Episode 19 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 19

Antiques experts travel across the UK searching for treasures. Mark Stacey and Mark Hales head for East Anglia in the search for lucrative antiques to sell at auction.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts

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with £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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It hurts!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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You mean lot!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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There's always another auction.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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On your marks! On this road trip, we have two Marks

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competing for glorious victory.

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Mark Stacey is a Sussex auctioneer who's known for his keen eye and hard bargaining.

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Do these people not know it's a recession?

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You're hating me, aren't you?

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While Mark Hales is a West Country ceramics expert and auctioneer

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who needs to pick up something cheap but attractive.

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OK, darling?

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From his original £200, Mark Stacey has now grown his budget to a very respectable £332.10.

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While Mark Hales has only inched upwards from his original £200

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to a skimpy £234.52.

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Our marvellous pair of Marks are piloting a gleaming scarlet beauty,

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the curvy 1968 Triumph Spitfire.

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This week, the two Marks are full of Eastern promise

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as they travel nearly 300 miles from Finedon in Northamptonshire

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through six east English counties

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to Colchester in Essex.

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On this leg, they cruise through lovely East Anglia

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from Harleston in Norfolk

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to the auction at Campsea Ashe in Suffolk.

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-We'll just have fun, shall we?

-Yes.

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That's the order of the day - have some fun!

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Their first stop this morning is the pretty market town of Harleston,

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which prides itself on its array of independent retailers.

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Sounds like the ideal place to get our chaps started.

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They're heading for the local flea market.

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Which way is it? Round here?

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A lively, monthly event at the Swan pub

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with stalls of many different stripes.

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Here we are. Some lovely fruit and veg.

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-You could buy some of that for the auction.

-I'm very tempted.

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Come on, now. Veg won't get you far. Best split up and get hunting.

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-I'll leave you out here looking, Mark.

-Thank you so much.

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-There are bits for you to look at.

-Be lucky, Mark.

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-Good morning. Can I have a little look round?

-Course you can.

-Thank you.

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Careful now, Mark. That lady's got her eye on you!

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-CHINK OF CHINA All breakages must be paid for!

-Absolutely!

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I'll try not to break anything!

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Jolly well make sure you don't. But what's in that box?

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Sorry, I've just seen these bales.

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I like these sorts of things.

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There's something very tactile about bales, isn't there?

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-They are.

-They need a polish up.

-They do.

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It's a shame you haven't got the jack.

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(I don't know anything about bowls!)

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Shocking news!

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Probably talking a load of bales!

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Steady!

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How much have you got on those?

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-15.

-That's quite reasonable, isn't it?

-It is reasonable, yes.

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I think ten would be better.

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-All right, then, ten.

-Ten pounds.

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I'm going to buy those for £10.

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I think they're rather fun.

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If you could give me £10 change, that's my first purchase of the day.

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Huh! A perfect score on the first roll

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and Mark bowls off to look for more bargains.

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Meanwhile, Mark Hales is on the other side...

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of the market.

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Nothing's really caught my eye yet.

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Then it's time you swapped rooms.

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Nothing in there for me, but in here now.

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You haven't got all day!

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Morning!

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-Mark, there's nothing in here for you.

-Fancy meeting you here!

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-It's all gone, I'm afraid.

-Haven't seen you for ten minutes.

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-I've reserved it all.

-Have you bought something?

-No.

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Oh, you fibber!

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-Did my friend Mark buy anything?

-Yes, he did.

-Did he, indeed?

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Rumbled!

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When I asked him, he said, "I bought nothing." Did he, indeed.

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-Are you competing with him?

-I most certainly am.

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Yes, you are, Mark. You'd better get hunting because Mark's spotted something else.

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-They're not gold, are they?

-I'm not sure.

-Nice shape, though.

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A pair of cufflinks.

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Could Mark have struck gold so early in the day?

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-How much are they, sir?

-Five.

-Five pounds.

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-Could I just take them to the light?

-Yes.

-With your thing.

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I think I've found a mark on this that says 18-carat gold.

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I think these are gold.

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And for five pounds, that's an absolute bargain.

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So I'm going to buy them, I think.

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What a find, eh?

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I didn't think I was going to buy anything here today,

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-but I'll buy those for five pounds from you.

-Thank you very much.

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I'll get my money out.

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You are in a rush, Mark. Suspicious!

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A pair of solid 18-carat gold cufflinks for five pounds!

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I'm on a roll, I think! Bring it on!

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Bring it on, indeed! But oh, dear. Poor Mark Hales is still empty-handed.

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So it's back on the road again.

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-Fun, wasn't it?

-Great fun, wasn't it?

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I'm really pleased we dropped in there, you know.

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Onwards!

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They're driving eight miles across the county border

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to Bungay in Suffolk.

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-Have you ever been there?

-Have I ever been to Bungay?

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No, I've never been to Bungay.

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I've been bungee-jumping!

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Well, you'd better jump right in, then.

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The market town of Bungay sits in the Waveney Valley,

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on the edge of The Broads.

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In 1577, a ghostly black dog known as Black Shuck

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is said to have killed two people in the town.

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Spooky!

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Let's hope for no such similar dramatics today

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as Mark Stacey is heading for Mayfair Antiques

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run by owner Joe.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-I'm Mark.

-I'm Joe.

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Mark's spotted something on top of one of the cabinets.

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It's a sweet little Art Deco jug in the shape of a pussy.

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I think it looks rather cute.

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I don't know it's going to make a lot of money at auction,

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maybe ten or £20.

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But look, the price is just two pounds.

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A bargain in anyone's book.

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But Joe's got a proposal.

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-I'll tell you what I'll do.

-What?

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Toss you for it. Double or quits.

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Oh, no, I'm not going to do that!

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Double or quits? I always lose when I do these.

