Episode 11 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 11

Anita Manning and Philip Serrell are travelling through the north of England in their classic car, with the aim of turning a profit on their items at auction in Edinburgh.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts

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with £200 each, a classic car,

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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It hurts!

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Is it the right way up?

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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I look like the mad hatter!

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So will it be the high road to glory

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or slow road to disaster?

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I'm only in this programme to be Anita Manning's chauffeur!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's the start of a brand-new week

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and we're with Anita Manning and Philip Serrell

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in a '65 sky-blue Sunbeam Alpine.

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I love it because it goes with my boots.

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Is that the way the week's going to go?

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There are times in your life when you wish you'd got a bloke as your partner!

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Phil is an auctioneer from Worcester whose gruff exterior

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conceals the heart of a true romantic.

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Does that give me a certain look?

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Phil, I love you because you're daft and dangerous!

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Anita is also an auctioneer and even though she hails from Glasgow,

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the two do have something else in common.

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This is going to surprise the nation here,

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-but you and I are both ex P.E teachers!

-That's right!

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I specialised in dance, not rugby!

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-Did you do the Bump, or whatever it was?

-The Bump?

-Wasn't that a dance craze?

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Come on, Anita. Who could forget the Bump?

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This week's Road Trip starts in Ford, in the far north of England,

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and ventures into Scotland before winding its way southwards

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and concluding in Yorkshire at Harrogate.

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The first leg kicks off in Northumberland at Ford

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and heads over the border to an auction in Edinburgh.

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-Edinburgh is a completely different thing from Glasgow.

-Is it?

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Edinburgh is more traditional.

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So why am I giving you all these hints?

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Cos you're my mate. You're trying to help me.

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The sleepy village of Ford

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takes its name from a crossing of the River Till

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which in Anglo-Saxon times was apparently popular with nuns and monks

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travelling between the holy places of Iona and Lindisfarne.

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It's nothing like so busy today, though.

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Once a humble dairy, this place is now THE destination

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for those seeking the unusual, the eclectic and the bizarre.

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You'll find just about anything here.

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I suppose these would have been the - what do you call them? -

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the pens that the cows are kept in.

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Do they keep cows in a dairy?

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Have you ever seen an actual farm, Anita?

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Bread sauce! Bread sauce!

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He doesn't like me at all.

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That is so bad that it's nearly good!

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Well, our two are certainly getting into the spirit of the place.

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That is some sort of...

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-Well...

-Bidet.

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It's got all the adjustments.

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You've got a spray, you've got a jet.

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You've got...

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You've got everything you could require behind you!

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It's a fantastic thing. Thankfully, it's out of my budget

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because I could end up buying something like that.

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Ah, well, it's nice to know even Phil has his limits.

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What's Anita spotted?

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I'm quite interested in these prints.

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They are the fashion plates of the 1860s.

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They show us the type of dress that women wore at that time.

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It's a very sort of girlie thing to buy

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and I know that Phil will hate them and think I'm totally mad.

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They're only £9.50.

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I think it's £9.50 for one, so it's pretty cheap.

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Time to consult Lynne.

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Is it 9.50 for the pair?

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-Nice try, Anita!

-9.50 each.

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-They're 9.50 each.

-But I could do the two for 15.

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Could you do them for 12? Could you come to 12 on them?

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Why not?

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-Will we do it?

-We'll do it.

-That's lovely. Thanks again.

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So, Anita has two pictures in the bag.

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Looks like Phil's getting with the farmyard idea.

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I quite like these two.

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There's a sort of chicken theme recurring here.

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Not exactly antiques, though, are they, Phil?

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The thing is, will my plans come home to roost? Ha-ha!

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Dear me, that was a really bad "yolk"!

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Oh, please! What does Keith think?

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We've got them up at 20 each.

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Yeah. Can you do £18 for the two?

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Call it 20. Then you've got one for nothing.

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Go on, then. Is that the way it works?

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-Hark at this! But I like them, anyway.

-All right.

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Ah, I wonder what that was used for?

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-Can you tell me anything about this?

-I know about that. Can you guess what it is?

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I thought it was the stretcher that they used to carry the drunks to jail on a Saturday night!

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-It's a coffin carrier.

-Is it a coffin carrier?

-A coffin carrier.

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How macabre!

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It's the type of thing you could take a chance on

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if it was, you know, a low price.

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I think it's quite a low price. Let me check.

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Lynne's gone off to consult Keith,

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leaving Anita to ponder.

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I'd pay 20 quid for that.

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Just to see the expression on Phil Serrell's face!

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Could this be bought for 20 quid?

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I mean, I'm playing a wild card here.

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It could go to auction and get a pound and I could lose 19 quid!

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I think we could let it go at 30.

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But that would be absolutely my bottom price.

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Could you come to 25? Could you come half-way down?

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Well, since it's you!

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Oh, thank you so much!

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Could it be a moment of madness?

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Now, that is unusual.

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Is Anita's strategy to beat Phil at his own game?

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I'm sure he'll rise to the challenge, though!

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Keith, I love all this architectural stuff.

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What's that?

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That's a ridge tile.

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-Ridge tile?

-A hump-back ridge tile.

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What would be the point of that?

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Just, I think, for decoration. Something different on a roof.

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-That's glazed stoneware.

-It is.

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What on earth would you do with that? How much is that?

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20 quid.

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Do you, know, I think that's cheap. But...

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-I just don't know who would buy it?

-Mm.

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Yeah. Who?

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And 20 quid is the absolute finito?

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-I might tweak it a little bit.

-Right.

-I could manage a tenner for it.

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Is he really going to buy that?

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He is, you know!

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Keith, thank you very much.

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-I'll put this in the back of the car before she sees me!

-Thank you.

-Thank you. Bye!

-Bye!

