Episode 20 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 20

Antiques experts travel across the UK searching for treasures. Mark Hales gets a lesson in spying and Mark Stacey is left stunned at the auction.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts. With £200 each, a classic car

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-and a goal to scour Britain for antiques...

-That hurts.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-You mean lot!

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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There's always another auction.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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This week, we have the ultimate battle of the Marks.

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Mark Stacey is a dealer and auctioneer from Brighton

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whose sharp eye and sharper wit make him a formidable road tripper.

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I don't want to force you, honestly. It's not in my nature, but...

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While Mark Hales is an auctioneer and ceramics expert from sunny Devon

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who hopes his chutzpah might just carry the day.

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He who dares wins, John.

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Although they both suffered losses in the disastrous first leg.

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-We've entered a new phase of the competition - who can lose the most?

-Yeah.

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Both boys have now managed to turn tidy profits.

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-I think I'm the cat that's got the cream.

-You are.

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Both Marks started this week with a cool £200.

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Mark Stacey has managed to grow that seed money into a bountiful £511.64. Pretty good.

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While Mark Hales has traded his original £200 up to a respectable £305.28.

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Today, our twosome are paired with a stunning '60s chick -

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the sinuous 1968 Triumph Spitfire.

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This week sees the two Marks journey through eastern lands

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from Finedon in Northamptonshire 300 miles through five English counties

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to Colchester in Essex.

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On this last leg of their epic road trip,

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they begin in Clare in Suffolk, heading for their final auction in Colchester.

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-A nice little Georgian town again, isn't it?

-Very pretty.

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During the medieval period, the small town of Clare prospered from the cloth industry.

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Today, its large range of listed buildings makes it an attractive place to start the day's buying.

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Right then, here we are.

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-Jolly good.

-You're very keen, Mark.

-I am very keen.

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I can't wait for this.

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You're positively bouncing, Mark.

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-I'm popping in that one, I think.

-OK, I'm off this way. Be lucky.

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-I'll catch up with you later.

-Don't catch up with me too soon.

-Oh, I will.

-Bye!

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Mark Stacey is heading off towards FD Salter Antiques where David rules the roost.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

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-I'm Mark.

-Hello. David.

-Nice to meet you, David. Lovely little shop.

-Thank you.

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Let's hope Mark is in luck as he hunts for his first item.

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Now, there's something that might be Mark's cup of tea.

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It's quite pretty, isn't it?

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Quite a sweet little thing. It's a little, um...

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pewter...embossed tea caddy.

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Almost Arts and Crafts in a way.

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The 19th century Arts and Crafts movement reacted against the manufacturing changes

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brought on by the Industrial Revolution

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and harked back to the styles and craftsmanship of previous centuries.

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I'll see what David says price-wise. We might be lucky.

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-What I did find, David, was this little tea caddy.

-Yeah.

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-Embossed with pewter, I suppose.

-I would say it was pewter, yes.

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-It's obviously got a bit of age because it's got that lovely patina on there.

-It has, yes.

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But there was no price on it, David.

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-Do I need to sit down?

-No, it's not too bad at all. It can be £35 to you.

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That's actually not too bad, is it?

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We couldn't get to 30?

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-I don't want to push you too much.

-I can't, I'm afraid.

-OK.

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I've not bought anything like this before.

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-I'm going to buy it for 35.

-Lovely.

-That's very kind of you. Thank you very much. Wish me luck.

-I do, yes.

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-If it does well, I'll have a cup of tea with you.

-Fair enough.

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Ripping! Mark Stacey's first buy is in hand.

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Meanwhile, Mark Hales is a couple of minutes away

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and heading into Clare Antiques & Interiors,

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but his morning isn't going quite so swimmingly.

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I'm having a "blonde" moment.

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Steady on now. Don't be colourist!

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What to do, what to do?

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What to buy?

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That, Mark, is the question.

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I keep seeing bits and pieces that I can buy for £15, they might make £25. It's not what I'm after.

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I'm trying to buy something with considerable profit in it.

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-And I'm not dreaming. It happens. I've done it before. I can do it again.

-Indeed you have.

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-Yes, yes! I'm going to hug Mark Stacey.

-Oh, my God!

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While Mark Hales pulls himself together,

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the competitive Mark Stacey is nearby and has just spotted another shop he's keen to have a gander at -

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Market Hill Antiques.

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This looks rather interesting, actually.

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-Hello there.

-Morning, sir.

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-I'm Mark.

-Robin.

-Nice to meet you.

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As ever, Mark's eagle eye is hunting for a bargain. Watch out, Robin.

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-We're realistically priced.

-Are you? Well, that's a word I like.

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But I prefer "very" in front of it.

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LAUGHTER I can fully understand that.

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And a good thing too.

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Mark's on fire today. He's just spotted a pair of Georgian lead tobacco boxes.

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There's one with the Prince of Wales feathers here. They are 1720s?

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Yeah. They're probably Scottish. They had the main tobacco import from Virginia and places like that.

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The Scottish port of Glasgow dominated the 18th century tobacco trade with the American colonies

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and many great fortunes were built on the weed.

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-I've never bought one before. They really are early 18th century?