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You couldn't... You can't. You can't.

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I can't really refuse, can I, for two pounds?

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-Oh, please, let it be mine. Who's calling?

-You can call.

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Flip the coin, then.

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Oh, the tension!

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Tails.

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Yes!

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Double or quits, you said.

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I can't believe that!

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I never win these tosses of coins.

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But I just have won!

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I'll put my five pounds back in my pocket. I don't need it now!

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Do you think Mark Hales will be furious? I do.

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Are we worried? No, we're not.

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Well! Miaow!

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You're a gentleman, sir.

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-I'll look forward to coming back again. Thank you.

-Thank you. Goodbye, now!

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Terrific.

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Mark's gamble pays off.

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He's like the cat who got the cream. Or pussy, actually.

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Meanwhile, Mark Hales is driving the 20 miles east to the coast

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and the town of Great Yarmouth.

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Great Yarmouth is Norfolk's largest seaside resort.

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Its sea-front, known as the Golden Mile, attracts thousands of holiday-makers every year.

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Mark's putting the frustrations of shopping aside for a while,

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and heading for the town's Hippodrome Circus,

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which is a real piece of showbiz history.

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Never mind the shopping. I'm off to the circus!

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That's lovely.

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What a lovely period building.

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Look at this! Beautiful!

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He's meeting showbiz impresario and proprietor, Peter Jay.

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Wow! I've stepped into another world!

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-Hello. I'm Mark.

-Peter. Nice to meet you.

-How do you do, Peter?

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Welcome to the Hippodrome. This is the original foyer.

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-When was it built?

-1903.

-1903?

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Well, it looks to me as it was.

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We're trying to keep the old vibe - including me!

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-I think we're...

-Lovely Art Nouveau copper door handles.

-Fantastic.

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You can't have 'em. They're not for sale! Nothing's for sale!

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Cor, he's got the mark of you, Mark!

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Built by renowned George Gilbert,

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the Edwardian-era Hippodrome Circus

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has delighted generations of East Anglians.

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Peter and his father bought the venue in the late 1970s.

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They're a showbiz family of theatre owners and promoters going back a couple of generations.

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Peter performs, too.

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Peter Jay and the Jaywalkers were a popular beat combo of the 1960s,

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and supported The Beatles. Far out, man!

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Over the years, Peter has built up an enviable collection

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of circus and entertainment memorabilia,

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much of it relating to shows that were staged at The Hippodrome.

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I don't think they'll be booking you, Mark!

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The venue has played host to legends like Lily Langtry and Max Miller

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and continues to be a popular working venue to this day,

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hosting music, variety and circus performances.

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Roll up! Roll up!

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Peter's taking Mark to see the main event.

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East Anglia's mini Albert Hall!

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I do not believe this! How does all this fit in this building?

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-It's cool, isn't it?

-That is incredible!

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When it's full of people, it's the most incredible atmosphere.

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The guy who built it was a genius. He was a performer and he built a fantastic performance space.

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The venue is renowned for one particular unique feature.

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Its sinking stage which drops to reveal a pool of water

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in which synchronised swimmers have performed spectaculars since the 1900s.

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It's absolutely amazing. The whole floor sinks.

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Takes 30 seconds to sink down.

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All 1903. We don't need any hydraulics or electrics.

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It's just incredible Edwardian engineering.

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Weren't they ingenious!

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And the water shows continue today.

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Synchronised swimmers, aerial acts coming out of the water.

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It's the most amazing thing. And what's amazing to me

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-is that it still wows people today.

-Well, it would!

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It's like 1903. There's nowhere else left in Europe where you can see this.

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And it's here in Great Yarmouth.

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Now, there's one last surprise.

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Hey, kids. Let's go!

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-Hoorah!

-Well done!

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They're from the Chermond Circus School in Norwich.

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-Thank you, Peter.

-Thanks for coming.

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-Fabulous.

-I appreciate it.

-I'll never forget this!

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Meanwhile, Mark Stacey's travelling to Beccles in Suffolk.

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Once a thriving Saxon river port, Beccles was granted its charter

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by Queen Elizabeth I in 1584.

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Mark has Blybergate Antiques in his sights.

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-Hello!

-Hello, there.

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Ding-dong!

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A nice musical entrance. How are you?

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-Fine, thank you. You?

-I'm Mark.

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-Hello, Mark. I'm Kate.

-Nice to meet you. I'm after a bargain.

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-You'll find one here.

-How many times have I heard that?

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Huh! The cheek!

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Mark's seen a plate, which is in tin-glaze pottery called Majolica.

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I quite like this because I love Majolica.

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I love the vibrancy of it.

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In the Victorian era, it exploded from the Staffordshire factories

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from the 1860s onwards.

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It's all a bit bright and garish, isn't it?

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Bit like me, really!

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You don't have to agree with that!

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I said nothing!

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It is marked on the back, and it's only priced up at £18.

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-Why is it only £18?

-I can make it more.

-How dare you?

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How faddy-dare you?

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Oh, you too!

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-So what could you do that for, then?

-To you, Mark, it can be 12.

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Oh, we're so close.

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As long as you don't say ten to me, it can be 12.

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I'm so close, honestly. I want to give you £10 for it.

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-If you can do a tenner, I'll have it.

-Go on, then, Mark. You may have it for a tenner.

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-Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

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Well, aren't I spending a lot of money today?

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£25 so far.

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You're East Anglia's answer to Donald Trump!

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Well, with that, the first day of this East Anglian adventure draws to a dignified close.

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Night-night, chaps!

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A new day, but a damp start.

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However, our brave boys are back in the Spit and gunning for victory nevertheless.

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The rain has descended on us. Typical, isn't it?

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-England, our England!

-Oh, yes. Oh, yes!

