Episode 10 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 10

James Braxton and Charles Hanson head deep into Cornwall on the last day of their road trip. James goes to church before the final auction in Truro.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each, a classic car

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-and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

-That hurts.

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-My sap is rising.

-The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-50 quid?

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Your steering is a bit lamentable!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today we're on the road for the final adventure

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with antiques experts James Braxton and Charles Hanson.

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And you have been, on this trip, the luckiest man.

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-You have had the Midas touch.

-I have. If only I could be so lucky in life, James!

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James Braxton just can't help being charming.

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That's very kind. Thank you very much, Treasure. Er, Trevor!

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And he's terribly good at getting out of tricky situations.

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My most pressing problem now is to lever my frame out of this fella!

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Oh, blimey!

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This is Charles Hanson.

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He's got a meticulous eye.

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You look at the body. It's got two good top drawers.

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And he's really rather passionate when it comes to antiques.

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Quality is improving and my sap is rising.

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James is having a rotten old time at auction.

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Even though his tea caddy made some money, the losses are outnumbering the profits.

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Charles, on the other hand, has made lots of cash.

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In particular, the Liberty stool and the Majolica jug.

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James hasn't set the world on fire when it comes to making an abundance of profit.

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From his original £200,

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he has a relatively piffling £296.92 jingling about in his back pocket.

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But the triumphant fourth-time winner, Charles Hanson, is seemingly unbeatable.

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From his original £200, he has a colossal £1,556.31.

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And the boys will be making their final road trip in James's adored 1952 MG.

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Only thing is, she doesn't have a roof. Not the best when the heavens descend.

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Well, James, I've never ever known weather like this.

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-Oh, lovely(!)

-Aww!

-That's lovely(!)

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James and Charles are travelling 400 miles from Dulverton, West Somerset,

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via the Isle of Wight to the county town of Truro in Cornwall.

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On today's show, first stop is the town of Liskeard and they will auction just outside of Truro.

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I'm looking forward to this, despite this inclement weather.

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I must say, if you wrap up, you don't feel it, do you?

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The boys certainly haven't brought the sun with them as they arrive on a stormy day in Liskeard.

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# Stormy weather... #

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Interesting umbrella, Charles.

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The boys share their first shop of the day, Bay Tree Trading Company,

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and with all that rain it looks like they're going to need a good old rub down.

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-What weather, eh? One last time... Nice to see you. How are you?

-Fine, thank you.

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-Fifth and final.

-James.

-Michelle.

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Owner Andy and his partner Michelle have a shop crammed with interesting wares.

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-Best of luck.

-Thanks. The last one. Make it a big one.

-I'm scouring.

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James has got a lot of catching up to do and really needs to find some money-making goodies.

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Cor, that's a weight, isn't it?

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So a very nice old winged nut.

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This piece of Great British design would be unscrewed

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when changing the tyre of a Jaguar XK150.

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It doesn't look terribly old inside, but it has been bashed,

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so they have used a copper hammer to loosen this off. You see where it disturbed the chrome.

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I like this fellow. It's got a fabulous weight. I like the wings.

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-Sort of ears, aren't they?

-Yeah.

-A great Jaguar item. I like this.

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Now, Michelle...what could it be?

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-Em, I think £10.

-£10? That's very fair.

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-I'm very happy with that.

-Good.

-There you are. A tenner.

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Faster than the speed of light, James is not hanging about today.

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Meanwhile, Charles has been searching high and low,

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but he just can't seem to find anything to buy. Stop faffing about!

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Now, down the road, James is sniffing out a bargain at the local church. Lordy!

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-Hello. I'm James.

-Hello, James.

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I've heard on a little whisper around Liskeard that you've got a pulpit you might be selling.

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-Am I right?

-You are, yes!

-Oh, good.

-Graham is a church warden at Liskeard Methodist Church

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and might just be able to help James with his second buy.

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What a glorious place.

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-So this is the fellow?

-This is it.

-Can I have a good old squint?

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So this is where your man or lady stands, firing out fire and brimstone,

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making better, more worthy people.

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So you've got quite ordinary bits for the stars and the rails.

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-But what a fabulous figuring on pine.

-Yes, yes.

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Now it's that old knotty thing, price, isn't it?

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Would £30...

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..be helpful? Did you have a figure in mind?

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-Graham?

-The figure I had in mind was £50.

-£50?

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Could we meet in the middle?

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-I'm sure we could.

-£40? I'm very happy to give you £40.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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I like your enterprise, James, but will your divine inspiration prove to be fruitful?

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Charles, on the other hand, has travelled 13 miles to the Cornish town of Bodmin.

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Charles is meeting with Chris Wilkes to find out about the grisly Bodmin jail.

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-Hello, sir.

-Good afternoon, sir.

-Bodmin jail.

-Yes, it is.

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-Can I come in?

-You may. You're not leaving in a hurry.

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Oh, dear. This might be a bit scary for Charles.

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The prison was built in the late 18th-century and was in use until 1927.

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During WWI, some of Britain's priceless national treasures were given safe haven here,

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including the Crown Jewels and the Domesday Book.

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Bodmin jail was a milestone in prison design and was the first in Britain

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to hold inmates in separate cells, rather than communal areas.

