Episode 23 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 23

Antiques experts travel across the UK searching for treasures. Thomas Plant takes a financial gamble and James Lewis talks to animals on the third leg of their trip in Scotland.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each, a classic car and a goal

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-to scour Britain for antiques.

-That hurts.

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What do you think?

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-What have I done?!

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Put your back into it!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's the start of a new leg and we join experts Thomas Plant and James Lewis on the open road

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in a classic 1950s Morris Minor.

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LAUGHTER

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See?

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And the competition is fierce.

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Ah! That's my head!

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Battling swordsman Thomas Plant is an experienced auctioneer who specialises in jewellery.

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-But so far he's lagging behind.

-It's a bit like the balance of power between James and I.

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This is what I feel I've got. And this is James's money.

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His rival, Derbyshire auctioneer James Lewis, is something of a celebrity.

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-Are you going to give me your autograph?

-That's 12.

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I'm joking!

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-He also likes tribal art and quirky collectibles.

-What do you think?

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So far, Thomas has made a respectable £284.22

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from his original £200 starter pack.

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-Well done.

-So he has plenty of cash to splash on this leg.

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Meanwhile, James's original £200

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has mushroomed to a whopping £797.10 thanks to two unlikely lads.

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Last chance at 150.

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I thought that was bonkers.

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This week Thomas and James are travelling over 800 miles,

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looping their way from the Scottish west coast up to the Highlands,

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down to the Lowlands and back again, eventually finishing at the country's capital city, Edinburgh.

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But on this, their third leg, the boys are starting off in Dunkeld

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and heading up to the north-east of Scotland for an auction showdown in Buckie.

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The little town of Dunkeld is one of Perthshire's gems.

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Nestling beneath thickly wooded hills on the banks of the Tay, there is a definite air of tranquillity.

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This is lovely, James. Scotland in the sun.

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-A rare thing, but beautiful when it happens.

-I'm going to go that way. I'll see you later on.

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-Have fun!

-Buy well.

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-And without delay James saunters off to his first shop to meet owner Margaret.

-Hello there.

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-Hello. How are you?

-I'm James.

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Originally selling sweets, then fish, now antiques, Vintage is the oldest shop on the street,

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dating back to 1804.

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-I'll have a look. Is that all right?

-You're welcome.

-Don't sell my hat!

-It looks good in the shop.

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-That's the pound shelf!

-Is it? I don't mind a pound shelf. I'm not proud.

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Meanwhile, Thomas is headed to Dunkeld Antiques,

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situated in a converted church, perhaps in search of a miracle.

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What do you think of this? Doesn't one look rather attractive?

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I could be in my smoking room, sort of lounging like a Lothario. Just imagine.

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It's rather good, don't you think?

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Not really. There we go, Thomas. I'm not so sure about that. How about something a bit more...you?

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I think that's rather fun.

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It's a tobacco jar in stoneware.

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But I love the Honey Dew on there. A real decorative, beautiful thing.

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This 19th-century stoneware tobacco jar has moulded leaf handles

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and Honey Dew written in gilt lettering. It would have been used to hold loose tobacco

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and would originally have had a cover.

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-It's quite stylish.

-SILENTLY MOUTHS PRICE

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I think it's lovely, though.

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Well, better keep on looking, then.

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Er, what's that?

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It might be something to do with fishing or it could be a weapon.

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It's a priest... It's a bar.

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Heavy.

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You could knock your fish on the head or you could protect yourself.

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But it's quite nice, though. Isn't it rather handsome?

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Walking sticks are so collectible.

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The concealed club within this 19th-century walking cane

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is called a priest and could be used to despatch captured fish quickly and humanely.

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Time to see if owner David will budge on the £90 asking price.

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-I like the stick.

-All right.

-I like the tobacco jar.

-Well, you know what it is.

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If you need something, you've got to save up for it. If you don't have the money, you can't buy it.

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I'll see what I can do. You're having a tough time.

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These two items combined are £230, which would decimate most of Thomas's budget.

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What would you say if I gave you 150 for the jar and the stick?

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I would think that's very generous.

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-It would be, from your point of view.

-Actually, no...

