0:24:590:25:01

First up, Thomas is hoping for a profit

0:25:020:25:05

with the Victorian glass vase.

0:25:050:25:07

We have £20 and away, £20 to start me.

0:25:070:25:10

20, ten and off.

0:25:100:25:13

Ten, five, six, eight... £8, £10.

0:25:130:25:17

£10, 12, 14, 16 anywhere now?

0:25:170:25:21

£14.

0:25:210:25:23

Even though you are a competitor, I have to say, that was a travesty.

0:25:230:25:27

-It's life, isn't it?

-I suppose so.

0:25:270:25:30

That's the spirit, Thomas, keep positive.

0:25:300:25:34

It's Mark's jugs next.

0:25:340:25:36

Best not to think about them.

0:25:360:25:38

He bought them for a song, but will they be fruitful?

0:25:380:25:41

£20, I'm bid.

0:25:410:25:43

20, 22, five, 28, 30 now.

0:25:430:25:48

At 30, any more?

0:25:480:25:49

At £30, the hammer will fall now at £30.

0:25:490:25:53

-I hate to say it, Thomas, but I told you so.

-Good profit.

0:25:530:25:56

-Well, I said so.

-I'm happy, I didn't lose.

-You didn't lose.

-I said so.

0:25:560:26:00

Let's be thankful for small mercies, Mark. Move on, quickly.

0:26:010:26:06

Next up is Thomas's delightful little musical box.

0:26:060:26:10

Go on, Pandora, open it.

0:26:100:26:12

20 I'm bid, at 20, and five, and 30,

0:26:120:26:15

and five, and 40, and five,

0:26:150:26:19

45, 50, and five, and again,

0:26:190:26:23

at 50 and five, 55, you're just in time.

0:26:230:26:28

At 55, any more now at £55?

0:26:280:26:32

At 55.

0:26:320:26:33

-Goodness me.

-£5 profit.

0:26:350:26:37

It wasn't even my lot and I'm disappointed, Thomas.

0:26:370:26:41

It's a profit now, but it won't be after deducting auction costs.

0:26:420:26:46

Next, it's another pair from Mark,

0:26:460:26:49

this time, his Staffordshire dogs.

0:26:490:26:51

Was he taking a chance here?

0:26:510:26:53

20, I'm bid.

0:26:530:26:55

I'll take five, five, 25, 30, 30.

0:26:550:26:59

-Come on.

-35, 40, 40,

0:26:590:27:03

five, 45.

0:27:030:27:06

-For nothing at this price, they should be this each.

-Oh.

0:27:060:27:09

-Did you hear the auctioneer? They're for nothing.

-Any more now?

0:27:090:27:12

He's right, they're for nothing.

0:27:120:27:13

I wrote down £55

0:27:160:27:20

as what they'd sell for,

0:27:200:27:21

and they sold for £10 less,

0:27:210:27:24

which I think, for you, was jolly lucky, because they started at 20.

0:27:240:27:29

Well, they didn't make you a juicy profit, Mark.

0:27:290:27:33

Let's hope things get better.

0:27:330:27:36

It's Thomas's set of art deco bowls next.

0:27:360:27:39

Just cross your fingers.

0:27:400:27:41

Five I've got, £6.

0:27:410:27:44

£6, £8, £10, £10. The lady's bid.

0:27:440:27:47

At £10, any more at £10?

0:27:470:27:53

That doubled its money, and I knew it would double its money.

0:27:530:27:55

I knew they would.

0:27:550:27:57

Yes, keep telling yourself that, Thomas,

0:27:570:28:00

if it makes you feel any better.

0:28:000:28:01

It's Thomas again.

0:28:030:28:04

Maybe his 1930s lady carving

0:28:040:28:07

will bring him some much-needed profit.

0:28:070:28:11

£20 to start, 20, ten, ten I've got.

0:28:110:28:15

£12, 14, at 14, 16, 16, 18, 18,

0:28:150:28:20

20 now, at 18, any more?

0:28:200:28:24

-No.

-At £18.

0:28:240:28:28

-That's another loss. Well done, me.

-Another day, another loss.

0:28:290:28:32

Oh, dear, it's not Thomas's day today. Nor hers.

0:28:320:28:37

It's Mark's turn next, with his porcelain pedestal bowl.

0:28:370:28:42

£20 I'm bid, 22, 24,

0:28:420:28:45

at 24, 24, at £24,

0:28:450:28:50

is there any more now? 24.

0:28:500:28:54

-£24 for a broken bowl.

-I wanted more, just a little bit more.

0:28:540:28:58

Not much more.

0:28:580:28:59

Don't moan, Mark, it's your best effort yet.

0:28:590:29:04

Finally, it's Thomas's very large

0:29:050:29:08

and, ahem, interesting pottery pike.

0:29:080:29:12

Right, where are we with him? £20, £20 straight in.

0:29:120:29:15

£20 I'm bid. At £20.

0:29:150:29:18

-Go on, more.

-No!

0:29:180:29:20

More, more, more.

0:29:200:29:22

£20, any more now? 20.

