Episode 18 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 18

Antiques experts travel across the UK searching for treasures. Mark Stacey visits the magnificent Ely Cathedral and his opponent Mark Hales gets excited about a sketchbook.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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That hurts.

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Oh!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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You mean lot!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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There's always another auction.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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In this show, two auctioneers called Mark are competing for the road trip laurel.

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Mark Hales is a West Country ceramics specialist

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who made a bundle on the spectacular last-minute sale in the last leg.

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Yes! Yes!

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While Brightonian Mark Stacey is a Road Trip veteran

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who has proven that his reflexes are as sharp is his eye for a bargain.

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Oh!

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Well caught!

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They both started with £200 after suffering a mental breakdown...

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No! Mutual losses, in the first leg.

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It was a tricky day, wasn't it?

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Mark Hales has now managed to grow his cash pot to a respectable £213.76...

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..while Mark Stacey is trailing slightly with £200.70,

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but there's everything to play for on today's leg. Oh, yes!

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They're hitting the road in a great British classic,

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the nippy Mark 3 1968 Triumph Spitfire.

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This week, our pair of remarkable Marks will travel nearly 300 miles

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from Finedon in Northamptonshire

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through six counties of gorgeous eastern England

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to Colchester in Essex.

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On today's show, they're driving from Risby in Suffolk

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through Cambridgeshire and Norfolk to the auction

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in the pretty market town of Diss.

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Don't "dis" that!

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The leafy streets of Risby still speak of its mediaeval history.

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Parts of the parish church of St Giles

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date back from the Anglo-Saxon and Norman periods.

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-Risby, do you know Risby?

-Yes, it sounds like a breakfast cereal, doesn't it?

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Well, it's not. It's a village.

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Tut, tut.

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Our two Marks are getting on their marks to invade a pair of local antique shops -

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if they can agree on where to start.

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Mark, come on!

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-Listen, this is amazing!

-Big!

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Two barns, lots of money, plenty of time.

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-Yes.

-You go that way and I'll go this way. It's a long walk from here.

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So, I'm going to the smaller one, am I? Yes. See you later. Happy hunting!

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That settles the matter.

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Mark Stacey is striding off into Risby Barn Antique Centre where congenial Richard will help.

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Nice to meet you, Richard.

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JAUNTY MUSIC

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CLANGING

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Carefully!

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What have we got here?

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This is fun.

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This is a lamp which has a Chinese vase as its central piece,

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but the Chinese vase has been absolutely smashed.

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It's riveted and cracked, but somebody has mounted it.

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This was mounted probably at the end of the 19th century.

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Even though the vase is smashed, it is still quite a decorative piece.

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It will make a difference, of course.

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They've already reduced it from 160 to 100.

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(I don't want to fiddle too much. It might fall apart!)

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Hm. Is it the wisest purchase then, Mark?

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What am I doing?

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You should never buy damaged ceramics,

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but don't you think that looks quite decorative? I do.

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It was a rhetorical question to the viewers,

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my millions of adoring fans who listen to every word I say.

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Ha! Sorry, what was that old boy? I was miles away.

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Anyway, Mark's been doing some research and has discovered

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that their auction at Diss is a specialist art and antiques sale.

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So what's his strategy?

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It gives me a good opportunity to have a hunt round and maybe find

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something which is good quality,

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because if you get the right thing there, then it will sell well.

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As luck would have it, Richard has something that might fit the bill.

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-I've never seen something like that.

-Oh, gosh - that's sweet, isn't it?

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Undo it, and be very careful because there are bits inside.

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-Does it undo like that?

-Yes, it just untwists.

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Oh, gosh. A little pair of dice.

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It's a miniature ivory egg containing two miniscule dice.

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While it's illegal to deal in modern ivory items, things made

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of ivory that date from before 1947, like this object, can be traded.

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On the ticket, it's £55.

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It's almost like a little bronze fly on there which has got

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a little decoration on his wings and a little red face.

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I can't see a mark for Faberge!

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No, we couldn't find anything like that, either!

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That might be a little over-optimistic,

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and speaking of wild optimism, Richard's made a phone call

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to the dealers who are selling the ivory egg, and the cracked lamp.

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What kind of deal can Mark strike?

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-What is the lowest price on that little egg?

-This little egg?

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I'll have a quick word with him. And he will...

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-Rock bottom's going to be £30.

-£30.

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OK, well that's a reasonable price, actually.

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What about that battered old lamp?

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Well, they would be quite pleased to see the back of it.

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-They can't give it away.

-No, I don't expect that.

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But they have actually said their rock-bottom today,

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as a special offer to you, because they knew it was you!

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There we are - how about that? - was £50.

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£50 does seem reasonable, doesn't it?

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Do you know what? I'm going to go for it, because I like them.

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And I think they're interesting items,

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and I think, fingers crossed, I might have a chance with them.

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Meanwhile, Mark Hales is next door in Past and Present,

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and seems so confident that he's just lounging around.

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-Ah!

-Oh, I think I'll have a little sit down.

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Gather my thoughts, get my head into gear.

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Just thinking about a couple of things I've seen. Rather nice here!

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There's a big mixture. I like it here.

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GENTLE CLASSICAL MUSIC PLAYS

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-RECORD SCREECHES TO A STOP

-Come on, then!

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You're not going to find anything lounging around there

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in your lilac trousers.

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Not everyone could carry those off, Mark. Natty, though.

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There are some very nice things here, and some very reasonable prices.

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Nice mahogany-veneered sewing box. I rather like that, and it has a use.

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And I do like anything that is useful. Isn't that lovely?