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-I can actually cope with that.

-You can cope with that?

-Yeah, I can.

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Have I gone in with too much now?

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-Em...

-An £80 reduction on the combined price, eh? Not bad, Thomas,

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-But it's sent the poor boy into a spin.

-I didn't want to do this. I didn't want to spend as much.

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Too late now, boy. Back with Margaret, James also has something.

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And it's not from the pound shelf. He's spotted a large bronze Chinese censer.

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Ticket price £45.

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What could that be?

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30...38?

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OK. That's... I think that's very fair.

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These were apparently originally used for ritual offerings of food and drink.

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As this example in archaic style dates from the 19th century,

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it would have been made as a decorative work of art.

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-Hello? What's this?

-Two potential objects here.

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A Persian coffee pot, mid-19th century,

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possibly even earlier.

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But value-wise, not a huge amount.

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My theory is that that Chinese censer

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would be a nice lot on its own, but there are so many fakes about

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that I want people to have confidence in its age. It has age. But I want to give that confidence.

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The Chinese censer is the genuine article and would make a striking job lot with the Persian coffee pot,

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priced at £10.

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-Could you do that for 30?

-32.

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40 for the two.

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40 for the two...

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OK. Yes on that, please.

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The Chinese for 32.

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But I quite like this as well. I'll give you a fiver for that.

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-Is that all right?

-Fine.

-Thank you very much. Lovely.

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James has bargained well and has got a handsome duo for his first buy of the day.

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It's back to Thomas to see if he's found anything else to go with his cane and jar, apart from the dogs.

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Well, what we've got here is a nice set of 19th-century beam scales.

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With some odd weights with them.

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-I don't know whether those appeal.

-They're quite sweet. Good fun.

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The scales are £95 and they were made by J White and Sons

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of Auchtermuchty in Fife, Scotland.

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But will Thomas want to spend that after already agreeing £150 for the storage jar and walking stick?

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-You could have those for £50.

-180 for the three items.

-Right, OK...

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-I'm actually...

-You're going to do me a huge favour.

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I must admit, it's nice to see you getting excited. Obviously, you're getting a good deal here.

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Right, OK, you've got a deal. You've got a deal. 180.

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Well, what a deal for Thomas on three items.

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Not far away, James is taking things in his stride.

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He's heading for The Little Curio Shop, run by Finlay, an art student in his youth,

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so it's full of elaborate odds and ends.

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And genuine pedigrees. Woof!

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-Hello. Who's this?

-This is Eddie.

-Hello.

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So how much is Eddie?

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Blimey! James will try to buy anything if it's not nailed down.

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It's not long before James's expert eye spots something else.

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Mm. Does this bust look familiar to you? Those flowing locks?

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That noble expression?

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-He's impressive. Lovely.

-No, it's not James. Sadly,

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the identity of this 1840s disembodied Greek philosopher is unknown.

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-How much is he?

-95.

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95? OK.

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He's certainly got a look about him,

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which I like. 95...

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How flexible is the 95?

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-I'd go down to 80.

-80.

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How does 50 quid grab you?

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Deep breath! Deeper and deeper then come back at me!

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But maybe Finlay's son Alexander can help here.

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What do you think? You think 50 quid's better.

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Er, well, maybe...

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Probably 75.

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-75. OK.

-Eddie, how about you?

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What do you say? What do you say?

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"65!"

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Oh, she says 65.

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-65.

-Is that all right? You've got a deal.

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Thank you so much. Thank you.

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Meanwhile, Thomas is keen to make the most of the glorious weather and heads north to Blair Atholl

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in Highland Perthshire.

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-BAGPIPES PLAY

-At its heart is Blair Castle, the ancient seat

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of the Dukes and Earls of Atholl.

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Thomas has come to see the Atholl Highlanders,

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the only private army in Europe with the royal seal of approval for their service to Queen Victoria

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almost 200 years ago.

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The Highlanders were formed in 1839 by Lord Glenlyon, later the Sixth Duke of Atholl,

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when he took a group of his estate workers to the Eglinton Tournament

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as his personal bodyguard.

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-Archivist Jane Anderson picks up the story.