0:29:220:29:25

£20, ludicrous, isn't it, when you think a dated English porcelain...

0:29:250:29:30

-Will you shut up?

-..bowl can only fetch £24?

0:29:300:29:34

And a bit of 20th-century tat...

0:29:340:29:36

-Will you please shut up?

-..fetches 20.

0:29:360:29:39

They're a right pair of bickering moaning Minnies, these two.

0:29:390:29:42

Despite playing it safe, the underdog won the auction.

0:29:440:29:47

Thomas Plant started with £507.84

0:29:490:29:52

and made a wounding loss after auction costs of £52.06.

0:29:520:29:58

Thomas is today's loser,

0:29:580:30:00

but still has a tremendous £455.78. Cheer up!

0:30:000:30:05

Mark Hales began with £278.15

0:30:100:30:13

and vanquished his foe.

0:30:130:30:16

After auction costs, Mark made a petite profit of just £9.18,

0:30:160:30:23

and now has a respectable £287.33

0:30:230:30:27

to fight on with.

0:30:270:30:28

-Bad luck for Thomas, £50 down.

-Not a lot, Thomas.

0:30:300:30:35

Still just over £400 in the kitty.

0:30:350:30:36

And the score is 2-1!

0:30:360:30:39

Thomas and Mark's journey will take them from Portrush, Northern Ireland

0:30:400:30:44

all the way to the beautiful village of Pontrilas in South Herefordshire,

0:30:440:30:47

notching up a whopping 460 miles along the way.

0:30:470:30:51

On this leg of the trip, they began in Newport, Pembrokeshire,

0:30:530:30:57

and motor the 48 miles to an auction in Llandeilo, Carmarthenshire.

0:30:570:31:01

-See, we're coming into... The sign there, Newport.

-There we are.

0:31:040:31:08

This Newport, not to be confused with the other,

0:31:080:31:10

bigger Newport in South Wales,

0:31:100:31:13

sits on the south-west Pembrokeshire coast

0:31:130:31:16

and is known for its great beaches.

0:31:160:31:18

Sadly, though, beaches are not on the schedule today.

0:31:180:31:22

Life's a beach, you know? At least, it can be.

0:31:220:31:25

-Right, here we are, Mark.

-Yes.

-Look at that.

0:31:260:31:30

Right, we are going shopping.

0:31:300:31:32

They're heading for the Carningli Centre - unfortunate name -

0:31:330:31:38

a shop specialising in lots and lots of railwayana.

0:31:380:31:41

TRAIN WHISTLE

0:31:410:31:44

So, which one of our intrepid antique hunters

0:31:440:31:46

will bag the first bargain? Mark, have you found something?

0:31:460:31:51

These are rather nice.

0:31:510:31:52

Ah! At last!

0:31:520:31:54

GWR, Great Western Railway. Buttons.

0:31:540:31:58

Very, very collectable.

0:31:580:32:00

Indeed they are.

0:32:010:32:03

These coat buttons date from the 1930s

0:32:030:32:06

and would have been worn by staff of the Great Western Railway,

0:32:060:32:10

which linked Wales and south-west England to London.

0:32:100:32:14

-Hello, Anne, I'm Mark.

-Hello.

-How do you do?

0:32:140:32:17

-Anne, there's no price on these.

-Just £10 for the set.

0:32:170:32:20

-Aren't they lovely?

-Yes.

0:32:200:32:22

I wonder. Yes.

0:32:220:32:24

They're very tempting. Very tempting.

0:32:240:32:27

I wonder, can we do a little bit with the price?

0:32:270:32:29

Could they be £7 for the six?

0:32:290:32:33

£7 for the six... Can we go for eight?

0:32:330:32:35

-Anne, they're lovely.

-Right.

-And £8 is fine.

0:32:350:32:39

-I'd like those, please.

-Right.

0:32:390:32:40

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-I'll have those.

0:32:400:32:43

Meanwhile, Thomas has found a police truncheon.

0:32:430:32:46

I saw SWR. Here it says South Wales Railway.

0:32:460:32:51

I quite like that. We're in South Wales.

0:32:510:32:53

This is a real bit of Welsh history.

0:32:530:32:56

These truncheons, the painted ones, are widely collected.

0:32:560:33:00

The SWR was built in 1845 to transport coal

0:33:000:33:04

from the Welsh valleys to London,

0:33:040:33:06

but only lasted 17 years before merging

0:33:060:33:09

with the Great Western Railway.

0:33:090:33:12

This railway police truncheon dates from around 1850

0:33:120:33:16

and is priced at £100.

0:33:160:33:18

-Would you do it 80?

-Can you meet me halfway? 90?

0:33:190:33:24

What, 75?

0:33:300:33:32

HE LAUGHS LOUDLY

0:33:320:33:35

No.

0:33:350:33:36

-Go on. It has got a bit of damage.

-Do you know what I mean?

0:33:370:33:41

-I'll do you 80, and it's a deal.

-Oh, OK.

-Yeah?

-Go on, then.

0:33:410:33:46

You're a star.