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I rather like that. Nice colour.

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-He's going to go and speak to dealer Joe.

-There's a bit of a gap on the top there.

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Nice thing, though. Original condition. Never been touched.

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-It's lovely, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-I like that because it's got a use.

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-Can I get a profit on it? What's the price?

-Well, the asking price is £80.

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-Is it?

-Which isn't...

-No, it's not silly.

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It's a very, very fair retail price.

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A trade price on that would be £65.

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I think I just want to buy it as cheaply as I can.

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-Where are you trying to be on it?

-£40? Give me a profit, wouldn't it?

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-£40 is going to show you a profit - must show you a profit.

-I think so.

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Thank you, Joe. I'll have that. Thank you very much indeed. That's wonderful.

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-And I've started. Joe, you've got the ball rolling.

-Smashing!

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And you're off the starting block, Mark.

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On the other side of the shop,

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some candlesticks in the Arts and Crafts style have some appeal.

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They're great! Good fun, aren't they?

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-See, it's not my specialist subject, but I love it!

-Yep!

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Items in the Arts and Crafts style, which flourished

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in the late 19th century, are today highly sought-after.

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Candlesticks like these, with copper and wrought metal,

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are in the manner of WAS Benson, the premier maker of the period.

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D'you know, Joe, I really, really like those.

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Come on, get me really tempted.

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-Sometimes you can, sometimes you can't.

-Retail on those was £95.

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That's what I'd want for them if I had them. Fair enough.

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-Where would you...?

-£45?

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I'm going to get a profit after commission, aren't I? They're going to fly.

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-I can put them in at £50, but that would be it.

-£50?

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-Well, we'll have those, Joe.

-Seems to be your number.

-We'll have those, mate.

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Thank you. £40 and £50 I've spent. That's brilliant. Thank you, Joe.

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-Stick them on the side.

-I'm on a roll! I'm having a good morning.

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The first two lots in the bag. He's on a roll - a Swiss roll!

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# Rollin', rollin', rollin' Though the streams are swollen... #

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Now, the two Marks are swapping shops.

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Let's hope they can be as successful on the second round.

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Listen, go and see Richard. He's a charming man.

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-Right, you go and see Joe. He's lovely.

-Lovely.

-Wonderful.

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Right, well, I'm on a roll. I can't wait!

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# Rollin', rollin', rollin'... #

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Mark's having a browse,

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but can he spot anything the other Mark's missed?

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Oh, hello! Mark's put a trap out for me. Hm!

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-He wanted me to fall right into that.

-Easy to miss, that.

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Right into that cabinet.

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Now, Mark's spotted something. It's a stained-glass panel.

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-Can Joe shed some light?

-Came in yesterday.

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-It's made by a guy in Somerset - John Yeo.

-So it's quite modern?

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-Yes, contemporary.

-And there's a crack there, is there? OK.

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I mean you've got £45 on that. What's the lowest you'd take for it?

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-If I cut that to the bone, it's £25.

-£25?

-Yep.

-OK, let's do it.

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-Are you happy with that?

-No, that's OK. It shows me a small profit.

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Then let's do that, because I think,

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even if it doesn't make a profit, it's a very interesting item.

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-Yeah, it's a nice thing - quality item.

-It is.

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Mark Hales is browsing in the other shop

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and he's found something dear to his ceramic-loving heart.

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That's rather nice in there. Oh, she's missing her arm. What a shame.

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There's an early Staffordshire group of the Welsh tailor's wife at the back.

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It was made by a potter called Obadiah Sherratt in about 1815-1820.

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Staffordshire figures are earthenware pottery pieces

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made in Britain between the late 18th and the mid-20th centuries.

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There is a pair to it as well, and that's the Welsh tailor.

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If we go back 20 years that was a very rare group in Staffordshire

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and it would fetch a couple of hundred pounds, that sort of thing.

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That one's damaged. They often are - it's very soft pottery.

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But it is restorable and it's got £45 on it and that's a good price.

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-Richard, could I have a look at something in the cabinet?

-Yep.

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That's the one.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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Unfortunately, we've got an ear missing.

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We've got her whole arm missing and we've got one little...

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One little baby missing, made up there. What a shame!

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The tail's broken off as well. Oh, a lot of damage!

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-I'm talking it down now, aren't I?

-Do you know...

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-You're doing your best!

-Yeah. But I've got to ask.

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-I need to phone the dealer.

-Could you ask them?

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Yes, see what they can do for you.

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Tell them about all the damage.

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Tell them I like it, but I'd only have a go

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if it's £15, because I could come a cropper with it.

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Staffordshire pieces can be highly collectable,

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but the damage will make it less desirable to a specialist.

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-Oh, Richard - any luck?

-I'm not expecting a lot, but you know...

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-She couldn't go £15.

-No.

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But she said she would let it go for what she paid for it - £20.

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Well, you know, that's really decent of her.

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I can't quibble at that. She's being very fair, isn't she?

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Yes! I think we'll have a go at that. Thank you, Richard.

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-Will you thank the lady for me?

-Very definitely.

-Thank you very much.

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We'll have a go. I like it.

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Marvellous.

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Ceramic expert Mark makes a specialist buy, and on they roll!

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# Move 'em on, get 'em up Get 'em up, move 'em on

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# Move 'em on, get 'em up, Rawhide. #

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They're back on the road

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and driving the 23 miles from Risby to Ely, Cambridgeshire.

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After his bumper morning of buying, Mark Stacey is

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off for a wander around the ancient local landmark, Ely Cathedral.

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Ely is one of the smallest cities in England.