-Yeah. I'll do you a deal on the pair.

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What are we looking at if I took the two of them?

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-I'll do you "buy one, get one free".

-OK.

-Do you want to look at the price now?

-No.

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-185.

-Oh, my God!

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I'm always open to an offer.

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I don't want to be reckless and jeopardise my hard-earned winnings.

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£120, they've got to make a profit for the pair?

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I mean, it does seem reasonable, but I do like round figures, you see.

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-150 then?

-No, 100. That's what I was thinking.

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-110 the pair.

-You can't do them for 100? Shake on 100?

-Go on.

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-What have I done?

-Spent £100, sir.

-I can't go back now, can I?

-No, we shook on it.

-We have.

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-Sweating, sir?

-I am sweating. I've never bought anything like this before. I'm really worried.

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Where are you going, Mark? Get back here!

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That's more like it.

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And Robin gets his cash, finally,

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and another buy is in the bag despite the tomfoolery.

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Mark Hales, though, still hasn't found anything in the other shop.

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It's all going wrong for me today. I've just got to...

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So he's taking a break from the stresses of buying.

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I hope I haven't missed anything. It's so easy to miss things.

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Right, onward.

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Onward.

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And he's driving the 32 miles to Maldon in Essex.

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The town's history is tied to the Blackwater Estuary on which it sits.

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Traditional Thames sailing barges,

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which once carried cargoes through the waterways of eastern England, can still be glimpsed.

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Today, Mark is visiting the town's Combined Military Services Museum

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and meeting museum historian Clive.

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-Good afternoon, sir.

-Good afternoon, sir.

-I'm Mark.

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-I'm Clive.

-Hello, Clive.

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The museum's collection illustrates the proud history of Britain's armed forces -

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weapons, uniforms and other equipment displayed here from all branches of the military,

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ancient and modern.

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The museum is owned by a private collector of militaria.

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Some of the most interesting pieces relate to espionage and covert operations in the 20th century.

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Clive's going to show Mark one of them.

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-Now, what have we here?

-This is a suitcase radio.

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It was the type of thing issued to Special Operations Executive operatives in the Second World War.

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Both men and women. And they used it to communicate back to the UK.

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The Special Operations Executive, or SOE,

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was a secret British army unit convened during World War Two

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to engage in covert reconnaissance and sabotage behind enemy lines.

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Way in advance of its time in terms of communications. You can pick it up, carry it

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and the obvious disguise for it was a suitcase, hence "suitcase radios".

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The men and women of the SOE risked their lives

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to send information vital to the war effort back to Britain.

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-They were brave.

-They were indeed. Very much so.

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You can put the headphones on and have a tap on the Morse key.

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Oh, lovely. Right, now, what's SOS?

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-Dot-dot-dot, dash-dash-dash, dot-dot-dot.

-That's it.

-I've done it. I've sent a message.

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Now, is that a gun in Clive's pocket?

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I've got something else here that you might find of interest, craftily concealed about my person.

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-This...

-That's a gun.

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It's a Luger, a standard German Second World War pistol.

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But this one is rather special and this weapon, along with another one,

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-was prepared for an assassination attempt on Hitler in 1944.

-That actual Luger?

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Yeah. They decided not to carry on with the operation because it was considered

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that Hitler was doing so much damage to the German war effort by himself that it was best to leave him alive.

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Yes. It sort of makes sense in retrospect, doesn't it?

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That gun would have been used, had the operation gone ahead. I'm having trouble getting my head round this.

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That actual pistol, basically, could have changed history.

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-It could have changed the history of the world. Can I have a go?

-Certainly.

-As it were.

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Like all of the firearms here, the Luger has been deactivated, thank goodness, so it can't fire

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and there's no chance of Mark doing himself a mischief.

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It's almost as if it was made for me.

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Oh, yes, Mark, you do look the part.

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'GUNFIRE'

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"JAMES BOND" THEME MUSIC

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Now Clive has some other super spy gadgets to show Mark.

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This room is packed full of items thought to have been used in espionage during the Cold War.

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Much of the collection was amassed by two real-life British agents,

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the husband and wife spy team Peter and Prue Mason

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who used many of these specially designed items in the field.

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Here are some particular artefacts that I thought you might find interesting.

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I think Clive might be Essex's answer to Q.

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I won't tell you what they are. I want you to think James Bond.

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-My goodness me!

-See if you can see what's different about these shoes.

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Apart from the fact they're very sexy patent leather.

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-Each to their own, Clive.

-Now, now!

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Oh, oh, here we go. If I pull that out... Oh, nasty.

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-There you go.

-That's for doing his nails, isn't it?

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The shoes contain a concealed blade,

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just like the shoes worn by arch-villainess Rosa Klebb in Bond film From Russia With Love.

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Typical James Bond scenario. All you've got to do is flick that out.

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-Flick that out with your other foot or wiggling about.

-Yeah, or on a chair.

-Cut your ropes.

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Quick bit of kung fu or whatever and out the building. Don't forget the young lady.

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Daniel Craig is quaking in his Italian leather brogues, I'm sure.

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Just pick up that cigarette there.

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That's heavy.

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-It's a gun.