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Isolation areas would hold the more dangerous and threatening prisoners, like Charles.

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Charles takes a wander round this dark, forbidding institution.

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As we walk through here, I can see on the left-hand side for a big man there are very big doorways.

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On the right-hand side they're slim. Is there a reason?

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Yes. This was the reception landing and the first cells down this side were the punishment cells.

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Hence a big doorway. If you were a non-compliant prisoner, who needed escorted in or dragged out,

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-there was sufficient room for two burly warders.

-OK, got you.

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They'd get underneath to wheel you in or out. If you were compliant,

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a standard size cell door. And you behaved yourself.

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After a period on this floor, you'd go up to a daylight landing

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where you were afforded a few extra privileges.

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-OK...

-Yeah.

-Chris, it wasn't me! It wasn't me, Chris!

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GATE SLAMS Oh, yes, it was!

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So we're now in a Bodmin prison cell.

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I don't feel very comfortable. Tell me what kind of crime must I have committed

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to justify coming in to Bodmin prison in the late 18th century?

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-Well, you could have done anything.

-Really?

-If you had stolen your neighbour's sheep,

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if you'd set fire to a mow of corn, you'd probably end up hanged.

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Petty theft. Fairly minor crime.

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-But this is a very clever prison.

-It's got a window.

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-It's got central heating and air conditioning to every cell.

-I can't see a radiator anywhere.

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You've got hot air. Hot air vents up here.

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So warm air would come in, as it cools, it drops and comes down to the floor.

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-You can see a vent down there.

-Yes.

-It was sucked out through tubes.

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But if you look here, pins on either side where you slung your hammock.

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-Really?

-Yeah.

-So these are the original...

-Hammock-hanging pins.

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Cast-iron hammock-hanging pins.

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-Where's my wash basin?

-I'll break the news to you. You might have got one bath every three months.

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-Really?

-Yes.

-No.

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-Now you had a jug of water and a small tin bowl.

-Yeah.

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That's your lot.

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Between 1735 and 1909 there were 60 executions in Bodmin.

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Steal a sheep or some grain in Cornwall and the hangman's noose could indeed seal your fate.

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Bleurgh! And the last to be hanged was a 24-year-old, William Hampton,

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found guilty of strangling his girlfriend.

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Thankfully, Charles has been released. I should run while you can, boy!

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Meanwhile, James is still hunting for a bargain and is travelling to the town of St Columb Major.

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The town features several times in the 1961 novel Castle Dor by Daphne du Maurier.

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It's still tipping it down, but nothing will stop James in his quest for finding antiques.

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He's visiting Stiltskin and Walrus. Great name! Owned by Janet.

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-Oh, hello!

-Hello.

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-Hello. James.

-Janet.

-Nice to meet you, Janet.

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What are these things saying, "On war service"?

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-They're lovely.

-I haven't come across those.

-They're WWI and they were given to people

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who hadn't volunteered and weren't at the front.

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So somebody couldn't accost them in the street and call them cowards.

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-Oh, I see. To stop the white feather business.

-Exactly, yeah.

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During WWI, white feathers were given to men who were thought to be cowardly

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and shirking their war duties. The badges served to protect those exempt from military service

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-and soldiers wearing civilian clothes.

-So this is 1915.

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And I understood that after a while there weren't so many available

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because people were conscripted after a certain date into WWI.

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I see. Interestingly, it was very much everybody was volunteering, bands of brothers,

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going to volunteer, weren't they?

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-You can't decide which one you like best, can you?

-I wouldn't mind those two.

-And leave me that one.

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Together the badges are priced at £30.

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-Could you do them for 24?

-I could do them for 25.

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25.

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-Janet, I'll have them for 25.

-OK, deal.

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And after a busy day of shopping, James, it's time to turn in.

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Looks like the weather may be changing for the better, thank goodness. Night night.

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It's the beginning of a new day and thank goodness it's not raining.

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The boys are looking forward to finding some lovely antique baubles.

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-So final day, four, five items? How many?

-Oh, James. I want to buy five items.

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If ever there's a day for a man of distinction to pull it out the bag, today is that day.

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So far, James has spent £75 on three lots.

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The Jaguar wheel nut, the pulpit and the World War One badges,

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leaving a sum of £221.92 for the day ahead.

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And Charles once again hasn't spent a single penny!

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He's swimming in riches, though,

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with a huge £1,556.31 to spend.

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The boys have travelled to the port town of Falmouth on the south coast of Cornwall.

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Falmouth is famous for its harbour and is well-known for being the start or finish point

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of round the world voyages.

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-Whereabouts are we now?

-We're still in Falmouth.

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And we will still be in Falmouth because you're in second gear.

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And James looks as though he's regretting handing over the car keys to Charles.

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-Nice...nice.

-Sorry! Hold on!

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Sorry, James! Sorry about that.

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Charles! He certainly needs to get cracking. He hasn't bought a thing.

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Let's hope Roadshow Antiques can help him in his pursuit.

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-Good morning, sir. How are you?

-I'm very well.

-Good to see you.

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-Hi. Chris.

-My name's Charles.

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-Could you guide me in a direction?

-Have a look over in the window.

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-You've got a fire screen there which I'm pretty sure is Newlyn.