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So far, Mark Stacey has spent a munificent £25 on four items.

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The wooden bowls,

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the gold cufflinks,

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the Majolica plate

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and the Art Deco jug in the form of a cat.

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Meanwhile, Mark Hales has yet to spend a penny.

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He still has £234.52

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but not a thing to show for it.

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I actually feel quite nervous this morning.

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Buck up, then. There's plenty of shopping to be done

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as they head towards Framlingham in Suffolk.

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The town's historic conservation area is one of the finest in England

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and is dominated by Framlingham Castle,

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a magnificent 12th-century fortress.

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What better place for Mark to storm into his first shop of the day.

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He's charging off towards Goodbrey Antiques.

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-Good morning, sir.

-Good morning.

-I'm Mark.

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-I'm Richard.

-How do you do?

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How do you do. Right, how is the empty-handed Mr Hales feeling this fine morning?

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Under pressure. Got to buy something.

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I'm a touch panicky, and that's not really me, you know.

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Deep breath. Calm down. Ahh.

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Do you need a paper bag to breathe into?

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Comedy and Tragedy.

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Which one am I?

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A little bit of both, I'd say.

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I'm selling in a general sale. I've got to think generally.

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You know.

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Big, decorative, a little bit quirky.

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Haven't got too much money.

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There's something that might fit the bill.

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This is why I like spending a lot of time.

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The more you're in a room, the more you notice, you know?

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It's an old sash cramp,

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used to hold the panels of a sash window together during gluing.

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Ticket price is £25.

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When you think about it, tools aren't bad in general sales.

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Richard, the clamp?

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Can Mark squeeze that price any?

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What would be the best value for the cramp?

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Well, while Mark thinks on it, there's something else on the other side of the shop as well.

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-Lions!

-The lions. I could do something on the lions.

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-Not very old, are they?

-No, but they're wonderfully done

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with all those teeth and eyes.

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On the ticket it's £45.

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What could Mark claw them down to?

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-They'd go for 30.

-Yeah.

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-Richard?

-Yeah?

-Hi.

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-I've had a little think.

-How are you doing?

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-I like the clamp. And I like the lions.

-Yes.

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If I had them both, Richard, that's 30 and 20.

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-Could you knock a fiver off?

-I could knock a fiver off. That's it.

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-That's 45.

-45 for those two items.

-All right. Thank you, Richard.

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-I'll have those.

-You've got a bargain!

-Thank you very much indeed.

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20, 40 and five.

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Yep, smashing.

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Wow! Mark has some buys at last!

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Right, then.

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Mark Stacey, meanwhile, is so relaxed about his shopping,

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he's driving nine miles west

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to have a wander around historic Helmingham Hall

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and its stunning gardens.

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I'm really fascinated. I'm looking forward to it very much.

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Good-o! When you're happy, I'm happy, Mark.

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It's quite an impressive house, isn't it?

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That's an understatement!

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Work on the glorious moated manor house at Helmingham

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began in the 15th century.

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Today, it's surrounded by its beautiful formal gardens

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and parkland.

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The estate has been handed down from generation to generation of the Tollemache family.

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Mark's lucky enough to have expert guides to the house and gardens.

0:18:440:18:48

He's meeting Tim and Zar, the current Lord and Lady Tollemache.

0:18:480:18:53

-Good morning! I'm Mark, Lord Tollemache.

-Hi, I'm Tim.

0:18:530:18:56

-Nice to meet you, Tim.

-Mark, I'm Zar.

0:18:560:18:58

Lady Tollemache is a garden designer.

0:18:580:19:02

She and dogs Mungo and Maestro are going to give Mark a quick tour of the gardens

0:19:020:19:06

before he sees the hall.

0:19:060:19:08

Indeed, the gardens boast a great historical feature.

0:19:080:19:11

-Oh, this is the other moat.

-This is the garden moat.

0:19:110:19:14

Yes. So this pre-dates the house, actually.

0:19:140:19:17

Because the house was built in 1490.

0:19:170:19:19

And this was before. Probably used as a cattle stockade.

0:19:190:19:24

Oh, yes. To protect your livestock, I suppose.

0:19:240:19:27

And then, of course, it was made into a garden in 1510.

0:19:270:19:31

The wall was put in in 1740.

0:19:310:19:34

And so it's been a garden for about 500 years.

0:19:340:19:37

We've got to keep the tradition going, haven't we?

0:19:370:19:40

-It's an isolated garden with its own moat.

-Yes.

0:19:400:19:44

While the hall remains a private residence,

0:19:440:19:46

the gardens are open to visitors during the summer months.

0:19:460:19:49

-Come into the walled gardens.

-I'd love to!

0:19:490:19:52

It's been very traditionally gardened, this garden,

0:19:520:19:57

and yet I've got contemporary touches, which is what I've done over the last 20 years.

0:19:570:20:03

Mark's heading into the house, towards the drawbridge

0:20:100:20:13

which is still raised and lowered every day

0:20:130:20:16

as it has been for hundreds of years.

0:20:160:20:19

-We pull it up every night.

-Gosh!

0:20:200:20:22

-Electronically, I hope!

-Electronically now.

0:20:220:20:25

Inside, Lord Tollemache has a very special treat lined up,

0:20:250:20:29

a chance to see one of Helmingham's great historical treasures.

0:20:290:20:33

-Mark, well done. You've been round the garden.

-Oh, it's been wonderful.

0:20:330:20:37

We've had such a fantastic time.

0:20:370:20:39

-And you're going to show us...

-A bit of history.

-Wonderful. Lead on, as they say!

0:20:390:20:43

Helmingham has been the family seat since 1487

0:20:430:20:47

and over the centuries, the Tollemaches have been involved in a grand sweep of British history.

0:20:470:20:53

What are you going to show me in here, Tim?

