Episode 2 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 2

Antiques experts David Barby and Margie Cooper go on the second leg of their journey, battling it out in County Durham before winding their way to auction in Scarborough.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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That hurts.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So much?!

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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SHE LAUGHS

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's the second leg of our antiques odyssey,

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with treasure hunters David Barby and Margie Cooper

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in their open-top 1979 Mercedes 350 SL.

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And fresh from success, David is raring to go.

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-I'm anxious to get shopping now.

-Yeah.

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I'm really excited I've got that money to spend.

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Hard-earned money, Margie.

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It certainly was!

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Not that he's one to gloat at all.

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David is the man of the moment after winning the first auction.

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Oh, well congratulations.

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He's the master of ceramics and also, the master of seduction.

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-Beryl, look in my eyes.

-Go on, then.

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This is where I don't really know what I'm doing.

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Margie Cooper likes to take a more chilled approach.

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That'll keep you cool, man!

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Cool is one thing,

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but Margie had a lukewarm response at the first auction, making a small profit,

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which means she only has £238 to spend on the next round.

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-That's life, isn't it?

-Certainly is.

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David, on the other hand, more than doubled his initial £200,

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giving him a mighty £417 to spend on today's road trip.

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How much was that?

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The route for the week takes our road trippers from Alnwick,

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in Northumberland, through the beautiful English countryside

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to their final destination of Lincoln, 200 miles away.

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But today's trip begins in Barnard Castle in County Durham,

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winding its way cross-country

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to the delightful seaside town of Scarborough.

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Barnard Castle is built around the great castle

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founded in the Norman conquest.

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Situated on the north side of the River Tees,

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this pretty location is a real draw for travellers.

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-I'm not going to say good luck.

-Why not?

-Because I don't mean it.

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The first stop for Margie is Robson's Antiques to meet owner, Dale.

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-Good morning.

-Hello, good morning.

-Wow!

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-Margie.

-Hello, Margie, nice to meet you.

-You too.

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There's something here to suit all tastes. It's a real Aladdin's cave.

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-My word, an Aladdin's cave.

-I just said that.

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-I'm going to have a look round, if I may.

-Yeah, look away.

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-So, I'll see you later.

-See you in a little bit.

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-So, what's the plan of action?

-I'm going to start up here...

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Yes?

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If I haven't got much money,

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I buy better than when I've got loads of money.

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You're at an advantage today then,

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since you've only got half as much cash as David.

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Ooh, whatever is that?

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Gosh, never seen one of them before.

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Must be a hearth brush...

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with a brass horrible face...

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and another horrible face.

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-I've never seen one of those.

-Well, you have now.

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It's £45 but is that going to, if I get it really much cheaper,

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I wonder is that going to be a saleable thing?

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Is somebody going to want to buy that?

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While Margie dithers over the hearth brush,

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David steams ahead to the Mission Hall Antiques Centre just down the road.

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-Hello there!

-Good morning.

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-We have something in common, haven't we?

-We have.

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-Your name's David.

-It is.

-Mine's David as well. That's a good start.

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It's a good start.

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And so, the Barby charm offensive begins. Watch this...

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There's a little piece of toleware.

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Toleware is a French term describing tin or steel-made objects

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often enamelled and with decorative designs.

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Inside there...

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you'd have a compartment.

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Ah! Isn't that lovely?

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You put your spices in there.

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Included in that circular section, that's the little nutmeg grater.

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Isn't that good? So it's complete.

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And I remember my grandmother having one of these.

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That's quite nice, I like that.

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I like that - good social history there. Mm.

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Mm, I feel a deal coming on

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-I'd say £40.

-£40...

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-35?

-Could we say 30?

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35 would be better.

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HE LAUGHS

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-32. I'll do it for 32, go on.

-Hallelujah!

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-Thank you very much, sir.

-Thank you very much.

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I haven't got the two pounds, unfortunately.

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That is the oldest trick in the book, David!

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I saw you look! I saw you look!

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Nice try!

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Oh, dear, oh, dear - you're such a hard man.

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That's rich coming from you!

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Back up the road, Margie is surveying the silverware.

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That's a little card case, look.

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She's eyeing up an Edwardian business card holder

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and is considering a job lot of silver.

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I need to compile a few bits.

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I do actually have a set of sorts that's come in,

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and that could be reasonable.

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-An Edwardian manicure set.

-How much is it, then?

-25.

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-What, for the whole lot?

-Yeah.

-Hmm.

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-So, you've said 20 for that.

-25 for that.

-Yeah.

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There's probably weight in that one!

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I always laugh when I'm bidding!

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-I don't know why, I should be more serious.

-Yeah, yeah.

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So what's your best offer...

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-It's got to be that really.

-Is it?

-45.

-It couldn't be 38?

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Oh, God, no!

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-I'm a bit...

-£40 for the two.

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And I don't think you can go wrong with that.

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-OK.

-OK.

-We'll do it.

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-Will we do that?

-We'll do it.

-Thank you very much.

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With the silver sorted, Margie turns her attention

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back to the hearth brush.

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I've never seen one before.

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I just think I like it, I like the heart, I like the wood.

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-£30, it can be.

-I've just spent 40!

-Very, very best.

-I've just spent 40!

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I know, I know, but...

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We have to make a bit of money.

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I know you do.

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So, 65 wouldn't do the deal?

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-40, 50, 65... OK, we'll do that.

-Go on then.

-Thank you very much.

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-It's a bit of a laugh!

-I'll polish it.

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-I'll even polish it for you, yeah?

-That's great.

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So, £65 for the manicure set and hearth brush.

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Oh, look who's here!

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Oh no, quick! Excuse me!

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-Have you bought something?

-Yeah, I just have.

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-I'll just go through to the back room.

-Right, go on then.

-OK.

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-Go on then.

-Yes, all right.

-You're not to look.