-Isn't that wonderful?

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This, I suppose, almost captures the essence of Newlyn, doesn't it?

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Newlyn copper was a type of Arts and Crafts copperware originating in Newlyn, Cornwall.

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It was produced in the late 19th century by unemployed fishermen.

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-Look around, make your decision.

-OK, thanks.

-I can do a little bit.

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I'll think about it. Thanks, Chris.

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I'm feeling a warm glow.

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-Chris...

-Yep?

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This...this stick in here. Is that local, the swagger stick?

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Yeah, Devon and Cornwall Light Infantry. Not in great condition, but would sell well.

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It is quite beaten

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and this binding on the swagger stick, is that to reinforce it?

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-Has it been split?

-Broken in half at some point, I would think.

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If I bought that, Chris, in its condition,

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what would be the best price?

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-I've got £35 on it. What about 25?

-£25.

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Yeah, that's food for thought, Chris. That could be an object.

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Mental note.

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This pill box in here.

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Oh, that's sweet. Look at that.

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This is a young lady waving her sailor goodbye.

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And it's titled Hope.

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It's circa 1790.

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And it's £90.

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That's quite good.

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And the Delft bowl I like as well.

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-Completely knackered.

-Yeah.

-It's going to fall apart.

-Is it?

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-Although it was been stitched.

-Can I have a quick look?

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This is Delft ware with a tin glaze over an earthenware body. Made in Liverpool around 1750.

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At the birth, the evolution of our porcelain industry. How much, Chris?

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It's so tired, it's so worn out, Chris. What's the best price?

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-You know...

-What have I got on there? 85 quid.

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-Seems like nothing. Does that say 85?

-It says 55.

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Oh, it says 55! Good try.

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-If you're putting together a package...

-It could be expensive.

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-..perhaps we'll kind of think about it then.

-I like your style.

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-I like the swagger stick and the bowl. I also like very much the pill box over here.

-Mm-hm.

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Is there any other...metalware, in terms of Newlyn School?

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-Copper?

-There's a piece of Hale copper in there...

-That one?

-..which was a contemporary.

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-And what's that?

-Hale copper.

-Yes.

-It's really a pipe rack, but people do put large spoons in them.

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That's quite sweet. We're going back to 1905, 1910.

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More importantly, it's in the Arts and Crafts style.

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Chris, it's priced at £55.

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-I think 40 would be the best.

-OK.

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OK. OK, Chris. What I'll do is I'd like to take a mental note of this

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and, if I may, put it on my table of desire.

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He's going to have a good go and get a combined deal with the pill box, spoon rack

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and the swagger stick.

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-So all three together, Chris, would be how much?

-110.

-110.

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-Would you do 60...

-Mm-hm.

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..25 and 15?

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Making it up to £100, which is £10 off?

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£10 off my final price, you mean?

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-Yeah.

-No.

-No?

-No.

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OK. See, £100 sounds very nice.

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-Shall I roll my sleeves up? We could wrestle on the pavement for the tenner.

-Arm wrestle?

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-Yeah. You're a young man.

-Are you being serious?

-Yes. Why not?

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Do your best, Charles. This is for the Road Trip.

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-OK, Chris.

-Away you go.

-Go!

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Are you trying?

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I am actually trying, yes. I have weakened over the years.

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He's a big man, Charles.

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Ungh!

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Steady.

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Yes!

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-There we are.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

-It's a deal! Fantastic, Chris!

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Well done, Charles! Interesting haggling technique. Just when you think he's all shopped out...

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If I said to you as a final attempt, what would be the absolute best price

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-on the copper...screen, which we believe is Newlyn...

-Mm-hm.

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-..and the Delft bowl?

-Together - 120 quid. Now that's...

-That's the death.

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-The absolute death.

-Yeah. OK.

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110?

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What don't you understand about, "this is the death"?

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-120 is the death?

-You're a lovely chap, but 120 is the death. I'm being really generous.

-£120.

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Well, I've got to hand it to you. That was an epic tour de force of buying power.

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James is next to have a shot in Roadshow Antiques.

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After the marathon buy from Charles, will there be anything left?

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Now the reason I like mirrors, Chris, is because my wife likes them

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and I just spotted this fellow. You would immediately call that Regency

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or, at a push, William IV, who only reigned for a nano-second of time,

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but in antique terms he could have reigned for 60 years!

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-Indeed. Mahogany.

-Mahogany.

-Split turnings.

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-And do you think that was once gilded?

-Gilded, I think.

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-Somebody's rubbed it away.

-What price have I got on it?

-You've got 58 on it, Chris.

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-40 would be the death.

-40. That's very kind of you. I'll definitely buy that, but...

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-I only want that to be the start.

-OK.

-Look at that.

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Isn't that funny?

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A monthly medal competition

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so they were producing and engraving pewter tankards to give monthly.

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And it's made by Liberty's.

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Isn't that amazing?

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-And the nice thing about this is it's got a lovely shape. It's well-designed.

-It is.

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-And you've got another one.

-The original price on the tankards is £28 each.

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Em, now what could you do the two for me, Chris?

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-40 the pair.

-40 the pair?

-That's what I would have said if you hadn't told me they're Liberty's.

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Probably 140 the pair now!