-Of course it is. How obvious! Of course it's a gun(!)

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-It's a single-shot pistol.

-Is it really?

-To fire it, you have to twist that.

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All you would do is twist it and that would...

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-Fire a bullet out of the end.

-This is Boy's Own stuff. This is straight out of books.

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The museum holds all manner of secrets, but the rest of them are for Mark's eyes only.

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I shouldn't really show you this, but we do have one or two items...

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Mark Stacey, though, is back in Clare, Suffolk,

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and has popped into the shop that gave Mark Hales such gyp earlier.

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Can his eagle eye spot anything his rival missed?

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I see this little box here. It's got Ollivant & Botsford on it.

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Ollivant & Botsford were jewellers, silversmiths and watchmakers.

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Shall we open the box? Come on, let's open the box.

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Oh, goody, let's!

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-It could be a winner. Can I have a look at this, sir?

-Sure.

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Dealer Jim will get it out of the case. Drum roll, please!

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Let's hope it's as exciting as it looks.

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Oh.

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Well, that was an anti-climax.

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Whatever was in there...

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Issued by the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, 19th of September, 1917.

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The box used to contain a deck watch used for naval navigation.

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The number on the box's lid uniquely identifies it

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and ties it to these records held in the Royal Observatory, Greenwich.

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They confirm the box's provenance and tell the story of its working life.

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It was acquired by the Royal Observatory in the 1890s

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and was issued to many Royal Navy vessels before being retired in 1922.

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It's just an intriguing little thing, but £40...

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Is the deal negotiable, do you think?

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-He could certainly do something on that price.

-What do you think he'd take?

-I know he'd do 35 on it.

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-Do you think he would come down to 30?

-I'd have to call him.

-Would you mind doing that?

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-He'll do £30 for it.

-I've got to have it for £30.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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Marvellous. And Mark Stacey sails off to his next shop.

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He's travelling the 39 miles to the small Essex village of Rettendon.

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A compact, but charming destination.

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Its church, All Saints, dates from the 13th century.

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He's strolling off into Rettendon Antiques.

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Is there anything he might risk his hard-earned on?

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There is this fire screen.

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The centre piece is made out of beaten copper and I quite like these very stylish roses.

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They're almost like Tudor roses.

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It's got £55 on it.

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We know you regard that as the very loosest of jumping-off points, Mark.

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-Best see what you can strike up with the lovely proprietor Elaine.

-Elaine!

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Sorry, Elaine. I found this and dare I say what I want to pay for it?

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I mean, it's got 55 on it. What do you think the lowest will be on that?

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-I could do it for £20.

-£20.

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It doesn't sound too bad, does it?

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-I think it's very reasonable.

-You would, Elaine.

-Yes.

-You would.

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Hmm, this Essex girl is no pushover.

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-You don't think we could get it lower than that?

-£20, I think, is a good price.

-Is it?

-Yes.

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-Do you want to hear what my good price is...? No.

-Do I?

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LAUGHTER I'm not sure!

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-Oh, you're getting far too good at this.

-She is, isn't she?

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We couldn't tweak it under a bit for good luck?

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I don't want to force you, honestly. It's not in my nature, but...

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Who will break the silent battle of wills?

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-You're a very good saleswoman, you know.

-I think it's worth the £20.

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-Go on, I'll take it for 20.

-Have we got a deal?

-We have.

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There's something you don't see every day. Mark is outdone at his own game.

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Elaine gets her £20 and Mark gets his fire screen.

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And with that highly irregular occurrence, the curtain falls on our first day.

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Night-night, chaps.

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But they can't stay off the road for long.

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The morning sun greets them back in the Spit and raring to go.

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Do you know, the sun's shining, Mark. It's a beautiful day.

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I'm on the up. Lady Luck is going to shine on me today.

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So far, Mark Stacey has spent £185 on four lots -

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the box for the naval deck watch,

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the lead tobacco boxes,

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the pewter tea caddy

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and the Arts and Crafts fire screen,

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while Mark Hales has yet to make a purchase

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and so has spent nothing whatsoever.

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But all is optimism as they head for the first shop of the day.

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There's lots of time left. I'm only a tad behind.

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It's not over until the last auction. That's what I think. You're only as good as your next purchase.

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They're driving to the Essex village of Battlesbridge

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through which the River Crouch flows

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along its stately way.

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This morning's a two-hander

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as our haggling heroes go to war in the same place...

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..Battlesbridge Antiques Centre.

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This complex of shops holds over 80 dealers, so there should be plenty for everyone.

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-This looks good.

-Are you feeling happier now?

-Yeah. This is great.

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They're heading off in different directions.

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-You're keen.

-I want to get in there.

-Don't worry about me.

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-Good morning, sir.

-Good morning.

-I'm Mark.

-My name's John.

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With no buys yet, Mark is going to have to work fast.

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Already I've seen a lovely Wemyss jardiniere. Is it in good condition? Let's have a quick look.

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225. That's too much for me.

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Wemyss Ware is a type of decorative pottery originally produced

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in Ceres, Fife, from around the 1880s to the 1930s.

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It was decorated by a chap called Nekola and this is all hand-painted.