0:20:530:20:55

I'm going to show you some letters all to do with the wonderful secret society of The Sealed Knot.

0:20:550:21:02

In the 17th century, King Charles I was beheaded, and England was mired in Civil War.

0:21:040:21:10

Supporters of the monarchy planned to have his heir, Charles II,

0:21:100:21:14

restored to the throne.

0:21:140:21:16

One of Lord Tollemache's ancestors

0:21:160:21:20

was a member of the secret society, The Sealed Knot,

0:21:200:21:23

which planned to bring the young king back from exile on the continent.

0:21:230:21:28

Lionel Tollemache, who was here at Helmingham at the time,

0:21:280:21:31

was very much involved with this secret society.

0:21:310:21:34

Unfortunately, he died fairly young

0:21:340:21:37

and Charles II wrote two letters which lie here on this table to his widow,

0:21:370:21:44

saying how very sad he was to hear of her loss,

0:21:440:21:47

and to thank her particularly for all the work they were doing

0:21:470:21:52

to help him be restored to the throne.

0:21:520:21:54

-Wow! These are the originals?

-The original letters.

0:21:540:21:58

-From Charles II.

-His handwriting is certainly better than mine

0:21:580:22:02

and you can read these letters really quite clearly.

0:22:020:22:05

"Madame, I have so good an account of the affection of my friends towards me."

0:22:050:22:10

They're both signed, "Madame, Your truly affectionate friend,

0:22:100:22:13

-"Charles R."

-This was 1654.

0:22:130:22:16

-So this was six years before.

-Paris. Yes, May 28th, 1654.

0:22:160:22:22

-So that was six years actually before he was restored to the throne.

-That's right, yes.

0:22:220:22:27

-So this is the lady that Charles II was writing to?

-The lady in the middle.

0:22:270:22:31

Elizabeth Murray, who married Lionel Tollemache of Helmingham

0:22:310:22:35

on her right there.

0:22:350:22:37

Really, they were responsible for helping restore Charles II to the throne.

0:22:370:22:43

It was a very brave thing to do then, wasn't it?

0:22:430:22:46

It was. It was thanks to them, really,

0:22:460:22:49

that although they were running this society,

0:22:490:22:51

that Helmingham was untouched during the civil wars.

0:22:510:22:55

Tim, thank you very much. As a lover of history, it's been great to see the letters.

0:22:560:23:01

It's been a great pleasure to show you round.

0:23:010:23:03

Thank you very much!

0:23:030:23:05

And with that, it's back to the hoi polloi with you, Mark!

0:23:090:23:13

Meanwhile, Mark Hales has travelled the 17 miles

0:23:180:23:22

to Needham Market in Suffolk.

0:23:220:23:24

Needham Market's parish church was completed in 1500

0:23:250:23:29

and remains a terrific example of medieval building ingenuity.

0:23:290:23:34

Let's hope Mark can be as inventive

0:23:350:23:38

as he heads for his last shop, Bygones.

0:23:380:23:41

-Hi, I'm Mark.

-Hello, Mark. I'm Paul.

-Hello, Paul.

-Nice to meet you.

0:23:420:23:45

This is Mark's final chance to shop and he's going to need to,

0:23:450:23:49

for he's only got two items so far.

0:23:490:23:51

I've only spent £45 today.

0:23:510:23:55

I want to spend everything I have left.

0:23:550:23:57

I must keep looking.

0:23:570:23:59

Yes, you must, Mark.

0:23:590:24:01

But when did you last have your eyesight checked?

0:24:010:24:05

All right, darling? Bit cold down here, isn't it?

0:24:050:24:07

I think you should cover up.

0:24:070:24:10

Come on, man!

0:24:110:24:13

I'm not saying anything!

0:24:130:24:15

Motor-mouth Mark has spotted something.

0:24:150:24:18

Auto memorabilia is selling. Things like this are still collectable.

0:24:200:24:23

These went on the bars on the front of your '50s and '60s cars.

0:24:230:24:27

One, two, three, four, five, six, seven,

0:24:270:24:31

eight, nine.

0:24:310:24:34

-How many were over there?

-Five.

0:24:340:24:36

-What's that? 14.

-Yep.

0:24:360:24:39

And Paul has another piece of automobilia that might suit.

0:24:390:24:44

What about an old car mascot? Champagne Charlie.

0:24:440:24:47

There he is! Champagne Charlie!

0:24:480:24:51

Hee-hee!

0:24:510:24:52

# Champagne Charlie is me name

0:24:520:24:56

# Champagne drinking is me game... #

0:24:560:25:00

The character of Champagne Charlie

0:25:000:25:02

was popularised by Victorian music hall performer George Leybourne.

0:25:020:25:07

Charlie, a caricature of a drunken aristocrat living the high life,

0:25:070:25:12

became a popular comic figure.

0:25:120:25:14

Decorative car mascots, like this one,

0:25:160:25:19

were all the rage in earlier days of motoring.

0:25:190:25:22

The ticket price for all the car badges and the mascot

0:25:220:25:26

is a whopping £325.

0:25:260:25:28

If I bought Champagne Charlie and all the badges for 60 quid...

0:25:290:25:33

-Yeah.

-I'll give them a go.

0:25:330:25:35

Do you want to have a deal now, today, at 60?

0:25:360:25:39

All right, mate.

0:25:390:25:41

-All right?

-Thank you, Paul.

-OK, sir.

-You're giving me a chance, aren't you?

-Yep.

0:25:410:25:46

What a deal!

0:25:460:25:48

A gift!

0:25:480:25:49

Now, there's a dapper chappy on the other side of the shop,

0:25:490:25:52

and I don't mean Paul!

0:25:520:25:54

-Paul, who's this chap here?

-The advertising sign?

