Episode 9 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 9

It is the fourth day of James Braxton and Charles Hanson's road trip. They head for Cornwall, where Charles has an enchanting experience and James goes to the fair.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts, with £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal -

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to scour Britain for antiques.

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That hurts!

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My sap is rising.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Could you do 50 quid on that?

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So, will it be the high road to glory,

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Your steering is a bit lamentable.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Today, we're out and about with a right pair of mischief makers.

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Auctioneers James Braxton and Charles Hanson.

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Stop mucking about, Charles.

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Now, James Braxton simply loves all the towns he visits.

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God bless you, Combe Martin.

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And he's VERY charming with the ladies...

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-Can I show it to you?

-Yes, fine.

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This is Charles Hanson.

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He's a real risk taker.

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-And nervy.

-That's my entire money gone!

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What have I done?

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And buying antiques really makes him very happy.

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I feel like dancing in the rain.

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James isn't faring too well at auction.

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Unfortunately, he's had more losses than profits.

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Gone.

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Not my day, is it?

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Charles, on the other hand,

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is proving to be one very smart cookie.

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Everything he buys turns into a profit,

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especially that liberty stool.

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-Yes!

-Well done, well done!

-Thank you very much.

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APPLAUSE

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Well, from his £200,

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James has only been able to shuffle towards the finishing line...

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Huh! And currently has a paltry £248.24

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rattling round in his back pocket.

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Oh, dear!

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But third-time winner, Charles Hanson...

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Wow, has he sprinted ahead!

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From his original £200,

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he has an impressive £943, and a penny, to spend.

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And the car of choice

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is James's beloved 1952 MG.

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You're just under 1,000.

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I'm trailing with just under 250.

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But I feel quite emotionally unstable.

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To have so much money - do I bank it? Do I play it?

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Do I gamble? Do I...?

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I think, on your roll,

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anything you touch may turn to gold.

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James and Charles are travelling 400 miles,

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from Dulverton, West Somerset,

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via the Isle of Wight,

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to the county town of Truro, in Cornwall. What a trek!

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On today's show, first stop is the Devon town of Crediton.

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And they'll auction in the Cornish town of Lostwithiel.

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I've got to bounce back.

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-Come on, Braxton!

-Bounce back.

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Bounce back, Braxton!

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Bounce back, Braxton.

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Bounce back, Braxton! Ha-ha!

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-"Bounce back, Braxton," indeed.

-It's coming in!

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The missionary St Boniface

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was born in Crediton in the seventh century,

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and the town's parish church is over 1,100 years old.

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Let's get going with our road trip.

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First to have a go is the excitable Charles Hanson. Stand by.

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-That's my first shop. Fantastic!

-Spooky - it's called "James".

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I know. "James Antiques".

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Well, good luck. Not too much luck.

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-My namesake can't hang around(?)

-Go on, get out, get out.

-I'll see you later.

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-See you later.

-Wish me luck.

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-Good luck.

-I don't need it.

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Good luck, birthday boy.

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-Bye!

-Bye.

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Oops! Steady there, James.

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Now, don't be too cocky, Carlos. This is traffic,

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and you're an adult.

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Now, get your shopping done before you do yourself a mischief.

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Good morning, sir.

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-Good morning.

-How are you?

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Welcome to James Antiques.

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-You're the Mr James, are you?

-I am indeed.

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-Or are you a James?

-I'm Jim.

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-Good to see you, Jim.

-Call me Jim.

-Hello, Jim.

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This is nice stick, Jim, isn't it? A wonderful Hawthorn cane.

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If you were a gent,

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as you are, Jim, a Devonian gent,

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back in the year, 1909...

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-Yes.

-London hallmark.

-It's one of the nicest sticks

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I think we've had.

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Wonderful stick.

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Of a superior quality.

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A wonderful handle, as well.

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I like it, Jim. That's a good thing, isn't it?

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So, Jim, what would be the best price on your fine cane?

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-We're asking 168, as you'll probably see.

-Yes.

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Er, 150, straight 150.

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Jim, it's not a bad price.

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I think, again, going back to auction,

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I'll want it a bit cheaper than that.

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What's the best price?

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-125.

-125, you see.

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That's a really good offer,

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and I just feel that, at 125,

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I'm going to say, "Thank you, but I'll leave it."

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Thank you very much. All the best!

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Well, I take it that's a no, then?

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Yeah, you, too. Bye.

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Charles-style. Good.

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Meanwhile, James has travelled south to the historic city of Exeter.

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Exeter's long and fascinating history

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dates back as far as 250 BC, and it's home to this

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breathtaking 12th-century cathedral.

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Just in case you didn't know,

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JK Rowling was a student at Exeter University,

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and my parents got married in the cathedral.

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Now, James hasn't had much luck so far,

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but the sun is shining, he's got the shades on.

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He's wearing a rather natty outfit, which should excite the ladies...

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if only he can get out of the car.

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MUSIC: "The Ipcress File" by John Barry

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What a glorious place!

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Watch out, Exeter Antiques Centre.

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James is a man on a mission,

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and it's not long before James finds dealer Mike to talk business.

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-Anything I should be looking...?

-This rolling pin here...

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Oh, right. OK.

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They might have put scraps in it. Victorian scraps.

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How interesting. That is unlike rolling pins I have seen before.

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-It's one of these Victorian salt pins, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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That were given, full of salt,

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and then sometimes, you get them painted, don't you?

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-How unusual!

-Victorian scraps.

-Scraps, aren't they?

-Yeah.

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Very quirky, isn't it?

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What could this fellow be, Mike?

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-What have I got on it?

-What have you got on it?

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95.

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-70?

-70.

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What else have got there? I think that's very interesting, Mike.

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Here's something unusual.

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Oh, yeah...

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Horseshoe filer.

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Oh, really, is it?

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So, that's a farrier's tool, isn't it?

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God, that's well made!

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And so you could take that out

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and sharpen that, as well?

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This file would whittle a horse's hoof.

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Much in the same way a nail file is used in manicures.

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And the ticket price is £20.

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So I could just sort of give it some, couldn't I?

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That's rather fun.

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Now, Mike, could this be really cheap?

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Could you do a tenner on that?

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I might buy something else from you, Mike, as well.

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-HE SIGHS

-Go on, then.

-Oh, Mike!

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Good man, good man. That's really nice, I like that.

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-Can I revisit that rolling pin?

-Very quirky.