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Several patterns. Lots of different flowers, plants.

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Very nice. Now, what can you get the blooming price down to?

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-I'm in a bit of a pickle, John.

-OK.

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-I'm up against Mark Stacey. He's in front.

-We don't want that.

-The pressure's on.

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-Bit of a nightmare.

-What are we going to do?

-I don't know.

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-Have you seen anything in particular?

-I love you already. "What are WE going to do?"

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-Can I show you a Wemyss jardiniere? You've got 225 on it. I want to buy it for 150.

-OK.

-What's it got to be?

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The absolute best to you has got to be £175.

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-Bottom line?

-That's the absolute best.

-OK, let's have a go.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you, John.

-I'll get this wrapped up for you.

-Brilliant.

0:20:250:20:30

Yeah... He who dares wins, John.

0:20:310:20:34

Oh, yeah, Del Boy. Oh, yeah.

0:20:340:20:36

Bye!

0:20:370:20:39

Meanwhile, Mark Stacey is outside.

0:20:400:20:42

Well, I've just spotted something which is completely barking mad -

0:20:420:20:46

a pair of cast-iron... what only can be described really as castle hinges.

0:20:460:20:53

It's almost like a fleur-de-lys design.

0:20:530:20:56

These would have gone on to a moat bridge or something.

0:20:560:20:59

Or a very, very old wooden door.

0:20:590:21:02

And I don't know if I'm crazy or very wise in trying to buy them.

0:21:020:21:07

On the ticket is £125.

0:21:080:21:10

I must be having a funny five minutes. I'm getting a hot flush about these. It's really quite mad.

0:21:110:21:17

-Oh, settle down, dear.

-What would be your best price?

0:21:170:21:21

-I'd go to 75.

-75.

-That would be my best price.

0:21:210:21:25

-You couldn't go to 70 for me?

-I'll go to 70.

0:21:250:21:29

I must be mad, but I'll have them for £70. Thank you very much.

0:21:290:21:33

Aha! A buy fit for a king.

0:21:330:21:35

Across the way, Mark Hales is really starting to feel the pressure.

0:21:350:21:40

He's still only bought one item. I think it might be getting to him.

0:21:400:21:45

Morning.

0:21:450:21:47

Cheerful chappies, aren't they?

0:21:470:21:49

I'm just looking for anything old that will just hit me.

0:21:490:21:53

At the rate I'm going, I should be knocked out.

0:21:530:21:56

You'd think I would buy something!

0:21:590:22:02

Oh, Mark, do settle down. Have you found anything yet?

0:22:020:22:06

-I'm "a frayed knot"!

-After all that flim-flam, he's back where he started in John's shop.

0:22:060:22:12

-Oh, dear.

-Oh, now that's nice.

0:22:120:22:16

That is me all over.

0:22:160:22:18

Lovely Georgian stoneware tankard.

0:22:190:22:22

Markings on it. In good order.

0:22:220:22:25

Imagine a couple of pints of porter in that.

0:22:250:22:28

It's brown-glaze stoneware.

0:22:280:22:31

Made all over the place, actually. Derbyshire, Nottingham.

0:22:310:22:35

We have to be a little bit careful. They did reproduce a lot of this.

0:22:350:22:39

But not with this sort of banding and turning. It's good. £35.

0:22:390:22:44

Let's see what we can get it for. ..I know what you're going to say. It's got £35 on it.

0:22:440:22:49

-I want it for 25.

-I can sell it for 30.

0:22:490:22:53

-Oh, blimey. Can't you do 28?

-30.

0:22:530:22:56

-Right. Let's have a go. I love it.

-Thank you very much. I'll get that packed up for you.

-Thank you.

0:22:560:23:02

Aha! Ceramics maestro Mark is back in familiar territory.

0:23:020:23:07

Maybe his luck's about to change.

0:23:070:23:10

Meanwhile, Mark Stacey is still outside and boxing clever.

0:23:100:23:14

The dealer's just brought this out of the back of his van and, basically, it's a box.

0:23:160:23:21

Have I bought any boxes so far?

0:23:210:23:24

Listen, you've bought four of the flaming things!

0:23:240:23:27

-It's a Victorian ladies jewellery box in walnut.

-Mark's thinking it might make a job lot

0:23:270:23:33

with his pewter tea caddy. The ticket price is £35. Best speak to dealer Colin. Col?

0:23:330:23:40

-Any way we can get it for 25?

-30?

-It will have to be 25, I'm afraid. I paid so much for the tea caddy.

0:23:410:23:47

-Go on, then.

-Are you sure? 25? Lovely, thank you.

0:23:470:23:51

-I'll quickly pay you before you change your mind.

-Yes!

0:23:510:23:55

Capital!

0:23:550:23:57

And with that it's time to bid Battlesbridge a fond adieu.

0:23:570:24:02

Mark Stacey has bought up to the hilt, so he's heading off to Stansted Mountfitchet, Essex,

0:24:050:24:13

where he's going to pay a playful visit to the House on the Hill Toy Museum,

0:24:150:24:21

where he's meeting owner Alan.

0:24:210:24:23

-Hello, Alan.

-Hi, Mark. Welcome to the toy museum.