0:25:540:25:58

"Sticker knitwear. Style. 1960."

0:25:580:26:01

-Very nice.

-He's got his herringbone suit on,

0:26:010:26:04

but his face is just brilliant!

0:26:040:26:06

-Can I have a look at it?

-Yep.

0:26:060:26:08

Oh, I thought it had a longer bottom to it.

0:26:080:26:11

-Where's his legs gone?

-CLATTERING

0:26:110:26:14

He didn't have any legs.

0:26:140:26:16

They didn't show legs in those days.

0:26:160:26:18

It's his face! It's his bloomin' face that gets me!

0:26:210:26:25

-What do you think?

-How much is it, seriously?

-50.

0:26:250:26:28

-£50?

-50 quid to you.

0:26:280:26:29

-Come on, 40 quid.

-Give us your money.

0:26:290:26:32

40 quid just for a laugh, OK?

0:26:320:26:34

-Am I going to lose money? I don't know.

-You won't lose money.

0:26:340:26:36

-Good fun. Thank you very much indeed.

-All right.

-Thank you. Another purchase.

0:26:360:26:40

Tick-tock. Mark's running out of time to make any more buys,

0:26:400:26:45

but he's just spotted yet another item.

0:26:450:26:47

What's this clock? Why didn't I see that? I quite like that.

0:26:470:26:50

"To W.P.Thompson, from his colleagues

0:26:500:26:53

"in the department of electricity, Kuwait, Jan, 1958."

0:26:530:27:00

And what is special about the year 1958?

0:27:000:27:02

I don't want to tell you!

0:27:040:27:06

Was it the year you started shopping for these buys, Mark?

0:27:060:27:10

-The year I was born!

-Was it?

0:27:100:27:12

Oh. My mistake!

0:27:120:27:14

If I bought it for 30 quid I can see a profit in it.

0:27:140:27:16

-It'll make more than 30 quid?

-I'd have thought so.

0:27:160:27:19

-What do you reckon?

-Yeah.

-Shall we shake on that one as well?

0:27:190:27:22

-OK. Thank you very much.

-That's a bit of fun.

0:27:220:27:24

Now he's on fire.

0:27:240:27:26

Downstairs, something else has caught his eye.

0:27:260:27:29

Ooh, what's this? Plaster.

0:27:290:27:31

That is made of plaster. But look at the colour.

0:27:310:27:35

And who is this chap? That looks so period, doesn't it?

0:27:350:27:39

Look at the back. It's all plaster.

0:27:390:27:41

I'll have to ask Paul about that. He can enlighten me.

0:27:410:27:44

Is it '30s or '50s?

0:27:440:27:46

-You don't recognise it?

-It's nothing like you, Paul, even when you were younger. Sorry.

0:27:460:27:51

-It's when I had a moustache.

-Errol Flynn, it looks like.

0:27:510:27:54

Do that for a tenner? Then I can put it in with my clock.

0:27:540:27:57

I'll be fair with you. 15.

0:27:570:27:59

-15. Thank you, Paul.

-Thank you.

0:27:590:28:02

Good heavens! Mark's bagged four buys for a whopping £145.

0:28:020:28:06

And all at the very last second.

0:28:060:28:09

-Thank you very much.

-Look, I've got some left. That never happens to me.

0:28:090:28:12

-You can take us down the pub, then.

-Gladly I would. I would!

0:28:120:28:16

Now, while you get pally,

0:28:170:28:19

Mark Stacey has caught up and is heading for Needham Market's Station Yard Emporium.

0:28:190:28:25

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:28:250:28:27

-I'm Mark.

-Ellie.

-Nice to meet you.

-And you.

0:28:270:28:31

What are you fiddling with?

0:28:340:28:36

I quite like that box.

0:28:360:28:37

It's specimen woods.

0:28:370:28:39

It's quite an early box. I'd have thought that's got to be 1830, 1840.

0:28:390:28:45

But I suspect it would have had a little tray. It's a jewellery box.

0:28:450:28:49

But I do like the grain on the wood.

0:28:490:28:51

It's quite elegant looking.

0:28:510:28:52

But £75?!

0:28:520:28:55

Do these people not know there's a recession?

0:28:550:28:58

You're hating me, aren't you?

0:28:580:29:00

You're driving them potty. Speaking of pots,

0:29:000:29:04

there's an eye-catching piece of ceramic

0:29:040:29:06

on the other side of the shop.

0:29:060:29:08

Another piece of Majolica.

0:29:080:29:10

I've already got a piece of Majolica, haven't I?

0:29:110:29:14

Remember I bought that Wedgwood Majolica dish?

0:29:140:29:17

This is a little jardiniere on a stand.

0:29:190:29:22

But I thought Majolica wasn't quite as fashionable as it once was.

0:29:220:29:25

Jolly good. Just as well you've only bought one piece, then!

0:29:250:29:28

This has got £85 on it.

0:29:280:29:31

It might go with my Wedgwood piece.

0:29:310:29:33

Time to strike a deal, eh?

0:29:330:29:35

I'm not a very good negotiator.

0:29:350:29:38

False modesty!

0:29:380:29:39

I need to know some best prices, if I can.

0:29:390:29:42

-60.

-Right.

0:29:420:29:44

-65.

-OK.

0:29:440:29:46

Do you think we could get anywhere near £40 for that?

0:29:460:29:49

45.

0:29:490:29:51

I knew you were going to say that!

0:29:510:29:52

If you had the two.

0:29:520:29:54

-For 45? Oh, lovely!

-40 for that one...

0:29:540:29:57

-40 for this one?

-And 40 for that one.

0:29:570:30:01

Oh, she is a mean woman, isn't she?

0:30:010:30:03

She's hooking me in. I'm being...

0:30:030:30:05

I think I'm going to call Crimestoppers because I think I'm being mugged!