-Were they just average men?

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They were the people who worked on the estate, so they were keepers, ghillies, gardeners, farmers,

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very much the men were just the average men in the area.

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In 1842, Queen Victoria came to Dunkeld on her first ever visit to Scotland.

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And Lord Glenlyon's estate workers welcomed the Queen in true Highland fashion.

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They entertained her to dancing and piping. She was so impressed,

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she asked if she could have the castle at her disposal for three weeks in 1844.

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Lord and Lady Glenlyon moved out and the Queen came with her servants, complete retinue,

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pastry cooks, hairdressers.

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Queen Victoria did not have her own security, so Glenlyon called upon his trusty estate workers

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-to guard her throughout her stay.

-She was so impressed, she decided to grant

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the Queen's Colours to the men who guarded her.

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This was completely unprecedented. That means you bear arms.

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This made them the only private regiment the Queen gave this honour to

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the Atholl Highlanders were born.

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-So this is the grant of the colours, signed Victoria.

-Oh, right.

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They then had later versions made

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and they're up here with the regimental colour and Queen's colour. Ever since 1846,

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they've paraded every year, very similar to how you see it today.

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Although the Highlanders were an army, they never fought as a regiment.

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However, many of the men enlisted in the Crimean War and World War One.

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Because so many of them were killed and never came back, it went into abeyance after the war.

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It was only right after the Second War that the 10th Duke brought the regiment up to strength

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in 1966.

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The Atholl Highlanders now have approximately 100 men, the vast majority of whom are local people

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-keeping their traditions alive.

-Present...arms!

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The Highlanders' Royal connections started with Queen Victoria,

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but it still continues to this day as Prince Michael of Kent presents them with a medal

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in commemoration of Queen Elizabeth's Diamond Jubilee.

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Let's hope the Highlanders' hearty spirit gives Thomas the inspiration to battle on

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against his rival, James.

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Back in Dunkeld,

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-James is, well, taking it easy.

-Look at that.

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He's in Dunkeld Antiques, where Thomas previously bought his cane, pot and scales.

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-I mean, I don't know whether these Crown Derby things appeal to you.

-Let's have a look.

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The first thing to ask is do they have their boxes? You can knock 30% off if they don't.

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-The answer is no.

-OK, they should have a rectangular certificate signed by Hugh Gibson,

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the chairman of Royal Crown Derby. Then we look underneath. You've got a gold stopper, not silver. Good.

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If it was a second, it would have a silver stopper. No box is a killer.

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The hippo is £120

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and the stag £140.

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For me, there are so many things that say, "Go for it."

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The first thing is it's Royal Crown Derby. It's my home.

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Secondly, it's called the Sherwood Stag.

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My first ever valuation was done in Sherwood in Nottingham.

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Thirdly, it's a stag. If a stag won't sell in Scotland, it won't sell anywhere.

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As both paperweights don't have their valuable original box, certificate and tissue paper,

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-can James get a decent discount on them?

-£50 each.

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Oh, well, at that... At that they're cheap.

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Good old David has given James a remarkable reduction in price.

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-Just tell me the sort of price you're thinking of.

-I've never done this before.

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-I want to give you £60 each.

-All right.

-Is that all right?

-Fine.

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I've never... I'm...I'm speechless.

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-Well, you know, I like to be able to think that I'm fair and...

-Excellent.

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I think if they don't make that, they don't make that.

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-120 for the two.

-Fine.

-Thank you.

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It seems James has bought with his heart,

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-and David's £140 markdown has given him a fighting chance at auction.

-Thank you.

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-All we need to do is make a profit!

-That's right.

-Bye!

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It's been a day well spent so it's time for James and Thomas to put their feet up. Nighty night.

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It's the start of a new day and both gents are deciding on a budget plan.

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-I'm trying to spend all my money.

-I can't do that!

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-Don't rub it in!

-Sorry!

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So far, underdog Thomas Plant has spent £180 on three items.

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A walking cane, a stoneware tobacco jar and an Auchtermuchty set of scales.

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-It's nice to see you getting excited.

-Leaving him with £104.22 for today's shopping.

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-I really like them.