0:33:460:33:47

It's full steam ahead

0:33:470:33:49

with this antique shopping spree, and the chaps hit the road again.

0:33:490:33:53

So, it's goodbye to Newport

0:33:530:33:55

and hello to Pen-ffynnon, near Llangeler,

0:33:550:33:59

in the neighbouring county of Carmarthenshire.

0:33:590:34:02

Apologies for any mispronunciation.

0:34:020:34:04

Mark wants to go back to school,

0:34:040:34:06

and the bell's just rung at the West Wales Museum of Childhood.

0:34:060:34:09

-I'm Mark.

-Hello, Mark. I'm Hilary. Croeso.

0:34:110:34:14

Welcome to West Wales Museum of Childhood.

0:34:140:34:17

-Let me show you around.

-Thank you very much.

0:34:170:34:19

This museum is packed with childhood memorabilia.

0:34:190:34:22

In fact, there are some 10,000 artefacts crammed in here,

0:34:220:34:27

much of it the personal collection of Hilary and her husband Paul,

0:34:270:34:31

who've had a passion for these things for much of their lives.

0:34:310:34:34

As well as the toys,

0:34:390:34:40

there's also a mock-up of an old classroom

0:34:400:34:43

from the first half of the 20th century, with its wooden desks,

0:34:430:34:47

chalk boards and milk bottles

0:34:470:34:49

that hark back to 1946 and the first free school milk for all.

0:34:490:34:54

There are also gruesome reminders of the tough side to school life.

0:34:560:35:00

In fact, when classes come, we actually put them in here.

0:35:000:35:04

We actually get the children writing on the slates

0:35:040:35:08

and we show them the canes.

0:35:080:35:10

-Look at that.

-My goodness.

-And the sound of it, I mean.

0:35:100:35:13

You just whoosh it through the air and they can imagine it.

0:35:130:35:17

And for the really sadistic teacher, a knobbly one, look at that one.

0:35:170:35:21

-What about this one?

-Now, what is that?

0:35:210:35:24

-What on earth is all that about?

-That's a backboard.

0:35:240:35:27

-A backboard?

-If you're slouching in class,

0:35:270:35:30

if you put this bit behind your back,

0:35:300:35:32

in front of your arms,

0:35:320:35:34

you've got to stand in the corner for 20 minutes like that, that teaches you deportment.

0:35:340:35:38

Oh, really? Keeps your back upright.

0:35:380:35:40

Yes, so 20 minutes of that, you'd remember not to slouch.

0:35:400:35:44

This isn't familiar to me, but I think I might know what it is.

0:35:440:35:47

I'm just wondering....

0:35:470:35:48

I'm trying to catch up Thomas Plant at the moment.

0:35:480:35:52

He's been doing terribly well. I'm still there.

0:35:520:35:55

Do you think you might have to wear one of these at the end?

0:35:550:35:58

I'm just wondering, if I haven't caught him by the end of the week,

0:35:580:36:02

do you think maybe I should stand in the corner with that on?

0:36:020:36:05

-Oh, yes.

-Looking very solemn.

-Oh, dear!

0:36:050:36:09

Oh, dear. This museum

0:36:090:36:12

also has an impressive collection of Welsh-produced toys.

0:36:120:36:16

The country was a magnet for big-name toy manufacturers,

0:36:160:36:20

like Louis Marx,

0:36:200:36:21

Triang and Mettoy, producers of Corgi toys.

0:36:210:36:25

They originally came to Wales for war work,

0:36:250:36:29

liked the place and stayed.

0:36:290:36:31

And in the 1950s, they brought in Corgi cars.

0:36:310:36:36

They wanted a name that was small, cute, and very Welsh.

0:36:360:36:41

And you've got a relatively new Queen on the throne at that point, so, Corgi.

0:36:410:36:44

-Welsh corgi, wonderful.

-Absolutely.

0:36:440:36:47

And they were huge.

0:36:470:36:50

I mean, there was 5,000 people working there at one time.

0:36:500:36:53

-Not many toys are made in Wales any more, but this one is.

-Ah!

0:36:530:36:58

This is a firm called Timber Kits.

0:36:580:37:01

They're up in North Wales and if you turn...

0:37:010:37:04

-There you are.

-So, toys still produced in Wales.

0:37:040:37:06

-He's rather lovely, isn't he?

-He's great fun.

0:37:060:37:09

Another toy that marks the end of a great manufacturing era

0:37:090:37:13

is this, the Silver Racer,

0:37:130:37:15

one of the last mechanically driven toys before the advent of batteries.

0:37:150:37:20

If you'd like to...

0:37:200:37:22

-Aha.

-..see this.

-I like that.

-Isn't that lovely?

0:37:220:37:27

-I've had lots of motorbikes. Tinplate?

-It is tinplate.

0:37:270:37:30

-1950s?

-'50s, yes.

0:37:300:37:33

It's German. It's Tipco.

0:37:330:37:35

And this is in good order. Isn't that nice? Can I have a go?

0:37:350:37:39

-Yes, go on. Have a go.