0:30:050:30:09

Oh, do come on, Mark!

0:30:100:30:12

40 and 40.

0:30:120:30:14

Deal. I'm not going to argue with you.

0:30:140:30:16

For once! Terrific!

0:30:160:30:18

Mark's last two buys are in the bag and we're ready for the great unveiling.

0:30:180:30:24

The chaps have repaired nearby to show each other their items.

0:30:250:30:29

Will there be "Marks and Sparks"?!

0:30:290:30:32

-Shall we have a look?

-I'm pleased. It's good fun.

0:30:330:30:35

-Be careful.

-Prepare to be wowed,

0:30:350:30:39

shocked,

0:30:390:30:40

and... How about that monster?

0:30:400:30:44

Why don't you regale me with what they are?

0:30:470:30:49

Well, Champagne Charlie.

0:30:490:30:52

-A car mascot.

-Yes.

-That's good.

0:30:520:30:54

With a vast selection of bumper badges.

0:30:540:30:57

-Good.

-Most of them old. Some of them retro.

0:30:570:31:00

-But a nice assortment there.

-Actually, that is lovely.

-It is fun, isn't it?

0:31:000:31:05

A really clever lot for a general sale.

0:31:050:31:06

-What about the advertising sign?

-Harold. He's 1960s, 1962.

0:31:060:31:12

-He's aged well!

-He's a bit of fun.

0:31:120:31:14

-He cost £40.

-And what about your crazy lions?

0:31:140:31:18

They're good fun. They're rosewood. They're carved.

0:31:180:31:20

And they cost £30.

0:31:200:31:22

Lions are quite popular.

0:31:220:31:24

Hmm. A modest hit.

0:31:240:31:26

-Do you want to see mine?

-Yes, please.

0:31:260:31:28

Again, I'm afraid, it's the sublime to the ridiculous.

0:31:280:31:31

-Of course, you know what these are?

-Yes.

-Majolica.

0:31:320:31:35

-This one is Wedgwood, 1860s, 1870s.

-Lovely. Like that.

0:31:350:31:38

-Where's the lid?

-It's not. It's a jardiniere.

0:31:380:31:41

Oh. But ceramics maestro Mark Hales begs to differ.

0:31:410:31:45

I think it had a little cover. It's got a lip for it there.

0:31:450:31:48

Never mind. Moving on.

0:31:480:31:50

Don't get testy!

0:31:500:31:52

-How much were they, together?

-£50 for the two.

0:31:520:31:54

Well, that's OK, because that is a superb dish.

0:31:540:31:57

What will Mark Hales make of the cat jug,

0:31:570:32:00

the spoils of some illicit gambling?

0:32:000:32:03

-This is my star lot.

-Is it, indeed?

0:32:030:32:06

-My lovely little Louis Wain cat jug.

-Ooh, yes.

0:32:060:32:10

-Isn't it gorgeous? Art Deco, hand-painted, made in Germany.

-Yes.

0:32:100:32:14

-How much?

-Nothing.

-Nothing at all?

-No.

0:32:140:32:17

You've done this to me before!

0:32:170:32:18

-You can't just walk into shops and come out with stuff for nothing!

-It's not my choice!

0:32:180:32:22

I sense you're not pleased about this, Mark Hales?

0:32:220:32:26

-I see. You walk in and your face says, "Give it to me"!

-No, no.

0:32:260:32:29

I walked in and said, "I'll buy it for two pounds."

0:32:290:32:32

And he said, "Tell you what, I'll toss a coin, double or quits."

0:32:320:32:37

He spun the coin and it landed on tails which I'd called. He said, "It's yours, Mark."

0:32:370:32:41

Goodness me.

0:32:410:32:43

But Mr Stacey has one other surprise up his sleeve.

0:32:430:32:46

Or, perhaps, in his sleeve.

0:32:460:32:49

Hold out your hand.

0:32:490:32:51

-A pair of 18-carat gold cufflinks.

-Oh, they're lovely.

0:32:510:32:56

And you're going to say that they were... How much were they, Mark?

0:32:560:32:59

-They were £18.

-A fiver.

0:32:590:33:02

Oh, no, it's not fair! What have I got to do?

0:33:020:33:05

-Looking forward to the auction.

-Thank you, Mark.

-Well done.

0:33:050:33:08

Chums again. How lovely.

0:33:080:33:09

But what do they say when their rival's back is turned?

0:33:090:33:13

The box. Love his box.

0:33:140:33:16

Regency, slightly later.

0:33:160:33:18

It's not in vogue at the moment, but jolly good buy.

0:33:180:33:22

The cat, well, it's worth a tenner, basically.

0:33:220:33:24

It was a gift, at the end of the day.

0:33:240:33:26

Louis Wain style, but Louis Wain cats have square heads, not round ones.

0:33:260:33:30

The cufflinks. Well, I missed those in the flea market.

0:33:300:33:33

Good for him. What a good buy.

0:33:330:33:35

Undoubtedly I think the most successful item will be the Champagne Charlie.

0:33:350:33:40

And with all those little car badges.

0:33:400:33:42

That should be a good lot for a general sale.

0:33:420:33:45

Harold. What can you say about him?

0:33:450:33:48

I think I'll skip on. It's a sign. 40 quid?!

0:33:480:33:51

Sounds a bit of a price to me, to be honest.

0:33:510:33:53

If there's any justice in the world, I really should come out on top in this one.

0:33:530:33:57

Well, that's fighting talk.

0:33:570:33:59

On this leg, our pair of haggling heroes has travelled

0:34:000:34:04

from Harleston in Norfolk

0:34:040:34:05

to Campsea Ashe in Suffolk.

0:34:050:34:08

The area of Campsea Ashe is thought to have been inhabited

0:34:090:34:13

since the Roman period.