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With some, er, unusual buys on board,

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Anita and Phil must now hurry up and motor

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from Ford to Berwick Upon Tweed.

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For over 400 years, this market town was fought over

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by the English and the Scots.

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Although it's been English since 1482,

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a recent poll suggested that 80% of residents

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would rather be under Scottish rule.

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And there are enough ramparts around here to remind us

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that you can never say never!

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Knowing Phil, he'll probably pick up a battlement going cheap!

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This place looks like a real mixed bag.

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Part antique, part charity shop. But the man from Worcester

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is quick to spot something.

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Hell's bells! 250?!

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Is that £2.50?

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I'm joking, man. I just wanted to see your face when you saw 250!

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I thought I did the jokes round here, Tom!

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If you pull that off, there's a proper price underneath.

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Really. Is that your... 40 quid?

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-Cheap, isn't it?

-Is that your shop price?

-Too cheap.

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It's a piece of Royal Worcester.

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G 161.

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-That's the pattern number of it.

-Right.

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If you look in the pattern book, it will tell you that 161 is a small, squat fluted vase

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and the G will tell you that originally it came from the Granges Factory.

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And then it's got there a little square.

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As if by magic, if you look just there,

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a square tells you that it was made in 1928.

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Genius.

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I think he's done this before, you know.

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So, we know how old it is.

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Who's it by, that's the question.

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-Do you know who it's by?

-There's a name on it.

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James Stinton.

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The Stinton dynasty dates back as far as the early 19th century.

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For four generations, the various family members painted china

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with each specialising in particular scenes.

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For James, it was pheasants.

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Their work is massively collectable.

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-It's not damaged or restored in any way, is it?

-No. Definitely not.

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I'm sort of embarrassed to ask.

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£40, I presume, is your best price.

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Yes!

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-I'm going to ask, because...

-I thought it was cheap at 40.

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35.

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I'm going to buy it off you.

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Let me tell you, I think that's worth between two and £300.

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I think Tom might need to sit down, now.

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I'm really, really pleased. Thank you very much.

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So I'm going to buy that off you. That's 35.

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You've been so kind, it's not true.

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I love this, as well.

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This angling guide is by the Hardy family who started as gunsmiths

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in nearby Alnwick in 1872,

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but later made their name with fishing equipment.

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I think that's fantastic. What's the best you can do on that?

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Bearing in mind that you've just got a really cheap vase...

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-I have, I have, I have.

-40 quid.

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Can I give you 35 quid for that?

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Go on.

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You're a gentleman.

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That was quick work. I think he's rather pleased with those.

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While Phil has been snaffling the bargains of Berwick,

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Anita has gone a few miles down the road to Paxton House.

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Designed by John Adam in the mid-18th century,

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Paxton is one of the finest examples of neo-Palladian architecture

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in the whole of Scotland.

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Anita's about to meet Martha, her guide.

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Martha, I'm Anita.

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Hello. Nice to see you.

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The house was built for the young laird Patrick Home

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on his return from the Grand Tour.

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Paxton is packed with reminders of his adventures.

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This is a young lad, about the age of 17,

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-and he was sent off to university in Prussia.

-Right.

-Leipzig.

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He went to the court of Frederick the Great.

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-Right.

-Of Prussia.

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I suppose that court would have been in the circuit of the Grand Tour.

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-Did he do the Grand Tour?

-Oh, absolutely, yes.

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He eventually left the court

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and then spent another two years wandering round Europe.

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Quite a nice looking guy.

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-Oh, yes.

-I could fancy him myself!

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Young Patrick was a sort of real-life Barry Lyndon,

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catapulted from sleepy Scotland to the romance of 18th-century Europe

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and dressed to kill!

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Oh, wow!

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These are just some of the clothes that Patrick wore.

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We've got this beautiful brocade waistcoat.

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See the gold around the buttonholes

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and these really fancy buttons.

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And we've got this one. This would have had a matching blue wool coat

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with this beautiful silver embroidery.

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Of course, the 18th century was all about opulence, extravagance,

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ornamentation to the nth degree.

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-Shoes with buckles.

-Absolutely.

-Powdered hair!

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As much as you could get. You wanted to show how great, how wonderful, how rich you were.

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But for all his finery, life took a sad turn for the young man from Scotland.

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He fell madly in love with a beautiful young lady-in-waiting.

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But when her mother forbade them to be married,

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Patrick was left only with her gloves.

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It seems he went on quite a spending spree to console himself, and acquired many treasures.

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Including this rosewood inlaid table cabinet.

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A stunning piece of furniture!

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It's based on Hercules.

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We've got Hercules here on the cupboard door.

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All these little drawer fronts are illustrating the Labours of Hercules

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and one or two of the other Greek myths.

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At the moment, we've counted 48 drawers all the way through.

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48 drawers, eh?

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What would you need all those for?

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Well, some of them are secret and concealed,

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to hold hidden treasure.

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He bought it in Italy. He bought it as we would buy an antique.

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It's made in the mid-17th century, so it was 100 years old or over when he was buying it.

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It's a wonderful, wonderful cabinet.

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I really haven't seen anything as beautiful as that for a long time.

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In the early 19th century, a brand-new East Wing was added to Paxton.

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This is the gallery that they built

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to show the paintings.

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GASPS

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You can just imagine what it was like when it was first hung with the paintings.

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This is heaven!

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Although the original paintings Patrick acquired are now dispersed,

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an important collection of late 18th- and early 19th-century paintings

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from the National Gallery of Scotland have taken their place.

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And that wonderful dome!

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Oh!

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I want a room like this!

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The house today flourishes, but Patrick's life never lived up to all that youthful promise.

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Whilst he was away on his Grand Tour, his mother was horribly murdered

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and when he did marry, it was to a woman who was soon pronounced mentally unstable.

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There he is, at the end there,

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a portrait of Patrick.