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Its ancient name commemorates the importance of eel-catching

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to the city and the surrounding fens.

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-Mark's meeting cathedral guide Michael.

-Hello, Michael!

-Yes.

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-Hello, Mark.

-How are you?

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Very well, thank you, and you're very welcome to Ely cathedral.

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I'm delighted to be here. Pretty spectacular, isn't it?

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Amazing, amazing.

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-I bet the inside is much more interesting than the outside.

-Yes.

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Let me show you.

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Ely cathedral is dedicated to St Etheldreda,

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the Saxon princess who founded the abbey here in the year 673.

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Work began on the present cathedral in the 11th century.

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The glorious Norman building survives

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but there have been some modifications over the years.

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-We're now coming into our octagon tower.

-Oh, right.

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Which replaces the Norman tower which stood on this spot

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for something like 200 years, but fell in February 1322.

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Good Lord!

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And created a great hole in the centre of the cross of the building.

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But with great enterprise, Alan of Walsingham, our sacrist at the time,

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rebuilt the tower much wider than before for extra security.

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But the really impressive bit is the way the wooden roof

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has been created. It's an entirely new style for the 1300s.

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The lantern in the middle is made of eight enormous oak trees

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standing on end, 63 feet long.

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Well, it looks pretty spectacular up there, doesn't it?

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For a better look at the cathedral's stunning Octagon Tower,

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they're climbing up to the heavens.

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-How many steps?

-About 165.

-Oh, right. OK.

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-I'm looking forward to this.

-Yes!

-Are you sure, Mark?

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-Perhaps your knees won't!

-No.

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-Wow!

-And now we're in the roof space.

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-And then you can walk right round?

-You can walk right round.

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And more spectacularly, you can open these doors,

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and you can get to look down into the church.

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Oh, good Lord! Gosh!

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It really is quite spectacular, isn't it?

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They are beautiful when you get up here, aren't they?

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These paintings were added

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during a 19th century restoration of the cathedral.

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The work was completed in 1864.

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But there's yet another part of the magnificent cathedral to explore.

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I'd like to take you into our Lady Chapel. The largest in Britain.

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The widest vaulted ceiling then attempted,

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and that was in the early 1400s.

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I mean, looking around, all this wonderful carving.

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It's carved in a very soft white stone.

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-It's a hard form of chalk called clunch.

-Oh, right.

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You'll notice that it's very seriously damaged.

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It is - you can see that. All the heads are missing.

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We think that at the time of the Reformation under the orders of

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the bishop here, Bishop Goodrich, somebody went around,

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possibly on horseback, and simply knocked all the heads off the saints.

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During the Reformation of the 1500s, many of Britain's religious icons

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were destroyed in the belief that they were ungodly.

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The chapel has one last unique property that Michael's keen

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to share.

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The acoustics here are really rather special.

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It's such a big enclosed space that it produces a 7-second echo.

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If I clap my hands you can get some impression...

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SOUND DECAYS SLOWLY

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Gosh! That's quite spectacular, isn't it?

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Michael, thank you so much. I've had a wonderful afternoon.

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I've learnt so much. I will need to rest well tonight after those stairs,

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but I wouldn't have missed it for the world. Thank you very much for your time.

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-Thank you.

-Good bye.

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Mark Hales is keen to do more shopping

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and has driven the 29 miles north to King's Lynn in Norfolk.

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The port was a vital centre of England's medieval sea trade.

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It became known as Lynn Regis - King's Lynn -

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during the reign of Henry VIII.

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This afternoon, Mark's heading towards the Granary Antiques Centre.

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-where he's meeting dealer Patrick.

-Hello, Mark.

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-Would it be OK if I had a look around?

-Yes, by all means.

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Tiara stand - I like that.

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White star labels.

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Ah.

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A Desert Rat sketch book. How lovely. Now, I've sold one of these.

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Quite a long time ago. But I can't remember how much I sold it for!

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But look at this! Isn't it lovely?

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Written and illustrated on the spot in full colour by Clifford Saber.

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Clifford Saber was an American volunteer

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to the British army in World War II.

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He served as an ambulance driver in the North African campaign.

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He was a talented amateur artist

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and published his moving sketchbook recording his experiences.

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This just caught my eye because it's World War II

0:18:380:18:41

and militaria's very strong at the moment.

0:18:410:18:43

-Patrick, isn't that lovely?

-It is.

0:18:430:18:46

First edition, and it's in very good order.

0:18:460:18:48

That's lovely. I do like that.

0:18:480:18:51

-The ticket price is £55.

-Is there any possibility it can be £25?

-No.

0:18:510:18:57

Does that work for you? That's too less. All right. That's fair enough.

0:18:570:19:00

-So what's your very bottom line on it?

-Well, I'm asking £50.

0:19:000:19:03

-The very best I would take is £35.

-Yes.

0:19:030:19:07

-See, I think that's a jolly good buy. Let's not mess about. Yes.

-£35?

0:19:070:19:12

-£35, Patrick.

-Excellent.

-Thank you.

0:19:120:19:14

-You've got a good buy there.

-Thank you. I hope so.

0:19:140:19:16

Thank you very much indeed. Right, thank you again.

0:19:160:19:20

And with that quality buy,

0:19:210:19:23

the curtain falls on another hectic day of road-tripping.

0:19:230:19:27

Night-night, chaps!

0:19:270:19:28

But our boys are early birds,

0:19:310:19:34

and morning finds them back in the Spit and raring to go.

0:19:340:19:39

-I suspect you bought rather well yesterday.

-Oh, well!

0:19:390:19:43

Shall we say all will be revealed?