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D'you like rolling pins, or d'you just buy quirky items?

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-Just buy quirky items.

-Yeah.

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Salt pins are handy, aren't they?

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They help keep salt nice and dry,

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and this one is decorated by scrap pictures,

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which is called "decalcomania".

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Could you do anything really good on this?

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-Like sort of 30 or 35?

-Oh! You're robbing me.

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HE LAUGHS

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-I like old puggy.

-45.

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45?

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It IS very unusual...

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-50, the two. There you are.

-50, the two?

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Oh, that's very kind of you.

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-Mike, I'm going to have it.

-Right.

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That's really kind of you. Thank you very much indeed. So, 50 for the two...

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Looks like Braxton is definitely tring to bounce back,

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and that's a good start, with two items in the old bag.

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Charles, meanwhile,

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is still empty-handed and stuck in Crediton.

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He's got an appointment to get to,

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but James and the MG are nowhere in sight.

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I'll see you later!

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I'll see you later. Bye!

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He's saying to me he's too busy shopping.

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I either get the number 51 or 50 bus in a lay-by

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over there somewhere,

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or I get a push-bike. I'll tell you...

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I'll do something.

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Mr postie,

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is there a bike shop around here at all, or anything on those lines?

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Yeah, just back there n the right hand side.

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-Right hand side?

-Yeah.

-A Bike shop?

-Yeah.

-Fantastic, thanks!

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Now what's he up to?

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-Fantastic. Look, The Bike Shed.

-Ah.

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Brilliant! Thanks, Andy.

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-Right, Charles.

-Helmet on.

-Gird up your loins.

-See you, Andy.

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Off you go.

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MUSIC: "The Pushbike Song" by The Mixtures

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The enigmatic Charles is using the magic of pedal power

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to travel.

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OK, well, not quite all the way we hoped,

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to West Putford, near Holsworthy.

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As if by magic, Charles is heading to the enchanting world

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of Britain's only gnome reserve. Huh!

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Artist and founder Ann Atkins created the reserve

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in 1979,

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and holds the world record for owning over 2,000 gnomes.

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Gosh.

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Siegfried was the very first gnome

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who gave Ann the idea of sharing her woodland retreat with the public.

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The sun is shining, and Ann...

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I begin to believe.

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Of course!

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-I begin to believe in gnomes.

-The real world, isn't it, here?

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-No blaring music and slot machines...

-No!

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-..It's just nature and the gnomes and the fairies.

-It is.

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Nature and the gnomes, and I can't wait to get started.

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You're going to wear a gnome hat.

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Erm...

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-You've got to wear a gnome hat...

-OK.

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..cos you embarrass them, otherwise.

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-Come on.

-Uh-oh.

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This is the real world, hey?

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Will that one fit you all right?

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-I'm going to go for an orange one, Ann.

-Oh, yeah(!)

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The gnomes recognise me.

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That looks splendid. That looks good, actually.

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Thanks, Ann. Are you going to wear one as well?

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I don't usually, because they know me well enough.

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Charles needs no encouragement.

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The little people have existed in different cultures

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throughout the world for many centuries.

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Gnomes originated in Germany in the 19th century,

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with a company called Heissner

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producing some of the first figures.

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But it's Sir Charles Isham who's credited with starting the tradition

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of garden gnomes in Britain.

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In 1847, he featured a number of terracotta gnomes

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in a large rockery alongside his home,

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Lamport Hall, in Northamptonshire.

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So, where are we going now?

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We're going into the wood.

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You lead the way and then you'll get the good view.

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Oh, wow!

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Wah-ah-ah-ah!

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-Oh, Ann, isn't it wonderful?

-It's nice, isn't it?

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I feel almost... I don't know...

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-Like you did when you were three, maybe?

-Exactly.

-Yes.

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There's something about them - they look so happy.

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-They make a landscape really come alive.

-They do.

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-You can just imagine magic, can't you?

-Yeah! Yeah!

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How would I tell the difference between

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an elf, or a pixie or a gnome?

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A gnome is ancient as the hills,

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-and young as a child - all in one go.

-Yes.

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-Pixies are entirely young.

-Are they really?

-Yes.

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-Never grow old?

-No.

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In the winter, do all these gnomes stay out and shiver,

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or will they be brought inside?

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They have their yearly bath...

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Do they complain?

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No, once a year they put up with it.

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Well done.

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Those that need it get new clothes.

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Tell me, if I was a gnome,

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which I am now,

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and you're going to sort of keep me in the woods,

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would I be fishing or perhaps just relaxing?

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-Oh, let me think.

-What would you do with me Ann?

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I think I'd have you on the beach.

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-Would you really?

-yeah, I think so.

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Would you like to be on the beach?

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-I could happily pop into Putford-on-Sea.

-Yeah!

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Exactly.

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Let's leave Charles in quiet contemplation.

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Sorry?

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James, meanwhile, is having a splendid day.

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He has two items already in the bag.

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And he's looking for more in the town of Torrington,

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in North Devon.

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James arrives in town on a baking-hot day...

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which is a rarity.

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-Hello!

-Hello.

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-James.

-How do you do?

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-Joanna.

-Very nice to meet you, Joanna.

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It is boiling out there!

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Funny fellow, isn't it?

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I like the shape. It's an unusual shape.

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Most tea caddies are square, round, and everything.

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And this is rather fun.

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It's hexagonal, so five-sided.

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I want to see what it's like when I give it a good old clean.

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And see whether it'll shine a bit.

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-I think it will.

-I think it will.

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How much do you want for this fellow, Joanna?

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Erm, I put 22 on that.

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Would you give a little discount, or not, for this?

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-Erm...

-You don't have to.

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THEY LAUGH

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-But it does all help. How much?

-Erm...

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-£20?

-£20?

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£20?

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It's a round note, isn't it?

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-I'll buy it for 20.

-Oh! Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed!

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Well, after all that shopping, James,

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it's time to turn in.

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Another busy day awaits tomorrow.

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Night-night!

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MUSIC: "There's A Brand New Day On The Horizon" by Elvis Presley

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# There's a brand-new day on the horizon... #

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The boys are up and at 'em!

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There's no stopping Charles now as he races the MG!

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So far, James has spent £70 on three lots.

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The farrier file, the unusual salt pin

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and the tea caddy,

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leaving a sum of £178.24

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for the day ahead.

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And Charles, meanwhile,

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may be the richest,

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but he hasn't spent, so far, a single penny.