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He became MP for Berwick.

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He went to live in a small rented house in London

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with just his housekeeper for company.

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And we've got a letter from one of his friends,

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and the gist of it is, "Dear Patrick, you really must try and get out more."

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So from bright young thing to poor, lonely old hermit.

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What a shame.

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Oh, dear. I hope that sad note doesn't discourage our pair for long.

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Because, after all, it's been a very good day.

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Nighty-night!

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Next morning, the mood in the Sunbeam is best described as "mixed"!

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You're not giving me this smiley, cheery person the whole week, are you?

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-I can't help it!

-It's going to wear me out! Absolutely wear me out.

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Please don't be this happy all the time.

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-My face isn't made for miserable.

-True. And mine is!

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Yesterday, Phil picked up a piece of his favourite Worcester

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with pheasants on it, as well as a couple of bowls with chicken designs

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and the Hardy's Anglers' Guide. Plus roof tile!

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He's spent exactly £100, leaving the same amount to spend today.

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I've either got three things that I should make one lot,

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or three things I can make two lots

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or three things I can make three lots.

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Sorry, you're yawning. Am I boring you?

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Don't know about that! Anita acquired a pair of framed fashion prints

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and an oak coffin carrier for just £37.

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Why, I'll never know!

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She cannily enough, therefore, has £163 left to spend.

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The best laid plans of mice and men gang aft agley.

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Quite.

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Our two are now actually in Scotland

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and heading for the big auction in Edinburgh,

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starting out in the rain

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at Innerleithen...

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-Cheers, Anita.

-Bye-bye, darling.

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..where Phil's about to put shopping aside and take a trip back in time.

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Behind this unassuming shop front is a unique piece of industrial heritage.

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-Hi.

-Hello!

-I'm Philip. How are you?

-I'm Jen. Nice to meet you.

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This is a fantastic building. This is Robert Smail's print works?

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-Yes, here in Innerleithin.

-19th century?

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-1866.

-Never had much of a clear-out, did they?

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That's the lovely thing about the Smails. They never modernised, and never threw anything away.

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When, after 120 years, the family finally gave up the unequal struggle against new technology,

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the National Trust stepped in to create a working museum of printing.

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-This is the type room, is it?

-The case room.

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It's called that because it's where you store your cases of type.

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We've got 400 cases of type.

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-A case is a literal wooden case that contains letters of the alphabet.

-Absolutely right.

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For each alphabet, you'd have two cases. The upper case, which sits on the upper part of the rack,

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that's for capital letters.

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-Your lower case...

-It's as simple as that.

-It is.

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It was really important that you put them back in the right case.

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The type, when it's cast, is cast in mirror image

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and apprentices were told to mind their p's and q's

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because a p would look like a q, and a q would look like a p.

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-So you'd have to put it in the right place.

-I love expressions like that.

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So your p's and q's come from... There's a q.

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-Yep.

-I have to remember where I got this. There's a p.

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So if it looks like a p, it must be a q.

0:18:050:18:08

Tell you what, that is confusing!

0:18:080:18:10

Downstairs in the machine room, Smails continue to print

0:18:110:18:17

on ancient letter-press machines like the Arab clamshell platen,

0:18:170:18:21

the Wharfedale Reliance and the original Heidelberg.

0:18:210:18:25

It's like being on the wheel, isn't it?

0:18:280:18:30

Yes, without the strawberries.

0:18:300:18:32

Miller and Richard in nearby Edinburgh were a major type foundry

0:18:340:18:39

supplying type to the world.

0:18:390:18:41

The archives of Smails reflects the importance of printing.

0:18:410:18:45

They're a fascinating social history of the first industrial age.

0:18:450:18:49

This one is quite interesting.

0:18:510:18:52

It's a poster, again 1912, the coming of women's suffrage

0:18:520:18:58

-to the town.

-Really?

0:18:580:19:00

This has been done in two sections and it would be pasted up together.

0:19:000:19:04

It's a precursor to the modern billboard.

0:19:040:19:07

They once printed a newspaper on these premises

0:19:070:19:10

and acted as a shipping agency, booking passages to the New World.

0:19:100:19:14

Responsible work and the letter-press type setter

0:19:140:19:18

was at the centre of it all.

0:19:180:19:19

No wonder it took a seven-year apprenticeship. I wonder what Phil can learn in an hour?

0:19:190:19:25

It's left to right. So you're setting it exactly the same way as you'd write it,

0:19:250:19:30

but as the letters are a mirror image, you have to set them upside-down.

0:19:300:19:33

I'm going to do my name, right?

0:19:330:19:35

Wherever the little label is, it's the space below.

0:19:350:19:38

That's the first mistake, then.

0:19:380:19:40

I was just about to be "Hilip" Serrell, was I?

0:19:400:19:42

-Yeah.

-So that goes there.

-Yes.

0:19:420:19:44

Each letter has a little nick or groove on them.

0:19:440:19:49

That helps you get them up the right way. So if you see...

0:19:490:19:51

-You're a natural! Well done!

-I know.

0:19:510:19:53

But the only way to find out if it's right is to take a proof of it.

0:19:530:19:57

Apply the ink, grab some paper,

0:19:570:19:59

get a hold of the mighty Eagle press

0:19:590:20:03

and pull!

0:20:030:20:05

Is that you, sir?

0:20:060:20:07

Good Lord above! It is, as well!

0:20:070:20:09

-I'm going to keep that!

-Excellent.

0:20:090:20:12

Well done, Phil. And to cap it all, you successfully spelt your own name!

0:20:120:20:17

Meanwhile, Anita has, with equal aplomb,

0:20:190:20:22

made her way from Innerleithen to Melrose.

0:20:220:20:25

Several well-known rugby players hail from Melrose.

0:20:270:20:31

It also has a fine ruined abbey.