0:19:430:19:45

So far, Mark Hales has spent £145 on four lots -

0:19:480:19:51

the Arts and Crafts candlesticks, the 1920s sewing box, the rare

0:19:510:19:57

but damaged Staffordshire figure and the World War II first edition.

0:19:570:20:03

He has £68.76 left to spend.

0:20:030:20:06

Mark Stacey, meanwhile, has spent £105 on three lots.

0:20:090:20:12

The unusual miniature ivory egg, the stained-glass panel

0:20:120:20:17

and the lamp, adapted from a Chinese vase.

0:20:170:20:19

He still has a generous £95.70 left.

0:20:190:20:23

We're still in Norfolk now, aren't we?

0:20:250:20:27

Yes, we're in Norfolk and we're quite near to the sea.

0:20:270:20:31

-Oh, are we?

-Yes, indeed.

-Of course you are! Ha!

0:20:310:20:36

They're heading for the coastal town of Sheringham

0:20:360:20:39

where Mark Hales is keen to visit the town's Fishermen's Heritage Centre.

0:20:390:20:43

Sheringham's long history as a fishing town means

0:20:430:20:47

the local people have always had a powerful connection to the sea,

0:20:470:20:51

and a respect for its dangers.

0:20:510:20:54

Mark's here to meet John, from the Sheringham Society,

0:20:540:20:57

who's going to introduce him to one of the town's celebrated heroines.

0:20:570:21:01

-Oh, my word! This is huge! I'm Mark.

-Hello, Mark. I'm John.

0:21:030:21:09

-How d'you do, John?

-Have you ever seen anything like this before?

0:21:090:21:14

This is huge!

0:21:140:21:15

This lifeboat, the Henry Ramey Upcher, or HRU,

0:21:150:21:20

was named after the family that donated it to the town.

0:21:200:21:24

It was a private lifeboat, one operated by the townspeople rather than the RNLI.

0:21:240:21:30

This is the third lifeboat that was provided by the Upcher family

0:21:300:21:34

for the town of Sheringham.

0:21:340:21:37

Built by local shipbuilder Lewis "Buffalo" Emery in 1894,

0:21:370:21:42

the boat was an essential lifeline

0:21:420:21:45

for the mariners of the Norfolk coast.

0:21:450:21:48

Is this a particularly treacherous part of the coast?

0:21:480:21:50

It is a treacherous part of the coast,

0:21:500:21:52

and way back in the 1890s there was a huge amount of sea traffic

0:21:520:21:57

because the sea was used to carry cargo to a lot greater extent

0:21:570:22:01

than it is today and the boats that were carrying that cargo,

0:22:010:22:07

most of them, they'd have been wooden sailing boats,

0:22:070:22:10

totally at the mercy of the elements.

0:22:100:22:12

Extraordinarily, the boat would be taken out in treacherous conditions

0:22:120:22:18

powered by only brave men at her oars.

0:22:180:22:21

-If you want to get a feel of it, let's climb in.

-Oh, yes please!

0:22:210:22:25

The lifeboat would have taken a crew of 28 men

0:22:270:22:30

with 16 of them rowing her through the sea.

0:22:300:22:33

-Is this an oar here?

-That is an oar.

-Let me feel the weight of that.

0:22:330:22:36

-That weighs about 22 pounds.

-John, I'm already uncomfortable.

0:22:360:22:40

You know... Frankly, I don't think I would have been much help.

0:22:400:22:44

I think I'd better stick to auctioneering! That is so heavy!

0:22:440:22:49

Tell me, John, please. Who manned these boats - who were these men?

0:22:490:22:53

The men who manned this boats were the local fishermen of Sheringham.

0:22:530:22:57

They were risking their lives to save other people.

0:22:570:23:00

Over her working life, the HRU rescued 202 people,

0:23:000:23:05

leaving an incredible legacy.

0:23:050:23:07

This went on right until the 1930s.

0:23:070:23:12

In 1935 the RNLI acquired a motorised lifeboat,

0:23:120:23:19

and obviously a motorised lifeboat is going to be much easier to use.

0:23:190:23:24

That was when this boat was no longer required,

0:23:240:23:28

so it was laid up in the shed.

0:23:280:23:30

But there was a huge amount of affection for this boat.

0:23:300:23:34

The fishermen loved this boat

0:23:340:23:37

-and so they wanted to keep it.

-She was a bit special, wasn't she?

0:23:370:23:41

-She was very special indeed.

-And they looked after her.

0:23:410:23:44

They looked after her.

0:23:440:23:45

We now look after her and people love to come and see.

0:23:450:23:49

-She was retired gracefully.

-She was indeed.

0:23:490:23:53

And she continues to keep the stories of the brave men of Sheringham alive today.

0:23:530:23:58

-Thank you so much, John.

-You're welcome.

0:23:580:24:01

What a wonderful, wonderful boat and what a wonderful story.

0:24:010:24:04

Meanwhile, Mark Stacey still has a princely £95.70 burning a hole in his pocket,

0:24:060:24:11

so he's heading for the town of Holt.

0:24:110:24:15

Holt sits at the crossroads of two ancient byways.

0:24:150:24:20

Its name derives from the Anglo-Saxon word for copse or woodland grove.

0:24:200:24:24

Mark's on his way to Mews Antiques

0:24:250:24:28

where an eager welcoming committee awaits.

0:24:280:24:31

Good morning. Oh! A trio of lovelies! How are you? I'm Mark.

0:24:320:24:37

-Nice to meet you. This is Diane.

-Hello, Diane.

-And this is Kim.

0:24:370:24:40

-Kim, nice to meet you. And you are?