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That gives him a bulging purse of £943 and a penny to spend.

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Our road-trippers have travelled to the port town of Bideford

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in North Devon.

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HORN BEEPS

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And Charles leads the way

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as they charge to the shops.

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Hah! The boys are in luck this morning.

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A bustling antiques fair is in full swing at Bideford's Pannier Market.

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Jim, I'll see you later.

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OK, see you later.

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So, with his swag bag empty, young Carlos needs to get a wiggle on.

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Now I'm after...antiques.

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Your little dog here, he's quite sweet, isn't he?

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That's a beautiful Airedale, a proper Beswick.

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-Beswick?

-Yeah.

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-What's your name?

-Tony.

-Tony, mate...

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Condition's so important.

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What is it - 1970s, '60s?

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It could be '60s, that.

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A '60s dog of a great collectability.

0:15:290:15:33

You're going to sell that to someone who is an Airedale owner,

0:15:330:15:36

or Airedale breeder,

0:15:360:15:37

who will say, "It's Beswick," so it's Rolls-Royce,

0:15:370:15:40

it's the proper quality.

0:15:400:15:41

-Yeah.

-And there's money in it for you.

-Very tempting.

0:15:410:15:45

What's he worth?

0:15:450:15:46

That's on at 37.50.

0:15:460:15:48

I would do you that for £20.

0:15:480:15:50

I was honestly hoping

0:15:500:15:52

to pay a tenner.

0:15:520:15:54

No, split it with me at 15.

0:15:540:15:56

£15. Well, sometimes,

0:15:560:15:59

you've got to get your show on the road.

0:15:590:16:01

£15, yeah. Take it for £15. We're happy.

0:16:010:16:04

And he's not finished yet.

0:16:040:16:06

Oh no, he's found another stall with something to tickle his fancy.

0:16:060:16:10

-I don't know who the maker is.

-Isn't that nice?

0:16:100:16:13

This is lead-glaze earthenware.

0:16:130:16:16

And it's novel, it's 1880s.

0:16:160:16:19

It's a water jug.

0:16:190:16:21

It's going to appeal to, perhaps, hunting people,

0:16:210:16:23

with this crop here, on the handle.

0:16:230:16:27

And it's what we call "majolica".

0:16:270:16:29

I do like it. It's in good condition, bar the fact

0:16:290:16:33

we have a crack here, just on the lid.

0:16:330:16:35

The age, and from the lozenge mark on the bottom, here,

0:16:350:16:38

we can date it to around 1881.

0:16:380:16:42

Margaret, what's your best price?

0:16:420:16:44

-65.

-65? OK.

0:16:440:16:46

Would you take £50 for it?

0:16:460:16:49

55.

0:16:490:16:52

55?

0:16:520:16:53

Margaret, we're going, going...

0:16:530:16:56

-Gone!

-We've got it!

0:16:560:16:58

Thank you very much, I'm delighted.

0:16:580:17:00

A really handsome jug,

0:17:000:17:01

which is full of Victorian flavour. Thanks, Margaret.

0:17:010:17:05

And Charles has good reason to be pleased as Punch.

0:17:050:17:09

I'm so excited,

0:17:090:17:10

because my jug I've just bought

0:17:100:17:13

is actually made by George Jones.

0:17:130:17:16

And George Jones was the most important maker

0:17:160:17:19

of majolica pottery.

0:17:190:17:21

In his lead-glaze earthenware forms,

0:17:210:17:23

he would always use a small, black number

0:17:230:17:26

on the bottom of his majolica wares.

0:17:260:17:29

It's got the black number.

0:17:290:17:30

Without the condition issue,

0:17:300:17:32

it could be a jug worth maybe £800.

0:17:320:17:35

In its condition, maybe, just maybe,

0:17:350:17:38

it might make more than £100.

0:17:380:17:40

I'm really excited, a really big find.

0:17:400:17:43

Could this be another Road Trip discovery?

0:17:430:17:47

James, meanwhile,

0:17:470:17:49

has spied something in the window

0:17:490:17:50

of Bideford Pottery.

0:17:500:17:52

Your window has lured me in. I'm James.

0:17:520:17:56

-Hello.

-Nice to meet you.

0:17:560:17:58

Harry Juniper is a skilled potter,

0:17:580:18:00

and has been in the business for the last 60 years.

0:18:000:18:04

And there's plenty here to tempt James.

0:18:040:18:07

I like this!

0:18:100:18:12

What's that? "A frog, he would a woo-ing go.

0:18:120:18:17

"Woopsie diddley dandy dee."

0:18:170:18:19

BELL RINGS

0:18:190:18:21

Beautifully delivered, James(!)

0:18:210:18:22

Some things lend themselves very nicely to clay.

0:18:220:18:25

Yeah, they do, don't they?

0:18:250:18:27

And I love the naturalistic face here.

0:18:270:18:30

-And I see, very nicely, you sign everything.

-Yes.

0:18:300:18:33

Here we are, "Harry Juniper". What a great name!

0:18:330:18:35

HE LAUGHS

0:18:350:18:37

"Of Bideford. 2011" I rather like that.

0:18:370:18:39

Could you give me a special price on that, Harry?

0:18:390:18:43

No!

0:18:430:18:45

Well, good for you!

0:18:450:18:46

It's got 25 on it.

0:18:460:18:48

-That's dirt cheap, isn't it?

-It IS dirt cheap.

0:18:480:18:50

-And I'll pay you 25 for it.

-Good!

-Why not?

0:18:500:18:52

Nice one, Harry!

0:18:520:18:54

Bideford is turning out to be very fruitful for the boys.

0:18:540:18:59

So far, so good.

0:18:590:19:00

Charles is nipping across the road to visit Susannah

0:19:000:19:03

in Old Bridge Antiques.

0:19:030:19:05

Have a rummage through this one, as well.

0:19:050:19:08

In the auction business, people love to rummage.

0:19:120:19:15

They love to dig deep.

0:19:150:19:17

They love to unearth treasure.

0:19:170:19:22

Would you split all this up, Susannah, for auction,

0:19:220:19:25

or would you almost sell the whole lot as one job lot?

0:19:250:19:29

We could put a collection together in a box.

0:19:290:19:31

If I bought an entire box, for example,

0:19:310:19:34

what would the price be?

0:19:340:19:35

I think the best price would be £80.

0:19:350:19:38

-Sue.

-Yes.

-Love the box.