0:24:230:24:28

Oh, thank you. That's amazing. Lovely weather. I'm hoping to learn a lot today.

0:24:280:24:33

-Largest toy museum in the world.

-Alan has run it since 1990

0:24:330:24:38

when he turned his magnificent private collection of toys into this huge public exhibition.

0:24:380:24:44

We're coming into the tin-plate area.

0:24:440:24:47

Alan started his collection at 14.

0:24:470:24:50

Today it spans all types of toy from board games to dolls and from ancient toys to modern,

0:24:500:24:57

but it's the tin toys of his WWII childhood that are his first and greatest love.

0:24:570:25:03

-Here we have a toy in its original box.

-Wow.

-A Rolls Royce, actually.

0:25:030:25:08

I bought that many years ago.

0:25:080:25:10

-I paid, actually, £600 for it.

-Did you really?

0:25:100:25:14

Today it's worth about £1,500.

0:25:140:25:17

-And the chauffeur's inside.

-Yeah.

-I think that's amazing, actually.

0:25:170:25:21

-And a real find from that era. How rare is it to find one in this condition?

-Extremely rare.

0:25:210:25:28

Because they played with them.

0:25:280:25:31

And Alan has another cabinet full of WWII period toys nearby.

0:25:310:25:35

Right, Mark, this is what we call our Home Front display.

0:25:370:25:41

It's war toys depicting everything from WWII.

0:25:410:25:45

As you can see, the toy manufacturers started producing all the toys in camouflage.

0:25:450:25:51

A lot of the toymakers were German, mainly Jewish, and they fled Germany in the early '30s, came to England

0:25:510:25:58

and set up manufacturing units here - Spears Games, Mettoy, etc.

0:25:580:26:03

And so these are all basically based on their knowledge and skill.

0:26:030:26:07

-And then after the war the Americans got the Japanese to produce toys, robots etc.

-I remember the robots.

0:26:070:26:15

And that kickstarted the Japanese economy.

0:26:150:26:18

-They started producing robots and space toys.

-Have you got some? I'm sure you have.

-Come over here.

0:26:180:26:24

-I've got loads of them.

-Oh, wow, Alan!

0:26:240:26:28

-These are fantastic.

-This is our robot and space cabinet. Mainly from Japan.

0:26:280:26:34

As a child of the 1960s, this is Mark's era.

0:26:340:26:39

It's bringing back memories.

0:26:390:26:41

Here I've got an early Japanese clockwork toy. You can wind it up.

0:26:410:26:46

-Oh, wow.

-And all the planets go round.

-There was that fascination

0:26:460:26:50

-with scifi. You get those B movies from the '50s.

-Exactly. And UFOs were being seen everywhere.

0:26:500:26:56

-And it wasn't long before men on the Moon in 1969.

-Exactly.

0:26:560:27:01

I do remember as a child I loved all the space television.

0:27:010:27:05

-Captain Scarlet and Thunderbirds.

-We've got the original Gerry Anderson car here.

0:27:050:27:12

From the TV series Investigator. That was the original prop.

0:27:120:27:17

Gerry Anderson was the creator who devised puppet series Thunderbirds

0:27:170:27:23

and Captain Scarlet amongst other.

0:27:230:27:26

-I was in love with Lady Penelope.

-Were you? Ever go out with her?

0:27:260:27:30

-No, we never met.

-No!

-She was a bit short for me.

0:27:300:27:34

A bit wooden!

0:27:340:27:36

Oh, Alan, that's been fantastic. A real trip down memory lane.

0:27:360:27:40

-Thank you very much.

-Great pleasure.

0:27:400:27:43

F.A.B.!

0:27:430:27:45

To the Spitfire and away!

0:27:450:27:48

Meanwhile, Mark Hales has travelled the nine miles to Debden, Essex,

0:27:530:27:58

where he has one final chance to shop.

0:27:580:28:01

Leafy Debden in the Uttlesford area of Essex is rural tranquillity itself.

0:28:020:28:08

In recent years, it's been twinned with the Nepalese village of Tang Ting.

0:28:080:28:14

Not a lot of people know that. Let's hope Mark can look forward to similar co-operation

0:28:140:28:20

-as he heads to Debden Antiques.

-My last shop of the entire trip!

0:28:200:28:25

-Ohh! I have to buy one or two items here.

-Indeed you do. Hopefully,

0:28:250:28:30

fresh-faced dealer James can be of some assistance.

0:28:300:28:34

-Would it be OK if I look around?

-Sure.

-Thank you very much.

0:28:340:28:38

225. Way out of my league.

0:28:410:28:43

Hmm.

0:28:430:28:45

-Leave well alone.

-It's crunch time.

0:28:460:28:49

-James...

-Yes?

-Help.

-Oh, Mark.

0:28:490:28:53

OK!

0:28:530:28:55

-Lovely.

-Help, James.

-Right.

0:28:550:28:57

Look, this is my last hour. I've got about £100 left.

0:28:570:29:02

Have you anything you can recommend that I might find attractive?

0:29:020:29:06

-Well...

-I've got to buy it, sell it and take the auctioneer's commission off it.

-Yes, I feel for you.