-It'll be fun, won't it?

0:37:390:37:41

Right, I don't know how we're going to get on this floor

0:37:410:37:44

but let's see what happens.

0:37:440:37:47

Wonderful.

0:37:530:37:55

Time to return to the world of grown-ups.

0:37:560:37:59

Thomas is on his way to Newcastle Emlyn,

0:37:590:38:02

a town perched on the banks of the River Teifi,

0:38:020:38:05

the second longest river in Wales. He's meeting Steve Furness,

0:38:050:38:09

the owner of the Emlyn Antiques Centre.

0:38:090:38:11

-Thomas.

-Nice to meet you, Thomas. I'm Steve.

0:38:110:38:13

It's all right. Has it got age? I'm no great one on furniture.

0:38:190:38:23

I'm not great on furniture.

0:38:230:38:25

Don't know what I'm doing looking at it?

0:38:250:38:27

For heavens' sake, then, put it down! Huh.

0:38:270:38:29

-What's this then?

-Dough bin.

-Dough bin, oh, yeah.

0:38:350:38:40

Dough bins were used for mixing bread dough and allowing it to rise.

0:38:400:38:45

Fairly obvious, really.

0:38:450:38:47

This one's priced at a lot of dough - £220.

0:38:470:38:50

It's got a nice patina to it.

0:38:500:38:53

KNOCK ON WOOD

0:38:540:38:56

Got a bit of worm, but I think that's not kicking out.

0:38:560:38:59

I think it's Victorian. Would've been in a pantry.

0:38:590:39:02

A real country cottage farming thing, probably.

0:39:020:39:05

Its uses now in the home are for towels,

0:39:050:39:08

so to speak, outside a bathroom or on a landing.

0:39:080:39:12

I don't know what they're worth, I've never sold one.

0:39:120:39:15

Look, what can it be?

0:39:150:39:17

-The best on that is 150.

-Really?

-Yeah, really.

0:39:180:39:22

Can I offer you 100 for it?

0:39:220:39:24

125.

0:39:240:39:26

Oh, go on.

0:39:260:39:28

-125.

-Go on.

-120.

0:39:280:39:31

-What do people use them for round here? Blankets?

-Blankets and plants.

0:39:330:39:37

-Take the top off and put plants in them.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:39:370:39:40

What, for 110 quid, because you'd sell it to me for 110, wouldn't you?

0:39:400:39:44

LAUGHS

0:39:450:39:47

Yeah, I'll sell it to you for 110.

0:39:470:39:49

LAUGHS

0:39:490:39:51

Thomas is now feeling smug enough to pile some pressure

0:39:510:39:55

on his less experienced Antiques Road Tripper.

0:39:550:39:59

-You've got to start buying, Mark.

-I know, I know.

0:39:590:40:02

You've been very badly behaved recently, spending very little money.

0:40:020:40:07

-Sensible.

-No, I don't think it is, it's boring!

0:40:070:40:11

Quite right! So, what can Mark pull out of the bag

0:40:110:40:15

when the boys hit Haverfordwest, in Pembrokeshire,

0:40:150:40:19

a town dominated by a castle,

0:40:190:40:21

where Mark plans to offload his outspoken opponent.

0:40:210:40:26

-She's all yours.

-Wonderful, I can't wait.

0:40:260:40:28

-I can't wait!

-Well, don't break her.

-Don't break her!

0:40:280:40:32

-Don't break her!

-Now...spend some money!

0:40:320:40:37

Well, is that "Mark's got his orders,"

0:40:370:40:39

or is that fighting talk from Thomas?

0:40:390:40:41

Mark gets stuck in and immerses himself in furniture -

0:40:440:40:48

and more furniture - at Tree House Antiques.

0:40:480:40:51

Donna is on standby to lend a hand,

0:40:510:40:54

and with just one item in the bag, Mark's really feeling the pressure.

0:40:540:41:00

Bit of a rush, because I've only got today - got to find something today.

0:41:000:41:05

Must find something TO-DAY.

0:41:050:41:08

Yes, TO-DAY, not...next week.

0:41:080:41:12

Can I ask you about a box over here?

0:41:220:41:27

-Little bit of damage around the keyhole, as there often is.

-Yes.

0:41:270:41:31

That could have an insert or something - it's just very pretty.

0:41:310:41:35

-How much is that, can you find out for me?

-Yes, I can.

0:41:350:41:39

I mean, is it a tenner, something like that?

0:41:390:41:42

-Oh, I think it would be a bit more than that?

-Would it? Lots more?

0:41:420:41:45

-Could you find out for me?

-I will.

-Just in case - it's very pretty.

0:41:450:41:49

That's right. With not a ticket price in sight,

0:41:490:41:53

time for Donna to play "middle man" and nip round the back

0:41:530:41:56

to consult the camera-shy owner on getting a deal.

0:41:560:41:59

# Cryin'

0:41:590:42:01

# Waitin'

0:42:010:42:03

# Hopin' you'll come back

0:42:030:42:07

# I just can't seem to get you off my mi-ind... #

0:42:070:42:11

Is my luck in, Donna? How much is it?