-I won't, no.

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-Have you bought anything?

-Yes.

-He has!

-In my bag.

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Ooh, I wonder what she's found?

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He's such an nosy parker!

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All will be revealed, David, but not just yet.

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-Six, and that's seven. Just check it, will you, Dale?

-Lovely.

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Bye!

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Ah, two lots.

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With Margie out of the way, David has free rein.

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Goodness me, this IS an Aladdin's cave!

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Yes, we've already said that, David, twice!

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Oh! It's got its cover!

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Registration mark on the bottom, so that's a good sign.

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This charming piece of Prattware is a hot water jug produced in 1851.

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I really like that.

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Particularly since it's got its original lid.

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I think I'll see what sort of price I can get on that.

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Prepare to witness the master at work as he engages his powers

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of flattery, charm and Jedi mind tricks.

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-You can try and sell it to me.

-I can try and sell it to you?

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It's £48. I'd like you to do your very, very best please.

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£35.

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Is that the silent treatment?

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I would like it at a much less figure than you've quoted.

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A much less figure? Well, you're very persuasive.

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And it really should be the figure I've quoted.

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-But if you'll give us £25 for it, I would accept that.

-OK.

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The incredible Mr Barby does it again.

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At the same time, you've got in the window a pudding basin.

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-Yes, yeah.

-With a green transfer on. How much is that?

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-Off the top of my head, I think that's about £80.

-80?!

-Yeah.

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I can get it out and we can have a look at it,

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but it is a decent amount of money.

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£80! £80!

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Well, I have to start high with you! You're a hard bargainer.

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I think it's got to be around £30.

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Just say no, Dale!

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It's got to be £50. Maybe do it for 45, but...

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It's a nice object. Somebody else will buy that.

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-Could we split the difference at 35?

-Oh, no, no, no way.

-Good for you.

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I tell you what, £40, but that's absolutely it, and that's cheap.

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38 would be very, very kind to me.

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Don't give in!

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HE SIGHS

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You've had one good deal,

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I think you should give me a good deal on that!

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Here he goes again. Don't look into his eyes, Dale!

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(Please.)

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HE SIGHS

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-Go on, then, we'll do that.

-OK, thank you very much indeed.

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Some people just never learn!

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Now, where's that money? Where's that money?

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I'll have to prise it off you!

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So how much do I owe you?

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63. Oh, look at that! Just right!

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You couldn't make it up!

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Hardly denting his groaning wallet, that's another two items for David -

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The hot water jug at £25, and the pudding basin for 38.

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Reunited, David and Margie cross the county border into Richmond

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in North Yorkshire, where they both shopped before.

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This time, Margie is destined for the stage.

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The Georgian Royal Theatre in Richmond

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is the best surviving example of a Georgian Playhouse in Britain,

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lovingly restored to all its former glory in 2002.

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-You must be Sarah?

-Hi!

-Hi, I'm Margie.

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-Come on in, welcome to the Georgian Theatre Royal.

-Thank you very much.

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So, Sarah, is this the main entrance?

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It would have been the original entrance to the theatre,

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cos this is the original box office that we've just passed.

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-Oh, right.

-Would you like to come up to the gallery?

-I'd love to.

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The theatre was built in 1788 by the famous actor-manager,

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Samuel Butler, to entertain the masses.

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Social status dictated the seating arrangements.

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For most, it would have been the cheap seats in the gallery.

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How wonderfully intimate.

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It seats 214 now,

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but it would have seated 400 when it was first opened.

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Up in the gallery, you can see a lot of features

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of the original Georgian Theatre, for example these kicking boards.

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They would have had no qualms in kicking them

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if they didn't like something that was going on stage.

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That would put me off, I think, if I was an actor

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by the fact that everybody's so close.

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The boxes are actually on the stage. There'd have been nowhere to hide at all.

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And people would be fidgeting and shouting.

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-One thing, though, the mobile phones wouldn't be going.

-No!

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So, these are the cheap seats. Can you show me the dear ones?

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-Yes, just through there. I'll take you down now.

-Great.

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For the aristocracy, it was a different story.

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They could afford somewhere and little grander,

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with views directly onto the stage - the royal box!

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Cheap seats up there, posh seats down here,

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all singing and dancing, a really good view of the stage?

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Yes, but it wouldn't have been all good.

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We've heard reports that there was a bunch of ladies who'd sat here, paid a lot of money,

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and complained that there was water coming through the roof

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onto their posh hats and everything. But obviously, it wasn't water.

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The people had been sat upstairs for eight hours, no toilet facilities,

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and they'd have been relieving themselves in buckets,

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so we can only assume that what was tripping on their hats wasn't water!

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Oh, gosh!

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So, that's where the royal "wee" comes from!

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Backstage, Margie's tour continues as she prepares to tread the boards.

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-Right, so this is under this stage.

-Very exciting! Gosh.

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Oh, so what have we got here?

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This is another feature of Georgian theatre, it's the trap mechanism.

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Oh, that's the trap door?

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Yes, there would have been three of these when the theatre first opened.

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Two corner traps and a coffin one at the back of the stage,

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which they'd have used for scenery as well as entrances on stage.

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-Right.

-So, do you fancy having a go?

-I thought you might ask me that.

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Not really! But I will.

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I can't do it on my own, so I just need to get some muscle power.

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-Right, I'm ready.

-Here come the boys!

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Keep my shoulders in, legs straight.

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Head straight.

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DRUM ROLL

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Chops away! Here I come!

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Ta-da!

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And for my next trick, I'm going to thrash that David Barby.

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Bravo! More! More!

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As the lights go down for Margie,

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there's more drama in store for David at his next stop - Yarm.

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The name of the town is derived from the old Norse word "yarum",

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meaning "an enclosure to catch fish."

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I wonder what David will manage to reel in here?

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Hello - David.