-My name's David.

-David.

0:24:400:24:43

JAUNTY MUSIC

0:24:430:24:45

With his magpie eye for shiny objects,

0:24:510:24:55

Mark's spotted a right pair of silver spoons.

0:24:550:24:59

And where did you get these from, Diane, if you don't mind me asking?

0:24:590:25:03

-They came from a private home.

-Oh, did it?

-Yes.

0:25:030:25:06

They've got little family initials there, a B and a K.

0:25:060:25:09

I don't suppose you've got an eyeglass, David, by any chance?

0:25:090:25:12

Well, that's got a date on it. 1820 on that one.

0:25:120:25:15

-David told me this morning.

-And the other one is 1870.

0:25:150:25:20

And David's got the eyeglass - a big eyeglass.

0:25:200:25:23

Do you mind if I take them outside, if I promise not to do a runner?

0:25:230:25:26

-Not at all.

-Thank you.

-I'm watching you, Stacey!

0:25:260:25:30

These are quite nice spoons. This is what you'd call a serving spoon.

0:25:300:25:35

This is more like a basting spoon for basting your meats.

0:25:350:25:40

They're both solid silver. This one is indeed...Victorian.

0:25:400:25:45

We've got Victoria's head on there.

0:25:450:25:48

We've got a gothic M, hallmarked for London.

0:25:480:25:51

The nice thing is they're in good condition.

0:25:510:25:53

There's not a lot of wear on the bowl of the spoon.

0:25:530:25:56

They're nice items, but together they're priced at up at £113.

0:25:560:26:01

Now I don't have £113, but they are quite nice items, actually.

0:26:010:26:06

Oh, the decisions of it all, honestly!

0:26:060:26:09

I know, it's all such a trial, dear!

0:26:090:26:12

Better get inside and see what sort of deal you can strike.

0:26:120:26:16

Right, ladies! Diane and David.

0:26:160:26:19

I know you're sharing these, aren't you? I do quite like them.

0:26:190:26:23

The question is, how much can I get them for?

0:26:230:26:26

-The best we could do them for would be £80.

-£80. It is tempting.

0:26:260:26:32

Would you take £75 for them, then?

0:26:320:26:34

-Yes.

-We've got a deal and a little kiss I think.

0:26:360:26:42

I won't kiss you, David, but shake your hand. Thank you very much.

0:26:420:26:46

In unison, the deal with D and D is done.

0:26:460:26:49

They're back in the car and heading now for the city of Norwich.

0:26:500:26:54

Norfolk's county town has seen plenty of tumult over its long history.

0:26:550:26:59

In the year 1004, it was sacked by Sweyn Forkbeard, King of Denmark,

0:26:590:27:07

who later ousted King Ethelred the Unready.

0:27:070:27:11

-Mark Hales, though, is ready for Treasure Chest Antiques Centre.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:27:110:27:16

-Would it be OK if I had a look around?

-Please do.

-Lovely.

0:27:160:27:20

Thank you very much indeed.

0:27:200:27:22

I haven't spotted anything yet.

0:27:240:27:26

-I'm looking for antiques.

-By Jove! I think he's finally got it.

0:27:290:27:34

A striking item in the corner catches Mark's eye.

0:27:360:27:39

What are these scales all about here? Aren't they wonderful?

0:27:390:27:43

-Merchant traveller's scales.

-Really nice. What sort of price are they?

-He's got £110.

-Has he?

0:27:430:27:49

-I love those, don't you? And what sort of date?

-I think he said 1940s.

0:27:500:27:57

They look '40s. And nice oak stands and the brass trays.

0:27:570:28:01

D'you know, I think they're such fun, aren't they?

0:28:010:28:03

-And it's got the case with it, too.

-That's the case? The box?

0:28:030:28:07

-The original box?

-Original, yes.

0:28:070:28:09

I wonder if he'd sell those for as little as £68.76,

0:28:090:28:13

which is to the penny what I have left.

0:28:130:28:15

-D'you think we could ask him, just for the hell of it? He might have bought them really well.

-Yes.

0:28:150:28:20

-I'll just give him a ring and see if it's OK.

-I'd be grateful.

0:28:200:28:23

-He says for you, the best he could do is £85.

-Oh! I haven't got £85.

0:28:230:28:28

-He hasn't got £85.

-I genuinely haven't.

0:28:280:28:30

It's the last money I've got and I desperately want to beat my competitor.

0:28:300:28:34

What's the best for you?

0:28:340:28:36

I've got exactly £68.76 left.

0:28:360:28:40

-Deal done, sir. £65.

-Thank you!

-Hurrah!

0:28:400:28:45

-I've bought some scales! Yes!

-Easily pleased!

0:28:450:28:50

-Spent up to the very last penny, Mark. Well done!

-See you again soon.

0:28:500:28:54

Bye!

0:28:540:28:55

A ten-minute walk away, Mark Stacey's at Elm Hill Collectables

0:28:550:28:59

and meeting dealer Paul.

0:28:590:29:02

-Hi. I'm Mark.

-Hah!

0:29:020:29:05

Mark's now down to the very last of his cash.

0:29:050:29:08

-I've already bought...

-Tell me how much you've got

0:29:080:29:11

and then we can narrow the field down!

0:29:110:29:12

-Do you want to know exactly how much I've got?

-Yes.

-I've got £20.70.

0:29:120:29:17

-70p?

-And that 70p is going to be my clincher this week, I think, actually.

0:29:170:29:22

Hope springs eternal, Mark.