0:29:060:29:13

-Ah, bless you, James.

-A large, hand-painted vintage ship's nameboard from the vessel...

0:29:130:29:20

-Organs?!

-Oh, lordy!

0:29:200:29:22

-Ogano.

-Thank you.

0:29:220:29:25

On the ticket, £245.

0:29:250:29:28

I've got £100 and 28p.

0:29:280:29:32

And...and what I want, James, right, cos I know you're on my wavelength,

0:29:320:29:37

is something big and showy. It's all a gamble. £100.28.

0:29:370:29:43

-You can have that for £100.

-I'd better take it.

0:29:430:29:46

-And I do want the 28p.

-I don't blame you!

0:29:460:29:50

Look, 20, 40, 60, 80, 90,

0:29:500:29:55

-5, 100.

-And 28p.

-28p.

0:29:550:29:57

-James, you got me out of a pickle.

-That's all right. I'm sure it will do OK.

0:29:570:30:03

And now you can get it off the wall.

0:30:030:30:07

-OK...

-Marvellous. Mark has three lots, at last.

0:30:070:30:11

They've repaired to the rustic environs of Stansted Mountfitchet Castle to unveil their purchases.

0:30:150:30:22

Looks like they've got some company, too. Let's see if we can quack this, shall we?

0:30:220:30:27

-Mark, it's our very last reveal.

-I know.

-How are you feeling?

-A little bit sad about it.

0:30:270:30:33

-Shall I show you?

-Yes, please.

-Are you ready?

-Oh, my goodness, me!

0:30:330:30:38

-Now...

-Wow!

0:30:380:30:40

-What do you think?

-I love it!

-This I think is great.

0:30:400:30:45

-Arts and Crafts copper.

-English Tudor roses. Nice wrought iron base, not been cleaned.

0:30:450:30:51

Yes, we know YOU like it, but what does Mark Hales think?

0:30:510:30:56

-Wonderful.

-Good, good.

0:30:560:30:59

-What are these magnificent...

-What have I done, Mark?

0:30:590:31:03

-They're castle door hinges.

-They certainly are!

-I love them.

-Super in the average kitchen(!)

0:31:030:31:11

-Sarcasm is the lowest form of wit.

-This is an interesting find.

0:31:110:31:15

It does have a Royal Observatory, Greenwich, mark. September, 1917.

0:31:150:31:21

-I just thought it was a beautiful little box.

-And military is up.

0:31:210:31:25

-How much? £25?

-30.

0:31:250:31:28

-Mark, I can't wait any longer. Please, show me all.

-Ah, yes.

0:31:280:31:32

I've been terribly brave. All my money is gone.

0:31:320:31:36

-Every penny.

-Really?

-OK?

0:31:360:31:39

What was that look, Mark?

0:31:390:31:41

Oh, I like that.

0:31:410:31:44

-Ogano. The name of the ship?

-Yep.

0:31:440:31:47

I love it. It's really good.

0:31:470:31:50

-1920s, I think.

-How much did you pay for that?

-£100 and 28p!

0:31:500:31:55

What about Mark Hales' pretty but pricey jardiniere?

0:31:550:31:59

-I don't need to look under here, but I will. It's Wemyss.

-Yes.

-I've always loved Wemyss.

0:31:590:32:06

-It actually cost me £175.

-Oh, that's a fair chunk.

0:32:060:32:10

-And I was thinking 200-300 at auction, hopefully.

-You must do.

0:32:100:32:15

-And the tankard?

-That's my favourite thing.

-GR. So that's George...the Third.

0:32:150:32:21

-It's a lovely Georgian tankard.

-I love it.

0:32:210:32:24

£30. It's going to be an interesting auction!

0:32:240:32:28

All very civilised, chaps, but when their rival's back is turned, do the gloves come off?

0:32:280:32:35

The Ogano ship sign. It's a pastiche, of course. Someone's put the portholes on.

0:32:350:32:41

Are they the originals? Possibly. 100 quid? Might be a small profit.

0:32:410:32:46

The Wemyss is very speculative. It's an interesting lot. I love Wemyss.

0:32:460:32:52

175 quid is not bad. Looking forward to the auction,

0:32:520:32:56

but I've said this before. It ain't over until the auctioneer puts his gavel down.

0:32:560:33:02

A lot of objects there. Good for him. I thought he was pretty brave.

0:33:020:33:07

Forget about the hinges. There's bits off, half of one is missing.

0:33:070:33:12

The two boxes he's put together, they are very nice. I like those a lot.

0:33:120:33:18

The military box. Beautiful mahogany box. Lovely.

0:33:180:33:22

Anything could happen at auction. I'm in with a chance.

0:33:220:33:26

On this epic road trip,

0:33:260:33:28

the two Marks have travelled nearly 300 miles through East Anglia.

0:33:280:33:33

On this leg, they started in Clare, Suffolk.

0:33:330:33:37

They're heading now for their final showdown in Colchester, Essex.

0:33:370:33:41

The town has housed a military garrison since as far back as the Roman period

0:33:420:33:49

and was an important city in Ancient Britain.

0:33:490:33:53

Let's hope our Marks can harness a bit of that warrior spirit as they head for their last auction.