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-Oh, hello.

-Hello, how are you?

-Sandy Welsh.

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-And you're Sandy?

-Yes, I am.

-What a lovely name.

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I recognise that face. We've been here before with Philip Serrell.

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-70 quid for the two.

-How much?!

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-Good luck, David.

-Right, what I'd like to do is have a look round.

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-I tell you what I'm after.

-Right, go on.

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-I'm after something quirky.

-Only me!

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-You're priceless, can't afford you! Let me have a look round, then.

-Yes.

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She's a feisty one. Could David Barby finally have met his match?

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This is a Victorian scrap screen,

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where it was a hobby to cut out of magazines or use greeting cards

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and stick them on to a screen.

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-This is a possibility.

-Oh, not cheap! Anything else?

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That's £80, it's a little bit too much for me.

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How much could it go for?

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You might be able to take advantage of me today,

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because I had a late night last night.

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Oh, I say! Frisky!

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This is Walter Moorcroft vase of cylindrical form

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and I suppose probably made to hold spills

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used for lighting fires or candles.

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-Right, it's nice.

-So, what sort of figure?

-Oh...

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When I said you could take advantage I didn't mean the whole way!

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-Well, halfway?

-Well, erm...

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-80?

-Oh!

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You're taking advantage of ME!

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-80? Oh, come on!

-Well...

-Sandy!

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75.

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These two started off so well together,

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but I sense it could all end in tears.

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-Absolutely.

-Let me put that out there.

-Put it to one side.

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I'll put that to one side. Because I trust you...

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Brace yourself, Sandy.

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..I'm going to ask you the best price that you can do for me on that.

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I trust your honesty and your kindness.

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I'll tell you what, you're good.

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-You're good.

-You what?

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Finally, someone has rumbled the silver-tongued charmer!

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In your heart of hearts,

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what do you think would be a good price on that for me and you?

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A good price? I'd say half the price you're asking.

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You're making me head ache. 55.

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-48.

-You have worn me to a frazzle.

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-So, it's 48?

-I'll let you have it for 48 if you buy something else.

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-Where are your post cards?

-You've worn me out!

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David won over the battle of the Moorcroft,

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but can Sandy triumph over the Victorian scrap screen, price - £168.

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You'll make a fortune on that screen.

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Sandy, I don't think it's in good condition, darling.

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No, but that's it, shabby chic.

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Not that shabby.

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There's plenty of chic.

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There is plenty of cheek!

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-Can you tuck it just under the £100, please?

-No.

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If I said you 115, then that would be it. Otherwise, we can't do it.

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-Could we split the difference at 100?

-Oh!

-That's splitting the difference.

0:18:070:18:12

Go on, then.

0:18:120:18:14

What have I done? What have I done?

0:18:150:18:18

-That's £148 you owe me.

-Oh, so much!

0:18:180:18:23

Yes...

0:18:230:18:25

My husband will say to me, "You're losing your touch."

0:18:270:18:31

You're not losing your touch at all.

0:18:310:18:34

Sandy, thank you very much.

0:18:340:18:36

So, no hard feelings. Time to kiss and make up.

0:18:360:18:39

-Made in heaven!

-Thank you.

-£2, thank you.

-Thank you.

0:18:390:18:43

-Bye.

-Bye-bye.

0:18:450:18:48

Was that Sandy crying?

0:18:480:18:50

Well, perhaps she'll have the last laugh

0:18:500:18:53

when the scrap screen goes to auction.

0:18:530:18:55

With five items already in the bag, David can sleep like a baby.

0:18:550:19:00

Night night.

0:19:000:19:01

It's not just a brand-new day,

0:19:060:19:08

it's a very special day for one of our antiques experts.

0:19:080:19:11

# Oh what a beautiful morning! #

0:19:130:19:17

-It certainly is. It's your birthday.

-It's my birthday.

0:19:170:19:20

# Happy birthday to you...#

0:19:210:19:23

Yes, he's another year older,

0:19:230:19:25

but does that make him any more valuable?

0:19:250:19:28

Well, it doesn't matter - he's loaded anyway.

0:19:280:19:31

So far, David has spent £243 on five items -

0:19:310:19:35

a vintage spice tin, a Grimwade pudding basin, a Felix Pratt hot water jug,

0:19:350:19:39

a Moorcroft vase and a Victorian scrap screen,

0:19:390:19:42

which means he still has £174 cash in hand.

0:19:420:19:46

Margie, meanwhile, has managed to part with £65 on two lots -

0:19:480:19:51

the hearth brush and a bundle of silverware,

0:19:510:19:54

which gives her a total of £173 to spend on today's shopping.

0:19:540:19:57

The first stop of the day

0:20:010:20:02

is a mystery location in the suburbs of Middlesbrough,

0:20:020:20:06

where Margie is going on a secret mission to secure her next purchase.

0:20:060:20:11

I think it's a business run from a house.

0:20:110:20:12

-Oh, right?

-It's a bit of a mystery.

-Well, Margie, I think we're here.

0:20:120:20:16

-Yeah. So, it's all very intriguing.

-I know!

0:20:160:20:19

I wish I was with you, actually. Buy lots! Spend all your money?

0:20:190:20:24

Margie has arranged to meet the owner, Jim.

0:20:250:20:28

I think it's over there somewhere.

0:20:280:20:30

Let's hope she finds the right house,

0:20:300:20:31

otherwise she's about to get done for breaking and entering.

0:20:310:20:35

-Good morning.

-Good morning, Margie. Pleasure to meet you.

0:20:390:20:42

Welcome to Appleton Antiques, Middlesbrough.

0:20:420:20:44

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Pleasure.

0:20:440:20:46

Jim's antiques shop is actually an extension of his home

0:20:460:20:50

and only select buyers get to visit,

0:20:500:20:53

so Margie had better make the most of it!