0:42:110:42:14

Well, he wanted £20 for it, really, but we can come down a little bit.

0:42:140:42:18

-What would you...?

-It's a pretty little box, not rare or anything,

0:42:180:42:22

I just...have to buy something today. If he'll do it for 15,

0:42:220:42:26

I'll have it - because I've got room, then, haven't I?

0:42:260:42:30

-Yes. That's fair enough, you can have that for 15.

-Yeah?

0:42:300:42:33

-Wonderful, I've made a purchase!

-That's good, we're all happy!

0:42:330:42:37

-You've got the day started.

-Yes.

0:42:370:42:39

A box - not exactly the big spend we were hoping for,

0:42:390:42:43

but at least Mark's moved into double figures.

0:42:430:42:47

Oh, and there's more...

0:42:470:42:50

-Was it this one in the corner?

-Right in the corner, Donna, please.

0:42:500:42:54

I rather like that. It's got to be a good price, though, Donna, honestly.

0:42:540:42:59

-How much is it?

-Well... It's £50.

0:42:590:43:02

It's 50, is it? Let's have a look.

0:43:020:43:05

That's not expensive.

0:43:050:43:08

It's decorative, it's nice, people like a sun dial.

0:43:090:43:13

A little bit of paint...

0:43:130:43:15

Oh, dear, though, I don't want to pay £50, I really don't, honestly.

0:43:150:43:19

I'll tell you what, Donna, I won't mess you about -

0:43:190:43:22

you can either do it or you can't.

0:43:220:43:25

If it were 40, I'd buy it. £40, I'd buy it.

0:43:250:43:28

-Oh...!

-All right?

-Well, seeing as it's you!

-Yeah?

0:43:280:43:32

-Yes.

-And to seal the deal...

0:43:320:43:35

-Thank you, £40.

-# Je t'aime

0:43:350:43:38

# Je t'aime Oui, je t'aime... #

0:43:380:43:40

Smoothy!

0:43:400:43:43

So, our new boy is finally motoring.

0:43:430:43:46

With the wind in his hair, he's heading 31 miles east

0:43:460:43:50

to Carmarthen,

0:43:500:43:52

and seems ready to take on the world - well, Thomas, anyway.

0:43:520:43:58

Must buy two more items...TO-DAY.

0:43:580:44:01

I think I'll just let Thomas carry on with his psychological warfare,

0:44:010:44:07

and let it go in one ear and out of the other. I'll do things my way,

0:44:070:44:11

and I'll get the result I need my way.

0:44:110:44:14

Oh! That's fighting talk!

0:44:140:44:18

Carmarthen claims to be the oldest town in Wales.

0:44:180:44:22

The Mount Antique Centre, where Mark is heading,

0:44:220:44:25

hasn't been around that long, but judging from the amount of stuff,

0:44:250:44:29

you'd think it had. Cor, look at that!

0:44:290:44:33

Crammed!

0:44:330:44:36

I'm looking for something with a decent profit in, obviously.

0:44:360:44:40

I don't care what it is any more - I've thrown all that to the wind.

0:44:400:44:44

Oh, hark at him! Watch out, Thomas!

0:44:440:44:48

-Gone, gone, gone...

-In fact...

-I like it here, interesting things.

0:44:480:44:54

Oop! Let's see what we have here.

0:44:540:44:57

That's really nice. Not very good quality, minor factory -

0:45:000:45:04

I think it's Scottish, Portobello factory, north of Edinburgh.

0:45:040:45:08

In fact, it began life in Staffordshire

0:45:080:45:11

and was sent to Edinburgh for decorating.

0:45:110:45:14

It dates from the 1920s, and with that rare Charlie Chaplin figure,

0:45:140:45:19

it's sure to appeal to movie buffs.

0:45:190:45:22

-Jack...

-Hi.

0:45:230:45:26

This is great fun, great fun!

0:45:260:45:29

That's really nice. Erm,

0:45:290:45:32

I'm a ceramics man, so, immediately, got a nasty old crack there,

0:45:320:45:37

bit of restoration there...

0:45:370:45:39

I really do like it, but... but it's all in the price.

0:45:390:45:44

Erm, have you any idea? I mean, can it be considerably less?

0:45:440:45:47

-I've got to ask.

-I can try and get hold of one of the traders there,

0:45:470:45:52

-that's the best way to get the best price.

-OK.

0:45:520:45:54

-I will come back and let you know what they say.

-Tell them I love it.

0:45:540:45:59

I really don't want to pay £52. I don't really want to pay £42.

0:45:590:46:03

But whatever I can get it for, (I've got to have it, I must buy it)

0:46:030:46:08

(it must be worth a go, it could be a sleeper in any sale anywhere.)

0:46:080:46:13

It could be the sleeper.

0:46:130:46:15

Mmm! The word "sleeper" is often used

0:46:150:46:18

to describe an antique that's been undervalued.

0:46:180:46:21

So, could Mark be onto something?

0:46:210:46:25

It's all down to that phone call to the dealer.