-Good. Excellent.

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Meanwhile, James Lewis has spent £22 on five items.

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A Chinese censer,

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a Persian coffee pot,

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a country house bust

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and two Royal Crown Derby paperweights.

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Cheers. And thank you very much!

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Leaving James still flush with £575.10.

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Our boys are now heading nearly 100 miles north to Nairn.

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Gosh! And there's discord in the camp.

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-Keep going all the way to the dead end(!)

-There's a junction!

-No, dead end.

-There's a junction!

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Oh, boys, do stop bickering!

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Nairn has been a popular holiday destination since Victorian times

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and it enjoys a prime location on the Moray Firth coast,

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just 16 miles east of Inverness.

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Thomas has parted from his rival and is intent on shopping.

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Nice shorts(!)

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Morning!

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There's an assorted mix of goodies from traditional to ornamental,

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but Thomas needs something special if he's to catch up James.

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I'm looking at jewellery. I shouldn't. It's not the thing I should be doing.

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See, I can't keep away.

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I get drawn to it like a magpie.

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Maybe owner Steve can help.

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Ah, yes, I think that's about the '60s, something like that.

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Somebody's obviously been over to Venice and bought it for a trip. It's very good quality.

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And it's signed on the bottom. It's on at 33.

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-Say £20. How about that?

-£20. It's lovely, isn't it?

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-You should do a reasonable return on that.

-Lovely.

-Lovely green colour.

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The other thing I quite like is this here. It's what we call biomorphic. Taken from nature.

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Almost like an amoeba it looks like. A single-cell organism.

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Thomas has also found a vintage blue art glass bowl to go with his growing collection.

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-Those three there. What would you do for those three?

-20 on that one.

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-20 on that one.

-This one we've got 26 on.

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Er, say 15.

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And what have we got on that one? Say a fiver.

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So you're looking at...

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-five, twenty...

-£40 total.

-£40 total.

-Mm-hm.

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-That would make an interesting lot.

-Steve, I'm going to make you an offer. You've come down a lot.

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£30.

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Em, it's a bit tight, but to give you a good chance, we'll do it.

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Wow! Surely Thomas can gain a profit on those vibrant bowls.

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-Thank you very much.

-Hope you do well.

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James is keen to soak up the history of the area so Thomas gives him a lift to Inverness.

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Although only half an hour away, it's plenty of time for James to interrogate Thomas.

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-So what did you buy?

-I'm not going to tell you. Don't do that! That hurts!

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-Come on, what did you buy?

-These beautiful hairs on my legs and you want to rip them off?!

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There they go again.

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Inverness is the most northern city in Britain and one of its claims to fame is its castle.

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But it's the townhouse that James is heading for today.

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On 7th September, 1921, this building made history when it hosted the first Cabinet meeting

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outside London.

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-That is rather special.

-It's sort of baronial, isn't it?

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Enjoy your shopping!

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-Yeah.

-Don't get any bargains!

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Such a team player.

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Here to meet James is local historian Jamie Gaukroger. Nice name.

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-Jamie, hi.

-Hello there. Welcome to Inverness Townhouse.

-Fantastic building.

-It is.

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The interior of the building itself is grand, with an imposing staircase rising from the entrance.

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In this council chamber the historic meeting was held.

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Of all places, why did they choose here to have the meeting?

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Lloyd George, the Prime Minister, was on holiday in the Highlands, as were several other Ministers.

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Winston Churchill was on holiday here. The King was holidaying just a few miles from Inverness.

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Rather than everyone travel back to London, the Ministers in London came up to Inverness.

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The emergency meeting was called after several years of violence in Ireland came to a head.

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Despite a truce in the July of 1921, by the September Sinn Fein leader Eamon de Valera

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was calling for an independent Ireland.

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-Churchill himself was here?

-Yes.

-So what was his role in 1921?

0:22:310:22:36

-He was Colonial Secretary.

-Colonial!

0:22:360:22:40

We couldn't get away with that today! So did they actually view Ireland as a colony?

0:22:400:22:47

Some would say they did. It was certainly part of the Empire.

0:22:470:22:51

-Strange, isn't it?

