Episode 1 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 1

Antiques experts David Barby and Margie Cooper go on a journey from Northumberland to Lincolnshire in a classic car as they compete to find the most profitable items to auction.


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Transcript


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(Tim Wonnacott) It's the nation's favourite antiques experts

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with £200 each,

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a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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That hurts.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So much!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or slow road to disaster?

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah.

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It's a brand new week and a brand new road trip,

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so let's meet our brand new treasure hunters.

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David Barby first became interested in antiques at the age of 12!

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And he's been at it ever since, which is a very, very, long time.

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Oh, I feel old today.

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He's known by his colleagues as The Master.

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Beryl, look in my eyes. 22.

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And here's his travelling companion, Margie Cooper.

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Afternoon.

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Margie comes from a long line of antique dealers.

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She loves a bargain but she doesn't always have a plan.

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I've absolutely no idea what his game plan is. I'm just worrying about mine.

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It's day one for David and Margie

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as they set off in their retro 1979 Mercedes 350 SL.

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It's a real dream machine and Margie has fond memories of the classic car.

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So, do you remember Dallas, David?

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I remember Dallas with Joan Collins.

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No, she was in Dynasty.

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Don't you mean Dynasty?

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This was the iconic car that Bobby owned.

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-Bobby was JR's brother.

-Right, right.

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So, as our very own Sue Ellen and JR hit the open road,

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let's hope oil's well that ends well(!)

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The route for the week ahead takes our intrepid road travellers

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from Alnwick in Northumberland

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through beautiful countryside

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to the final destination of Lincoln, 200 miles away.

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Today's road trip begins in Alnwick

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and ends up 90 miles due south in Leyburn, North Yorkshire.

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So, first up is historic Alnwick.

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This picturesque market town dates back to 600AD

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and was a staging post on the Great North Road between London and Edinburgh.

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But taking centre stage is the magical Alnwick Castle,

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star of the Harry Potter films.

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-I always thought it was a mock-up, but it isn't, is it? It's here.

-No, no, no.

-That's incredible.

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-Just look at it. Splendid.

-It really is very good.

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It's certainly cast a spell on our experts.

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The first stop for Margie is nearby Alnwick Lodge.

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What a fabulous place!

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Now this looks the sort of place where there's hidden treasures.

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-Do you think so?

-Don't forget your handbag with all that money.

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-See you!

-Bye.

-Bye.

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Now, this looks interesting.

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I'm excited.

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This exquisite emporium has been owned by Peter Smith since 1978.

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-Hi!

-Good morning.

-Peter, good morning.

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Peter has lovingly transformed the lodge into the most unusual of shops

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and declares his love of antiques from the rooftops...

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-literally.

-Look up as well as down.

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I quite like that. It isn't Worcester, but it looks just like Worcester.

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I think it's, sort of, like 1900, isn't it?

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1900s, 1920?

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I'm just impressed by the quality of the painting.

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I like that. It would be nice if that was a little Worcester cup,

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because that would go for, like, 20 or 30 pounds. And it's only a fiver.

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What's David going to say if I show him that? Is he going to laugh?

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He probably is.

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Stop worrying about what David might say. It's only a fiver.

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But it could be cheaper, couldn't it? Five pounds.

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-Four pounds?

-Four pounds.

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I can't argue with you, can I?

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-It's very beautiful.

-But it's not going to set the world on fire.

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So you've said four, yeah?

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£3.50. My final offer.

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Look, I'm not going to argue with you. £3.50's fine.

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Just up the road at the Antiques Centre,

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David also has his eye on a rather special mug.

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This is a political election victory mug,

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which is quite rare.

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The great contest at Alnwick, which is interesting, this is where we are.

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"The choice of the people and Northumberlands."

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But what an interesting piece.

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How much is that? £38.

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I like that.

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I feel a deal coming on.

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What's the value on that? What's your very best price?

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Oh, gosh.

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But will David be able to work his magic on Beryl?

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-It's got to be quite cheap, actually.

-Yeah. 20?

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-It's very reasonable.

-Awful spasm I had in my heart then.

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That it was too cheap?

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No!

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I think the condition goes against it, really,

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but it's an interesting piece because of its local history.

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-Oh, g... 15. And that's it.

-That's the lowest, is it?

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-Yea. Yeah.

-OK.

-Because I've only put it in this morning.

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-Have you really?

-Yes, yeah.

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Well, no point in rushing a decision when there's some enticing pieces of Staffordshire nearby.

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Is that £15 the pair?

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Well, I suppose to you, yes.

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But anybody else, no.

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They don't sell, do they?

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That's the trouble with Staffordshire at the moment.

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-Such a shame.

-Well, we seem to sell them.

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-Do you really?

-We've only got those. We haven't got any more cos we've sold the rest.

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So, these are the rejects?

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Cheeky.

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Well, no, those are something else that's come in this morning.

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Do you want to think about it? I'll put them aside.

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-OK.

-Right.

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-I'll put them in the office.

-Lovely. Thank you very much.

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Well, he's not the only one getting excited.

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See, that catches my eye. I really like Imari porcelain.

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You know, the blues and the lovely colours.

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Let's just have a look. Really pretty.

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Imari porcelain was made in Japan and extensively exported

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via the port of Imari between the 17th and 20th centuries.

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Can you spot the slight problem?

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Huge crack there.

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-Very mendable problem.

-Yeah.

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If it's cheap enough, I'll go for it.

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So, it's £10.

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You said eight pounds on it.

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It's going to have to be five.

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Otherwise, I don't think there's any point in me trying.

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5.50?

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You love your 50ps, don't you?

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5.50, you're on.

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Thank you.

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Right. After all that, I owe you £9.

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£9. Not bad for a cracked plate and a teacup.

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So, off to find David.

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I hardly dare tell him what I've bought.

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He'd better not laugh.

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Laugh? David's far too busy for that.

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He's now got his eye on a copper coal scuttle

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and has stallholder, Annie, in his sights.

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-75.

-Ooph!

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Too much for the present state of the market.

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It really is. Can you go down to 40?