0:20:310:20:34

Oh, yeah, and it welcomes careful drivers.

0:20:340:20:37

Steady, Anita!

0:20:370:20:39

This looks like a very nice little shop.

0:20:400:20:42

The sort of place where Anita might just spot something shiny.

0:20:430:20:47

Oh, like that, for example.

0:20:490:20:52

Or that.

0:20:520:20:54

This is a lovely item here.

0:20:540:20:55

This is a little perfect Christening gift.

0:20:550:20:58

This would have been a gift for a very well-off little baby.

0:20:580:21:03

And, what with the price of silver, it may be too dear for Anita today.

0:21:040:21:09

But, as well as that puppy, it seems there's an elephant in this room.

0:21:090:21:14

Can I lift this up and have a good wee look at it?

0:21:160:21:19

And another!

0:21:190:21:21

I like those. It would be nice to get them at a reasonable price.

0:21:210:21:26

-Are they the type of thing that the posh Edinburgh folk will buy?

-Yes.

0:21:260:21:30

Yes, actually.

0:21:300:21:32

Are they as sophisticated as the Glasgow crowd?

0:21:320:21:35

Differently!

0:21:350:21:36

-Good answer, Sue!

-What I'm doing here is

0:21:360:21:39

I'm trying to avoid coming straight out and saying, "What sort of price?"

0:21:390:21:45

It could be a way out of my price, and it might not.

0:21:450:21:48

Um...

0:21:480:21:49

£90 the pair.

0:21:510:21:53

Hmm. Not exactly jumbo. But worth thinking about.

0:21:530:21:56

Is there anything in here that you think is a good buy, or is it all too expensive for me?

0:21:560:22:02

What I like is that lovely Art Deco ring there.

0:22:020:22:05

It's gorgeous, but I know that will be out of my price range.

0:22:050:22:09

-It's not diamonds, Anita.

-It's not diamonds?

-No.

0:22:090:22:12

It looks the part, doesn't it?

0:22:120:22:14

But it's got to be £75.

0:22:140:22:17

I'm selling it on behalf of a client.

0:22:170:22:20

The design is lovely, isn't it?

0:22:200:22:22

Its sparkle, as well!

0:22:220:22:24

-When she showed me, I was, "Ooh!"

-"£75? Yes, I'll take it right away!"

0:22:240:22:28

-So it's got to be 75?

-It has to be.

-Yep.

0:22:280:22:32

But, if they're actually not diamonds, is it worth it?

0:22:320:22:36

Now, I think I've got to have a go at these elephant tables.

0:22:360:22:41

I think these elephant tables might just be me!

0:22:410:22:44

I'd also like to have a go at the ring.

0:22:440:22:46

-Is there no negotiation on the ring at all?

-No.

0:22:460:22:48

-On the tables, I was thinking round about 50. Is that...

-No.

0:22:480:22:53

-No, they'd have to be more than 50.

-Have to be more than 50?

0:22:530:22:57

Can we come anywhere near that?

0:22:570:22:58

65?

0:22:580:23:00

Is 60 out of it altogether?

0:23:000:23:02

-All right, 60.

-Will we go to 60, uh-huh?

0:23:020:23:06

That's great. That's lovely. Thank you very much.

0:23:060:23:09

I'm so pleased, because I just fell in love with them.

0:23:090:23:12

So, Anita's splashed £135 on the elephant tables

0:23:120:23:17

and the ring with the paste diamonds.

0:23:170:23:20

Leaving her just enough cash for one more buy,

0:23:210:23:24

motoring further north from Melrose to Danderhall.

0:23:240:23:28

Well, they started out in a dairy

0:23:310:23:33

and now they've arrived at a couple of industrial units,

0:23:330:23:36

ready to get their hands dirty and have a rummage.

0:23:360:23:40

That Black Beauty, he was a dark horse!

0:23:450:23:48

The fingers are looking for silver and gold. Zzzz!

0:23:500:23:54

These are called Codd bottles and they're great fun.

0:23:550:23:57

In the 19th century, you used to have a little wooden tool

0:23:570:24:02

that you put on top and you bashed it and then it knocked that marble

0:24:020:24:06

down to the bottom so you could drink out of it.

0:24:060:24:08

Then kids used to smash these bottles and play marbles with the marble inside.

0:24:080:24:14

They can be massively collectable,

0:24:160:24:18

depending upon what it says on the front.

0:24:180:24:20

This has got Manchester on it,

0:24:200:24:23

which won't be a great deal of help in Edinburgh, I don't think!

0:24:230:24:26

Now, they might appeal.

0:24:270:24:29

Murano glass. Probably 1960s.

0:24:300:24:33

They have bags of style.

0:24:330:24:35

Murano glass, famous for its colour,

0:24:350:24:37

is from the Venetian island of the same name.

0:24:370:24:39

The glassmakers were allegedly encouraged to move there from nearby Venice

0:24:390:24:44

because of the fire hazards involved with their trade.

0:24:440:24:48

One is marked up at £15, and the other is marked up at 25.

0:24:480:24:54

So that's 40 quid for both of them.

0:24:540:24:57

Now, I don't want to pay £40 for both of them.

0:24:580:25:01

I haven't got £40 to spend.

0:25:010:25:04

Actually, Anita, you've only got £28, so you can't afford the asking price for that, either.

0:25:040:25:11

It's a little oak table.

0:25:120:25:14

Art Deco in style.

0:25:140:25:17

There's not a lot to it,

0:25:170:25:20

but the simplicity is what people like today.

0:25:200:25:23

It's solid oak. It's not veneered. It's a nice little thing.

0:25:230:25:27

While Anita ponders spending her last few pounds,

0:25:270:25:31

cash-rich Phil is busy once more with architectural salvage.

0:25:310:25:36

That's going to be a mother to move, that is!