-The British were determined it would stay.

0:22:510:22:56

-Who else out of the Cabinet was here?

-Lloyd George, Prime Minister.

0:22:560:23:01

-And Stanley Baldwin, future Prime Minister.

-Yeah.

0:23:010:23:05

Out of the 21 members, 16 of the Cabinet were here.

0:23:050:23:09

At the meeting, council officer William Bain passed round a blank sheet of paper

0:23:090:23:15

-which each member signed to document the occasion.

-Gosh.

0:23:150:23:19

Lloyd George was the first to sign, then Austen Chamberlain, the Lord Privy Seal.

0:23:190:23:24

All the way down to Winston Churchill at the bottom, Secretary for the Colonies.

0:23:240:23:30

This is a time when politicians really led from the front.

0:23:300:23:34

-They were really respected people.

-They were. They were revered.

0:23:340:23:39

People like Lloyd George and Churchill were hugely respected.

0:23:390:23:44

The politicians then were, in fact, the celebrities of their day

0:23:440:23:49

and the British Cabinet meeting was so momentous, it drew cheering crowds who gathered outside.

0:23:490:23:56

People were coming from all round Inverness, all parts of the Highlands, lining the rooftops,

0:23:560:24:02

in shop windows. They were sitting on chimney stacks. Every possible vantage point.

0:24:020:24:08

-After this crisis Cabinet meeting, what was the result?

-The Government said Ireland could have self-rule,

0:24:080:24:15

self-government, if it stayed within the Empire.

0:24:150:24:19

The Inverness Formula was agreed at that meeting

0:24:200:24:24

and used to form the 1921 Anglo-Irish Treaty, which established the Irish Free State.

0:24:240:24:30

The townhouse was witness to this pivotal event as the first venue outside London to host the Cabinet.

0:24:320:24:40

-I've really enjoyed it. Thank you.

-Most welcome.

-Cheers.

0:24:400:24:44

Now it's time for James and Thomas to have their own rendezvous

0:24:440:24:48

as they head east to their last shop of the day in Auldearn.

0:24:480:24:53

-And Thomas wants pampering.

-I have got sand in my toes.

0:24:530:24:57

-They need brushing off.

-If you expect me to brush your feet...!

0:24:570:25:02

-No, no, not you, James. You don't do it for me.

-Thank goodness for that!

0:25:020:25:07

This is supposed to be about buying antiques, although sometimes I do wonder.

0:25:070:25:13

-Please don't try this at home.

-Argh! That's my head!

0:25:150:25:19

-OK, boys, stop it before it all ends in tears.

-Yes! Yes!

-What do you mean "yes"?! You're dead!

0:25:200:25:28

James and Thomas split up in search of their items,

0:25:280:25:32

but Thomas, who loves to parry, is still reeling from the impromptu duel.

0:25:320:25:38

I did give James the longer fencing foil. I found one short blade, one long. One junior, one adult.

0:25:380:25:45

I've got £575 left.

0:25:450:25:48

I don't have to buy anything if I don't find anything,

0:25:480:25:51

but if I do, it would be nice to buy it.

0:25:510:25:55

He went...

0:25:550:25:57

like a charging herd of bulls.

0:25:570:26:00

It would be nice to buy something meaty, but I don't want furniture.

0:26:000:26:05

Anyway, I got him back. A quick parry and riposte.

0:26:050:26:09

Great. Now they can concentrate on shopping.

0:26:090:26:12

This is not a bad little thing.

0:26:120:26:15

It's a Japanese Satsuma vase.

0:26:150:26:19

It's from the Meiji period, around 1895, and decorated with geisha figures

0:26:210:26:26

from the Imperial Court.

0:26:260:26:29

This is typical of Japanese export china of that period,

0:26:300:26:35

but £22 is really cheap.

0:26:350:26:39

I quite like that really. £22. Definitely a profit.

0:26:390:26:43

Meanwhile, Thomas is going for...kitchenware!

0:26:440:26:48

You sort of clamp it on to something and you slice God knows what.

0:26:480:26:53

What a mad thing.

0:26:530:26:55

Follows and Bate Limited. Patent marmalade cutter, Manchester.