0:19:380:19:41

It's a great box,

0:19:410:19:43

but I just love this box as well,

0:19:430:19:45

which is leather, and it's clad,

0:19:450:19:47

and it's of a higher quality.

0:19:470:19:48

Let's say, for example,

0:19:480:19:50

I put all this jewellery

0:19:500:19:52

-into there, OK?

-Yes.

0:19:520:19:54

All my treasure...

0:19:570:19:59

Blimey, I hope you're going to buy all that now.

0:19:590:20:02

..into there...

0:20:020:20:05

like that, OK?

0:20:050:20:07

My treasure, into a really fine box.

0:20:070:20:11

Best price, Sue? Give me the biggest and best price.

0:20:110:20:14

OK, £70.

0:20:140:20:16

Oh, my goodness me!

0:20:160:20:17

-OK.

-And that is a very good deal.

0:20:170:20:19

Yeah.

0:20:190:20:21

How about this? If I give you,

0:20:210:20:23

not 400,

0:20:230:20:25

but 4,000...pence...

0:20:250:20:27

-SHE LAUGHS

-..for this?

0:20:270:20:29

Which is £40.

0:20:290:20:31

So that's your very best offer?

0:20:310:20:34

HE SIGHS

0:20:340:20:35

I feel really mean, but yes, because...

0:20:350:20:37

OK, then I wish you well,

0:20:370:20:39

and I hope that you make plenty at auction.

0:20:390:20:40

-I will leave it, and that's fine.

-That's fine, you can have it for 40.

0:20:400:20:43

-You sure?

-Absolutely. Shake my hand.

0:20:430:20:45

-£40, you sure, Sue?

-Shake my hand!

0:20:450:20:47

-Are you happy?

-I'm happy as long as you shake my hand.

0:20:470:20:49

Even though I don't really like it!

0:20:490:20:51

SHE LAUGHS

0:20:510:20:52

OK, Sue, I'll have it.

0:20:520:20:54

-I'll take it away.

-Well done.

0:20:540:20:56

That's £40. Or, to Sue, 4,000 pence.

0:20:560:20:58

SHE LAUGHS

0:20:580:21:00

Crikey, Charles!

0:21:000:21:01

Your bare-faced cheek has got you another Road Trip bargain.

0:21:010:21:04

Look at that!

0:21:040:21:06

Meanwhile, James had arrived at the Pannier Market,

0:21:060:21:11

and, like Charles, Tony's stall has also caught his eye.

0:21:110:21:15

That's a great fun mirror, isn't it?

0:21:150:21:19

It's very stylish.

0:21:190:21:21

That's typical '20s/'30s.

0:21:210:21:23

It's got a lovely outback on it.

0:21:230:21:26

-It's great fun, isn't it?

-Mm!

0:21:260:21:29

That little touch of the bubbles just makes it, doesn't it?

0:21:290:21:33

Tony, can you do a "special" special price...?

0:21:330:21:35

For £60 is a bargain.

0:21:350:21:37

Can you do anything more dramatic on that?

0:21:370:21:40

"Dramatic"?

0:21:400:21:41

If I knocked you £20 off that,

0:21:410:21:44

I think you'd have a superb bargain at £40.

0:21:440:21:46

I would be very pleased at that, Tony.

0:21:460:21:48

Thank you, that's really kind of you.

0:21:480:21:51

Aw, ever the gent!

0:21:510:21:53

So, James has just bought his fifth item, and they're off.

0:21:530:21:56

Looks like Charles has had enough of the bike, though.

0:21:560:21:59

Right, Okehampton.

0:22:010:22:03

-You don't mind.

-That's a long way.

-It IS a long way.

0:22:030:22:05

You weren't really thinking of cycling, were you?

0:22:050:22:08

Yes, I would have done, if you'd told me I had to.

0:22:080:22:10

Don't worry, you're safe, I'll take you.

0:22:100:22:12

Don't talk push-bikes.

0:22:120:22:14

Let's go. That's more like it!

0:22:140:22:17

He's hitching a lift with gallant, Buck-up Braxton,

0:22:170:22:20

and they're travelling 30 miles south to the West Country town

0:22:200:22:24

of Okehampton.

0:22:240:22:25

Okehampton is located on the northern edge of Dartmoor.

0:22:250:22:29

With three items bagged, Charles is hoping to splash more of his cash.

0:22:290:22:33

He's got over £800 left,

0:22:330:22:35

and he's on the run.

0:22:350:22:38

-Hello, madam.

-Hello!

-How are you?

0:22:380:22:40

I'm very well. Nice to see you.

0:22:400:22:41

Thank you for letting me come to your shop and peruse.

0:22:410:22:44

-I believe you are Charles?

-I am Charles, yes.

0:22:440:22:47

This is fun, isn't it?

0:22:510:22:52

I know!

0:22:520:22:54

Tell me about these musket balls.

0:22:540:22:55

The area, Great Torrington,

0:22:550:22:57

which is North Devon,

0:22:570:22:59

going back towards Bideford,

0:22:590:23:00

was the last stronghold of the Cavaliers

0:23:000:23:05

during the Civil War.

0:23:050:23:06

This is something I picked up locally.

0:23:060:23:09

I'm almost certain these musket balls,

0:23:090:23:11

which are mounted in this oak display case,

0:23:110:23:15

are certainly mid-17th century.

0:23:150:23:19

I would think so, but it could be quite gory.

0:23:190:23:21

-They could have killed somebody.

-Exactly.

0:23:210:23:23

-I also quite like that scent bottle here.

-Yeah.

0:23:230:23:28

This is a cut-glass perfume bottle -

0:23:280:23:31

Birmingham, 1942.

0:23:310:23:34

If you were a lady in the Second World War, you may have had this

0:23:340:23:37

to maybe mesmerise your husband

0:23:370:23:40

coming back from the Forces, or whatever.

0:23:400:23:43

What's the best price on that, Sue?

0:23:430:23:45

-Goodness me!

-Best price, Sue?

0:23:450:23:46

-Right.

-I don't negotiate now.

0:23:460:23:48

"Best price, Sue?" or, "Best price, Jo?"

0:23:480:23:50

"Best price, Jo." Sorry, Jo.

0:23:500:23:52

-It's gone up.

-Silly boy!

0:23:520:23:53

SHE LAUGHS

0:23:530:23:54

I would do that for £60.

0:23:540:23:56

OK. That's food for thought. Thanks, Sue.