0:20:530:20:56

-My eye's suddenly gone to this.

-It does...

-It's distressed.

0:20:560:21:01

-It's distressed.

-What a good word!

0:21:010:21:04

£59, so where's it distressed?

0:21:040:21:09

-It's quite heavy.

-Distressed? I call it cracked!

0:21:090:21:11

Do you want to see on the bottom - it's got a nice crack on the base.

0:21:110:21:16

Yeah, yeah, lovely!

0:21:160:21:17

-But it's got a presence.

-It certainly has.

0:21:190:21:21

And no wonder - it's a classic piece of Linthorpe pottery

0:21:210:21:24

by influential designer, Christopher Dresser.

0:21:240:21:27

Linthorpe was only produced over a ten-year period from 1879,

0:21:270:21:32

so it's now highly collectable.

0:21:320:21:34

I've never seen anything quite like it. £59...

0:21:340:21:38

-40's the rock bottom.

-Rock bottom.

0:21:400:21:42

I'm going to be brave and I'm going to say,

0:21:420:21:44

I would have been really happy at 35, but you're not going to go down?

0:21:440:21:47

-40's the best, yeah.

-OK, Jim.

-Good, thank you.

0:21:470:21:51

So that's...£40, Jim.

0:21:510:21:55

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks so much.

0:21:550:21:57

Back on the road, David has driven 30 miles across to Whitby

0:21:570:22:01

the on the east coast of Yorkshire.

0:22:010:22:03

The fishing port emerged during the Middle Ages.

0:22:030:22:07

It's where Captain Cook learned seamanship.

0:22:070:22:10

Known for its fish and chips, Whitby is also famous for something else.

0:22:100:22:14

I'm on the way to meet a young lady

0:22:140:22:19

who's going to tell me about Whitby jet.

0:22:190:22:21

It's going to be quite a fascinating lesson.

0:22:210:22:25

The jet found in Whitby is unrivalled

0:22:250:22:28

to that found anywhere else in the world.

0:22:280:22:30

The semi-precious gemstone

0:22:300:22:32

comes from ancient fossilised monkey puzzle trees

0:22:320:22:36

formed when trees decomposed under extreme pressure

0:22:360:22:40

182 million years ago.

0:22:400:22:43

Much of the raw material is found here at Boggle Hole

0:22:430:22:46

in Robin Hood Bay.

0:22:460:22:48

-What a romantic place!

-It's gorgeous, isn't it?

0:22:480:22:50

-I'm David, what's your name?

-Rebecca.

0:22:500:22:53

-You come here often, do you?

-Yeah, on days off.

0:22:530:22:56

What do I look for, is it all black?

0:22:560:23:00

It is black, but it's quite difficult to actually find it.

0:23:000:23:03

Because of coastal erosion, it's illegal to mine the jet,

0:23:030:23:06

which can make it difficult to find.

0:23:060:23:08

One way of telling it is by its weight.

0:23:080:23:11

Obviously, stones and pebbles are quite heavy.

0:23:110:23:14

Jet is a very light material, with it being fossilised wood.

0:23:140:23:17

-Right, right.

-That is heavy, that's definitely not jet.

0:23:170:23:20

-Don't even need to scratch that to find out.

-Just my luck!

0:23:200:23:23

Everything I pick up, you throw away!

0:23:230:23:25

We've not been very successful, have we?

0:23:250:23:27

We've not, really, but it is VERY difficult to find.

0:23:270:23:30

I'm sure it is. I think we've experienced that.

0:23:300:23:32

Have you got a piece on you, what I should be looking for?

0:23:320:23:35

Yeah, I do. I've a couple of examples.

0:23:350:23:37

Jet comes in two different ways, really.

0:23:370:23:40

There's either sea-washed jet or cliff jet.

0:23:400:23:43

So, that's the sea-washed yet. You can feel how light it is.

0:23:430:23:46

-It is, it would almost float.

-Yeah, it's not what you expect.

0:23:460:23:49

You look at it, it looks quite a dark, heavy material,

0:23:490:23:53

but it's incredibly light. It's also warm to the touch as well.

0:23:530:23:56

-And it's been polished by the sand, hasn't it, and the sea?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:23:560:24:00

We actually prefer it sea-washed

0:24:000:24:03

-as opposed to out of the cliff like this.

-Why's that?

0:24:030:24:07

When it's sea washed, it tumbles against the rocks in the waves

0:24:070:24:11

-and it gets off any shale or impurities.

-Right, I follow that.

0:24:110:24:15

So you're literally left with the best stuff.

0:24:150:24:18

It's easier for us to work with as a product.

0:24:180:24:21

Why don't I take you to the shop

0:24:210:24:23

and you can see various different designs in the antiques section,

0:24:230:24:26

and you can also have a go at cutting some yourself if you like?

0:24:260:24:28

-And maybe a cup of tea?

-Oh, definitely a cup of tea!

0:24:280:24:31

Thank you very much.

0:24:310:24:33

Queen Victoria loved Whitby jet and made the jewellery popular

0:24:330:24:36

during her 40-year period of mourning.

0:24:360:24:39

Back at Rebecca's workshop,

0:24:390:24:42

David is about to get a lesson in working with the semi-precious stone.

0:24:420:24:45

This is the ring that I'm going to get you to work on.

0:24:480:24:51

I've got a piece of jet that's roughly cut and polished,

0:24:510:24:55

so what I want you to do is grind that into that exact shape

0:24:550:24:59

so that it fits in perfectly.

0:24:590:25:01

That is the first process of working with jet.

0:25:010:25:03

Have a go. I'll turn the machine on for you.

0:25:030:25:06

That's it.

0:25:140:25:15

-You have to have a good eye.

-You do.

-Where did you train?

0:25:150:25:19

I trained doing jewellery, like the silversmithing side,

0:25:190:25:23

at Birmingham City University in the Jewellery Quarter.