0:25:360:25:38

But what on earth is it?

0:25:380:25:40

What do you reckon it was? Was it like the keystone off a bridge?

0:25:460:25:49

-Apparently.

-Sort of set into the middle of the bridge.

0:25:490:25:53

Hang on, there's more junk - I mean, salvage.

0:25:530:25:56

This is clearly a radiator with a bit here, I don't know if that's to put the stuff in.

0:25:560:26:01

Or light a fire on.

0:26:010:26:03

I would think it's probably around 1900. It's cast iron.

0:26:030:26:08

May have had pipes coming out of here originally.

0:26:080:26:10

I really, really don't know.

0:26:100:26:12

So what do you think is more Serrell?

0:26:120:26:15

A radiator that might be for warming your feet, or part of a bridge?

0:26:150:26:19

Now, that's a real poser!

0:26:190:26:21

But while Phil wrestles with metal, Anita's moved on to the bargaining stage.

0:26:210:26:26

It's lovely. It's a wee gem.

0:26:260:26:28

You're looking in the region of £18?

0:26:280:26:30

-That would be too little for me.

-Does it come anywhere near that?

0:26:300:26:35

-It would have to be around 25.

-Around 25?

-Couldn't be any less than 25.

0:26:350:26:41

What about on the glass?

0:26:430:26:45

If I wanted to go on the glass?

0:26:450:26:47

I could do the two for 30.

0:26:470:26:50

Could you come to 25 on the two glasses?

0:26:500:26:52

27 is the best on them.

0:26:520:26:55

-I've got 28 that I can spend.

-Right.

0:26:550:27:00

But I want to keep a couple of quid so that I don't...

0:27:000:27:03

..spend everything. So at least I can carry two pounds on

0:27:050:27:09

to the next thing! Know what I mean? I know it sounds daft.

0:27:090:27:12

Take the glass, then, for 27.

0:27:120:27:14

That is so Sixties, isn't it?

0:27:140:27:17

-Sure.

-And that shape's a wee bit more unusual.

0:27:170:27:19

-OK, we'll take a chance and go on it. Thank you very much.

-Thanks.

0:27:190:27:24

So, two pieces of glass for £27.

0:27:240:27:27

Just one pound left, then.

0:27:270:27:29

He's definitely plumped for the bridge bit,

0:27:310:27:34

but the dealer seems a bit shy!

0:27:340:27:36

Can I give you 30 quid for it?

0:27:360:27:38

Get it out your way?

0:27:380:27:40

There's another way of looking it. It can sit there forever.

0:27:400:27:43

But this is a shop, not a museum!

0:27:430:27:45

I'll give you 35 quid for that.

0:27:450:27:48

Are you going to lift it?

0:27:490:27:51

Well, I'll get it lifted.

0:27:510:27:53

-When?

-Soon.

0:27:530:27:55

-I'll give you 35 quid.

-Have it for 30 quid if you lift it today.

0:27:550:27:59

OK, you're on.

0:27:590:28:01

Away off these premises today.

0:28:010:28:04

-You're on.

-40 quid if you dinnae.

0:28:040:28:07

30 quid, done deal. Got a tenner?

0:28:070:28:09

Give us the 40 quid and I'll give you the tenner back when you lift it.

0:28:090:28:12

-It'll be moved today, I promise.

-Then you'll get the tenner back.

0:28:120:28:15

-30 quid if it's moved today.

-A tenner back if you move it today.

0:28:150:28:17

Thank you very much.

0:28:170:28:19

Well done, Phil... I think!

0:28:190:28:21

Plus a £10 discount if he can only shift it quick.

0:28:210:28:25

My new mate here. International man of mystery. No-one knows who he is.

0:28:250:28:29

Ah. Phil's got some wheels already and his £10 change, too.

0:28:290:28:33

I don't think I should have bought this.

0:28:330:28:35

How far's he going to get with that, though? Not in the Sunbeam!

0:28:350:28:38

Ah. Well done, Phil.

0:28:400:28:42

If I'd have known that, I'd have bought the whole bridge!

0:28:530:28:57

OK. Time to own up. What's under them covers?

0:28:570:29:01

-OK, are you ready?

-I'm ready.

0:29:010:29:03

I'm going to peel these wonderful things off

0:29:030:29:09

and let you see them.

0:29:090:29:12

What the hell is that?

0:29:120:29:15

-Isn't that wonderful?

-No.

0:29:160:29:18

Go on, Phil, say something nice for a change!

0:29:180:29:22

I quite like the top, but I'm not quite sure about Dumbo on the bottom! How much were they?

0:29:220:29:26

60 quid.

0:29:280:29:29

Are you still taking those tablets?

0:29:290:29:32

-Now, let me guess.

-OK.

0:29:320:29:34

-Is that your Scottish glass?

-No, it's not Scottish.

0:29:340:29:37

-Scandinavian?

-It's Italian glass.

-Somewhere in Europe.

0:29:370:29:41

I was almost close! And how much were they?

0:29:410:29:44

I paid £27 for those.

0:29:440:29:47

And a bit of girlie stuff down here.

0:29:470:29:50

Yes, I wanted to buy a piece of jewellery.

0:29:500:29:52

-How did you buy that on the budget?

-Well, I bought it for 75 quid.

0:29:520:29:56

-That's nothing!

-I hope so. The ring has been changed at one point.

0:29:560:30:02

-May I look?

-You certainly can.

-Not that it'll make...

-As long as you don't ask me to marry you!

-No, no.

0:30:020:30:09

And my last item is a Philip Serrell affair here.

0:30:090:30:14

This should be interesting!

0:30:140:30:16

-"Stannington Parish".

-Yeah.

0:30:160:30:19

-It's a coffin carrier, isn't it?

-It's a coffin carrier.