0:23:560:23:58

Thanks, Jo.

0:23:580:24:00

And this caster?

0:24:000:24:02

A lovely, quality...

0:24:020:24:04

-Which it is.

-..heavy...

0:24:040:24:06

Which it is.

0:24:060:24:08

..silver caster and cover.

0:24:080:24:11

This is London, from the year, 1937.

0:24:110:24:14

And it's Georgian-style, but yes, 20th-century.

0:24:140:24:17

It is. Lighthouse caster form.

0:24:170:24:19

Faceted. Good size.

0:24:190:24:22

We likey-likey, OK?

0:24:220:24:24

What have we got on that?

0:24:240:24:26

Right, 160.

0:24:280:24:29

What will we do with that?

0:24:290:24:31

Let's try and be good to you.

0:24:310:24:33

120.

0:24:330:24:34

Yeah.

0:24:340:24:36

Oh, I sense another Cheeky Charlie bargain on the cards.

0:24:360:24:38

I've seen those two, and I do like the musket balls, as well, up here.

0:24:380:24:42

Would you take...

0:24:420:24:44

60 for him, 60 for him,

0:24:440:24:46

and 30 for him?

0:24:460:24:48

Which makes...?

0:24:480:24:49

£150.

0:24:490:24:51

For three items...

0:24:530:24:55

There you go. Lovely.

0:24:550:24:56

On eggshells. We've got there.

0:24:560:24:58

We've sold, so that's wonderful.

0:24:580:25:00

Hats off to you, Charles.

0:25:000:25:02

Yet another good deal done.

0:25:020:25:04

While Charles has been

0:25:040:25:06

on a buying bonanza,

0:25:060:25:08

James is travelling half an hour away to the village

0:25:080:25:10

of Lifton, in Devon.

0:25:100:25:13

James is visiting the Fairground Heritage Trust.

0:25:160:25:22

It was created to preserve the vibrant history

0:25:220:25:24

of the funfair.

0:25:240:25:26

Housed in a massive barn,

0:25:260:25:28

the collection is open to the public

0:25:280:25:30

and illustrates the splendour of a bygone era.

0:25:300:25:32

It is testament to the travelling showmen

0:25:320:25:35

who would construct and operate

0:25:350:25:37

the large, colourful rides and stalls

0:25:370:25:39

along beaches and open spaces, up and down the country.

0:25:390:25:42

James is meeting with trustee Guy Belshaw to find out more.

0:25:420:25:47

-Hello.

-James, welcome to the Fairground Heritage Centre.

0:25:470:25:50

Hello. It's Guy, isn't it?

0:25:500:25:52

That's right. I'm a trustee here.

0:25:520:25:54

What an amazing place.

0:25:540:25:55

Who operated these funfairs?

0:25:550:25:57

They were operated by

0:25:570:25:59

extended families...

0:25:590:26:01

two or three generations...

0:26:010:26:02

and they would operate over a specific geographical area.

0:26:020:26:06

So, "manors"?

0:26:060:26:07

That's it. There would be families in the West Country,

0:26:070:26:10

the Midlands, South Wales.

0:26:100:26:11

They'd come together for big charter fairs in the autumn,

0:26:110:26:14

but generally, they'd travel as a cohesive family unit...

0:26:140:26:17

with the riding masters owning the big stream rides

0:26:170:26:21

and the side tenants with coconut shies

0:26:210:26:23

and the fat lady show,

0:26:230:26:25

that sort of thing.

0:26:250:26:27

What sort of time? Queen Victoria's time?

0:26:270:26:29

From earlier than that, really.

0:26:290:26:31

From Queen Victoria, 1837,

0:26:310:26:33

there were already roundabouts by then.

0:26:330:26:35

But the great heyday of the English steam fair

0:26:350:26:38

-was around the late 1880s...

-Right.

0:26:380:26:40

..to the outbreak of the Great War, really.

0:26:400:26:42

Guy, that is a particularly splendid carousel.

0:26:420:26:47

This one was carved by Arthur Anderson of Bristol.

0:26:470:26:50

A galloper, not a carousel -

0:26:500:26:52

there's leatherwork there, real horse hair for the tail.

0:26:520:26:56

This one, Silver Song,

0:26:560:26:58

is one of the best examples of Anderson's work.

0:26:580:27:00

The ones on the outside, that the public saw first,

0:27:000:27:03

were the more elaborately-carved ones...

0:27:030:27:06

with the lesser detail were the ones within, really.

0:27:060:27:09

But the biggest thrill is yet to come.

0:27:090:27:13

God, these are the living fellows, aren't they?

0:27:130:27:15

This is it.

0:27:150:27:16

This is our pride and joy in here, the fairground building.

0:27:160:27:19

So, the real dodgems here.

0:27:190:27:21

How old is this fella?

0:27:230:27:24

Well, James, this is oldest working fairground ride in the country.

0:27:240:27:28

This was built in 1906

0:27:280:27:30

by Savages of King's Lynn,

0:27:300:27:33

who were very famous agricultural engineers,

0:27:330:27:35

as well as fairground ride builders.

0:27:350:27:38

It really is the centrepiece of our collection here...

0:27:380:27:41

Is this fellow unique?

0:27:410:27:43

It is unique.

0:27:430:27:45

It is the only spinning-top, switchback ride in the world.

0:27:450:27:48

There isn't another like it.

0:27:480:27:49

It takes a lot of upkeep, but it certainly works.

0:27:490:27:52

-How'd you like to have a go?

-Yeah I'd love to.

0:27:520:27:55

-Why don't you jump in the third car?

-Third car? OK.

0:27:550:27:58

The anticipation!

0:28:010:28:02

Am I going to be jettisoned?

0:28:020:28:04

I'm ready for speed. Here we go.

0:28:040:28:06

The rodeo switchback travelled around the country till the 1940s,

0:28:140:28:17

thereafter spending most of its time

0:28:170:28:20

at Clarence Pier Amusement Park in Southsea.

0:28:200:28:23

However, in 1974,

0:28:230:28:25

it was sold to the Six Flags theme park in New Jersey,

0:28:250:28:29

in America.

0:28:290:28:30

A successful consortium, though,

0:28:300:28:33

rescued this historic ride and returned it to the UK

0:28:330:28:35

in the mid-'80s.

0:28:350:28:37

Marvellous.

0:28:370:28:39

Sadly, all good things, though, must come to an end.

0:28:390:28:44

That was fun, really good fun.