0:29:220:29:24

And now he's spotted an antiquity that's just a SHADE

0:29:280:29:32

out of his price range -

0:29:320:29:33

an early Christian cross that's priced up at £2,495.

0:29:330:29:39

-My god, isn't that amazing?

-Heavy.

-It is, actually, isn't it?

0:29:400:29:43

So what date is this?

0:29:430:29:45

Well, obviously it's Byzantine, so it's post-Roman,

0:29:450:29:48

-so you're talking, what? 6th, 7th century? AD.

-And then the quality's very good, isn't it?

0:29:480:29:54

-The lovely...

-Filigree...

-..decoration is wonderful.

0:29:540:29:57

If it was £24.95, I could almost have bartered you down!

0:29:570:30:02

But I think even with my legendary bartering skills,

0:30:020:30:05

I don't think we're going to get to £20.70 somehow!

0:30:050:30:07

Thank you for showing me that.

0:30:070:30:09

Mm. You'd better cast your eye somewhere else!

0:30:090:30:12

Well, I've spotted three little miniature plates down there

0:30:180:30:22

and I used to like collecting these sorts of things.

0:30:220:30:25

-That's lovely.

-These small plates are called creamware.

0:30:250:30:29

I mean there's a little dinner plate

0:30:290:30:32

and then two little meat platters.

0:30:320:30:35

They're quite nice cos

0:30:350:30:36

they've got this little feathered edging there.

0:30:360:30:38

And these would have been made for a child to put in their doll's house.

0:30:380:30:42

Creamware was an earthenware pottery first made in the 1740s.

0:30:420:30:47

I think they're rather sweet, actually.

0:30:470:30:49

You've got them marked up at £28. What would you take for them?

0:30:490:30:53

I'll take your £27 so I can clean you out totally.

0:30:550:30:57

-Well, let's do it. £20.70.

-No problem.

0:30:570:31:00

Well, blow me down!

0:31:000:31:02

Both Marks have managed to blow their entire budgets.

0:31:020:31:05

The boys have repaired nearby for the great unveiling of their buys.

0:31:050:31:11

-Right, Mark. Let me show you what I've bought.

-I can't wait!

0:31:110:31:13

Seems like you've bought half of East Anglia!

0:31:130:31:17

I've got an Obadiah Sherratt Welsh tailor's wife. Isn't it lovely?

0:31:170:31:21

-1820. It's in a sorry shape, but it was only £20.

-I love it.

0:31:210:31:26

Do you know what I really like about it is the colours.

0:31:260:31:28

-And the sort of naive faces. I love her rouge.

-Lovely, isn't she?

0:31:280:31:32

It is actually a rare figure.

0:31:320:31:34

I think it's a really nice thing, actually. I love it. Well done.

0:31:340:31:37

Thank you for that.

0:31:370:31:38

High praise - despite the damage.

0:31:380:31:41

Two rather nice Arts and Crafts candlesticks.

0:31:410:31:46

Now those are interesting, aren't they? I love the handle.

0:31:460:31:49

Those could do quite well. It's a very good choice.

0:31:490:31:52

Marvellous. And Mr Stacey's taken with something else, too.

0:31:520:31:56

What did the scales cost you?

0:31:560:31:58

Well, that was rather exciting,

0:31:580:32:00

because I was down to my last £68.76,

0:32:000:32:05

and that's what they cost.

0:32:050:32:08

-I think they're fabulous.

-So do I.

-I think they're amazing.

0:32:080:32:11

Wacky, out of this world, and I adore them. I absolutely adore them.

0:32:110:32:16

-So do I!

-Would you like to see mine?

-I would, please.

0:32:160:32:21

Mark, I'm going to be very delicate. There's one or two fragiles. Right.

0:32:210:32:24

You'll never less than delicate, Mark!

0:32:240:32:27

-Now, what do you think?

-Well, I do... No, I like these.

0:32:270:32:33

I like these a lot. I like the stained-glass window.

0:32:330:32:37

-I like the Chinese vase.

-It's wrecked.

0:32:370:32:39

It's absolutely stapled to heavens.

0:32:390:32:42

-Very decorative.

-But I love the Japanesque mounts on it.

0:32:420:32:46

The panel is modern. It's by John Yeo of Somerset.

0:32:460:32:49

Late 20th century and in good condition

0:32:490:32:52

apart from one crack on one of the panes.

0:32:520:32:57

That is absolutely beautiful. I love it to bits.

0:32:570:33:01

And that is such an auction piece, isn't it? I mean, that is wonderful.

0:33:010:33:04

-£25.

-Oh, goodness me!

-Steady on, lads.

0:33:040:33:08

This is becoming quite the love-in!

0:33:080:33:10

What do you think of my little creamware miniature plates?

0:33:100:33:14

-Love them to bits.

-Can ceramics expert Mark Hales cast any light on the mini plates?

0:33:140:33:19

Aren't they super?

0:33:190:33:20

-Probably Leeds. They're more likely to be late 18th than early 19th.

-That's kind of you.

0:33:200:33:25

-And do you know, these miniatures - you do not find these any more.

-You don't see them very often.

-No.

0:33:250:33:29

-They're fabulous.

-To find two graduated meat plates and a little soup plate.

0:33:290:33:33

I bet you picked those up for nothing.

0:33:330:33:35

-I had £20.70 left.

-I knew it. I knew it.

0:33:350:33:38

-And I spent it on the three plates.

-Oh, what a bargain!

-£20.70.

0:33:380:33:43

-And you've spent every penny.

-Every penny.

0:33:430:33:46

-That's great!

-I've matched you this time.

-That's wonderful.