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-I'll be good. 40 quid.

-That's really kind. I'll take them.

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£40 for the pair of tankards and £40 for the mirror. Good going, James.

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Shopping now over, James is motoring 35 miles south to Porthcurno in Penzance.

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James is paying a visit to Porthcurno Telegraph Museum

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which formerly housed a very important hub of international communication.

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In the 19th century, the telegraph took the world by storm.

0:22:000:22:04

For the first time, a message could be sent instantly, rather than being delivered by letter,

0:22:040:22:10

which revolutionised the speed of world communications.

0:22:100:22:14

And this is where it all started.

0:22:150:22:18

James is meeting with John Packer, a former employee of the station.

0:22:190:22:23

This looks like a military establishment from the outside.

0:22:230:22:27

It's pseudo-military. It was in Worl War Two that the tunnels were dug

0:22:270:22:31

to protect a very important communications centre.

0:22:310:22:34

This is all about early communications, telegraph?

0:22:340:22:38

Well, the first communications here was in 1870

0:22:380:22:42

when a cable under the sea was laid from here to Bombay.

0:22:420:22:46

It was India's first direct electrical communication with the mother country.

0:22:460:22:50

Well, show me the way.

0:22:500:22:53

With the advent of World War Two, the station had become so important, it had to be protected.

0:22:530:22:59

Secret tunnels were dug by Cornish miners to house an underground building

0:22:590:23:04

and the entire telegraph operations.

0:23:040:23:06

These bomb and gas-proof tunnels protected 14 secure cables out of the UK to its allies.

0:23:070:23:14

The museum has some of the equipment used in the Victorian era

0:23:150:23:20

which displays the technology from which today's computer age grew.

0:23:200:23:24

So this is where it all starts, is it?

0:23:240:23:27

This is the digital age, Victorian-style.

0:23:270:23:31

This is sending in binary code, left and right, left and right, by hand.

0:23:310:23:37

-Yeah.

-Left, left, right, left, left, right, left, left, right...

0:23:370:23:41

Noughts and ones, positives and negatives, binary code, computer code. This is where it all started.

0:23:410:23:47

-It all started.

-The Victorian internet.

-So the alphabet is simplified into this binary code?

0:23:470:23:54

-Precisely.

-This is what you were sending through those mighty cables?

0:23:540:23:58

This is the earliest form of sending by hand

0:23:580:24:01

and at the receiving end, the signals were received on paper tape as a squiggly line.

0:24:010:24:06

Above and below, above and below a central line,

0:24:060:24:09

-dot and dash, mark and space, noughts and ones.

-Right.

0:24:090:24:14

Basically, a telegraph transmits and receives messages over long distances.

0:24:140:24:20

The message would be sent by Morse code and the end message was called a telegram.

0:24:200:24:26

So this is the next stage, is it?

0:24:280:24:30

We've moved on now until the late 1920s and now, instead of sending by hand,

0:24:300:24:36

-we tap away on a keyboard...

-Right.

0:24:360:24:39

..and produce holes in paper tape.

0:24:390:24:42

-This is our binary code.

-That's a binary code.

-Above and below the centre line.

0:24:420:24:47

We can place that in an auto-transmitter.

0:24:470:24:50

Lovely mechanical object, isn't it? So that's reading it. Isn't that great?

0:24:500:24:55

-This is now reading the tape and sending it at a speed faster than I could do it by hand.

-Yeah.

0:24:550:25:01

The ever-improving advances in communication technology

0:25:010:25:06

put Porthcurno at the centre of the war effort.

0:25:060:25:09

So you're taking me back to World War Two here, John?

0:25:090:25:13

World War Two equipment and we're in the workshop where it was maintained

0:25:130:25:17

And this building and communication centre was very important in the Second World War, wasn't it?

0:25:170:25:23

-It was of vital importance.

-Vital importance.

0:25:230:25:27

We've said it was the gateway to the world. It was the gateway to the world in World War Two.

0:25:270:25:32

-For secure communication.

-With our allies, America, at the other side of the pond?

0:25:320:25:38

And as we had more cables than the enemy, we had a better network.

0:25:380:25:43

We had a more elaborate system of communicating around the world

0:25:430:25:47

-in a manner that could not be intercepted.

-Right.

0:25:470:25:49

Once so vital to the world, the telegraph became a museum piece,

0:25:490:25:54

but it's the ancestor of modern communications.

0:25:540:25:58

John, it's been really fascinating. Thank you.

0:25:580:26:02

Tour over, James needs to rendez-vous with young Charles

0:26:020:26:05

and have a gander at one another's treasures.

0:26:050:26:09

What on earth have you bought?

0:26:090:26:11

-I don't know whether I'm overwhelmed or underwhelmed.

-Really?

0:26:110:26:15

And tell me, what is the... What is the stick here?

0:26:150:26:20

-James...

-What is that? Is that one of those canes?

0:26:200:26:23

James, all week I've walked with a swagger.

0:26:230:26:26

-OK? Exactly, a swagger stick.

-I like your swagger stick.

-Thanks, buddy.

0:26:260:26:31

What's local to maybe this neck of the woods, apart from St Ives and the art centre there,

0:26:310:26:37

-you've also got Newlyn, so I've gone for a cracker over there, but, James...