0:28:440:28:46

Oh! I'm on quite a slope here!

0:28:460:28:48

HE LAUGHS

0:28:480:28:50

It's time for James to meet up with Charles

0:28:500:28:53

and have a look at one another's treasures.

0:28:530:28:56

Right, James - show us what you've got.

0:28:560:28:58

-BOTH: Woh!

-Hello!

0:28:580:29:01

It's a real old motley crew.

0:29:010:29:02

Five items,

0:29:020:29:03

but I think my bargain,

0:29:030:29:05

which I'm rather pleased with, is this fellow.

0:29:050:29:08

-Yeah.

-Now, have a look at that,

0:29:080:29:11

What do you think of it?

0:29:110:29:13

That's really good.

0:29:130:29:15

-A tea caddy...?

-With lid.

0:29:150:29:16

-Oh, no!

-Keep going - how much?

0:29:160:29:19

It IS solid silver, as well.

0:29:190:29:20

Oh... You've done it!

0:29:200:29:23

That is a crossroads.

0:29:230:29:25

You've found a real bargain there.

0:29:250:29:27

How much?

0:29:270:29:28

It ought to have cost you... Silver tea caddy, Dutch, 1880s...

0:29:280:29:32

It ought to have cost you, probably, between £150 and £200.

0:29:320:29:36

You'll tell me you bought it for about 50?

0:29:360:29:38

-20.

-You didn't?!

0:29:380:29:40

Oh! He's back!

0:29:400:29:42

-Bingo's back!

-yeah, Bingo's back!

0:29:420:29:44

And this is a mad bit.

0:29:440:29:46

That's awesome. Victorian.

0:29:460:29:47

-Have you ever seen a scrap-work salt pin?

-Never!

0:29:470:29:52

That's gorgeous.

0:29:520:29:53

Again, so Victorian, so whacky.

0:29:530:29:56

Don't tell me it cost you £30.

0:29:560:29:58

-40.

-That's a great thing.

0:29:580:30:01

This is my last purchase...

0:30:010:30:02

in Bideford...

0:30:020:30:04

-and I thought, "Cornwall. Seaside home."

-That's lovely.

0:30:040:30:08

-How much?

-40.

-No!

0:30:080:30:10

Right, Charles, your turn.

0:30:100:30:13

There you are. That's my collection.

0:30:130:30:15

Hey, a nice collection!

0:30:150:30:17

My favourite lot, James, is this.

0:30:170:30:18

I'm happy it's George Jones.

0:30:180:30:21

It's circa 1881.

0:30:210:30:23

It's got that hunting Cornish interest.

0:30:230:30:26

I would say, with the damage,

0:30:260:30:28

it's quite easy to restore, this stuff.

0:30:280:30:30

You might be pushing the two, maybe more.

0:30:300:30:33

-You're being serious?!

-I think, 100, 200...

0:30:330:30:35

It cost me £55.

0:30:350:30:37

-That's very good.

-I hope so.

0:30:370:30:39

What are all your balls?

0:30:390:30:42

They are, reputedly,

0:30:420:30:44

from the Civil War.

0:30:440:30:46

-Oh, sort of musket balls?

-Exactly.

0:30:460:30:49

I think you would have paid 25 for those.

0:30:490:30:51

Yeah, they cost me £30.

0:30:510:30:54

What about this fella?

0:30:540:30:56

I thought, "I'm digging all the time..."

0:30:560:30:58

A lady came in, over the counter,

0:30:580:31:01

she said, "Charles, this has just come in."

0:31:010:31:03

I said, "Oh, yeah." So, like Fagin,

0:31:030:31:05

I looked in.

0:31:050:31:08

-Hey!

-"Hey!"

0:31:080:31:10

-Aw!

-Came in over the counter!

0:31:100:31:11

These people pay fortunes...

0:31:110:31:13

Oh, no!

0:31:130:31:15

Like Fagin does, look at this, James.

0:31:150:31:18

-We've got some coral here.

-That will make 150 to 200 quid.

0:31:180:31:21

Get out of here!

0:31:210:31:22

Easy!

0:31:220:31:23

The box is quite nice.

0:31:230:31:25

It's a lovely box - a really heavy, functional Regency box.

0:31:250:31:29

I bet you paid 80 to 100.

0:31:290:31:32

Yeah, £40.

0:31:320:31:33

HE LAUGHS

0:31:330:31:35

Then I rounded off, and I thought, "You know..."

0:31:350:31:39

No, I'm not interested.

0:31:390:31:40

Is that Beswick?

0:31:400:31:42

You're peddling hard...

0:31:420:31:44

Is it BESWICK?!

0:31:440:31:46

Yes, it is.

0:31:460:31:47

That's nice, isn't it?

0:31:470:31:49

I know you like dogs. You have two at home and your wife likes dogs,

0:31:490:31:51

-so I paid £15.

-That's good.

0:31:510:31:53

But what do they REALLY think?

0:31:530:31:56

His last purchase

0:31:560:31:58

is his danger purchase, for me.

0:31:580:32:00

That Regency box stuffed full of goodies,

0:32:000:32:02

that in the auction room is just a magnet.

0:32:020:32:04

If it's in the cabinet, lots of goodies in it,

0:32:040:32:07

I predict that will make between £150 and £250.

0:32:070:32:12

I'm really impressed with James's items.

0:32:120:32:14

I love his silver caddy and I think he struck gold.

0:32:140:32:18

It's been an ambitious fourth leg

0:32:210:32:23

with the boys battling it out from Crediton via Exeter, West Putford,

0:32:230:32:27

Torrington, Bideford, Okehampton, Lifton

0:32:270:32:30

and finally heading for the Cornish town of Lostwithiel.

0:32:300:32:34

Lostwithiel sits at the head of the estuary of the River Fowey,

0:32:360:32:39

and the name comes from old Cornish, meaning Tail End of the Woodland.

0:32:390:32:43

And as our experts arrive in town,

0:32:470:32:50

it's time to find out who will be crowned champion

0:32:500:32:53

at today's auction. Can Charles make it four in a row?

0:32:530:32:56

Jeffrys Auctions was established in 1865.

0:32:590:33:03

Auctioneer Ian Morris kindly lends his thoughts

0:33:030:33:07

on the chaps' offerings.

0:33:070:33:09

I very much like the black case with the jewellery in

0:33:090:33:13

and I think that will do rather well.

0:33:130:33:16

I would like to see it make £150, £200.