0:25:230:25:27

It's the best place I could have trained,

0:25:290:25:31

but I didn't know anything about working jet

0:25:310:25:33

until I came to work for this company.

0:25:330:25:35

Of course, you can't go anywhere else, can you?

0:25:350:25:37

-Because there's no jet anywhere else.

-Well, no.

0:25:370:25:40

-Shall I give it a try now?

-Yeah.

0:25:430:25:44

I think it's gone slightly at an angle.

0:25:460:25:48

That's very good for your first try, I have to say. You're almost there.

0:25:480:25:53

This is one that I've done earlier.

0:25:530:25:56

That's what it's going to look like when it's done,

0:25:560:25:58

when the piece of jet is set in place.

0:25:580:26:01

I think it's wonderful.

0:26:010:26:03

I hope you have loads of people come and have a look at this,

0:26:030:26:06

-because it's fantastic.

-Oh, we do, yeah.

0:26:060:26:07

-Thank you very much.

-You're quite welcome.

0:26:070:26:09

-And thanks for letting me have a go.

-That's OK. You did very well.

0:26:090:26:12

I'm going to have a shower.

0:26:120:26:13

Make it a cold one.

0:26:150:26:16

While David cleans up,

0:26:160:26:18

Margie has travelled four miles south to the village of Sleights.

0:26:180:26:22

Located in the Esk Valley,

0:26:240:26:26

Sleights is a charming little village where time passes slowly -

0:26:260:26:31

unless you're Margie Cooper hunting down a bargain, that is.

0:26:310:26:35

As usual, we're in a bit of a rush.

0:26:350:26:37

Let's have a look in here.

0:26:370:26:40

-Hello. You must be Phil?

-Hello, pleased to meet you.

0:26:400:26:43

-I'm Margie.

-Hi.

-Hi. God, it's cold, isn't it?

0:26:430:26:45

It is, it's not the warmest of days out there.

0:26:450:26:47

Eskdale Antiques is quite literally a barn of a shop

0:26:470:26:51

based in an old farmyard.

0:26:510:26:53

Let's hope Margie doesn't end up buying a pile of you-know-what by mistake!

0:26:530:26:57

-Do you like advertising?

-Oh!

0:26:570:26:59

One and nine with three gallons,

0:27:000:27:02

so it's got a slight motoring association.

0:27:020:27:04

How much is that?

0:27:040:27:07

45.

0:27:070:27:09

-You know, I'm lost for words?

-It's quite retro, isn't it?

0:27:090:27:13

-And retro's quite...

-I know.

-It's quite in fashion, retro stuff.

0:27:130:27:16

-Oh, gosh.

-It's just something a bit unusual.

-Yeah...

0:27:160:27:18

I don't know whether I want to risk £45 on that,

0:27:180:27:22

cos I don't know what I'm doing.

0:27:220:27:24

It's never stopped you before, Margie.

0:27:240:27:26

Oh, I don't know. How low could it go?

0:27:260:27:27

If I said 35 to you.

0:27:270:27:30

-35?

-It must give you 15 or 20 quid at least, maybe a bit more?

0:27:300:27:34

-That's not going to go for 50 quid, is it?

-Yeah, I think it will.

0:27:340:27:37

Oh, I don't think so.

0:27:370:27:40

It's just all guesswork with something like that, isn't it?

0:27:400:27:43

Yeah, but that's what makes it fun, isn't it?

0:27:430:27:45

-It'd make it fun if it was 25 quid.

-How about going halfway?

0:27:450:27:51

-Meet me in the middle.

-Oh, gosh, 30 still sounds dear, Phil, doesn't it?

0:27:520:27:58

-We'll make a deal if you like.

-25?

0:27:580:28:00

Yeah, we'll make a deal at 25 quid, OK? Thank you very much.

0:28:000:28:03

Thank you very much. Let's give you some money.

0:28:030:28:06

We've got 20, 30. There you go.

0:28:060:28:09

Thank you very much.

0:28:090:28:11

-Thank you very much.

-There we go, just a fiver.

0:28:110:28:13

That's great, thanks, Phil. Oh, what have I done?

0:28:130:28:17

With time running out, Margie legs it across to Whitby...

0:28:170:28:21

Here goes - nothing ventured...!

0:28:210:28:24

..where David is looking for his last shop of the day.

0:28:240:28:27

Gosh, it's getting rather late now.

0:28:270:28:29

I'll just nip down there and see if there's a shop open,

0:28:290:28:32

because I haven't shopped today and I need to get one more item.

0:28:320:28:35

Well, you know what they say, David? He who shops last shops longest.

0:28:350:28:40

Looks like Margie's stolen his thunder.

0:28:400:28:43

She's beaten you to the last shop.

0:28:430:28:47

-Hi, hello.

-Hello, how do you do?

-Margie Cooper, and you are?

-Frank.

0:28:470:28:50

Frank. Hi, Frank. I'm just going to have a quick look round,

0:28:500:28:53

-is that all right?

-You're quite welcome, yes.

0:28:530:28:57

You've got all sorts in here.

0:28:570:28:59

-Yeah, there's a bit of everything.

-Yeah.

0:28:590:29:02

-That's nice.

-Yeah, it is.

0:29:020:29:04

Not that easy to... Where's the other one?

0:29:040:29:07

THEY LAUGH

0:29:070:29:09

-There's not two, is there?

-I think there might be!

0:29:090:29:12

Yes, some antiques come in matching pairs, just like our experts.

0:29:120:29:17

Where there's Margie, David's usually not far behind.

0:29:170:29:21

Oh, I can't believe it, Margie's in there! Oh no!

0:29:210:29:26

-I see what you mean about the barometers, they're quite nice.

-They're lovely.

0:29:280:29:32

-What sort of money can they be? What's the middle one?

-The rope one?