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No, no. No way, no.

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-50. Sorry.

-Could you split the difference between 40 and 50? 45.

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That's a lot off.

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But copper is not selling at the moment.

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-OK.

-Well, you know the market.

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I'll believe you.

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-Go on then, 45.

-45, yeah. OK, 45.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

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Looks like he's not finished yet, though.

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Here comes that cracked tankard and the Staffordshire figures.

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Right, now we've got that

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and we've got those two pieces.

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You've told me I can have those at 15. I hoped for 10 but...

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No, it's got to be... They've got to be 15 each.

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Those for 15 and that for 15, that's 30.

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That's the worrying one, actually.

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-I think you're...

-Could you do them for 20, please?

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Well, I think that's a bit...

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-25, OK?

-Can we split the difference at 22?

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-No.

-22.

-25.

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-Beryl, look in my eyes.

-22,22.

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25.

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Go on then, being as it's you, yeah.

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The master of seduction. That hypnotic stare has worked a charm.

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David.

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HORN HONKS

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-Are you ready?

-My word, you're raring to go.

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Have you had a good day?

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-So-so.

-Oh.

-Have you had a good day?

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Wonderful. Absolutely superb.

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I've enjoyed every minute of it.

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Reunited, David and Margie are back on the road

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and are heading towards Rothbury in the heart of the Northumberland countryside,

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where David's taking a break to recharge his batteries, literally.

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Cragside! Do we go up here?

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Cragside House is famed for being the first in the world

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to generate its own electricity

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and is so-called because it stands on a crag, of course.

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My, oh my, what a splendid house.

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-Hello. David Barby.

-Hello. Andrew Sawyer.

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I'm longing to know about this house. It looks splendid.

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So, what are you going to show me first of all?

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I'm going to show you where the electricity was generated first.

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-Well, lead on.

-Thank you.

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Cragside's owner, Lord William Armstrong,

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thought fossil fuels would run out within 200 years.

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Nicknamed The Geordie Genius, he pioneered green energy

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by using waterfalls to drive in-house generators.

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Well, all the equipment survives.

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We don't run it any longer because it is very much a museum piece.

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-Right.

-And because of its great national importance.

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Where did the idea about creating electricity and light bulbs come from?

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Was it a variety of people?

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Yes, it's a culmination of all sorts of people's thoughts, really,

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and Lord Armstrong was very good at taking people's ideas

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and evolving them.

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He was a great innovator really.

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Genius.

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Not just electricity but free electricity.

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What about drought?

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Well, this was one of the problems that he did encounter in the 1890s

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and he added the battery room to try and take up that slack.

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-Right.

-But, eventually, he had to put in a gas engine

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for those periods of drought.

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So, he designed this for his own use?

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-Yes.

-And his own use was to light the house.

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Yes, to make it the first house in the world to be lit by hydroelectricity.

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But it was a bit of a juggling act

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with the caretaker of the electric light and the butler.

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-Yes.

-Because the butler had to turn off lights

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out of rooms to put on lights in rooms that they were going into.

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-Right.

-Because they could only have 97 on at any one time.

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-Oh, this is fascinating.

-So, the green energy generated

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by this giant dynamo ended up here,

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lighting the very first lamp, in 1880.

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Oh, this is wonderful.

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These are the cloisonne vases,

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which were kerosene lamps,

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and he converted them over to the electric light.

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And he made the electric connection

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by having them in a saucer of mercury.

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Then he lifted them out of the saucer of mercury to turn them off

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and put them into the saucer of mercury to turn them on.

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But these were the first lamps to be lit in the first room.

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He was known as The Magician, wasn't he?

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The place was known as The Palace Of The Modern Magician.

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And if you think that's magic, just wait until you see upstairs.

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Lord Armstrong was keen to show off his electricity

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to the great and the good.

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Oh my.

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Oh my.

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That is stunning.

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This room was entirely added

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for the visit of the Prince and Princess of Wales in 1884.

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Well, they came to see the electric light in this very modern home.

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-Right.

-And they did have a choice

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of either going to stay with the Duke of Northumberland...

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-Who had no electric light.

-Indeed.

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And actually chose to come here.

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Now, this was modern living, wasn't it? But for the very wealthy.

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Yes. This is the house, really, where modern living began.

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So it was about 60, 70 years before the rest of Britain,

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ordinary people, could actually enjoy electric light in the home.

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But this is where it all began, here.

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Yes. You're having a wonderful Armstrong moment.

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-Does it happen to many people?

-Oh, it happens to everyone that stands in this room.

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I'm sure it does. Andrew, can I honestly say,

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this is one of the most exciting properties I've been in to.

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It's wonderful. And thank you very much for taking me round.

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You're very welcome.

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Meanwhile, back in the old jalopy,

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Margie has driven 30 miles south to Newcastle.

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Historically a part of Northumberland,

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Newcastle is situated on the north bank of the River Tyne.

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It's the perfect place for our Margie to pick up an antique or two.

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Right. We're here.

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Margie's next shop is the Fern Avenue Antique Centre,

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run by Giuseppe Anthony.

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-Hi. Hello.

-Hello there. Pleased to meet you.

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-Margie Cooper. Nice to me meet you.

-Are you all right? Pleased to meet you.

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-I'm going to have a look round.

-Yeah, please do.

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-And, see how we get on.

-Okey doke.

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Margie's only spent a paltry £9 so far

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but I sense a shift in strategy.

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Well, my plan is to just try and find something.

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I'd like to find a couple of things, you know, 40, 50 pounds each,

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that I can make, sort of, 20 or 30 pounds on.

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I do want to go for it a little bit, don't I?

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What's this?

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These do well.

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-It's a dough bowl.

-Yeah.

-Eastern European, for mixing the dough,

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come in various sizes, make a great sledge.

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Yeah.

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Looks Romanian to me.

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Made out of a single piece of wood, in this case sycamore,

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and, after being hollowed out, the giant bowls were used to mix dough in.

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That's cheap and cheerful.

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£38, which doesn't sound very dear.

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So how cheap can this be, 'Seppe? Come on, you want me out of here, don't you?