0:33:160:33:20

Wow! James Braxton started today with £248.24,

0:33:200:33:25

and spent £135 on five auction lots.

0:33:250:33:28

Charles Hanson began with £943.01,

0:33:300:33:34

and spent £260 on six lots.

0:33:340:33:37

Quiet, please! The auction is about to begin.

0:33:410:33:44

There's an atmosphere.

0:33:440:33:46

-There is. I like it.

-Can you feel the hum?

-I can.

0:33:460:33:51

First up it's Charles's Victorian leather jewellery box,

0:33:510:33:54

stuffed full of loot!

0:33:540:33:57

-Come on, James, here we go.

-Here we go.

0:33:570:33:59

Got some interest already and I'm starting at £110.

0:33:590:34:03

NO way!

0:34:030:34:04

110, 120, 130...

0:34:040:34:05

I told you!

0:34:050:34:07

160, 170...

0:34:070:34:09

I can't believe it!

0:34:090:34:10

180, 190, 200... 210

0:34:100:34:13

220, 230,

0:34:130:34:15

-240...

-I can't believe it.

0:34:150:34:17

-At 240 are we all done?

-At £240...

0:34:170:34:19

HE BANGS GAVEL

0:34:190:34:20

Put it there! I can't believe it!

0:34:200:34:23

By gosh, Charles has done it again and is off to a rip-roaring start.

0:34:230:34:29

Just look at James's face!

0:34:290:34:31

Steady there, Charles.

0:34:350:34:37

Let's see if James can make his mark with the farrier's file.

0:34:370:34:40

Very good, did my nails this morning, lovely.

0:34:400:34:42

£10, we'll say no more.

0:34:420:34:45

£10? five, six, at eight, at eight, ten,

0:34:450:34:49

12, 14,

0:34:490:34:51

16, 18,

0:34:510:34:53

at 18, 20,

0:34:530:34:55

22, 24,

0:34:550:34:57

26, 28,

0:34:570:34:58

£30, 32...

0:34:580:35:00

32, front row.

0:35:000:35:02

-At 32, are we done?

-32...

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:35:020:35:05

Come on, give it!

0:35:050:35:06

-It's all right, isn't it?

-Trebled your money.

0:35:060:35:10

Not bad, James, but you'll need better luck to beat Charles.

0:35:100:35:14

And it's James's tea caddy now and he's got high hopes.

0:35:140:35:19

£70 I'm bid.

0:35:190:35:20

£70, £70...

0:35:200:35:22

75, £80, 85...

0:35:220:35:26

95...

0:35:260:35:28

At £100...

0:35:280:35:30

-At the £100...

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:35:300:35:33

Congratulations! That is five times what you paid for it.

0:35:330:35:37

-That's good.

-I'm pleased with that.

0:35:370:35:39

That's more like it.

0:35:390:35:41

Let's hope you're on the up.

0:35:410:35:43

It's that 1950s mirror

0:35:430:35:46

with the little fish next.

0:35:460:35:48

£30 away, £20 away...

0:35:480:35:50

-Ten, I'm bid. At £10, 12, 14...

-Here we go.

0:35:500:35:53

15, 18, 20,

0:35:530:35:55

22, 25...

0:35:550:35:57

28, £30,

0:35:570:35:59

32... At 32...

0:35:590:36:01

At 32... All done?

0:36:010:36:04

-At 32...

-BANGS GAVEL

0:36:040:36:06

Only 32.

0:36:060:36:07

Oh, dear. Just when you thought your luck was changing.

0:36:070:36:10

But never fear, James,

0:36:100:36:12

there's still that unusual Victorian salt pin to go.

0:36:120:36:16

Quite interesting.

0:36:170:36:18

Can I say £30? £20?

0:36:180:36:20

£15? £18, £20,

0:36:200:36:22

22,

0:36:220:36:24

25,

0:36:240:36:25

28,

0:36:250:36:26

£30... Is it?

0:36:260:36:28

£30, 32,

0:36:280:36:30

35, 38,

0:36:300:36:32

£40...

0:36:320:36:33

38, still seated. At 38...

0:36:330:36:36

Are we done at £38?

0:36:360:36:38

HE BANGS GAVEL

0:36:380:36:39

-Yes!

-(LAUGHS)

0:36:390:36:41

Is that laughter or tears?

0:36:420:36:45

It's just not your day today, James.

0:36:450:36:49

We're back to Charles and his majolica jug next.

0:36:490:36:53

It's the one he thinks might go for a mint.

0:36:530:36:57

-We've still got three bids on the books.

-Oh, hell!

0:36:570:36:59

I'm going to start at £80.

0:36:590:37:02

£90, £100,

0:37:020:37:04

110, 120, 130,

0:37:040:37:05

140, 150, 160,

0:37:050:37:07

170, 180, 190...

0:37:070:37:09

-Delighted.

-What did I say?

0:37:090:37:11

200. Oh, my God.

0:37:110:37:14

-220, 230, 240?

-240.

0:37:150:37:19

250, 260...

0:37:190:37:20

Well, well!

0:37:200:37:22

-270, 280...

-I don't believe it.

0:37:220:37:25

280. That's good.

0:37:250:37:27

Yeah, it is good.

0:37:270:37:29

-320, 340...

-Keep going.

0:37:290:37:31

-340.

-I can't believe it.

0:37:310:37:33

At 340 on the phone... 360, 380...

0:37:330:37:36

Gosh!

0:37:360:37:38

380,

0:37:380:37:39

-400...

-I don't believe this. Keep going. This is wonderful!

0:37:390:37:43

Wonderful!

0:37:430:37:44

-420, 440?

-Oh, goodness me!

-440. 460?

0:37:440:37:47

-460...

-Oh, magic!

0:37:490:37:50

-480, 500...

-This is heaven.

0:37:500:37:53

500. 520? 520. 540?

0:37:530:37:57

-540?

-'Telephone bid.'

-No.

0:37:570:38:00

-520 in the room.

-Thank you very much.

-At 520 in the room...

0:38:000:38:03

£520...

0:38:030:38:04

-HE BANGS GAVEL

-Yes!

0:38:040:38:05

Wonderful, wonderful!

0:38:050:38:06

Thank you very much! Wonderful!

0:38:060:38:09

Thank you, auctioneer!

0:38:090:38:10

-Drinks are on you!

-Oh, absolutely! And the rest.

0:38:100:38:14

Oh, goodness me!