0:46:250:46:28

Mark, I got hold of the traders, and they said the lowest they could do

0:46:300:46:35

would be £40, and that's the absolute rock bottom.

0:46:350:46:38

-No point in offering them 35 or anything, seriously?

-Seriously.

0:46:380:46:42

They wouldn't take it, I'm afraid, £40 is the absolute rock bottom.

0:46:420:46:46

-I think we've got to have that, then.

-Ah! Thomas!

0:46:460:46:50

Mark's here. I hope he hasn't nicked all the bargains.

0:46:520:46:56

Well, you'd better chop, chop, then, Thomas.

0:46:560:46:58

Upstairs, Mark's finally thinking big,

0:46:580:47:01

and it's £95.

0:47:010:47:03

-Lovely pine bench, I really like that.

-I can tell you,

0:47:030:47:07

the very best she will go down to on that

0:47:070:47:10

-is £70, and that's her absolute best.

-That's her bottom line?

-Yes.

0:47:100:47:14

Those attractive Gothic ends suggest this bench came from a chapel,

0:47:140:47:19

and Mark's hoping for some divine intervention on the price.

0:47:190:47:24

Do you think she'd do it for 60?

0:47:250:47:27

I'll give her another ring, and just...

0:47:270:47:30

-Tell her what I'm going to do with it.

-I will do.

0:47:300:47:33

-It's going in a local sale and deserves to find a good home.

-OK.

0:47:330:47:38

Mark - she said she'd meet you in the middle at 65,

0:47:390:47:43

but that really is the absolute lowest - no more room to move.

0:47:430:47:48

-You know, I think that's enough money, but I'll say yes.

-Good lad!

0:47:480:47:53

So, with one more item in the bag - ha! -

0:47:530:47:56

and another in the back of a car, Mark heads off,

0:47:560:47:59

leaving his rival, Thomas, in danger of disturbing the peace.

0:47:590:48:04

THOMAS BLOWS ON EUPHONIUM

0:48:040:48:07

Oh, dear. Maybe he should stick to the day job.

0:48:120:48:16

I think I could have found my third purchase.

0:48:220:48:26

With vintage cars short on space,

0:48:260:48:29

these trunks would have been the answer - packed with clothes

0:48:290:48:33

and strapped to the boot or roof.

0:48:330:48:36

Now, they're popular with interior designers,

0:48:360:48:39

doubling as blanket boxes and even pieces of furniture.

0:48:390:48:43

It's another coffee table.

0:48:430:48:45

It's another coffee table, isn't it?

0:48:450:48:49

It's a... Just cleaned up, waxed up.

0:48:490:48:52

Shame it's not leather, but... I'm going to take it away.

0:48:520:48:56

If I was a porter in a railway station,

0:48:590:49:02

I don't know if I'd make a good one,

0:49:020:49:04

but I'm going to find out how much I can get it for.

0:49:040:49:08

Well, with a price tag of £49 and made of canvas and leather,

0:49:080:49:12

it's certainly worth a gamble,

0:49:120:49:14

unless there's something else, Thomas, that takes your fancy.

0:49:140:49:17

A-ha!

0:49:180:49:21

I quite like it, it's probably like a...

0:49:210:49:24

It says here, "Victorian hop or grain scoops."

0:49:240:49:28

It's Victorian, and you can imagine a big vat of grain or hops,

0:49:280:49:33

and scoop in and out it comes, you know?

0:49:330:49:36

Some big guy scooping the grain in and out.

0:49:370:49:42

It would make something great for your kitchen.

0:49:420:49:44

At 65, though, it's more rusty than rustic.

0:49:440:49:48

That's tetanus Central.

0:49:480:49:51

Maybe that's part of my bargaining. Tetanus Central.

0:49:510:49:54

Maybe Thomas is hoping this grain scoop

0:49:540:49:57

can scoop up a huge profit. Ha!

0:49:570:50:01

-I quite like it.

-Right.

0:50:010:50:03

It's a good plant pot, good for your kitchen, BUT...

0:50:030:50:06

-Ah, right.

-These are really dangerous.

-Yeah, yeah.

-Really dangerous.

-They are quite sharp.

0:50:090:50:13

-What are you thinking?

-20 quid, cos of that damage.

0:50:130:50:15

20 quid, I think, should be fine.

0:50:150:50:17

-I shall give him a ring, just in case.

-I can't believe that.

0:50:170:50:20

Quite sharp edges on it, so would you accept a £20 offer?

0:50:200:50:24

It's your lucky day, he said 20's fine.

0:50:260:50:29

-20's fine for that?

-Yep, 20's fine for that.

0:50:290:50:31

-That's all right. And the trunk...

-Right.

0:50:310:50:34

I'd like to offer 30. So, 50 for the two.

0:50:340:50:37

Aye, that should be fine. Go on then, yeah. Yeah.

0:50:380:50:40

-You think so?

-Yeah, well it should be fine for 30 for that,

0:50:400:50:43

-cos it's been here a while.

-Has it?

0:50:430:50:45

Oh, well, that's a good sign, isn't it?