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35 quid and it's for nothing.

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-35. You've knocked three quid off.

-Yeah.

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You've put sycamore there.

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I'm syca-you!

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-I don't blame you. I'm sick of myself.

-No.

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Come on, can it be, like...?

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-Can it be what?

-Can it be 25 quid?

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No, it can't be 25.

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£32, but that is the bottom line.

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-Don't even think about bidding me.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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-Cos I'd offend you?

-I wouldn't be offended but you'll just get a "no".

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£32, it's not a lot of money.

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-We'll have it.

-Right?

-Yeah.

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So that's one, two, three, £40.

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-Thank you very much.

-Lovely. Great.

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-The strategy's not working.

-You're not wrong there.

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Wasn't the idea to buy boldly?

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Never mind, there's still time.

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Sunderland beckons.

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Founded in 1179 at the mouth of the River Wear,

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Sunderland grew from a humble fishing village

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to become a thriving port, trading coal and salt.

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Last shop of the day.

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SPOOKY MOAN

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Oh, my goodness.

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It's the head of a giraffe, isn't it?

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It says, "Please do not touch".

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Oi, can't you read?

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Yeah, it is.

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A weird and wonderful shop. Right, let's have a look round.

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-I'm a bit fascinated by your giraffe.

-Hello.

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This strange curiosity shop belongs to David Whitfield,

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who is giraffe-daft.

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Have a look round. Just help yourself. Feel free.

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Right. That's an interesting piece of wood isn't it, your baluster here?

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Er, newel post.

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-Can I just unleash it?

-Course you can. Do you want a hand?

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Yeah. I might just try and get him down a bit.

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You don't want it to drop on your toes.

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-So what did you say, darling?

-£60.

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And that's the least?

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-£40.

-Oh, done it.

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-OK.

-That's terrific. Oh, I love it.

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Love it, love it, love it.

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I think we got the message.

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I haven't spent long in the shop and I found something.

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-£40.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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-Thank you so much.

-Thank you, Margie. Lovely meeting you.

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And you, too.

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Well, I can't believe I've just bought a newel post.

0:17:120:17:14

-Nor can I.

-But I think it's superb

0:17:140:17:17

and I'm really pleased and it's the best buy today.

0:17:170:17:20

So I'm off.

0:17:200:17:22

-See ya.

-See ya.

0:17:220:17:23

Wouldn't want to be you, not with that newel post.

0:17:230:17:26

Margie has splashed the cash on a piece of old staircase

0:17:260:17:29

but will she still love it tomorrow?

0:17:290:17:31

Night-night.

0:17:310:17:33

It's a brand new day and our experts are pushing south

0:17:340:17:37

in their 1979 Mercedes 350 SL, with David in the driving seat.

0:17:370:17:43

The thing that I'm worried about is it's automatic.

0:17:440:17:46

I have never driven an automatic before.

0:17:460:17:49

Now he tells us.

0:17:490:17:51

I feel as though I should be doing something with the left leg.

0:17:510:17:53

Just leave your left leg alone. Give it a rest.

0:17:530:17:56

These two are turning into a right old married couple.

0:17:560:18:00

So far, David's spent £67 on two lots.

0:18:000:18:03

A lovely pair of Staffordshire figures bundled together

0:18:030:18:05

with a chipped, old tankard and a copper coal scuttle,

0:18:050:18:08

which means he's still got £133 burning a hole in his pocket...

0:18:080:18:12

..and smiling.

0:18:130:18:15

Margie, meanwhile, has managed to spend a total of £81 on three lots.

0:18:170:18:21

A pretty porcelain cup paired with a cracked Imari plate,

0:18:210:18:25

a mahogany newel post and a rather rustic dough bowl.

0:18:250:18:28

A porter would just stand there like that.

0:18:280:18:30

But will she rise to the challenge and prove to be a worthy winner,

0:18:300:18:33

with just £119 cash remaining?

0:18:330:18:37

Before he gets down to more shopping,

0:18:390:18:41

David is making a detour to Weardale in County Durham

0:18:410:18:45

to drop Margie off for a royal appointment.

0:18:450:18:48

This is an area of outstanding natural beauty,

0:18:490:18:51

rolling hills and valleys,

0:18:510:18:53

and it even has a pony.

0:18:530:18:55

-Well, here we are.

-Now, you have a good day.

0:18:560:18:58

-I will do so.

-Don't buy anything special.

0:18:580:19:00

-I promise not to do that.

-I'll see you later.

0:19:000:19:03

Bye-bye.

0:19:030:19:05

-That's a good start.

-Margie is here to meet Anita Atkinson.

0:19:080:19:12

Union Jack mad.

0:19:130:19:15

A loyal subject with a right royal passion.

0:19:150:19:17

-Anita!

-Hello. You made it. Margie Cooper.

0:19:170:19:20

-I have made it.

-Pleased to meet you. Come on in.

0:19:200:19:22

Would you please be upstanding

0:19:220:19:24

for Anita's enormous collection of royal memorabilia.

0:19:240:19:26

Oh, my goodness me.

0:19:280:19:30

This is some of it.

0:19:300:19:31

Gosh, so when did you start all this?

0:19:310:19:34

I think my collection really took off in Silver Jubilee year

0:19:340:19:37

because that was the first big occasion of my lifetime.

0:19:370:19:41

I've now got over 5,000.

0:19:410:19:44

Anita used to be the world record holder for the largest collection

0:19:440:19:47

-but she recently lost her crown.

-I'm not bothered about it at all.

0:19:470:19:50

In fact, I'm over the moon that there's someone else as daft as me.

0:19:500:19:53

Right, well, I can show you my oldest piece,

0:19:530:19:55

-if you'd like to see that.

-I'd particularly like to see that.

0:19:550:19:57

Because the collection starts at Queen Victoria's coronation.

0:19:570:20:01

This is actually an original newspaper

0:20:010:20:04

and it's the coronation edition of the Sun,

0:20:040:20:08

-June 28th, 1838.

-That is a lovely thing to have.