0:30:200:30:23

I think he likes it.

0:30:230:30:26

So how much have you paid overall? How much have you spent?

0:30:260:30:29

I've spent £199 in total.

0:30:290:30:35

I think your ring's a winner.

0:30:350:30:36

Is it, Phil? I don't think they're diamonds.

0:30:360:30:39

I'd sort of possibly worry about those two.

0:30:390:30:44

And I think that is actually quite fun.

0:30:440:30:47

I paid £25. I don't think that's bad.

0:30:470:30:50

But where's Stannington?

0:30:500:30:52

I think it's some place in Greece!

0:30:520:30:56

-That won't help you too much! Is it my moment now?

-Show me!

0:30:560:31:00

I'll just whip this off here.

0:31:000:31:02

-Ready for this last one?

-Yeah.

0:31:020:31:04

What is that?

0:31:050:31:07

What is that? What is it?

0:31:070:31:10

I was hoping you wouldn't ask that.

0:31:100:31:12

It's a ridge tile.

0:31:120:31:14

It suddenly dawned on me after I'd bought it...

0:31:140:31:17

..one of them actually isn't a lot of use to anybody, is it?

0:31:180:31:21

-How much did you pay for that?

-£10.

0:31:210:31:24

This is my favourite bit.

0:31:240:31:26

Right. That scabby old book?

0:31:260:31:29

Wash your mouth out, woman!

0:31:290:31:31

This is Hardy's annual.

0:31:310:31:33

Look at all this, right.

0:31:330:31:36

Easy!

0:31:370:31:38

Listen, hold on a minute!

0:31:380:31:40

1926. Isn't this just fabulous?

0:31:400:31:43

£35.

0:31:430:31:45

This was a little beauty.

0:31:450:31:46

-A little Royal Worcester vase.

-Mr Worcester, Mr Worcester!

0:31:460:31:50

A little Royal Worcester vase by James Stinton.

0:31:500:31:53

-The painting in that is exquisite, isn't it?

-Yeah, he was a good man.

0:31:540:31:58

I think, at auction, I'm hoping it'll do between...

0:31:580:32:02

It should do a minimum, I would think, of 120, 180.

0:32:020:32:07

On a good day, it's 200 to £300.

0:32:070:32:10

Worcester is one of your passions.

0:32:100:32:11

It's also one of your passions to buy these stupid, useless things,

0:32:110:32:15

-but as a piece of sculpture and for £10...

-Can I stop you for a minute?

0:32:150:32:19

"Stupid useless things"?

0:32:190:32:21

Come with me a second.

0:32:210:32:23

Save the best till last, eh?

0:32:230:32:26

OK, you can turn round, now.

0:32:310:32:33

What on earth is that?

0:32:330:32:36

I'm not actually sure, if the truth be known.

0:32:360:32:39

But I can tell you it was made in 1848!

0:32:390:32:42

There's only one problem I have with it, having bought it,

0:32:420:32:45

-what do you do with it?

-I don't know! How much did you pay for it?

-£30.

0:32:450:32:50

£30?! You'd get more for that in scrap!

0:32:500:32:53

And I'll tell you something else, there's a scrap yard just down there.

0:32:530:32:57

I'm off there now. This is heavy!

0:32:570:33:01

Now, your true thoughts?

0:33:010:33:03

Anita's done really well. Her real ace is that ring.

0:33:030:33:06

If those are diamonds, it's surely worth £300.

0:33:060:33:09

This group of things that Philip has bought is so Philip Serrell!

0:33:090:33:14

A wonderful delicate piece of Worcester

0:33:140:33:17

and that big cast iron bridge thingy!

0:33:170:33:22

The elephants, I can't quite see those at all.

0:33:220:33:26

60 quid seems like a pile of money.

0:33:260:33:28

It's the day of the auction, and they haven't got far to go.

0:33:290:33:33

Which way's north?

0:33:330:33:34

That way.

0:33:370:33:38

It's that way or that way.

0:33:380:33:41

Where's the sun?

0:33:410:33:42

This is not... The sun?!

0:33:420:33:44

We're in Scotland! What sun?

0:33:440:33:46

-There's no sun at all, you silly woman!

-There's the sun.

0:33:460:33:49

What sun? It's closing down with rain.

0:33:490:33:52

-It's sun.

-It's grey. There's no sun anywhere!

0:33:520:33:54

After starting out in Ford,

0:33:560:33:58

the first part of our trip will end up in Edinburgh.

0:33:580:34:00

Eventually.

0:34:000:34:02

Ah! As capital city and heart of the Scottish Enlightenment,

0:34:030:34:07

dominated by the castle,

0:34:070:34:09

Edinburgh has many famous and infamous buildings.

0:34:090:34:13

Like the expensive parliament.

0:34:130:34:15

Anyone seen any salmon rising?

0:34:150:34:18

I'm quite excited.

0:34:180:34:20

I love the thrill of anticipation of a new auction.

0:34:200:34:24

-It looks like a shop as well.

-Yeah.

0:34:240:34:27

This is Shapes auctioneers,

0:34:270:34:30

where they recently sold a pair of Sir Walter Scott's slippers for £3,000.

0:34:300:34:35

So, while the Edinburgers take a peek at the treasures,

0:34:350:34:39

let's hear what auctioneer Gavin Lindsay thinks of what Anita and Phil have bought.

0:34:390:34:43

I think they've got a bit of a mixed bag!

0:34:450:34:48

The Worcester vase by James Stinton should do quite well.

0:34:480:34:52

We've had the ring under the diamond tester

0:34:520:34:55

and unfortunately, it doesn't look like they're diamonds,

0:34:550:34:57

so it's a nice thing for the ladies, or to buy someone a quick present.

0:34:570:35:00

You could claim it's a diamond and see if you get a smile out of it!