0:50:450:50:47

So, at £50 for the two,

0:50:470:50:50

could these items secure Thomas's lead in this competition?

0:50:500:50:53

Thank you very much.

0:50:530:50:56

It's time to find out, but first, let's recap what our experts are taking to auction.

0:50:560:51:01

Mark started this leg of the road trip with £287.33

0:51:010:51:06

and has spent £168 on five auction lots,

0:51:060:51:09

buying the sundial, the pretty little box,

0:51:090:51:12

the Great Western Railway buttons,

0:51:120:51:14

the Chaplin jug and the pine bench.

0:51:140:51:17

Thomas, on the other hand, started streets ahead, on £455.78,

0:51:170:51:24

but has gambled £240 on four auction lots,

0:51:240:51:29

made up of the vintage trunk, the police truncheon,

0:51:290:51:32

the grain scoop and the dough bin. So, pleased with their purchases,

0:51:320:51:36

what do our experts think of each other's auction items?

0:51:360:51:39

Again, has he been buying safe? Yes. Has he bought bold?

0:51:390:51:44

-Not really. He's bought safe. It's a bot of a yawn-fest.

-Ow!

0:51:440:51:49

His truncheon? Well, extremely rare.

0:51:490:51:53

Extremely rare.

0:51:530:51:54

If I'd have seen that before him, undoubtedly, I'd have bought that.

0:51:540:51:59

Overall, I think Thomas did very well, actually.

0:51:590:52:01

So, with no further ado, it's off to the auction.

0:52:010:52:05

Thomas and Mark started this road trip in Newport, Pembrokeshire,

0:52:050:52:09

and after a number of pit stops, they're heading for Lladeilo,

0:52:090:52:12

in Carmarthenshire, Their rendezvous with destiny,

0:52:120:52:16

auctioneers, Jones & Llewelwyn.

0:52:160:52:19

-Do you know, I always feel excited at this point.

-Really?

0:52:210:52:24

-I feel extremely nervous.

-This is catch-up day for me.

-I think I'm not going to do very well.

-Rubbish!

0:52:240:52:28

So, can Mark make up lost ground? Let's get going.

0:52:290:52:34

Oh, you might think this auctioneer was more used to selling livestock,

0:52:340:52:38

the way he speeds through the lots, so better pay attention, folks.

0:52:380:52:42

Right. Here comes Mark's sundial.

0:52:420:52:46

HE CHANTS AT SPEED

0:52:460:52:48

What a beauty.

0:52:500:52:52

25, 30 here.

0:52:520:52:54

35? 35.

0:52:540:52:56

Lovely one there. 35.

0:52:560:52:58

35. Yes, you did. 35, 159.

0:52:580:53:01

-So, what was that?

-I don't know. What did it fetch?

0:53:010:53:04

-I think it was £35.

-I made a loss anyway, Thomas.

0:53:040:53:07

Mm. But hardly anything to worry about at this stage, Mark.

0:53:070:53:11

Now, anyone fancy a vintage trunk for the car?

0:53:130:53:16

HE CHANTS AT SPEED

0:53:160:53:18

30, I've got 30 out the way.

0:53:180:53:20

-HE CHANTS AT SPEED

-32...

0:53:200:53:23

Last call at £32. 32.

0:53:230:53:25

-Eh, got away with that.

-Got away with that.

0:53:250:53:28

Only just, Thomas. Only just.

0:53:280:53:31

But now, Thomas thought this box was a Plain Jane,

0:53:330:53:36

but will the bidders agree?

0:53:360:53:38

At five, I'm bid. Five, I've got.

0:53:380:53:41

HE CHANTS AT SPEED

0:53:410:53:43

£10, I've got 10.

0:53:430:53:44

£12?

0:53:440:53:46

And again, 15, 15, 15.

0:53:460:53:48

-HE CHANTS AT SPEED

-Open the gate, £20 I'm bid. And two now.

0:53:480:53:51

At £22.

0:53:510:53:53

One, one more.

0:53:550:53:56

28? 24?

0:53:560:53:58

26? 26.

0:53:580:54:00

Come on, one more.

0:54:000:54:01

27, then. 27.

0:54:020:54:05

One more? 27, he goes, there,

0:54:050:54:07

last call, last time at £27. 27.

0:54:070:54:10

-He's done well. Well done.

-It did me proud.

0:54:100:54:12

Oh, Mark is nudging ahead, look.

0:54:120:54:15

But now it's Thomas's rare secret weapon.

0:54:160:54:19

Will Mark's fragile lead take a beating?

0:54:190:54:23

I've got £35 I'm bid.

0:54:230:54:24

At 35. 35.

0:54:240:54:26

£40. I've got 40 here, as well.

0:54:260:54:27

45 for you. 45. 47.

0:54:270:54:30

47. £50. 50 bid.

0:54:300:54:32

Last call, last time out. £50.

0:54:320:54:34

-PEN TAPS

-73.

0:54:340:54:36

Unlucky, Thomas. Genuinely unlucky.