0:38:140:38:15

Put it there!

0:38:180:38:19

Well done.

0:38:190:38:21

Put it there indeed! A magnificent lump sum for young Charles.

0:38:210:38:26

Can I...?

0:38:270:38:28

HE KISSES THE JUG

0:38:310:38:32

That Charles is in a kissing mood!

0:38:360:38:38

Still, next it's the collection of musket balls.

0:38:380:38:41

£30 to start me. £20 I'm bid.

0:38:410:38:43

Come on.

0:38:430:38:45

£30, 35, £40,

0:38:450:38:47

-45, £50...

-Keep going.

0:38:470:38:49

55, £60...

0:38:490:38:50

Wonderful.

0:38:500:38:51

-How much did you pay for it?

-£30 it cost me.

0:38:510:38:55

Approximately £30.

0:38:550:38:56

-65...

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:38:560:38:58

-Well done.

-Congratulations.

0:38:580:39:00

-Well done.

-Congratulations.

0:39:000:39:01

Well done.

0:39:010:39:03

Profits aplenty yet again for young Charles. Keep up the good work, boy!

0:39:050:39:10

Great balls of fire! Goodness gracious...

0:39:100:39:13

You say "Great balls of fire."

0:39:130:39:16

-Goodness gracious...

-Great balls of fire.

0:39:160:39:19

HE MIMICS GUN FIRING

0:39:190:39:22

Stupid boy!

0:39:220:39:23

Anyway, it's Charles again with the lighthouse sugar caster.

0:39:230:39:27

How about £80? £80 away.

0:39:270:39:30

-Come on!

-£30 I'm bid.

0:39:300:39:33

55, 60, 65, 70, 75,

0:39:330:39:36

80, 85, 90...

0:39:360:39:38

That's great!

0:39:380:39:40

£90, take 95... At £90...

0:39:400:39:43

95, thank you. 100, 110...

0:39:430:39:45

-Well done!

-110, 120, 130?

0:39:450:39:48

At 120. You sure?

0:39:480:39:50

At 120...

0:39:500:39:53

-£120.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:39:530:39:54

Brilliant! Double money. You were right.

0:39:540:39:57

Is there no stopping the young pretender?

0:39:570:40:00

The bidders of Lostwithiel just can't resist his items.

0:40:000:40:05

So how about Charles's scent bottle?

0:40:070:40:09

Are we in for another sweet-smelling profit?

0:40:090:40:11

-£20 to start me.

-No. Too much. Too much.

0:40:130:40:16

35, £40, 45,

0:40:160:40:18

50, 55,

0:40:180:40:20

£55, 60,

0:40:200:40:23

65, £70...

0:40:230:40:25

At £70, take 75...

0:40:250:40:27

-One more!

-Too much.

0:40:270:40:29

-At £70, are we done? Going at £70...

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:40:290:40:32

Yes, profit! Put it there!

0:40:320:40:35

No.

0:40:350:40:36

Come on, James, be a sport! We all have bad days.

0:40:360:40:40

So now, show Charles what you're made of.

0:40:410:40:44

It's your last lot of the day, the froggy hand bell.

0:40:440:40:47

Handsome, isn't it?

0:40:490:40:51

LAUGHTER

0:40:510:40:52

£10 away.

0:40:520:40:53

£10? £5?

0:40:530:40:55

Five I'm bid. Rings your bell?

0:40:550:40:57

At seven, at eight,

0:41:000:41:01

at nine? At nine, at ten. At 12? At 12.

0:41:010:41:04

At 14, at 16, at 18,

0:41:040:41:06

at 20, 22... At 22...

0:41:060:41:09

Dropped a clanger there! At 22...

0:41:090:41:12

-At 22...

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:41:120:41:14

And that little froggy didn't come home with the money, James.

0:41:140:41:17

It just croaked.

0:41:170:41:19

From froggy to doggy.

0:41:190:41:21

It's the final lot of the day with Charles's terrier.

0:41:210:41:26

£30 away? £20 I'm bid.

0:41:260:41:28

Yes! Profit.

0:41:280:41:31

25, £30, 35,

0:41:310:41:32

£40, 45.

0:41:320:41:35

I can go to 48. 50? 50.

0:41:350:41:37

Wowzer! Well done.

0:41:370:41:39

At £50 I'm bid. Done?

0:41:390:41:41

-Going at £50.

-HE BANGS GAVEL

0:41:410:41:43

You are unassailable.

0:41:430:41:45

-It gets better and better and better.

-Can I drive?/

0:41:450:41:47

No.

0:41:470:41:49

Yet another profit with the little dog

0:41:500:41:53

makes Charles the jubilant fourth- time-in-a-row winner at auction.

0:41:530:41:57

I'm just absolutely blown over. I'm blown away. I'm blown away.

0:41:570:42:03

Oh, dear, oh, dear.

0:42:030:42:05

Well done.

0:42:050:42:06

So James started today's show with £248.24.

0:42:080:42:12

And after paying auction costs, made a small profit of £48.68,

0:42:120:42:17

leaving him with just £296.92 to carry forward.

0:42:170:42:22

Oh, dear, oh, dear.

0:42:220:42:24

Charles, meanwhile, started with a massive £943.01,

0:42:250:42:30

and made a magnificent £613.30 profit today.

0:42:300:42:35

Giving him a staggering £1,566.31 to take forward.

0:42:350:42:40

Good lord.

0:42:400:42:42

Well done.

0:42:420:42:44

James, sometimes you get lucky, OK?

0:42:440:42:47

HE CHUCKLES

0:42:470:42:48

Hold on. There is no "sometimes". With you it's "always".

0:42:480:42:52

-Anyway, well done.

-Thank you, mate!

0:42:540:42:56

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:000:43:03

James and Charles head for a stormy Liskeard, in Cornwall.

0:43:030:43:08

Ohhh!

0:43:080:43:09

No!

0:43:090:43:11

James turns to the church.

0:43:110:43:14

I heard you've got a pulpit that you might be interested in selling.

0:43:140:43:17

-Am I right?

-You are right, yes!

0:43:170:43:19

And Charles tries a spot of arm-wrestling.

0:43:190:43:22

Come on, Andy!

0:43:220:43:24

He's too good. I'm off!

0:43:240:43:27

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:300:43:32

It is the fourth day of James Braxton and Charles Hanson's road trip. They head for Cornwall, where Charles has an enchanting experience and James goes to the fair.


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