0:29:320:29:36

-Yeah.

-Has it got £60 on it? £40.

0:29:360:29:39

-Not 20?

-No, can't do it at 20.

0:29:390:29:42

Oh, now what? Oh, it is him!

0:29:420:29:46

What? I'm going now, I'm nearly finished.

0:29:480:29:51

Are you buying a pair of shoes?

0:29:510:29:53

SHE LAUGHS

0:29:530:29:55

I can't wait any longer.

0:29:550:29:57

She hasn't bought anything. Typical women!

0:29:580:30:02

35 and that's it, right?

0:30:020:30:07

You've got to buy something otherwise...

0:30:070:30:09

You'll kick me out of the shop.

0:30:090:30:11

You're fed out with me now, aren't you? I can't feel it.

0:30:110:30:14

He's not the only one!

0:30:140:30:15

I've had enough.

0:30:150:30:17

I'm going back to the hotel.

0:30:200:30:22

And just like that, David Barby becomes Diva Barby.

0:30:220:30:27

SHE LAUGHS

0:30:270:30:29

-Here we are.

-Right, thank you so much.

0:30:290:30:33

-Margie has sealed the deal on the barometer for £35.

-There you go.

0:30:330:30:37

-Thank you so much.

-OK, my dear.

0:30:370:30:40

And I hope it makes a profit.

0:30:400:30:44

-You'll be all right.

-Thanks a lot.

-OK then.

0:30:440:30:49

After David's calmed down with a good dose of gripe water,

0:30:490:30:52

our experts are ready to reveal themselves.

0:30:520:30:55

Well, not literally!

0:30:550:30:57

A case of "you show me yours and I'll show you mine."

0:30:570:31:00

-Right, you start, Margie.

-Ready?

0:31:000:31:03

Yeah, let's have a look.

0:31:030:31:04

-There's another.

-Oh!

-There's something else.

-Oh!

0:31:060:31:09

I've seen something I would have bought!

0:31:100:31:12

This is the piece de resistance.

0:31:120:31:14

Oh, pull the other one! It's got tights on.

0:31:140:31:16

Oh no, that brings back too many memories.

0:31:160:31:19

I could never get them on then!

0:31:190:31:21

That is wonderful! I like that.

0:31:240:31:27

Well, I don't. I don't understand the market.

0:31:270:31:29

-How much did you pay for that?

-25 quid.

-Oh, that's good.

0:31:290:31:33

-Can I just dive in immediately, please?

-Yeah.

0:31:330:31:37

-How funny you've gone for that.

-I love it.

0:31:370:31:39

-I know. I was rather hoping...

-I'm so envious.

0:31:390:31:42

Now I AM surprised.

0:31:420:31:45

-What did you pay for that?

-25.

-Oh, that's so cheap.

0:31:450:31:49

Thank you, dear.

0:31:490:31:50

Then I would imagine the next thing I'm looking at, is this Burmantofts?

0:31:500:31:54

-Linthorpe.

-Oh, sugars!

0:31:540:31:56

-But, very distressed.

-But not as distressed as David!

0:31:590:32:03

What is so good about this is the shape. How much did you pay for it?

0:32:030:32:08

-£40.

-Oh, that's a giveaway.

0:32:080:32:10

-Lovely, lovely piece.

-It will be, with all those cracks!

0:32:100:32:14

OK, now look at my miserable little collection.

0:32:140:32:17

-Oh, God!

-Oh, gosh!

0:32:190:32:21

And then...

0:32:210:32:22

Oh, my goodness.

0:32:240:32:26

-What's that, scrap work?

-Yes.

-I say!

0:32:260:32:30

-And how much did you pay?

-£100.

-Hmm...

0:32:300:32:34

-About £100 too much.

-Well, good luck David.

0:32:340:32:36

Thank you very much. Thank you. Just sounds like my mother.

0:32:360:32:39

Let's get to the next thing, come on.

0:32:390:32:41

Can I look at that Japan - is it Japan tinware? What is it?

0:32:410:32:44

-Toleware.

-Oh, that's nice, isn't it? Oh, I like that.

0:32:440:32:48

We've both got quite unusual things, I hope.

0:32:480:32:51

You have, that's really nice. How much did you pay for that?

0:32:510:32:55

Oh, have a guess - a lot.

0:32:550:32:58

-65?

-No.

0:32:580:33:01

-28.

-Oh!

0:33:010:33:04

Er, £32 I think!

0:33:040:33:05

I'm getting to know you now.

0:33:050:33:07

-What about?

-Little Moorcroft.

-Isn't it sweet?

-It is sweet.

0:33:070:33:11

-25?

-48.

0:33:110:33:14

-We'll wait and see.

-We will wait and see. It'll be interesting.

0:33:150:33:18

Thank you very much for revealing yours, Margie.

0:33:180:33:20

-Thank you for revealing yours.

-Not at all.

0:33:200:33:23

That's what they're saying now, but what do they really think?

0:33:230:33:26

I thought her Linthorpe pot - oh, such a dream!

0:33:260:33:30

I don't know whether she knows a Christopher Dresser design,

0:33:300:33:33

and even though it's cracked, there's going to be demand for it,

0:33:330:33:36

so she's bought exceedingly well.

0:33:360:33:38

I think she's bought better than me, actually.

0:33:380:33:41

Mine are so basic and ordinary.

0:33:410:33:45

There's no "wow" factor there, except for the screen, which I still like.

0:33:450:33:50

I just hate those screens.

0:33:500:33:52

I think they're everything that's bad about Victoriana.

0:33:520:33:55

He's going to be very lucky if he gets a profit.

0:33:550:33:57

I was so thrilled he liked my brush!

0:33:570:34:00

That lovely little Arts and Crafts brush.

0:34:000:34:03

But it's not up to me, it's up to the people of Scarborough.