0:33:530:33:59

A venerable Colchester institution, Reeman Dansie Auctioneers have been established here since 1881.

0:34:000:34:08

Our very final chance.

0:34:090:34:12

-The last auction.

-The last dance, the last tango. The last everything.

0:34:120:34:18

-Anything could happen.

-And it probably will. Shall we go and find out what's happening?

0:34:180:34:24

Auctioneer James Grinter will be wielding the fateful gavel today.

0:34:270:34:33

But before he takes to the stage, what does he think of our boys' buys?

0:34:330:34:38

The ship's nameboard, sadly, I think we'll probably struggle with that.

0:34:380:34:44

It's not very old. It's not very decorative. And it hasn't got very much quality.

0:34:440:34:50

The tobacco boxes are very stylish, but will there be collectors there?

0:34:500:34:55

My least favourite lots are the pair of iron hinges.

0:34:550:35:00

Mark Stacey started this leg with £511.64.

0:35:020:35:06

He spent £280 exactly and has assembled five lots for his lucre.

0:35:060:35:13

Mark Hales, meanwhile, has spent his entire cash pot,

0:35:140:35:19

a grand total of £305.28, but he's only assembled three lots for his trouble.

0:35:190:35:26

Anything could happen as our pair ready themselves for the final showdown. Look comfy, don't they?

0:35:260:35:33

-Without further ado, I will start I will start.

-Oh, this is it.

0:35:330:35:38

First up, Mark Stacey's pair of lead tobacco boxes.

0:35:380:35:42

Will they set the saleroom alight or simply smoulder?

0:35:420:35:45

£40 to start me. 40? 40 I have.

0:35:450:35:47

40. I haven't lost everything!

0:35:470:35:50

£42 down there. 42. 44. 46. 48.

0:35:500:35:53

-50. 5. 60. 5.

-Come on, a bit more.

0:35:530:35:57

All done at £65.

0:35:570:36:01

So a less than stellar start for Mark Stacey.

0:36:010:36:05

-Thank goodness - a loss!

-Charming(!)

0:36:050:36:08

It's boxes, boxes everywhere as Mark Stacey's next lot takes the stage.

0:36:080:36:14

£40 to start me. 40 I have now.

0:36:140:36:17

40. 42. 44.

0:36:170:36:20

46. 48. 50.

0:36:200:36:22

55. 60.

0:36:220:36:24

-Well, I've got my money back.

-Any advance?

0:36:240:36:28

All done now at £60. All done?

0:36:280:36:32

They held their value, but that's a loss after the auction house's commission.

0:36:320:36:38

Is it Mark Hales' chance to catch up?

0:36:380:36:41

-I thought there might be a £20, £30 profit.

-I thought they'd make 120 in a sale like this.

0:36:410:36:47

So Mark Hales' first lot now as his Wemyss jardiniere meets the saleroom.

0:36:470:36:53

What do you say to start me? £100?

0:36:530:36:55

-£100 I have down here now. At £100.

-Come on.

-110.

0:36:550:36:59

120. 130. 140. 150.

0:36:590:37:02

-160. 170.

-Good.

-180.

-That's my money back.

0:37:020:37:07

At £190 bid. 190. 200?

0:37:070:37:10

I'm going to sell. All done at 190.

0:37:100:37:13

A profit, but not the one he'd hoped for.

0:37:130:37:17

He'll still need a flyer to catch up.

0:37:170:37:21

-I've got to laugh.

-You made a £15 profit, Mark.

0:37:210:37:26

Enough of the sighing, boys.

0:37:260:37:28

Maybe Mark Stacey's Arts and Crafts fire screen will ignite the saleroom's interest.

0:37:280:37:34

30? £30 to start me somewhere. £30.

0:37:340:37:37

32. 34. 36.

0:37:370:37:40

38. 40.

0:37:400:37:41

At 40. 42. 44. 46. 48.

0:37:410:37:45

50. At £50. Gentleman at the back.

0:37:450:37:48

-That's good.

-It's good.

0:37:480:37:51

At £50.

0:37:510:37:53

-Another modest profit.

-Well done, Mark, yes.

0:37:530:37:58

Add that to the coffers.

0:37:580:38:01

One now for Mark Hales as his antique tankard is up.

0:38:010:38:06

-£30 to start me. 30 I have.

-Show me a profit.

0:38:060:38:10

At £30. Do I have 32? £30 is bid.

0:38:100:38:13

-32 anywhere?

-No.

0:38:130:38:15

At £30. All done.

0:38:150:38:18

NOT what he hoped for.

0:38:180:38:21

-Oh, dear. Story of my life.

-Don't despair.

0:38:210:38:24

You've still got the Ogano ship sign.

0:38:240:38:28

Indeed he does!

0:38:280:38:30

But the next lot hinges on what the punters make of Mark Stacey's...hinges.

0:38:300:38:36

-These weren't my favourite at all.

-I really regret buying these.

0:38:360:38:40

-I can't look.

-Don't give him 30.

0:38:400:38:43

-Oh, no...

-Please don't.

-32.

0:38:430:38:45

34. 36. 38.