0:35:000:35:03

Anita began with £200. She's spent a total of £199 on five auction lots.

0:35:050:35:11

-I need some change.

-For a cup of tea?

0:35:110:35:14

Phil also started out with £200. He spent £130 on five auction lots.

0:35:140:35:20

A hump-backed ridge tile? Why on earth would you want a hump-backed ridge tile?

0:35:200:35:24

OK.

0:35:240:35:25

Almost ready.

0:35:250:35:26

Oh, dear! I think they call this breaking news!

0:35:260:35:30

It really doesn't help when one of your own crew go and drop it!

0:35:300:35:33

Ooh-ah.

0:35:330:35:35

So now it's up to Gavin to estimate what it would have sold for.

0:35:350:35:38

We had a 30 to 40 estimate, and the insurance will cover that.

0:35:380:35:42

So I would say about £35 for something that's been damaged.

0:35:420:35:46

It could be a good day for them!

0:35:460:35:47

I've made 20 quid by breaking something. How cool is that?

0:35:470:35:50

-Where's the sledgehammer?

-I'm going to rip into everything now!

0:35:500:35:55

Quick, let's get started before anything else gets bust!

0:35:550:35:58

Lindsay Brown is in the rostrum.

0:35:580:36:00

-Ooh, I'm getting the wobbles.

-I didn't know you were the nervous type.

0:36:000:36:03

I'm like a coiled spring.

0:36:030:36:05

First up, the Worcester vase.

0:36:050:36:08

Phil has high hopes for this one.

0:36:080:36:10

I'll take 70. Any interest at 70?

0:36:100:36:12

You do surprise me. No hands in the air.

0:36:120:36:16

50? I'll take 50.

0:36:160:36:18

55. 60.

0:36:180:36:19

65. 70.

0:36:190:36:21

75. It's our bid.

0:36:210:36:25

On my right at 75.

0:36:250:36:26

I'll be surprised if that's all it sells for. It's ridiculously cheap.

0:36:260:36:31

£80 online.

0:36:310:36:33

£80 and he's out.

0:36:330:36:34

It's £80 on the net, then.

0:36:340:36:36

-Still for nothing.

-£80.

-Ouch!

-Any last offers?

0:36:360:36:39

-Selling, then.

-That's for nothing!

0:36:390:36:42

We will sell at £80, if we're all out.

0:36:420:36:44

Selling at £80. £80.

0:36:440:36:48

GROANS

0:36:480:36:49

That was way short of the £200 he wanted.

0:36:490:36:52

But with that and the broken tile,

0:36:520:36:54

the wily old fox is off to a solid start.

0:36:540:36:57

I don't mind. It's just a game. Doesn't matter who wins. Very much!

0:36:580:37:02

What can his chickens do?

0:37:030:37:05

Anyone interested at 20 for the two items?

0:37:050:37:08

Thank you, madam, I see you.

0:37:080:37:09

-£20 seated.

-I'm just losing money.

-Looking for 25.

0:37:090:37:12

Selling, then, to the maiden bid at £20

0:37:120:37:15

to the lady seated. Last chance.

0:37:150:37:18

-All out at £20.

-That just cost me three quid.

0:37:180:37:21

Yes, a loss after commission.

0:37:220:37:24

But you're still in the lead here.

0:37:240:37:27

You haven't sold anything yet!

0:37:270:37:30

OK. Anita's first lot.

0:37:310:37:32

The Murano glass.

0:37:320:37:34

£10, then? Ten. Thank you, sir.

0:37:340:37:38

£10. Is there 15 going on? 15, I see you.

0:37:380:37:40

20? Got to be worth it. You're getting two.

0:37:400:37:43

Go for it. £20. Do you want to bid?

0:37:430:37:45

I have 20 online, so you're too late! There you go.

0:37:450:37:48

20 online, and the lady is out also.

0:37:480:37:51

Selling online at £20.

0:37:510:37:53

25. I see you. Thank you. 25 we have.

0:37:530:37:55

Seated in the middle at 25. Someone with some taste!

0:37:550:37:59

There we go. 25. 25.

0:37:590:38:02

It's good value for money.

0:38:020:38:04

But I've still made a loss.

0:38:040:38:06

Now, Phil, behave yourself!

0:38:080:38:10

They're all related to her. They only live up the road, all of them!

0:38:100:38:14

Right. They're definitely not diamonds.

0:38:140:38:17

But will it sparkle anyway?

0:38:170:38:18

-Where shall we say, ladies? £20 to start?

-£20? For heaven's sake!

0:38:180:38:23

Any interest at ten? Ten, I see you. I have 15 here. 20.

0:38:230:38:27

25 with me.

0:38:270:38:28

£30. £30 seated in the room.

0:38:280:38:31

35. 40. 45.

0:38:310:38:34

50. 55. It's very twinkly. You won't regret it.

0:38:340:38:37

Last call at 55. 55 and selling, then. At 55.

0:38:370:38:41

-You'd have taken that, ten minutes ago, wouldn't you?

-It could have been worse.

0:38:410:38:45

Another loss. What's next, Anita?

0:38:450:38:48

So, we've got a coffin carrier!

0:38:480:38:52

I love that.

0:38:520:38:54

-A fun thing. I hope it doesn't bury you!

-Fun?

0:38:540:38:56

Yeah, he just wished he'd spotted it! OK.

0:38:570:39:00

Shift change. Gavin's now at the helm.

0:39:000:39:02

30 we have, straight in. £30.

0:39:020:39:05

Anyone else? 30. 35.

0:39:050:39:08

40. 45. 50.

0:39:080:39:10

-It's going to make 80 quid, this.

-55.

0:39:100:39:12

60.

0:39:120:39:14

-65.

-Come on!

-70.

-Good girl.

0:39:140:39:17

70 still, standing.