0:34:030:34:05

From wonderful Whitby,

0:34:060:34:08

there's just one final push on to the seaside town of Scarborough.

0:34:080:34:12

Seeing Scarborough at its very best.

0:34:120:34:15

-Elegant town, isn't it?

-That's enough of the sightseeing.

0:34:150:34:18

It's time to get down to business!

0:34:180:34:21

Not a cloud in the sky!

0:34:210:34:23

-What a lovely day!

-Yeah.

0:34:230:34:25

Today, our experts are doing battle at David Duggleby's auction house,

0:34:250:34:29

a family-run business with over 40 years' experience.

0:34:290:34:33

What will the main man think of David and Margie's items?

0:34:330:34:37

One of the most interesting lots then is the jardiniere, Linthorpe,

0:34:370:34:40

attributed to Christopher Dresser.

0:34:400:34:42

Everything going about it,

0:34:420:34:43

apart from it's got a great big crack in it.

0:34:430:34:46

I think they'll do all right.

0:34:460:34:49

David began today's road trip with a mighty £417

0:34:490:34:52

and has spent £243 on five lots,

0:34:520:34:55

leaving him with £174 still burning a hole in his pocket.

0:34:550:35:00

By comparison, Margie started out with a meagre £238

0:35:020:35:05

and has also bought five lots, costing £165,

0:35:050:35:09

leaving her with £73 cash in hand.

0:35:090:35:12

-How are you feeling?

-How am I feeling?

0:35:120:35:16

How am I feeling?! Nervous.

0:35:160:35:18

It's awful sitting next door to a winner.

0:35:190:35:22

Oh, no don't build my hopes up. Here we go.

0:35:220:35:24

Lot number 13, then.

0:35:240:35:26

So, kicking things off is David's 1930s Moorcroft vase.

0:35:260:35:32

£40, I'm in at 40.

0:35:320:35:34

At £40, at 40.

0:35:340:35:36

At 40, five, 50, five, at 60.

0:35:360:35:39

Five, 70. Five, 80.

0:35:390:35:42

Five, 90. Five, 100.

0:35:420:35:45

110, 120.

0:35:450:35:47

120 with me, £120. 120, 130, fresh bid.

0:35:470:35:53

130. 140.

0:35:530:35:54

150. 160. 170.

0:35:540:35:58

At £170, then, at 170.

0:35:580:36:00

It's in the room, it's selling at 170. All done, 170.

0:36:000:36:05

Oh no, defeated before I start!

0:36:050:36:08

Oh, my goodness me, that was amazing.

0:36:100:36:12

David Barby has done it again, with a blooming great profit of £122.

0:36:120:36:18

Wow!

0:36:180:36:20

-I don't want to play this game any more.

-Yours is still to come.

0:36:200:36:24

But can Margie close the gap

0:36:240:36:27

with her badly cracked Linthorpe jardiniere? Er...

0:36:270:36:31

There we are, we've got some interest in this one.

0:36:310:36:34

We can start this at £40, I'm in at 40.

0:36:340:36:36

At £40, at 40.

0:36:360:36:38

50 with me. At £50 then? At 50. At £50, and five.

0:36:380:36:42

-At 60. £60. Selling at 60, then.

-60 quid!

0:36:420:36:47

Going in at 60. All done at £60? It's selling at 60, then. All done.

0:36:470:36:52

-You've made a profit, Margie.

-£60!

-Yeah, but it's £20.

0:36:520:36:57

Yeah, but it should have rolled on a bit more.

0:36:570:36:59

It's a respectable profit, but just not enough to jump into the lead.

0:36:590:37:04

-Christopher Dresser and all that?

-But it was smashed.

0:37:040:37:07

Will David's toleware spice tin curry favour with the bidders?

0:37:100:37:14

With me at £25. At 25, at 30. At 30.

0:37:140:37:19

35. At 40, 45?

0:37:190:37:22

At 50, £50 in the room, at 50.

0:37:220:37:24

At £50, then, it's selling. All done at £50?

0:37:240:37:28

Going at 50, all done? 50.

0:37:280:37:30

A nice price for the spice

0:37:300:37:32

and another tasty little profit for David.

0:37:320:37:35

That's good.

0:37:370:37:38

The pressure is on for the next item -

0:37:380:37:41

Margie's 1930s oak barometer.

0:37:410:37:44

£20 to start, 20. £20 anywhere, 20? 20 bid. At 20.

0:37:440:37:50

At £20 at the back there, £20. 25, 25.

0:37:500:37:53

At £25 on this side? Selling at 25. Are you all done at £25? £25.

0:37:530:37:59

Uh-oh, I can see the storm clouds brewing for Marjorie.

0:37:590:38:03

-It's not my day.

-You've got other things coming up, Margie.

0:38:030:38:07

Here we are, all you need for your tea today.

0:38:070:38:10

David's next lot is the Grimswade pudding basin.

0:38:100:38:13

But will it turn out to be a duff purchase?

0:38:130:38:15

With me at £25. At 25, at 30.

0:38:150:38:19

£30. 35 with me. 35. At 40?

0:38:190:38:22

£40 on this side, at 40.

0:38:220:38:24

At £40, it's selling at 40. Are we all done at £40?

0:38:240:38:27

Got to go. All done? It's going at 40.

0:38:270:38:30

-You've made a profit. Or have you?

-Yes.

0:38:300:38:33

The proof was in the pudding, but only just.

0:38:350:38:38

Still, at least it's profit - I'm not making a loss.

0:38:380:38:41

Another of David Barby's items next -

0:38:410:38:43

the Felix Pratt hot water jug.

0:38:430:38:45

£20 bid on it, at 20.

0:38:450:38:47

At £20 with me at £20, then, at 20.

0:38:470:38:50

Five, 30. Five, at 40. At £40.

0:38:500:38:54

-It's worth more than that.