-Bit of copper.

0:26:370:26:43

-How much?

-I think you paid...£50 for it.

0:26:430:26:46

I paid £100.

0:26:480:26:50

What is the bowl? Show me the bowl.

0:26:510:26:54

James, the bowl is tired, it's worn out, but it goes back to around 1750.

0:26:540:27:01

It's a Liverpool Delft bowl.

0:27:010:27:04

How much?

0:27:040:27:06

-I think you bought it cheaply. I'd say £30.

-£20.

-Well done.

0:27:060:27:11

It's your turn now, James. Show Charles what you've got.

0:27:110:27:15

-Here are my items.

-Very good.

-All of them. One was just too big and heavy and everything.

0:27:150:27:21

And by the wonders of modern technology, James has brought a photo of the pulpit.

0:27:210:27:27

-I like it.

-You like it?

0:27:270:27:29

It looks to be in that neo-Gothic, High Victorian manner.

0:27:290:27:33

-It's got very attractive little carpet panels.

-So you found it purely by chance?

0:27:330:27:38

I heard a whisper that this chap was keen to get rid of it, so I thought it was worth a visit.

0:27:380:27:44

I bought a rostrum not too dissimilar and it cost me about £300.

0:27:440:27:50

-£40.

-It wasn't?

-£40.

0:27:500:27:53

-£40?

-£40.

0:27:530:27:56

Well, maybe our luck's turning.

0:27:560:27:59

-I saw these on the shelf in Falmouth and I just liked the design of it.

-Yes.

0:27:590:28:04

-Liberty's.

-Iconic name. They're great to handle. They feel great.

0:28:040:28:09

-Cheers, cheers.

-Cheers.

-How much?

0:28:090:28:11

-£40 for the two.

-That's very cheap. That's very good.

0:28:110:28:15

I think they're probably worth at auction between 50 and 80.

0:28:150:28:18

But what about the mirror?

0:28:180:28:21

-It is a very nice mirror.

-It's a nice mirror, the sort of mirror you can put anywhere.

0:28:210:28:26

It'll add tone to your loo, won't it?

0:28:260:28:28

I think you've gone bold and big. I reckon you paid £55.

0:28:280:28:33

-40.

-Good. Good buy. Yeah.

0:28:330:28:36

-Anyway, Charles, it's been great.

-I'm very excited.

-Come on.

-Good man.

-Well done.

-Well done.

0:28:360:28:41

But what do they really think?

0:28:410:28:44

He is unquantifiable, that man.

0:28:440:28:47

Those little items will make a fortune at auction. I don't like them.

0:28:470:28:52

He suggests to me that James will walk the plank. Yeah, I agree.

0:28:520:28:57

It's been an ambitious finale with the boys battling it out

0:28:570:29:02

from Liskeard via Bodmin,

0:29:020:29:04

St Columb Major, Falmouth,

0:29:040:29:06

Porthcurno and finally to Truro in Cornwall.

0:29:060:29:09

As our boys arrive in the village of Ladock in Truro,

0:29:100:29:15

it's time to find out who will be this week's Road Trip winner.

0:29:150:29:19

Will Charles make it five in a row and be crowned reigning champion?

0:29:190:29:23

Philip Buddell Auctions has been established in Cornwall for the last 30 years.

0:29:240:29:30

Auctioneer and proprietor Philip offers up some thoughts.

0:29:320:29:36

If I'd been in their shoes, I don't think I would have purchased a church pulpit.

0:29:360:29:41

I think that's really stretching my ability just a little far today.

0:29:410:29:45

James Braxton started today with £296.92

0:29:460:29:51

and spent £155 on five auction lots.

0:29:510:29:54

Charles Hanson began with £1,556.31

0:29:570:30:03

and spent £220 on five lots.

0:30:030:30:06

Quiet, please. The auction is about to begin.

0:30:080:30:12

-This is it.

-The final one.

0:30:120:30:15

First up, it's James's William IV mahogany mirror.

0:30:160:30:20

£10? 10, I'm bid. At 10. 12 at the back. At 12.

0:30:200:30:23

If they turned it round the right way, it might make more.

0:30:230:30:27

18. £20. £20, I'm bid. At 20. And 2. And 4.

0:30:270:30:31

And 6. At 26, I have. £28 in front. At 28. 30 at the back.

0:30:310:30:35

At £30. At 30, I'm bid. And 2. £32. Bidding in front at 32.

0:30:350:30:39

-Well done.

-It's moving, it's moving.

0:30:390:30:42

-The bidding's at 36. 38 now...

-Go on son.

-Oh, wow!

-At 40, I'm bid. At 40.

0:30:420:30:47

At £40. 42 or not? At £40.

0:30:470:30:49

All done at 40? 2 or not? He's going to lose money if we're not careful.

0:30:490:30:54

At 40 and selling...

0:30:540:30:56

-Well done. Profit?

-No.

-Profit, is it...?

0:30:560:30:59

The atmosphere here is electric.

0:30:590:31:02

Pity it didn't fetch a profit though.

0:31:020:31:05

It's James again with the stylish pair of Liberty tankards.

0:31:050:31:10

What are you going to say on those? £10 on the pair of tankards?