0:20:080:20:12

The whole country was rejoicing, of course, because, you know,

0:20:120:20:15

this young queen, 18 years old, she was a teenager and the first female monarch for 100 years.

0:20:150:20:19

-Yeah.

-And I think they had been a bit fed up with old men.

0:20:190:20:22

That's a really fabulous piece of memorabilia.

0:20:240:20:26

And from the oldest piece in the collection to one of the newest.

0:20:260:20:30

What's going on with this, then?

0:20:300:20:32

Well spotted!

0:20:340:20:36

A mug celebrating the wedding of Kate Middleton and, er...

0:20:360:20:40

Prince Harry?

0:20:400:20:41

So who got this wrong then?

0:20:410:20:43

Well, the manufacturers.

0:20:430:20:46

Off with their heads!

0:20:460:20:47

I had to pay £10 for that mug.

0:20:470:20:49

-Oh, that's funny, isn't it?

-I had to get it imported from China.

0:20:490:20:52

-You see, in 30, 40, 50 years' time...

-Yeah. That is unusual.

0:20:520:20:56

That is the royal wedding mug to collect.

0:20:560:20:58

That'll be on the Antiques Road Trip.

0:20:580:21:00

Anita's collection is so big that most of it isn't even on display.

0:21:010:21:05

-So, here we go.

-Yeah, well, there's more up here.

0:21:060:21:09

This is where most of the collection is.

0:21:090:21:11

-Right.

-Up here, in the loft.

0:21:110:21:13

With 36 boxes full, Anita has royals coming out of the rafters.

0:21:130:21:18

Don't you find it frustrating to have a lot of your stuff up here?

0:21:190:21:22

-Oh, it is, yeah.

-Cos you've probably forgotten half the things that are in here.

-Yeah.

0:21:220:21:25

-You haven't got the room.

-Isn't that awful, Edward VII in the loft?

0:21:250:21:28

-Yeah, I know.

-And there's not many folk can say that.

0:21:280:21:32

I've got to get back to my shopping.

0:21:320:21:34

I've got to beat this David Barby.

0:21:340:21:37

And he's out now, shopping, and I'm here, up this ladder.

0:21:370:21:40

-Mind how you go down the ladder.

-I certainly will.

0:21:400:21:42

Cos that would be an easy win, wouldn't it, if I fell?

0:21:420:21:45

-Bye!

-Bye.

0:21:470:21:48

With a right royal wave to Weardale,

0:21:490:21:53

David has driven on to Durham,

0:21:530:21:55

where there's also a royal connection.

0:21:550:21:57

This impressive castle is the ancient palace of the Prince Bishops,

0:22:030:22:06

who exercised extraordinary powers over the diocese.

0:22:060:22:09

In Durham's indoor market, it seems David has also caught the royal bug.

0:22:130:22:18

-Oh, dear.

-Now, isn't that fun?

0:22:180:22:21

Isn't that fun?

0:22:210:22:22

This is a cameo portrait of the Duke of Edinburgh and Elizabeth.

0:22:220:22:27

Now, this was made by Crown Devon, a very good company.

0:22:270:22:29

So there's loads of local history there.

0:22:290:22:33

That's a very nice pot. I quite like that.

0:22:330:22:36

That's £16. A little bit on the high side but we can come back to that.

0:22:360:22:40

I'd like to have something that had royal connections

0:22:420:22:45

because of the, you know, the Diamond Jubilee.

0:22:450:22:48

And there's this Wedgwood tankard there.

0:22:480:22:51

That's a good design one.

0:22:510:22:54

That's the Silver Jubilee.

0:22:540:22:55

Have a look at these. They're two sailor dolls and they were produced as sort of souvenirs.

0:22:580:23:04

£12.50 each.

0:23:040:23:06

A little bit on the top side.

0:23:060:23:08

Sylvia, are these yours?

0:23:090:23:12

Yes. Yes, they are.

0:23:120:23:14

What's the best price you could do on the little dolls?

0:23:140:23:17

What's the best price you could do on them?

0:23:170:23:19

Oh, that's asking me to be both buyer and seller.

0:23:190:23:22

£10 each.

0:23:250:23:27

That's still too much, that's £20 for two.

0:23:270:23:28

-Are you going to stare at me for ages then?

-No, I'm not.

0:23:280:23:32

I wouldn't bet on it.

0:23:320:23:34

-15, final, final offer.

-For the two?

0:23:340:23:37

Yes.

0:23:370:23:38

They're jolly cheeky chappies, aren't they?

0:23:410:23:43

Will you take £10 for the two?

0:23:430:23:45

£12.50, that's it.

0:23:480:23:50

(£10.)

0:23:530:23:55

Oh, go on, £10.

0:23:570:23:59

Whoever would have guessed that David had a thing for sailors?

0:23:590:24:03

I think they're great fun.

0:24:030:24:05

Thank you very much indeed.

0:24:050:24:06

With another purchase under his belt, David rejoins Margie

0:24:070:24:10

for their final shopping spree in Richmond.

0:24:100:24:13

Situated on the River Swale, this beautiful little market town

0:24:160:24:19

is dominated by the 11th century castle, a Mecca for tourists.

0:24:190:24:23

Time's running out now. We've only got another few hours.

0:24:240:24:27

Well, that's right. I'm getting into a panic situation, very apprehensive,

0:24:270:24:31

I just don't know what I'm going to find here.

0:24:310:24:33

Richmond has been described as the most romantic town in the North of England.

0:24:330:24:38

But will our experts fall in love with anything else to make them part with their cash?

0:24:380:24:43

-Best of luck.

-And you, too.

0:24:430:24:45

-See you.

-Bye.

-Bye.

0:24:450:24:47

Don't worry about parking the car, guys, we'll take care of that.

0:24:470:24:50

David has found his way to Harry Thompson's shop

0:24:530:24:55

and immediately spies a lovely piece of Prattware.

0:24:550:24:59

Oh, my God. This, basically, is a paste pot.

0:25:010:25:06

And, around about sort of 1845, 1850...