-On commission, then, at £40, at 40.

0:38:540:38:58

-You won't get a better example.

-He's right!

0:38:580:39:00

It's selling, are we all done at 40?

0:39:000:39:02

It's profit. It's profit.

0:39:030:39:06

A lukewarm response to the hot water jug,

0:39:060:39:09

but David still profits to the tune of £15.

0:39:090:39:12

-Disappointing.

-It is disappointing.

-It is disappointing.

-Very surprised.

0:39:120:39:16

Oh, no!

0:39:160:39:18

Disappointing for David, but it gives Margie a chance to catch up.

0:39:180:39:21

-Just tell me when it's over.

-Have faith in your taste.

0:39:210:39:23

Let's hope there are no snags with this 1960s advertising board.

0:39:250:39:29

Number 95, there. There we are, we've got a bit of interest in it.

0:39:290:39:32

-Let's start it at £20.

-There you are, you're in.

0:39:320:39:34

20, at £20, I'm in at 20. At 20.

0:39:340:39:38

At 20, and five. At 30, and five.

0:39:380:39:41

At 40. And five, at 50.

0:39:410:39:43

-And five, £55 in the room, at £55.

-£55!

0:39:430:39:47

It's here to sell, it's going at 55. Are we all done at £55?

0:39:470:39:51

-Wonderful!

-Hooray!

0:39:510:39:54

Suspend your disbelief - Margie is quids-in with her saucy stocking ad.

0:39:560:40:02

That was good.

0:40:020:40:03

Margie's luck has turned, but can she clean up

0:40:030:40:07

with her Arts and Crafts hearth brush?

0:40:070:40:09

20, at £20. At 20. In the room at £20 then, it's here to sell.

0:40:090:40:14

It's going at 20 then. Are we all done at £20? And five. £25, 25.

0:40:140:40:19

30, £30 here. 35.

0:40:190:40:21

At 40, £40. At 40. Selling at 40, then.

0:40:210:40:26

Are we all done at £40? It's got to go, we all done at 40?

0:40:260:40:29

That's OK. You're not losing.

0:40:310:40:33

A tidy little profit nevertheless.

0:40:330:40:36

We can't all make large profits.

0:40:360:40:38

Let's see if David's still smiling

0:40:400:40:42

when his tatty old Victorian scrap screen comes up next.

0:40:420:40:45

I hope they put on the screen the other side, the red screen.

0:40:450:40:50

I don't like the scraps!

0:40:500:40:51

There we are, lot 120, the modesty screen there.

0:40:530:40:58

A modesty screen! I love the description.

0:40:580:41:00

You can put your 1960s stockings on behind this one.

0:41:000:41:04

-£40 I have bid, at 40.

-40, is that all?!

-At £40, at 40.

0:41:040:41:07

At £40, at 40 for the screen there, 40.

0:41:070:41:09

-Come on!

-At 40, and five.

0:41:090:41:12

45, and 50. Five, 60.

0:41:120:41:15

-Five, 70.

-It's going!

-Come on!

-£70 with me then, at 70.

-It's going!

0:41:150:41:19

-Five, 80.

-It's going.

-£80 with me, at 80.

0:41:190:41:22

It's on commission, it's here to sell.

0:41:220:41:24

It's going at 80 then. Are we all done at £80? Selling at 80, £80.

0:41:240:41:29

-Oh!

-Ouch! That scrap screen is scrap value. Oh dear.

0:41:290:41:34

Still, no need to cry, David.

0:41:340:41:36

Margie's last hope lies with her silver collection,

0:41:370:41:41

which she needs to sell for at least £110 to stand any chance of winning.

0:41:410:41:46

No pressure, then.

0:41:460:41:48

35, 40. 45, at 50.

0:41:480:41:51

55, at 60.

0:41:510:41:53

-Keep going.

-65, at 70. 75, at £75.

0:41:530:41:57

-That's good. You were bang on.

-75, 75. £80 on the phone, at 80.

0:41:570:42:01

-80 on the phone.

-At 90.

-We were on the phone.

0:42:010:42:04

At £90 here, at 90. Selling at 90, then.

0:42:040:42:07

All done at £90? Going at 90, all done at 90?

0:42:070:42:10

Well done!

0:42:100:42:12

Well, it's a sterling profit but sadly, not enough.

0:42:120:42:15

That's it. You're a bit of a wily old fox, aren't you?

0:42:150:42:18

You're a crafty vixen, aren't you? Ooh!

0:42:180:42:21

Margie started today's show with £238 and after auction costs,

0:42:210:42:25

she's made a profit of £56.40,

0:42:250:42:29

increasing her spending power for the next round to £294.40.

0:42:290:42:34

David started with £417,

0:42:360:42:39

but even after costs, he's made a profit of £68.60,

0:42:390:42:43

increasing his stash of cash to a mighty £485.60,

0:42:430:42:47

claiming his second victory in a row.

0:42:470:42:50

-You happy?

-I'm very happy. What about you?

-I'm quite happy.

0:42:530:42:57

-You made a profit.

-I know, but you had a really good flyer there.

0:42:570:43:01

-That's auctions for you.

-I know.

0:43:010:43:04

I can't wait for the next sale.

0:43:040:43:05

Off we go! This is a lovely, lovely place.

0:43:080:43:12

-I think we need to go for a paddle.

-Well, you can.

0:43:120:43:15

Come on, Barby, let's go party! The ice creams are on you.

0:43:150:43:20

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:220:43:24

Margie has delusions of grandeur...

0:43:240:43:28

I fancy myself in here with the future king.

0:43:280:43:30

..and David comes over most peculiar.

0:43:320:43:35

150. Thank you.

0:43:350:43:38

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:550:43:58

David Barby and silver expert Margie Cooper go on the second leg of their journey, battling it out in County Durham before winding their way to auction in Scarborough.


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