0:31:100:31:14

-It must be worth a tenner.

-10?

-5? 5, I'm bid.

0:31:140:31:17

£5 on the two. 6.

0:31:170:31:19

At 6, I'm bid... 7. At 7. And £8.

0:31:190:31:22

Not quite the units I was hoping for!

0:31:220:31:25

At 10, I'm bid. 12. At 12. 14.

0:31:250:31:27

At £14. £14. 16?

0:31:270:31:29

At £14. £16. On the right at 16. 18. At 18, I have. At 18.

0:31:290:31:34

20, I'm bid. At 20. At £20, I have. At 20.

0:31:340:31:37

-22.

-That pays for one!

-They're worth an awful lot more than that.

0:31:370:31:41

At £22.

0:31:410:31:43

The hammer's up. All done for 22 and I sell...

0:31:430:31:46

£22.

0:31:460:31:48

Unexpected result there, James.

0:31:480:31:51

The only way is up... Surely!

0:31:510:31:54

We were both slightly out on that one.

0:31:540:31:56

It's now Charles's turn with the swagger stick next.

0:31:560:32:00

-What are you going to say on that? Start me at £20?

-2.

0:32:000:32:05

22?

0:32:050:32:07

Two quid!

0:32:070:32:09

At 2, I'm bid. At £2. 2, I have. 4.

0:32:090:32:12

6. 8. At 8. 10.

0:32:120:32:15

12. At 12, I'm bid. At 12. 14.

0:32:150:32:17

16. 18...

0:32:170:32:20

History. Absolutely.

0:32:200:32:22

22. 24. At 24.

0:32:220:32:24

Well done. The Midas touch.

0:32:240:32:27

28. At 28, I have. At £28. £28. Bidding to my right.

0:32:270:32:31

-Charles is getting excited.

-I'll sit down. Sorry.

0:32:310:32:34

At £30. 32. 34. 34, I have. At £34. 36.

0:32:340:32:38

36. Bidding on the far right. 38 bidding here.

0:32:380:32:41

CLOCK CHIMES £38. £38. At 38, I'm bid.

0:32:410:32:44

Bidding here at 38. 40. At 40, I'm bid.

0:32:440:32:47

And 2. 42. At £42.

0:32:470:32:49

44 or not? At 42. Are you all done? You'll regret it later.

0:32:490:32:52

CLOCK STILL CHIMING Oh, shut up, clock!

0:32:520:32:55

-At £42. 44 or not?

-Well done.

0:32:550:32:58

-At 42.

-History. Well done, sir.

0:32:580:33:01

Thank God for a bit of quiet! At £42

0:33:010:33:04

All done? I sell at 42...

0:33:040:33:08

Bingo, bingo! That's great.

0:33:080:33:10

Charles turns the tide of fortune with a good profit.

0:33:100:33:15

And it's Charles's turn again with the cracked Delft bowl.

0:33:150:33:20

20? 10?

0:33:200:33:23

It must be worth 10. 10, I'm bid. At 10. 12. 14.

0:33:230:33:26

16. At 16. 18. 20.

0:33:260:33:29

22. 24.

0:33:290:33:31

At £24, I'm bid. At 24. 26.

0:33:310:33:33

-28. 30.

-I'm in profit.

0:33:330:33:36

-£32.

-Keep going, keep going.

-34 at the back.

0:33:360:33:39

At £34. £36. 36. 38. 38, I'm bid. At £38.

0:33:390:33:43

40 on the right. At £40, I'm bid. 42

0:33:430:33:46

At 42. 44. At 44. 44, I have. This is cheap.

0:33:460:33:49

-46. At 46...

-It isn't cheap!

0:33:490:33:53

At £48. 50. At £50. 55.

0:33:530:33:56

At £55. £55. 55... 60.

0:33:560:33:59

-At £60, I'm bid. And 5. At 65, bidding here at 65.

-Still cheap!

0:33:590:34:03

I sell at £65...

0:34:030:34:07

Well done.

0:34:070:34:09

Profit number two for Charles, a good speculative buy there.

0:34:090:34:13

Can you make it three in a row, Charles?

0:34:140:34:17

It's the copper spoon rack next.

0:34:170:34:19

A former pipe rack, but probably now a spoon rack.

0:34:190:34:22

Or it might even take one of these. Can you try one of these out?

0:34:220:34:28

-Oh, here we are, a bit of theatre.

-Egg rack. Oh, good idea!

0:34:280:34:31

Yes, it does.

0:34:310:34:33

-Perfect.

-It's an egg rack.

0:34:330:34:35

It's gone from a pipe to spoon and now an egg rack.

0:34:350:34:39

There's an egg rack, ladies and gentlemen.

0:34:390:34:42

Egg, spoon, we can have egg and spoon rack.

0:34:420:34:44

Who's going to start me at £30? 30, thank you. £30, I'm bid. At £30.

0:34:440:34:49

-He's at the back.

-Keep going.

-And 5. At 35. 40. At 40, I'm bid. At 40.

0:34:490:34:54

5, will you say now? At 40. And 5.

0:34:540:34:57

I have 50 in the corner. At £50, I'm bid. At 50. And 5.

0:34:570:35:00

55, I have. At 55. At £55. 55. 60.