0:25:070:25:12

..they used to present gentlemen's hair grease ointment

0:25:130:25:16

in plain, white pottery boxes.

0:25:160:25:18

And then somebody suggested, if we put a coloured picture on the top,

0:25:200:25:23

they'd sell more of the product.

0:25:230:25:25

David's quite right. Prattware elaborate polychrome images

0:25:250:25:29

were transfer-printed onto the top of hair grease and fish paste pots,

0:25:290:25:33

and they're now highly collectable today.

0:25:330:25:35

I think this one is of Strasbourg, is it not?

0:25:350:25:38

-I don't know.

-I think it's Strasbourg.

0:25:380:25:41

So I rather like that one.

0:25:410:25:44

-You've got 50 on it.

-Well, I know.

0:25:440:25:47

But that doesn't mean it's 50, does it?

0:25:470:25:50

What sort of price would it be?

0:25:500:25:52

Do I go up or down?

0:25:520:25:54

No. You go down, you go down.

0:25:540:25:57

Can you do it at 20 quid for us?

0:25:590:26:00

-Would you rob an old pensioner?

-Yes.

0:26:000:26:03

Look how weary and tired I look like, you know.

0:26:030:26:06

And, I mean, some day you'll get to be old.

0:26:060:26:08

Oh, I feel old today. I feel old today!

0:26:090:26:13

22 Harry, please?

0:26:140:26:16

23.

0:26:160:26:18

Or 53, I aren't bothered. 53 or 23.

0:26:190:26:22

-23.

-Oh.

0:26:220:26:24

-Thank you very much.

-Are you going home now?

0:26:240:26:26

Oh, no. No, there might be something else lurking around.

0:26:260:26:29

I know. That's what's worrying me.

0:26:290:26:31

Not something, David, someone.

0:26:310:26:33

Look who's lurking at the door.

0:26:330:26:35

-Am I allowed to, or have you finished?

-Yes, come on in.

0:26:350:26:37

-Let me introduce you to 'Arry.

-Oh right, have you finished?

0:26:370:26:41

-Almost, yes.

-Hello Harry. Well, I don't want to disturb you.

0:26:410:26:44

It's all right. I just want him out.

0:26:440:26:47

-You got rid of him.

-He's robbed me summat rotten.

0:26:470:26:49

Has he robbed you? That means he's bought something.

0:26:490:26:51

Well, if I stay up here. I'll stay out of your way. I'll just go in here.

0:26:510:26:55

David, he's bought something. Bully for him.

0:26:550:26:58

Oh, she's not bitter, that girl.

0:26:580:27:00

Come on, Margie, you're in happy Harry's emporium now,

0:27:000:27:04

where there really is something for everyone.

0:27:040:27:07

That's quite interesting. Shelley. Collectable.

0:27:080:27:10

1930s.

0:27:110:27:13

The price is right.

0:27:130:27:16

Then you've got the lustre, which is very nice. 1930s.

0:27:160:27:20

Not a brilliant painting in the middle.

0:27:200:27:22

But purely because it's clean.

0:27:240:27:27

You know, it's not amazing, but I think it would sell.

0:27:280:27:32

Well, you'd better not dally then cos, down the road,

0:27:330:27:36

David is scenting success with a perfume bottle.

0:27:360:27:39

-I like that.

-It is nice, that, isn't it?

0:27:410:27:43

So we've got a hinge-top section there,

0:27:440:27:47

with the cork, which I think has been replaced, actually.

0:27:470:27:51

And then this end, which is a screw end,

0:27:530:27:56

that would have been, again, you've got a cork stopper.

0:27:560:28:00

And I think that would have been for smelling salts.

0:28:000:28:02

I think it's the sort of thing that, if people are collecting scent bottles, and they do,

0:28:040:28:08

that's quite a nice little item.

0:28:080:28:10

That's got 95 on it, which is a little bit high.

0:28:120:28:16

What's the very best you can do on that?

0:28:170:28:19

Right, well, I'm saying I'm not going to go any lower than 65.

0:28:200:28:23

That's a good drop, a really good drop. 65.

0:28:240:28:27

What about £50?

0:28:270:28:30

No. I'll do you 55.

0:28:300:28:32

Can we split the difference at 52, please?

0:28:320:28:35

-(Go on, then.)

-52.

-52, that's it.

0:28:390:28:42

And that's why some people call him The Master.

0:28:430:28:46

This is mild hysteria now because we're on the last knockings.

0:28:480:28:52

What's this? This footman's quite nice, isn't it?

0:28:540:28:57

-Ooh, God, it's so heavy.

-Oh, aye, that's nice.

0:28:570:29:00

By gum it's old, isn't it? Brass footman.

0:29:020:29:05

Interesting detail on the top.

0:29:060:29:09

I don't know enough about it but I quite like it.

0:29:100:29:13

In the early 19th century, fireside stools, or footmen like this,

0:29:130:29:16

were used to keep kettles and pans on.

0:29:160:29:19

Oh, God, we've got a floppy leg here.

0:29:200:29:22

No, I don't think that's... I quite like that, but...

0:29:230:29:26

Do you think I should buy this footman?

0:29:260:29:28

How much is it?

0:29:280:29:30

65 quid.

0:29:300:29:32

Right, so, if I buy that for a fiver.

0:29:320:29:36

It's that pretty little Shelley bowl.

0:29:370:29:39

-What would you want for the...

-50.

-50 quid.

0:29:400:29:42

Right, because I want to spend my money and because I'm fed up

0:29:460:29:50

and it's too late now to go anywhere else, it's the end of the day.

0:29:500:29:52

-I'll tell you what I'll do.

-Yeah.

0:29:530:29:55

If you look at it all, give me 45.

0:29:550:29:59

-And go.

-45.

0:29:590:30:00

Bless you. Harry, you're a star.

0:30:000:30:02

So that's £45 for the bowl and the footman. Deal done.

0:30:020:30:06

Well done, happy Harry.

0:30:060:30:08

I'm sorry if I've tested your patience.

0:30:080:30:11

You haven't tested my patience. As long as I'm taking some money, I don't care.