0:33:460:33:50

Well, on the face of it. They're both being too kind.

0:33:500:33:54

But what do they REALLY think?

0:33:540:33:57

I think he's done really, really well this time.

0:33:570:34:00

I don't like the clobbered Chinese vase.

0:34:000:34:03

The creamware plates - to die for. You just don't see them any more.

0:34:030:34:07

I think we both bought very well and I think we're going to have a very exciting auction

0:34:070:34:12

and I think we're going to make up for a lot of lost time.

0:34:120:34:15

You cannot pin him down.

0:34:150:34:17

He definitely has an eye for the unusual.

0:34:170:34:20

I mean, who would have thought he'd find that

0:34:200:34:23

fabulous set of scales in their original box for £68?

0:34:230:34:27

On top of that, a pair of Arts and Crafts copper and brass candlesticks.

0:34:270:34:31

You know, every turn, that man pulls something out of the bag.

0:34:310:34:35

-I've got to keep on my toes.

-Hm!

0:34:350:34:39

Today, our pair of Marks have taken the scenic route

0:34:390:34:44

through lovely East Anglia from Risby in Suffolk to Diss in Norfolk.

0:34:440:34:48

The weekly market in picturesque Diss dates further back than most.

0:34:480:34:53

It was first granted a charter by Richard the Lionheart in the 12th century.

0:34:530:34:59

Let's hope our lion-hearted lads

0:34:590:35:02

can take a leaf from his book as they prepare to do battle.

0:35:020:35:06

Here we are, Mark, at the auction. Let the excitement begin!

0:35:060:35:09

The Diss auction rooms have been central to the town for over a century and a half.

0:35:090:35:15

This busy sale room hosts over 70 auctions per annum.

0:35:150:35:19

Fresh-faced auctioneer and valuer Edward Smith is in the rostrum.

0:35:190:35:24

But before the first gavel strike,

0:35:240:35:27

what does he think of the two Marks' buys?

0:35:270:35:30

My favourite item of all of them is basically the little charm egg.

0:35:300:35:33

It's a sweet item, also having an insect on it,

0:35:330:35:36

which people are very interested in.

0:35:360:35:38

So I think it is just such a nice item,

0:35:380:35:41

that yes, it is my favourite, and hopefully it'll do really well.

0:35:410:35:44

Marvy!

0:35:440:35:46

Mark Hales started this jaunt with £213.76.

0:35:470:35:51

He spent that entire amount on five lots.

0:35:510:35:55

While Mark Stacey began this leg with £200.70.

0:35:550:36:01

He also spent right up to the hilt and has five lots to show for it.

0:36:010:36:05

Take it away, Edward!

0:36:060:36:08

First up we have Mark Stacey's stained-glass panel.

0:36:100:36:13

Can he see his way clear to a profit?

0:36:130:36:17

50. 50 is bid. Where's the 5? 5?

0:36:170:36:19

60. 5. 70. 5. 80. Shakes his head.

0:36:190:36:24

Come on! Bit more!

0:36:240:36:28

We are selling here for £80.

0:36:280:36:30

And they're out of the gate.

0:36:310:36:33

It's better than nothing, isn't it?

0:36:340:36:36

What do you mean better than...? That was a jolly good start!

0:36:360:36:39

Oh, indeed! Do cheer up, Mark.

0:36:390:36:42

Now, Mark Hales's candlesticks.

0:36:420:36:46

20's bid, 20's bid. Who's a 2?

0:36:460:36:47

It's a start here at 20. 2.

0:36:470:36:49

-It's ridiculous.

-8. 30.

0:36:490:36:52

30 is bid, 30 is bid. Is there 2? We're staying here at £30.

0:36:520:36:58

It seems that the Arts and Crafts style is not to this crowd's taste.

0:36:590:37:04

What a shame.

0:37:040:37:06

To be honest, that was very disappointing. I'm sorry for you, actually.

0:37:060:37:10

Now, Mark Stacey's bonny-but-battered lamp.

0:37:100:37:14

Who wants this for 30? 30 is bid. Is there 2?

0:37:150:37:18

It is a low start for it.

0:37:180:37:20

-Come on.

-32. 35. 38. 40.

0:37:200:37:23

42. 45. 48. 50.

0:37:230:37:26

-50 is bid.

-Come on. A bit more.

-50 is bid. Is there 5?

0:37:270:37:30

We waltz away at the £50. Are we all done?

0:37:300:37:32

Oh, you mean lot!

0:37:320:37:33

A mean lot - in every sense!

0:37:350:37:38

It's a small loss with the commission. That's fine.

0:37:390:37:42

-Well, it's hardly good, is it, Mark?

-Hah! Temper, temper!

0:37:420:37:46

-Mark Hales next.

-I have interest. I have to start in at the £30.

0:37:460:37:53

-Come on!

-32, 35, 38.

0:37:530:37:56

And 40, 42, 45.

0:37:560:37:58

48 and 50.

0:37:580:37:59

5. 60. 5.

0:37:590:38:02

-70.

-That's better.

-80. 5.

0:38:020:38:05

90. 5.

0:38:050:38:08

95 is standing. 95 I have. Is there 100? 100 - new bidder.

0:38:080:38:13

110. 120. 130. 140. 150.

0:38:130:38:19

-And it's flying!

-150 is bid. 150 I have.

0:38:190:38:23

Is there 60? We're still at £150.

0:38:230:38:25

-What a profit. Let's hear it for the Desert Rats.

-Yes!

0:38:270:38:32

Well, I was right to be worried, Mark. I was right to be worried, wasn't I?

0:38:320:38:36

D'you know, I was so happy then, I nearly kissed you.