0:39:170:39:18

£70. Anybody else? £70, this unusual lot. £70.

0:39:180:39:23

Maybe it was the type of item that Edinburgh would love.

0:39:240:39:27

It wasn't a dead loss, was it?

0:39:270:39:29

No, it carried off a few pounds instead!

0:39:290:39:31

Philip, we're approaching the moment of truth.

0:39:320:39:36

OK, Edinburgh. Are you ready for this?

0:39:380:39:40

Hope you've got a strong boot and good muscles to move this one out!

0:39:410:39:44

Who'll start me off at 20?

0:39:440:39:47

I'll sell this for 20. 20 we have. £20

0:39:470:39:50

against you all. 20, still seated.

0:39:500:39:52

Last chance. 25. New bidder.

0:39:520:39:54

25. 30.

0:39:540:39:56

35.

0:39:570:39:59

£35. I will sell then.

0:39:590:40:01

£35. Any last chance?

0:40:010:40:03

35.

0:40:040:40:05

-I hope you brought your truss with you!

-Yes!

0:40:070:40:09

-Have you lifted it?

-Not yet!

-All the best!

0:40:090:40:12

So, someone actually wants the middle of a bridge!

0:40:120:40:15

-It's your lot now, darling.

-Shh, shh!

0:40:160:40:18

Concentrate. It's in wonderful condition, isn't it?

0:40:180:40:22

Wonderful condition.

0:40:220:40:23

What will Phil's dog-eared book make?

0:40:230:40:27

A copy of Hardy's Anglers' Guide.

0:40:270:40:29

48th edition. Slightly used condition.

0:40:290:40:32

-Whose side are you on?

-We'll start it off at £20. £20 we have.

0:40:320:40:36

£20 in the room.

0:40:360:40:38

-£20 we have standing at the back.

-Can I bid on this?

0:40:380:40:40

-Anybody else?

-Oh, no!

0:40:400:40:42

£20. Still standing. I'm going to sell this at £20.

0:40:420:40:45

On the maiden bid. First come, first served.

0:40:450:40:48

That's just cost me 20 quid.

0:40:480:40:50

-Oh, darling.

-I've spent...

0:40:500:40:52

Do you know, you're so insincere!

0:40:520:40:54

Another one gets away!

0:40:550:40:57

Anita's behind, though, thanks to her diamond ring without the diamonds!

0:40:570:41:02

Philip, my little elephant tables are coming up now.

0:41:020:41:05

I'm very, very happy to see that they're in the elephant section.

0:41:050:41:09

What do you mean? How many lots are in the elephant section?

0:41:090:41:12

-One!

-Oh, great!

0:41:120:41:15

Watch out, heffalumps about!

0:41:150:41:17

Not Phil's favourites, I seem to remember.

0:41:170:41:20

Go on, somebody! £30. Liven up your life.

0:41:200:41:23

You can see someone's keen to move these! £20. Just £10 each.

0:41:230:41:27

Oh, no!

0:41:270:41:28

That's what we've got. £20 in the room. Come on, somebody!

0:41:280:41:32

Bring the hammer down! Sell 'em!

0:41:320:41:34

-25.

-Yes!

0:41:340:41:36

25. 30.

0:41:360:41:38

35.

0:41:380:41:39

40. 45.

0:41:390:41:41

-Anybody else?

-The woman is deranged!

-Against the internet.

0:41:410:41:44

In the room. At £45. Last chance. Fair warning.

0:41:440:41:48

Can I just get this right? You are Glasgow's leading fine art and antique auctioneer,

0:41:480:41:53

-and you've put your name to those?

-Yeah, they're lovely!

0:41:530:41:56

No stampede into profits, though!

0:41:560:41:58

The adrenalin is beginning to surge!

0:42:000:42:02

-It is.

-Are you excited for me?

-It's a job to contain myself!

0:42:020:42:06

Finally, Anita's pictures. Bought cheaply, so there must be a profit here.

0:42:060:42:11

£10?

0:42:120:42:13

£10, surely?

0:42:130:42:15

£10, anyone? A fiver for the two? Surely?

0:42:150:42:18

Come on! £5. You can see it means something to somebody.

0:42:180:42:21

£5 I have! £5. Anybody else?

0:42:210:42:24

-£5.

-(Ten!)

-£10 I have.

-Yes!

0:42:240:42:26

£10 there on the right. 15, thank you. £15.

0:42:260:42:30

-There's just no justice at all!

-15 I have.

0:42:300:42:32

-15. Thank you.

-Yes!

0:42:320:42:34

£20 here. £20. £20.

0:42:340:42:36

Ready? It's yours at £20.

0:42:360:42:39

They were robbed!

0:42:390:42:41

Absolutely robbed!

0:42:410:42:42

Oh, dear. Another measly profit after commission.

0:42:420:42:47

That means Phil carries a disappointing day.

0:42:470:42:50

He, at least, has more than he started out with.

0:42:500:42:54

After paying auction costs,

0:42:540:42:55

Anita's got just £177.30 to spend tomorrow.

0:42:550:43:00

Phil, on the other hand, made a tiny profit,

0:43:020:43:04

leaving £225.80 in his pocket.

0:43:040:43:07

Cor, blimey!

0:43:080:43:10

That didn't quite go according to plan, did it?

0:43:100:43:12

We'll let the winner drive the limo.

0:43:120:43:15

I'm only in this programme to be Anita Manning's chauffeur!

0:43:150:43:18

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, Phil has high hopes!

0:43:220:43:27

It's like waking up on Christmas morning!

0:43:270:43:29

And Anita, great expectations!

0:43:290:43:32

All I need now is a man!

0:43:320:43:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:540:43:57

It is the start of another road trip and Anita Manning and Philip Serrell are travelling through the north of England in their classic car, with the aim of turning a profit on their items at auction in Edinburgh.


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