0:30:110:30:16

-Charming young ladies like you.

-Young ladies. Here's another tenner.

0:30:160:30:19

No, my eyesight's going.

0:30:210:30:25

What a charmer! I'd get out while the going's good, Margie.

0:30:250:30:27

Thankfully, that's cheered her and him up.

0:30:270:30:30

With the final deals done, it's time for our experts to reveal their items to each other.

0:30:320:30:37

A bit like show and tell but for grown-ups.

0:30:370:30:39

Heads or tails?

0:30:390:30:41

-Which do you want?

-Heads.

-Heads. You ready?

0:30:410:30:44

Yeah. Oh, my...

0:30:440:30:46

-OK. It's tails.

-It's tails.

-Tails.

0:30:460:30:48

-So it's my choice.

-It's your choice.

0:30:480:30:50

So you reveal.

0:30:500:30:52

Oh, dear, dear, dear.

0:30:520:30:53

Ooh. Oh, very David Barby.

0:30:530:30:58

Oh, I like... Oh, my goodness.

0:30:580:31:00

-Oh!

-Oh!

0:31:000:31:02

And there's the coin.

0:31:020:31:04

What do you think?

0:31:050:31:06

My eye goes to that.

0:31:060:31:09

Absolutely super and in extremely good condition.

0:31:110:31:13

-That's my most expensive item.

-Was it?

0:31:130:31:15

You paid 60 to 70 pounds for it?

0:31:150:31:19

I paid £52 for it and I think it has got a potential of making a profit.

0:31:190:31:23

Yeah, if it's right, you'll probably get just under 100 quid for it.

0:31:230:31:27

If not, you're probably talking, what, 70, 75.

0:31:270:31:31

-Yeah.

-That looks interesting, at the back.

0:31:310:31:33

Oh, crikey, what's that big tankard at the back?

0:31:330:31:35

-It's commemorative.

-Yes, but it's in appalling condition.

0:31:350:31:38

-Yeah.

-Appalling condition.

0:31:380:31:41

Oh, that's lovely, isn't it?

0:31:410:31:43

Isn't it nice? I love anything to do with politics.

0:31:430:31:45

I think that's a really good piece.

0:31:450:31:47

Margie's seems oddly impressed by that tired, old tankard.

0:31:470:31:51

Right, come on girl, let's have a look at yours.

0:31:510:31:53

Right, here we go. Don't laugh.

0:31:530:31:55

Oh.

0:32:000:32:01

-Oh.

-That's...

0:32:020:32:04

It's not often you see David Barby lost for words.

0:32:060:32:09

Oh.

0:32:090:32:11

Dough.

0:32:110:32:12

Is it a dough or is it a...

0:32:120:32:16

a mixer?

0:32:160:32:17

-Well, I don't know, it was sold...

-It's continental, isn't it?

0:32:170:32:19

-Yeah, it is, European.

-Continental.

0:32:190:32:22

And they would use it for storing vegetables.

0:32:220:32:23

Well, it's supposed to be a dough bowl.

0:32:230:32:26

-A dough bowl?

-Dough bowl.

-Right.

-That's hard to say.

0:32:260:32:29

I can see it filled with cabbage, at harvest festival,

0:32:290:32:34

-with turnips and things like that.

-Yeah.

-I like the Imari.

0:32:340:32:38

Yeah, but turn it over.

0:32:380:32:41

-Ah.

-I just thought that could be repaired. Five pounds.

0:32:410:32:45

Oh, that's so cheap.

0:32:450:32:46

And then there's Margie's bit of staircase.

0:32:460:32:49

Now, do tell me about the newel post.

0:32:490:32:51

-I know you're dying to tell me.

-I love architectural stuff.

0:32:510:32:53

-Right.

-You're obviously not keen, are you?

0:32:530:32:55

-I like this sort of thing.

-No, I'm not, I'm not.

0:32:550:32:57

-Have we done all right?

-I think we've got such diverse objects.

0:32:570:33:01

I think yours are more exciting than mine.

0:33:010:33:04

I think you've done very well.

0:33:040:33:06

Marge, best of luck at the auction.

0:33:060:33:08

Well, they're being nice to each other's faces

0:33:100:33:12

but what do they really think of each other's items?

0:33:120:33:15

I think Marjory has got quite an eclectic mix there.

0:33:150:33:18

The newel post, if anybody's restoring a house,

0:33:180:33:21

that's an ideal piece of Victoriana.

0:33:210:33:23

Out of the two of us, it's level pegging.

0:33:230:33:26

I think his old commemorative,

0:33:260:33:28

it'll be really interesting to see what that does

0:33:280:33:32

because it's so old and it's so damaged,

0:33:320:33:34

that could be a disaster.

0:33:340:33:36

I think I might just have the edge.

0:33:370:33:39

With both our experts feeling confident,

0:33:390:33:41

it's time to test their metal as they head out

0:33:410:33:44

into the open road and off to auction.

0:33:440:33:46

BOTH: # Wish me luck As I wave you goodbye

0:33:460:33:49

Gracie Fields.

0:33:520:33:53

From Alnwick, it's been an eventful first leg of the road trip

0:33:550:33:58

with one final push on to the auction at Leyburn,

0:33:580:34:01

in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales.

0:34:010:34:03

-Moment of truth.

-Can be told.

0:34:050:34:07

Well, all I can say, Marge, is best of luck.

0:34:080:34:10

Today, our experts are doing battle at Tennants,

0:34:100:34:14

one of Yorkshire's most highly regarded auction houses.

0:34:140:34:17

It attracts buyers from around the world.

0:34:170:34:19

But will David and Margie's items have a global appeal?

0:34:190:34:22

We'll ask auctioneer Jeremy Patterson.

0:34:220:34:25

I think the Victorian double scent bottle's a decent lot.

0:34:250:34:28

I mean, it's small, condition's OK on it as well.

0:34:280:34:32

Quite desirable. I think that should sell OK.

0:34:320:34:35

The newel post. Not quite sure what you actually do with that.

0:34:350:34:38

Who knows? But certainly quirky anyway.