0:34:130:34:16

The village's Abbott's Auction Rooms

0:34:160:34:19

have been staging lively sales since the 1920s.

0:34:190:34:23

Here we go, Mark.

0:34:230:34:25

Jolly good.

0:34:270:34:29

Well, Mark.

0:34:320:34:34

This is the moment!

0:34:340:34:36

Let's go and face our destiny, shall we?

0:34:370:34:39

Onwards.

0:34:390:34:41

Auctioneer James Shand will be wielding the gavel today.

0:34:410:34:45

But before battle commences,

0:34:450:34:47

what does Abbotts' valuer Geoffrey Barford think of Mark and Mark's buys?

0:34:470:34:52

The sash clamp, a good rustic lot.

0:34:540:34:55

That usually sells well in this location.

0:34:550:34:58

The lot I've got serious doubts about it the presentation clock and the plaque.

0:34:580:35:03

I haven't got high hopes of those.

0:35:030:35:04

Top selling lot I think should be the inlaid box.

0:35:040:35:08

Mark Hales started this leg with £234.52

0:35:080:35:14

and bought five lots at a cost of £190.

0:35:140:35:17

While Mark Stacey started with £332.10.

0:35:200:35:24

Of that, he's only spent £105, but has amassed five lots.

0:35:240:35:29

On your marks! It's hammer time!

0:35:320:35:35

Without further ado, we'll make a start.

0:35:360:35:39

Here we go.

0:35:390:35:40

First up, it's Mark Stacey's combined lot of Majolica ceramics.

0:35:400:35:45

30 and off we go, then. 30 I have here in front.

0:35:450:35:48

At 30. Do I see five? It's at 30. 35.

0:35:480:35:52

40. Five. 50. Five. Do I see 60?

0:35:520:35:57

With the lady at £55.

0:35:570:36:00

I sell at 55.

0:36:000:36:01

A disappointing first lot for the confident Mr Stacey.

0:36:020:36:06

Five pound profit.

0:36:060:36:08

But a loss after commission.

0:36:080:36:10

Now it's the lot our valuer wasn't sold on.

0:36:120:36:15

Mr Hales' retro clock and plaque.

0:36:150:36:18

I start the bidding at £20.

0:36:180:36:20

With me and on the book at 20. At 20. Do I see two?

0:36:200:36:23

Not doing terribly well, is he?

0:36:230:36:25

28. 30.

0:36:250:36:27

30 with me. 32 is in the room now. At 32.

0:36:270:36:30

We haven't even got our money back at the moment.

0:36:300:36:32

In the room at £32. I sell at 32.

0:36:320:36:36

Not a great start.

0:36:370:36:39

A magnificent loss.

0:36:390:36:41

Can Mr Hales' natty friend Harold

0:36:420:36:45

get him back on track to a profit?

0:36:450:36:47

Ten to start me for this one. Ten I have at the back. At £10 only.

0:36:470:36:51

Do I see 12?

0:36:510:36:52

-Come on!

-12 is there. 14.

0:36:520:36:55

16. 18. 20. Two.

0:36:550:36:58

-He's worth more than that.

-25.

0:36:580:37:01

28.

0:37:010:37:03

30.

0:37:030:37:04

-On my right at £30.

-Ah, well.

-I sell at 30.

0:37:040:37:08

Not a good day for retro, it seems!

0:37:080:37:12

Another day, another loss!

0:37:130:37:15

Mark Stacey won the coin toss.

0:37:150:37:18

But can his cat jug win over the sale room?

0:37:180:37:22

Ten and off we go for this one. Ten I have. 12.

0:37:220:37:24

14. 16.

0:37:240:37:26

18. 20.

0:37:260:37:28

20. In the middle at 20. And two.

0:37:280:37:31

25.

0:37:310:37:32

28. 30.

0:37:320:37:34

And two. 35. 38. 40.

0:37:340:37:38

40. In the middle at 40. Is there another bidder?

0:37:380:37:41

40 and I sell.

0:37:410:37:43

A spectacular profit into Mr Stacey's swelling coffers.

0:37:430:37:48

What have I got to do? Look at him, grinning like a Cheshire cat!

0:37:480:37:53

I'm the cat that's got the cream!

0:37:530:37:55

Will Mr Hales' car badges and mascot

0:37:550:37:59

provide a reason to break out the bubbly?

0:37:590:38:02

20 and up we go. 20 I have. 22.

0:38:020:38:05

-25.

-This is so rare!

-30.

0:38:050:38:08

Two. 35. 38.

0:38:080:38:10

40 and two. 45.

0:38:100:38:13

There's a lot of interest.

0:38:130:38:15

55. 60. Five.

0:38:150:38:17

70. Five. 80. Five.

0:38:170:38:21

90. Five. 100.

0:38:210:38:23

-100's here at 100.

-Don't stop! Get past it.

0:38:230:38:26

Get past that barrier. That's better.

0:38:260:38:29

110 on the far side. 120.

0:38:290:38:31

130.

0:38:310:38:33

-Better.

-140.

-Getting cheerful!

0:38:330:38:36

-140's on the pillar.

-Getting happy.

-150.

0:38:360:38:38

160.

0:38:380:38:39

170. 180.

0:38:390:38:42

-190.

-I'm redeemed!

-200.

0:38:420:38:44

And ten.

0:38:440:38:46

In the corner at 210. Any other bids? I shall sell at £210.

0:38:460:38:50

A right Champagne Charlie you are, Mark!

0:38:510:38:55

With that he's stolen a triumphant lead.

0:38:550:38:58

-Yes!

-Well done!

0:38:580:39:00

-£210, Mark!

-I'm going to hug Mark Stacey!

-Oh, my God!

-Isn't that good?