0:38:450:38:48

40. 2. 44. 46.

0:38:480:38:51

-48. 50.

-No!

0:38:510:38:53

55. 60.

0:38:530:38:55

-65. 70.

-Are we having a snooze?

0:38:550:38:59

-You're going to wake up in a moment.

-95. 100. At £100. Going to sell.

0:38:590:39:05

All done. At £100.

0:39:050:39:08

An unexpected triumph for Mark Stacey. Lovely.

0:39:090:39:12

I'm really not as unhinged as I thought I was.

0:39:120:39:16

Don't know about that! But this certainly widens Mark Stacey's lead.

0:39:160:39:21

-#

-We're in the money...

-#

0:39:210:39:23

Right. After that stunner from Mark Stacey,

0:39:230:39:27

the ship's sign would really have to have the wind in its sails if it's to redeem Mark Hales.

0:39:270:39:33

£30 for it. 30 I have down here.

0:39:330:39:36

At 32. Make it 34?

0:39:360:39:39

34. 36. 38.

0:39:390:39:42

40 I have. Another place.

0:39:420:39:44

-42.

-It's climbing very slowly.

0:39:440:39:47

44. 46. 48. 50. At £50.

0:39:470:39:50

Against you. 55? 55.

0:39:500:39:52

-60. 65.

-Fresh bidder.

-70.

0:39:520:39:56

Oh. Clawing its way. Clawing its way.

0:39:560:40:01

85. 90.

0:40:010:40:03

95.

0:40:030:40:05

At £95. In the far corner at 95.

0:40:050:40:09

I'm going to sell. Against you all at 95.

0:40:090:40:14

It fails to sail, sadly, for Mark Hales.

0:40:140:40:18

Finally now, Mark Stacey's intriguing mahogany deck watch box. Minus the watch.

0:40:200:40:26

Might it sail off into the sunset?

0:40:260:40:29

I have two commissions with me. I go straight in at £100 with me.

0:40:290:40:33

-At 100. 110.

-Gosh!

-120. 130. 140.

0:40:330:40:36

150. 160. 170. 180.

0:40:360:40:40

-At £180. Still with me. 190.

-Well done, Mark.

0:40:400:40:44

At 200 on the book now.

0:40:440:40:47

200 against you on the internet. At £200. It's going to be sold.

0:40:470:40:51

All done at £200?

0:40:510:40:53

Mark Stacey, you look quite flabbergasted.

0:40:530:40:58

-Well done.

-That lot certainly went tick-tock.

0:40:580:41:02

A stonking profit for Mark Stacey and his victory is decisive.

0:41:020:41:07

-I don't know what to say.

-Fantastic.

0:41:070:41:09

Attack of the vapours, Mark? So a run of bad luck for Mark Hales

0:41:110:41:15

and an absolute flyer on the deck watch box mean Mark Stacey is the king of this road trip!

0:41:150:41:23

-Very well done, Mark.

-Thank you.

-You did really well.

0:41:240:41:27

Mark Hales started this final leg with £305.28.

0:41:300:41:35

After auction costs, he made an unfortunate loss of £46.98

0:41:350:41:40

and finishes the road trip with £258.30.

0:41:400:41:44

Bad luck.

0:41:440:41:46

Mark Stacey began with £511.64

0:41:490:41:53

and with the help of that deck watch made a terrific £109.50 profit today

0:41:530:41:59

giving him a victorious total of £621.14.

0:41:590:42:04

All the money our boys have made will go to Children In Need.

0:42:040:42:09

-Well, Mark, what an auction that was.

-Yes. You did terribly well.

0:42:090:42:13

-Highs and lows.

-Highs and lows.

0:42:130:42:15

-But we had some good results throughout the week.

-We certainly did.

0:42:150:42:20

But having said that, it's not just about the profit. It's about the fun, Mark.

0:42:200:42:26

-Yeah, lots of fun along the way.

-We've had that.

0:42:260:42:30

Well, this has certainly been a week of trenchant competition

0:42:310:42:36

and high drama for our two remarkable Marks.

0:42:360:42:40

# Sun is shining in the sky

0:42:400:42:42

# There ain't a cloud in sight

0:42:420:42:46

# It's stopped raining Everybody's... #

0:42:460:42:50

-They've experienced joy...

-Yes!

0:42:500:42:54

-..and pain!

-That hurts.

0:42:540:42:56

-There have been frustrations...

-How very dare you!

0:42:560:43:00

-..and revelations.

-I'm looking for...antiques.

0:43:000:43:05

-But it's never been predictable.

-Oh!

0:43:050:43:09

-And they've always been friends in the end.

-I nearly kissed you.

0:43:090:43:13

Onwards!

0:43:150:43:17

Next week on Antiques Road Trip: we're with two dashing gents on the hunt for a bargain.

0:43:190:43:26

-We've got Thomas Plant, who is always calm under pressure.

-What have I done?!

0:43:260:43:32

-And James finds his long-lost twin.

-Any resemblance to me is merely coincidental.

0:43:320:43:38

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:500:43:52

On this final day of their 300 mile road trip around eastern England, Mark Hales gets a lesson in spying and Mark Stacey is left stunned at the auction.


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