0:34:380:34:41

Sounds to me like a bit of a mixed bag then.

0:34:420:34:44

A cross between could-do-well and could-do-better.

0:34:440:34:47

But have they spent their money wisely?

0:34:470:34:50

David began the road trip with £200 and spent £152 on five lots,

0:34:520:34:57

leaving him with £48 cash in hand.

0:34:570:34:59

Margie also started with £200 and also bought five lots

0:35:030:35:06

but she only spent £126,

0:35:060:35:08

leaving her with £74 in the kitty.

0:35:080:35:11

And, as the auction gets under way, the tension is beginning to show.

0:35:130:35:16

I'm hyperventilating.

0:35:200:35:21

First up is David with this pretty,

0:35:230:35:25

if unfashionable, little piece of Prattware.

0:35:250:35:28

£50 for lot number 68. 50, 20, bid.

0:35:280:35:31

£20 I am bid. 30. 30 and you're in.

0:35:310:35:34

Any more bidders on this? For the pot, got to sell.

0:35:340:35:37

Any more bidders? 40. Against you, sir.

0:35:370:35:39

£40, the lady's bid.

0:35:390:35:40

On my right for the last time, 40'll take it, thank you.

0:35:400:35:44

Well done, mate, you've got a profit.

0:35:440:35:47

That's nice, isn't it?

0:35:470:35:50

Very nice indeed. Not a big profit but a profit nevertheless.

0:35:500:35:54

-I'm always happy once we've made a start.

-I know.

0:35:540:35:56

-Don't worry, you'll make a profit on your footman.

-Are you sure?

0:35:560:35:59

What, even with its wobbly leg?

0:35:590:36:01

Lot number 73, this 19th century footman.

0:36:010:36:05

£20 to start me. Bid, 20 at the back.

0:36:050:36:07

30, 40, 50, 60.

0:36:070:36:10

£60 I am bid in the room.

0:36:100:36:12

Bid standing against you, Madam, at 60.

0:36:120:36:14

Going to sell this. Any more bids? Don't want you to lose it for one bid.

0:36:140:36:17

£60'll take it.

0:36:170:36:18

Well done.

0:36:180:36:20

That's 20 quid profit, Marjory.

0:36:220:36:25

So, Margie takes an early lead with a profit on her first piece.

0:36:250:36:28

You've made £20.

0:36:280:36:30

-I'm three ahead of you.

-I know.

0:36:300:36:32

I'm getting worried now, I'm really getting panicky.

0:36:320:36:35

Which is more than can be said for some in this auction room.

0:36:350:36:37

Wakey-wakey then, it's time for the next lot.

0:36:370:36:40

David's Victorian glass scent bottle.

0:36:400:36:43

-Here we go.

-Isn't that lovely?

0:36:430:36:44

What am I going to say, £50 to start for that, 50?

0:36:460:36:48

30, bid. £30. Good scent bottle this.

0:36:480:36:50

40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90.

0:36:500:36:54

£90 back row, lady's bid.

0:36:540:36:57

-100 if you wish anywhere? £90 right at the back row.

-So cheap.

0:36:570:36:59

Don't miss it for one bid. With the lady at 90'll take it.

0:36:590:37:02

I told you you'd get 80, you got 90.

0:37:030:37:06

-Well done.

-Thank you very much.

0:37:060:37:08

How much profit is that, Marjory?

0:37:080:37:10

Another profit for David.

0:37:110:37:13

£38, which is definitely not to be sniffed at.

0:37:130:37:16

Next, Margie's two pieces of porcelain.

0:37:180:37:21

A bargain at nine pounds.

0:37:210:37:23

£30 on the two. £20, thank you. 20 I am bid at the back.

0:37:230:37:26

155. £20 the starting bid.

0:37:260:37:29

Any advance on this? 20. 30. 30 to the lady.

0:37:290:37:32

At £30 at the back. 40 new bidder. 50. 50 on the back row against you, sir.

0:37:320:37:37

£50 at the moment. Any more bids on that? Going to sell.

0:37:370:37:40

All finished at 50.

0:37:400:37:42

I'm coming to this room again.

0:37:420:37:43

I am going to give him a kiss after this. He's brilliant.

0:37:450:37:48

Well, what a result, eh?

0:37:480:37:50

That is incredible. £41 profit.

0:37:520:37:55

And that definitely puts Margie back in the game.

0:37:560:37:59

-Oh, dear. Oh, dear. Oh, dear.

-My nerves are going.

0:37:590:38:01

So are mine.

0:38:010:38:03

Now, can David do any better with his Staffordshire pottery figures

0:38:030:38:06

and that cracked commemorative tankard?

0:38:060:38:09

-He's giving it a good build-up.

-..Alnwick, Northumberland.

0:38:090:38:11

£50 to start me. 50 bid, thank you, sir.

0:38:110:38:14

50 straight in, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100,

0:38:140:38:18

110, 120, 30, 140,

0:38:180:38:20

150, 160, 170, 180, 190.

0:38:200:38:24

Two bid, 220, 240. 240 I am bid.

0:38:240:38:28

Room bid at the moment. Rare mug there.

0:38:280:38:30

-It is rare.

-Any more bids on this? For the last time.

0:38:300:38:32

Back right the bid. All finished at 240.

0:38:320:38:34

Well done!

0:38:350:38:37

Well, who would have thought that. A £218 profit on £22 of outlay.

0:38:370:38:42

Well done.

0:38:420:38:44

Flipping heck, what am I congratulating you for?

0:38:440:38:46

How much was that?

0:38:470:38:49

So can the auctioneer wield his magic

0:38:530:38:55

with Margie's pretty £5 Shelley bowl?

0:38:550:38:58

£30 for it. Good design, that one, 20.

0:38:590:39:01

£10 I am bid, thank you. Lot number 217 for Shelley.

0:39:010:39:04

-£10 bid on this one, 20, you're in.

-It's worth more than that.

0:39:040:39:07

£20 I am bid on the Shelley bowl.

0:39:070:39:09

-30 anywhere? 1930s example as well.

-Oh, no.