0:38:360:38:39

There's no need to get over-familiar.

0:38:390:38:41

But that has put Mark Hales in a spectacular lead.

0:38:410:38:46

But can he repeat the trick with his sewing box?

0:38:470:38:51

£20. 20 is bid. Who's the 2?

0:38:510:38:53

22. 25. 28. We sell away at £28.

0:38:530:38:58

Sadly, that sale was not stitched up.

0:38:590:39:02

I'm sorry, I like all your other things, but I didn't like that.

0:39:030:39:06

Oh, now you tell us!

0:39:060:39:08

Right, one for you, Mark Stacey.

0:39:090:39:13

The miniature creamware plates.

0:39:130:39:15

20 I have. Who wants 2?

0:39:150:39:17

It is a start here at 20. 2.

0:39:170:39:19

5. 8. 30. 2. 5. 8. 40.

0:39:190:39:23

2. 5. 8. 50. D'you want one more?

0:39:230:39:27

It's 50 bid, 50 bid. Is there 5?

0:39:270:39:29

-Come on, one more!

-£50, then. Is there 5?

0:39:290:39:32

-Be nice!

-Are we done?

0:39:320:39:33

The miniscule plates serve up a substantial profit.

0:39:350:39:40

-I'm pleased with that.

-Well done, Mark. Good.

-No, that's not bad.

0:39:400:39:43

-That's respectable, yes.

-Ana Mark Stacey's upped his game.

0:39:430:39:47

Now, the outsize scales for Mr Hales.

0:39:500:39:54

Who wants these for £50?

0:39:540:39:56

£30's a start. Who's a 2? 32. 35. 38.

0:39:560:40:00

40. 42.

0:40:000:40:01

It's not looking very good.

0:40:010:40:04

Is there 50? We're selling all the time at £48. Are we done?

0:40:040:40:09

With that, Mark Hales's lead now hangs in the balance.

0:40:100:40:14

I'm surprised, Mark. I don't know what to say.

0:40:150:40:19

I'm really surprised by that.

0:40:200:40:22

I would have happily paid £120, £130 all day long for them.

0:40:220:40:26

Can his Staffordshire figure secure his win

0:40:270:40:30

or will the damage be the death of it?

0:40:300:40:32

I'm just going to start in here just at the £15 for this one. 15 I have.

0:40:320:40:37

Who's 18? It is the £15. 18. 20. 2. 5. 8. 30. 30 is bid.

0:40:370:40:43

-Little bit more. Little bit more, please.

-All done?

0:40:430:40:46

Not a loss.

0:40:490:40:51

Well, it's a profit.

0:40:510:40:54

I have to say, £30 for half a figure's not bad!

0:40:540:40:57

So it's all down to Mark Stacey's last two lots.

0:40:570:41:01

First, will the silver spoons all go wealth?

0:41:010:41:05

65 I have. Where's 70?

0:41:050:41:07

-It is here at 65.

-It's OK.

-75.

0:41:070:41:10

80. 5. 90. 5. 100. 110.

0:41:100:41:14

120. 130. 140 I have. Is there 50?

0:41:140:41:18

We're selling for £140. Are we all done?

0:41:180:41:21

Oh, precious metal indeed!

0:41:220:41:25

Mark Stacey has suddenly stolen the lead.

0:41:250:41:28

Well done, well done. We thought that, though, didn't we?

0:41:280:41:31

-Well, there's £65 profit.

-That was good.

0:41:310:41:35

And finally, auctioneer Edward's favourite - the miniature ivory egg.

0:41:360:41:40

Can this confirm Mark Stacey's victory?

0:41:410:41:44

I have interest on the streets. I have to start in here at the £40.

0:41:460:41:49

-I'm in profit.

-There you go.

0:41:500:41:52

42. 5. 8. 50. 5. 60.

0:41:520:41:56

-Good!

-5. 70. 5. 80. 5.

0:41:560:42:01

Keep going, why don't you?

0:42:010:42:04

Is there 90? We'll sell here for £85. Are we all done?

0:42:040:42:08

The mini egg turns out to be a lucky charm.

0:42:090:42:13

And Mark Stacey has stolen triumph at the very last second.

0:42:130:42:17

£85!

0:42:170:42:19

Well done. Very good price. Well done, Mark!

0:42:190:42:21

-It was the top price, £85 for that.

-Very good.

0:42:210:42:24

Mark Hales started this leg with £213.76.

0:42:250:42:30

Today, after paying auction costs, he pocketed

0:42:300:42:34

a modest profit of £20.76, leaving him with £234.52 to carry forward.

0:42:340:42:40

Mark Stacey began this leg with £200.70.

0:42:430:42:47

After making a smashing profit of £131.40,

0:42:470:42:51

he now has a generous £332.10 to be going along with.

0:42:510:42:56

-You're not too disappointed, are you?

-No, I think best forgotten.

0:43:000:43:05

Can't win them all. But yes, I was disappointed.

0:43:050:43:08

-Worse things happen at sea.

-They do.

0:43:120:43:14

-And there's always another auction, Mark.

-Sail on, chaps! Sail on.

0:43:140:43:18

On the next Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:180:43:21

our chaps are in with a sporting chance.

0:43:210:43:25

I'm probably talking a load of bowls!

0:43:250:43:27

As long as they don't panic, Mr Mainwaring!

0:43:270:43:30

I'm not saying anything!

0:43:300:43:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:500:43:53

On the third day of their road trip, Mark Stacey visits the magnificent Ely Cathedral and his opponent Mark Hales gets excited about a sketchbook.


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