0:54:360:54:39

Ridiculous. Should have been £150.

0:54:390:54:42

Mm, I bet you're glad it wasn't, Mark.

0:54:420:54:45

Right. You're back in the dock.

0:54:450:54:47

Let's pray that there are some train buffs in the crowd,

0:54:470:54:50

or at least button collectors.

0:54:500:54:53

HE CHANTS AT SPEED

0:54:530:54:55

Five. Five I'm bid, then. £5 I'm bid. Selling at £5.

0:54:550:54:59

A fiver. You lost a bit of money on those, but not much,

0:54:590:55:02

because you only paid £8 for them.

0:55:020:55:04

Mm. Well, someone's got a good deal there, and it's not Mark.

0:55:040:55:09

Thomas's grain scoop is up next.

0:55:090:55:11

He made a packet on a grain measure recently,

0:55:110:55:15

so can he do it with the scoop? I bet not.

0:55:150:55:18

£28, I'm bid. At 28.

0:55:180:55:20

28, I'm bid.

0:55:200:55:22

At 28, this is a disappointing price, here.

0:55:220:55:24

£28, then.

0:55:240:55:25

Last call, last time at £28.

0:55:250:55:29

-PEN TAPS

-It all adds up, Thomas.

-It all adds up.

0:55:290:55:31

Well, that's one way of looking at it.

0:55:310:55:35

Now, Mark's Chaplin jug.

0:55:350:55:38

Is this the sleeper he predicted?

0:55:380:55:40

And I've got three bids on the phone

0:55:400:55:42

can I come straight in at £115, I'm bid.

0:55:420:55:45

-115?!

-Go, go, go.

0:55:450:55:47

At 115.

0:55:470:55:48

£115, then.

0:55:480:55:49

I'm selling at £115.

0:55:490:55:53

< 120.

0:55:530:55:55

-I've got 120 here.

-You've got to go more, sir.

0:55:550:55:57

I've got 120 here, as well.

0:55:570:56:00

130? I'm out, you're in. At 130.

0:56:000:56:03

I'm selling at £130.

0:56:030:56:06

PEN TAPS God, well done you. £90 profit. Come on, you must...

0:56:060:56:09

I'm pleased. Of course I'm pleased.

0:56:090:56:11

Well, he doesn't sound it or look it.

0:56:110:56:14

Still, that profit, before costs,

0:56:140:56:16

puts our new boy firmly in the lead today.

0:56:160:56:18

So, can Thomas's dough bin make some real bread?

0:56:210:56:25

A lovely item here now, then.

0:56:250:56:27

50. Five. 60. £60, I'm bid.

0:56:270:56:30

70, at the back. £70, I'm bid. At 70. At 70.

0:56:300:56:34

80. 90. 90.

0:56:340:56:37

100.

0:56:370:56:38

£100, I'm bid.

0:56:380:56:40

-I'm selling at 100.

-TAPS PEN

0:56:400:56:43

-Could be worse.

-I have lost £30.

0:56:430:56:46

It's not a lot of money to lose.

0:56:460:56:48

Well, you say that, Mark, but you're not trailing really badly.

0:56:480:56:53

And not even a disaster with the pine bench

0:56:530:56:56

will knock him off the winner's podium now.

0:56:560:56:59

£55, I'm bid.

0:56:590:57:01

At 55. At £55, I'm bid.

0:57:010:57:04

Come along, now. Go on, then. Good man.

0:57:040:57:08

At 60. £60, he owes, and at £60.

0:57:080:57:11

PEN TAPS You've had a loss.

0:57:110:57:13

I can afford a very small loss.

0:57:130:57:15

Oh, you can afford a small loss. Look at you.

0:57:150:57:17

You tell him, Thomas.

0:57:170:57:20

-3-1 up. 3-1 up to you.

-I'm on schedule.

0:57:200:57:22

You're on schedule to overtake me next week.

0:57:220:57:24

-Clawing it back.

-Unless I do something amazing.

0:57:240:57:27

-Which you probably will.

-Probably won't.

0:57:270:57:29

Under pressure, that's when you pull it out the hat.

0:57:290:57:31

So, with the results in, it's Mark who claims victory.

0:57:340:57:37

Thomas started this leg of the road trip with a huge £455.78,

0:57:370:57:42

but lost £67.80 after auction costs,

0:57:420:57:47

leaving him with £387.98.

0:57:470:57:50

So, it just shows how unpredictable this game can be.

0:57:500:57:54

Mark, however, began with £287.33

0:57:570:58:01

and made a profit of £42.74 after auction costs,

0:58:010:58:06

leaving him with £330.07. He looks happy. Which is nice.

0:58:060:58:12

For a change.

0:58:120:58:13

-Yeuch! Yeuch! My bottom is wet!

-Come on, then.

0:58:160:58:22

I hope the car's leaking - and not Mark. Yeuch, indeed.

0:58:220:58:26

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:480:58:51

Thomas Plant and Mark Hales go shopping in Ironbridge before ending up at auctions in Froncysyllte in North Wales and Llandeilo in Camarthenshire.