0:39:090:39:11

Bid's there, all finished on the gent's bid, £20.

0:39:110:39:15

Well, it's still a tidy profit for such little outlay.

0:39:170:39:20

-This interesting newel post.

-The next item could be the answer to Margie's prayers.

0:39:200:39:25

But only if she can salvage a profit from it.

0:39:250:39:27

I'm not sure where the rest of the staircase is.

0:39:290:39:31

-Have I come late?

-You cheeky monkey.

0:39:310:39:34

We'll see anyway. £20 for the post.

0:39:340:39:36

20, tenner. £10. Thank you, sir. £10 starts me.

0:39:360:39:40

£10 in the room. Shall I sell this? At 10 only.

0:39:400:39:44

15 bid. £20 you're in, sir.

0:39:440:39:47

-20 against, madam.

-Keep going.

-Don't miss it for one bid.

0:39:470:39:50

-All finished for the post.

-Oh no.

-£20'll take it.

0:39:500:39:53

Well done, sir. Do you want to take it now?

0:39:530:39:56

Thanks.

0:39:560:39:58

Well, he's got an absolute bargain.

0:39:580:40:00

Would you believe it?

0:40:000:40:02

It posted a loss(!)

0:40:020:40:04

But that, that is a scandal. That is worth a lot more than that.

0:40:040:40:08

I admire your guts in buying it.

0:40:080:40:11

All aboard for David's next lot

0:40:110:40:13

and his slightly scary-looking sailor boys.

0:40:130:40:16

These two charming 1930s Nora Wellings style.

0:40:160:40:20

Oh, for goodness' sake, don't start whipping up enthusiasm.

0:40:200:40:24

Start me at 20, sir. Bid. £20 at the back.

0:40:240:40:26

30, 40.

0:40:260:40:28

-40. Bid's at the back now with 40.

-Come on.

0:40:280:40:30

Take the five if you want, sir. All finished at £40.

0:40:300:40:32

-40 quid, well who would've...

-Any advance at 40 for the two?

0:40:320:40:36

-Thank you. £40.

-You can't go wrong.

-£40.

0:40:360:40:39

Who would've thought?

0:40:390:40:41

David's riding on the crest of a wave

0:40:410:40:43

with his two sailor boys and that profit.

0:40:430:40:46

But he's still not home and dry.

0:40:460:40:48

-We've both got one lot left.

-Yes.

0:40:480:40:50

So, if you make a profit on your next lot,

0:40:500:40:53

you've scored on every single one.

0:40:530:40:56

Here we are, here we are.

0:40:570:40:59

David's final item is this decorative 19th century copper coal hod.

0:40:590:41:03

But will it set the auction room ablaze?

0:41:030:41:05

£20 bid thank you, sir. £20, got a commission bid on this.

0:41:050:41:09

20. Any more bids on this? 20, 30, 40.

0:41:090:41:12

On commission, it's my bid at the moment. One more, sir.

0:41:120:41:15

-Come on.

-40. No buyer. My bid'll take it, then.

0:41:150:41:16

Any advance £40 and going?

0:41:160:41:19

-Commission bid.

-Oh, what a shame.

0:41:190:41:21

You've not swept the boards.

0:41:210:41:23

I've lost.

0:41:240:41:26

No need to be a drama queen, David. It's only £5.

0:41:260:41:29

You've lost a fiver. I'm sorry for your loss.

0:41:290:41:32

Margie may yet have the last laugh.

0:41:360:41:39

She's still got her European dough bowl,

0:41:390:41:41

but will it rise to the occasion and give her the bread she needs to win?

0:41:410:41:46

£20 for a good piece of country furniture there.

0:41:480:41:51

£20 surely. Bid, thank you, sir. 20 starting bid.

0:41:510:41:54

-20, 30. 30 front row, 40, 50.

-You're in profit.

0:41:540:41:59

-Frank, one more, sir. £50 I am bid.

-It's not enough.

0:41:590:42:01

-60 anywhere for that large bowl?

-You're in profit.

0:42:010:42:04

-You are in profit.

-Don't be condescending.

0:42:050:42:07

Aw.

0:42:070:42:09

-That's disappointing again.

-No it's not. It's a profit.

0:42:090:42:12

Sadly, Margie's dough bowl hasn't risen enough.

0:42:120:42:15

David Barby has triumphed.

0:42:150:42:17

-Well, congratulations, do you want to shake my hand?

-Yes.

0:42:170:42:19

-Well done on your first day's success.

-Don't worry about that newel post.

0:42:210:42:25

Margie started the show with £200 and, after auction costs,

0:42:270:42:30

has increased her spending power to £238.

0:42:300:42:33

David also started with 200

0:42:350:42:36

and, with some canny buys, he's more than doubled his cash.

0:42:360:42:40

So, after auction costs,

0:42:400:42:42

he has an impressive £417 going into the next leg.

0:42:420:42:46

-Oh Margie, wasn't that good? I really, really enjoyed that.

-It certainly was.

0:42:460:42:50

-Excuse me.

-What?

-I thought I was driving?

0:42:500:42:52

I'm a little bit concerned in your present state.

0:42:520:42:55

Are you going to be in control emotionally?

0:42:550:42:57

-Of course. I'm driving.

-Oh, dear. Right, there we go.

0:42:580:43:01

Why do I always give way to women?

0:43:020:43:04

Ah well, David might be in the lead

0:43:040:43:07

but it looks like Margie's in charge going into the next round.

0:43:070:43:10

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, Margie pops up in Richmond.

0:43:110:43:15

Here I come.

0:43:150:43:17

-Da-dah!

-And David meets his match in Yarm.

0:43:190:43:22

That's it, shabby chic.

0:43:220:43:24

Not that shabby.

0:43:240:43:27

Well, there's plenty of chic.

0:43:270:43:29

There's plenty of cheek!

0:43:290:43:31

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:510:43:52

Veteran road tripper David Barby joins up with silver expert Margie Cooper for a mammoth journey from Northumberland to Lincolnshire in their classic car, as they aim to buy antiques to make a profit at auction.


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