0:35:000:35:04

-At 65. 65, fresh bidder.

-Fresh bidder.

-Yes!

-70.

0:35:040:35:08

-5. At 75.

-Brilliant, brilliant.

-80.

-Brilliant.

-£80 in the corner.

0:35:080:35:12

85? At 85.

0:35:120:35:15

-90.

-90.

-90! Thank you, thank you.

-At £90, at £90.

0:35:150:35:20

-And 5. At 95.

-Oh, wonderful. Well done, well done.

0:35:200:35:23

Let's round it up now to the ton.

0:35:230:35:25

Selling on my right at 95...

0:35:250:35:28

£95.

0:35:280:35:30

Ha-ha, the winner of the egg and spoon race!

0:35:300:35:33

Yet another wonderful profit for the Hanson kitty.

0:35:330:35:37

I've just had a God looking down at me, looking after my objects.

0:35:370:35:41

-It's just been unbelievable.

-I know, it has been unbelievable.

0:35:410:35:46

It's Charles yet again, this time with the Newlyn-style fire screen.

0:35:460:35:51

£30? 30? It must be worth 30. 30, I'm bid. At 30. And 5.

0:35:510:35:56

At 35. 35, I have. 40, I'll take.

0:35:560:35:58

At £35. £35. 40 down here.

0:35:580:36:01

At 40, I have. Fresh bidder at 40. At 45. 45 in the middle.

0:36:010:36:05

-I'm enjoying this.

-That's cheap.

-I'm watching you struggle.

-That's cheap.

0:36:050:36:10

-No, it isn't. It's very expensive.

-At 55. 55. I saw the twitch!

0:36:100:36:15

60. At £60, I'm bid. At 60. 65.

0:36:150:36:18

Put the hammer down!

0:36:180:36:21

The chaps won't be able to afford to go home unless you bid a bit more

0:36:220:36:26

At £70. £70. 75, do you say? At 70.

0:36:260:36:28

-75.

-That's enough, that's enough.

0:36:280:36:31

At £80, I have. At 80. At £80. Bidding here at 80.

0:36:310:36:34

-85.

-85! Keep going, please!

0:36:340:36:36

At 85. 85. 90!

0:36:360:36:39

At £90. Bidding on the front row at 90.

0:36:390:36:42

Any advance on £90? The gavel is up at 90. I sell...

0:36:420:36:47

-£90.

-I've lost £10!

0:36:470:36:50

I've lost £10. What a shame!

0:36:510:36:54

Ah, what a shame! Unusual to see you with a loss there, Charles.

0:36:550:36:59

I never thought I'd see this moment on this road trip.

0:36:590:37:03

-Is this your first loss?

-For a long time.

0:37:030:37:07

Back to you, James. It's the Jaguar wheel nut next.

0:37:070:37:11

Can you finally score a profit?

0:37:110:37:14

Your opportunity to build a car from scratch.

0:37:140:37:18

LAUGHTER

0:37:180:37:20

-Start me at £10? 10, I'm bid. At 10.

-Well done, well done.

0:37:200:37:24

At 10, I'm bid. At 10. 12. 14.

0:37:240:37:27

16 at the back. At £16. 18 in front.

0:37:270:37:30

-At £18...

-I'm going to make history!

-22 at the back.

0:37:300:37:34

£22. 24. 26. At 26 on my right. The bidding's at 26.

0:37:340:37:38

-28 at the back. At £28.

-Racing away, accelerating!

0:37:380:37:42

30, I have. 32 in the middle. At £32. £32. 34 or not?

0:37:420:37:46

I sell at £32...

0:37:460:37:48

4. At 34.

0:37:480:37:50

-Well done, that man.

-Well done.

0:37:500:37:53

-Good timing.

-At £34. Brinkmanship. 36.

0:37:530:37:55

At £36. Must be worth more than that

0:37:550:37:58

The hammer's up. I sell at £36...

0:37:580:38:02

-£36.

-Now...

-That was good.

0:38:030:38:05

Finally, a sizeable profit, James.

0:38:050:38:08

Now it's his unusual World War One badges.

0:38:110:38:14

I've got to start the bidding with me at £8. 9. At 9, I have.

0:38:140:38:19

10 with me. 12. I'm out. 14.

0:38:190:38:22

At £14. 16. 18 at the back.

0:38:220:38:25

At £18. At 18, I'm bid.

0:38:250:38:27

-20, I'll take. At £18.

-Keep going.

0:38:270:38:30

-Come on.

-18. 20. 22.

-Well done.

0:38:300:38:33

At 22. 24. 24. 26 at the back.

0:38:330:38:36

28 on the right. £30. Bidding at the back at 30.

0:38:360:38:39

At £30. 32. At £32. Bidding to my right.

0:38:390:38:43

Selling, all done for £32...

0:38:430:38:46

-32.

-Well done.

-It just shows...

0:38:460:38:48

Blimey, two profits in a row, James! Congratulations.

0:38:490:38:53

Back to Charles. The sweet little pill box is his final item.

0:38:530:38:58

-Where are you going to start me on this one? £20?

-Oh, no.

-10? 10?

0:38:590:39:03

Must be worth 20. Thank you. 20, I'm bid. At 20.