0:39:000:39:06

Next, the bowls.

0:39:070:39:10

Is Mark Stacey on a roll?

0:39:100:39:12

Ten and off we go, then, on the bowling woods.

0:39:120:39:15

Ten I have here at ten. Do you wish to bid 12?

0:39:150:39:17

12. Gentleman's bid there at 12.

0:39:170:39:21

They're cheap at 12. Do I see 14? Gentleman's bid at £12.

0:39:210:39:23

Any other bids? At £12 and I sell at 12.

0:39:230:39:27

It would seem not.

0:39:290:39:30

-Oh, auctions are such a funny business.

-This one is!

0:39:310:39:34

The lions are next.

0:39:350:39:37

They may be the king of beasts,

0:39:370:39:39

but will they make Mr Hales king of the sale room?

0:39:390:39:43

Ten and off we go for these. Nice lot at ten. Ten I have.

0:39:440:39:48

At £10 only. Ten, 12. 14.

0:39:480:39:50

16. 18.

0:39:500:39:52

-Come along, now.

-I think that's enough, Mark.

0:39:520:39:56

Any other bids? At £18. I sell at 18.

0:39:560:39:59

No crown for you, Mr Hales!

0:40:000:40:03

And your magnificent lead is being nibbled away.

0:40:030:40:06

-There you go.

-They didn't roar, those lions, did they?

0:40:060:40:09

No. Another loss.

0:40:090:40:11

Next, the valuer's favourite item.

0:40:110:40:14

Mark Stacey's inlaid wooden box.

0:40:140:40:16

Start the bidding with me at £60. Do I see five?

0:40:160:40:20

With me and on the book at 60.

0:40:200:40:21

-At 60. Five.

-You're going to be OK.

0:40:210:40:25

-80.

-80. I'm happy with that.

0:40:250:40:27

90. Five. 100.

0:40:270:40:29

And ten. 120.

0:40:290:40:31

-Ooh.

-Good.

-130.

0:40:310:40:32

-Fantastic.

-Any other bids?

0:40:320:40:34

I'm going to sell at 130.

0:40:340:40:37

A stormer. Mark Hales is still ahead

0:40:370:40:41

but Mr Stacey is snapping at his heels!

0:40:410:40:44

-Well done, Mark.

-£90 profit.

-Really good buy.

0:40:450:40:48

Now, the find of the leg.

0:40:480:40:50

Mr Stacey's 18-carat cufflinks.

0:40:500:40:53

Will they be enough for him to steal the lead?

0:40:530:40:57

I start the bidding with me at £50.

0:40:590:41:01

Do I see five? 55.

0:41:010:41:03

60. Five.

0:41:030:41:05

70. Five. 80. Five.

0:41:050:41:08

90. Five.

0:41:080:41:10

100. And ten.

0:41:100:41:12

110. 110's on my right. At 110.

0:41:120:41:15

Any other bids at £110.

0:41:150:41:17

I sell at 110.

0:41:170:41:19

Not bad for an outlay of a fiver!

0:41:200:41:23

Mr Stacey has stolen the lead.

0:41:230:41:25

Gosh!

0:41:250:41:27

Wonderful! Well done!

0:41:280:41:29

Actually, I've got to be pleased with that.

0:41:290:41:31

One more lot to go.

0:41:310:41:33

Indeed there is.

0:41:330:41:35

It all hangs on Mr Hales' sash cramp.

0:41:350:41:39

I start the bidding with me at £20. Do I see two?

0:41:400:41:42

22. 25.

0:41:420:41:45

28 is in the room. In the room at 28. Do I see 30?

0:41:450:41:48

In the room at 28. On my right at £28. Any other bids?

0:41:480:41:52

You were right.

0:41:520:41:54

A respectable profit.

0:41:540:41:56

But it isn't enough to regain the lead.

0:41:560:41:59

It could have been worse. That was OK.

0:42:000:42:02

That's the spirit, Mark.

0:42:020:42:04

Great British dignity in defeat!

0:42:040:42:07

It's been a rollercoaster. Ups and downs.

0:42:070:42:10

Very exciting. Well done.

0:42:100:42:12

-We've enjoyed it.

-I really have.

0:42:120:42:13

Come on. Let's find out who's won.

0:42:130:42:15

Ah, you always make up in the end. How sweet!

0:42:150:42:18

So, Mr Stacey stole that bout with his bargain gold cufflinks.

0:42:180:42:23

Mark Hales started this leg with £234.52.

0:42:250:42:30

After paying auction costs,

0:42:300:42:32

he made a profit of £70.76

0:42:320:42:35

and carries £305.28 on to the next leg.

0:42:350:42:39

The other Mark, meanwhile,

0:42:420:42:44

started with £332.10.

0:42:440:42:46

He made a smashing profit of £179.54,

0:42:460:42:50

giving him £511.64 to go forwards.

0:42:500:42:55

-What a successful day all round, Mark, I think.

-It was good.

0:42:560:42:59

-That was jolly good.

-Mark, no.

0:42:590:43:01

-Open the door for the victor.

-That's what I'm here for!

0:43:010:43:04

-Open the door for the victor.

-After you, sir.

0:43:040:43:07

-Thank you.

-There you are, Mr Winner.

-I could get used to this!

0:43:070:43:10

I'm sure you could!

0:43:100:43:12

-That's it.

-Forward!

0:43:120:43:15

On the next Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:210:43:24

..will our two Marks trust their instincts?

0:43:250:43:28

I'm getting a hot flush about this!

0:43:280:43:30

And avoid paying money for old rope?

0:43:300:43:33

I'm afraid not!

0:43:330:43:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:540:43:57

Road trippers Mark Stacey and Mark Hales head for East Anglia in the search for lucrative antiques to sell at auction as the battle to win intensifies between them.


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