0:39:030:39:07

At £20. 25.

0:39:070:39:09

25, I have. 30. 35.

0:39:090:39:11

35, I have. At 35. 40, I'm bid.

0:39:110:39:14

Keep going. It's worth all of that.

0:39:140:39:16

It must be worth a lot more. 45 at the back. At £45.

0:39:160:39:20

-Come on.

-Back of the room at 45. 50, I've got. At 50.

0:39:200:39:24

At £50, bidding on the right. 55 at the back of the room. 60 on my right

0:39:240:39:29

At £60, I'm bid. And 5 I'll take from you. At £60.

0:39:290:39:32

-5.

-Yes!

-65, I have. £70, I'm bid. At 70.

0:39:320:39:37

Any advance on £70?

0:39:370:39:39

The hammer's up, selling at £70...

0:39:390:39:42

-Well done.

-Great trip.

-Well done.

-I got there in the end, James.

0:39:440:39:48

Indeed you did, Charles. Another profit to add to your hoard.

0:39:480:39:53

Finally, it's our last lot of the day.

0:39:540:39:57

It's James's Gothic pulpit.

0:39:570:40:00

It only needs to make over £1,600 to take James into the lead(!)

0:40:000:40:04

Ha! Snowflake's chance!

0:40:040:40:07

-What shall we say? £50?

-£50.

-50.

0:40:070:40:11

-A unique piece of furniture.

-Come on, James. This is your finale.

0:40:110:40:15

Start me at 20 then? £20?

0:40:150:40:18

£20 on the pulpit? I'm not asking the earth. Surely?

0:40:180:40:22

10 then? I know how you love your pulpits.

0:40:220:40:25

£10, thank you. At 10, I'm bid. From number one.

0:40:250:40:29

£10, I have on the pulpit. At 10.

0:40:290:40:31

At 10. 12. At 12, I have. At 12. 14, will you say?

0:40:310:40:35

Bidding at the back at 12. At £12. You're being very disappointing here

0:40:350:40:39

At 12, I'm bid. 14 or not? At £12 on the pulpit.

0:40:390:40:42

Any advance on 12 on the pulpit? Against you, number one.

0:40:420:40:47

Selling at the back of the room at £12... 14.

0:40:470:40:50

-Well done.

-At 14. 16.

0:40:500:40:52

-At £16. At 16.

-Saved!

-18 or not? At 16, I'm bid.

0:40:520:40:57

-You're causing me a lot of hard work 18, I'll take.

-18!

0:40:570:41:01

At £16. All done at 16...

0:41:010:41:03

Selling at 16 to 269...

0:41:030:41:07

Come here, mate. Come here. Come here, mate. Listen...

0:41:070:41:11

Come on, mate.

0:41:110:41:13

Oh, poor old James! A little cuddle from Charles will make everything better.

0:41:130:41:18

Unlucky. Sad day.

0:41:180:41:21

So, for the fifth time this week, the Young Pretender is the reigning supremo at auction.

0:41:210:41:27

-Well done. It's been a great pleasure.

-It's been wonderful.

0:41:270:41:30

Let's go and uncover that car.

0:41:300:41:33

James started today's show with £296.92

0:41:360:41:40

and, after paying auction costs,

0:41:400:41:42

made a small loss of £35.28,

0:41:420:41:45

leaving him with a final balance of £261.64.

0:41:450:41:50

Charles, meanwhile, started with a mighty £1,556.31

0:41:540:42:00

and made a profit of £76.84 today,

0:42:000:42:04

bringing his final earnings to £1,633.15

0:42:040:42:09

and making him this week's jubilant winner.

0:42:090:42:12

Well done, boy.

0:42:120:42:15

-Watch out, watch out. Go.

-OK.

-Go, go.

-Well done, James.

0:42:150:42:20

All the money our experts make will go to Children In Need.

0:42:210:42:25

James and Charles's road trip adventure has all too soon come to an end.

0:42:260:42:32

Over the past week we've had changeable weather...

0:42:320:42:36

I feel like dancing in the rain.

0:42:360:42:38

# It's raining men Hallelujah, it's raining men... #

0:42:380:42:44

James regretted giving Charles a whizz in his MG.

0:42:440:42:47

-Don't say sorry. Just do it.

-Sorry.

0:42:490:42:52

-Don't say sorry!

-Sorry!

-Don't say sorry!

-OK, OK.

0:42:520:42:56

Charles got rather excitable.

0:42:560:42:58

I'm so nervous, I need the toilet.

0:42:580:43:00

They both went off on a magnificent island adventure.

0:43:000:43:05

-Pirates are like this.

-Exactly.

-With berets.

-Let's make our fortune, mate.

0:43:050:43:09

Thanks, boys. This has been a blast!

0:43:090:43:12

HORN BLOWS

0:43:120:43:14

Next week on the Antiques Road Trip, we have a new couple - rivals Philip Serrell and Anita Manning.

0:43:140:43:20

Auctioneers both, but with little else in common.

0:43:200:43:24

-I love it because it goes with my boots.

-Is that the way the week is going to go?

0:43:240:43:29

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:480:43:51

James Braxton and Charles Hanson head deep into Cornwall on the last day of their road trip. James goes to church before the final auction in Truro.


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