0:26:550:27:03

Yes, it's an orange slicer.

0:27:030:27:05

I think I've found my final item. Everybody likes a bit of marmalade

0:27:050:27:09

-and the Scottish like marmalade more than most nations, don't they?

-If you say so, Thomas.

0:27:090:27:16

I don't want to leave it there. I don't want James to find it.

0:27:160:27:20

Or I don't know if he'd be interested in something like this. It's not really his bag.

0:27:200:27:26

-Too late, Thomas. It's already been spotted.

-Hello.

0:27:260:27:31

-What is it?

-It's nothing. Maybe something I might purchase.

-Let's have a look.

-No!

0:27:310:27:37

You're like some evil pest. I'm being trapped!

0:27:370:27:40

Come on, James. You've got your own lots to find.

0:27:400:27:45

Right. What do I do here?

0:27:450:27:47

I've got the Japanese Satsuma vase, but then I've got these,

0:27:470:27:51

which are marked for Meissen.

0:27:510:27:54

Meissen was, without question, the finest porcelain maker

0:27:540:27:58

of the 18th and 19th century. They were the first factory to invent porcelain in Europe.

0:27:580:28:04

But these plates are by Helena Wolfsohn. These are 1880. Copies of Meissen.

0:28:040:28:12

The Helena Wolfsohn business was taken to court by Meissen

0:28:120:28:17

for using their AR trademark and it's considered to be

0:28:170:28:21

the first copyright case of its kind. They were ordered to change the mark to show they were copies.

0:28:210:28:27

They're 24.

0:28:270:28:29

That's 22. What do I do?

0:28:310:28:33

Well, it's tricky, James, but you could buy them all! Time to call in owner Roger.

0:28:350:28:40

-The first thing was that, the vase.

-Yeah.

0:28:400:28:45

-It's got 22 on it.

-Mm-hm.

0:28:450:28:47

Well, certainly we could do it for £20. It's well priced.

0:28:470:28:52

-I was thinking more along the lines of 15.

-Yeah. 18 would be the absolute best.

-Is it?

0:28:520:28:59

OK, if that's your best. The other thing was these. Two of those at 12 each.

0:28:590:29:04

-Yeah.

-Em...

0:29:040:29:07

-What could they be?

-Again, £10 each could do the job.

0:29:070:29:11

I'll give you 30 for all three.

0:29:110:29:13

-I could do a deal at 35.

-30 no good to you?

-I could go another pound, but...

0:29:130:29:20

I'm not going to argue with you! You said 35 was your best.

0:29:200:29:24

-£35 it is.

-Thank goodness for that.

0:29:240:29:28

Well, a really good Satsuma vase, a pair of Helena Wolfsohn plates.

0:29:280:29:32

I've still got all that cash left.

0:29:320:29:35

Lucky you.

0:29:350:29:37

Now Thomas is mulling over the cutter, ticket price £15.

0:29:400:29:45

-What can your really wonderful price be on that?

-I would think £12.

0:29:450:29:49

-10.

-I'm struggling for 10, but 12 I think there would still be some money available in that.

0:29:490:29:56

-Do you think so?

-Definitely.

-I'd be happier at 10.

-Go between.

0:29:560:30:02

-Call it 11. Thank you.

-£11. Thank you very much.

0:30:020:30:06

Right. The boys are all shopped out, so it's time to show and tell.

0:30:060:30:11

In the middle of a field?!

0:30:110:30:14

-Do you want a hand?

-Yes, please.

-Oh...!

0:30:140:30:18

There we go.

0:30:180:30:20

-Who's that? Aristotle?

-I wasn't quite sure.

-Is it plaster?

0:30:200:30:24

-Yes.

-And is the base plaster?

-Yes.

0:30:240:30:27

-No, he's rather good, isn't he?

-I liked him.

0:30:270:30:31

-How much was Aristotle?

-65.

0:30:310:30:33

-He's marvellous, isn't he?

-Particularly good with a Panama.

0:30:330:30:37

I love this! This is my favourite. A sort of rose water.

0:30:370:30:41

-Yes.

-Or tea.

-Coffee.

-Yeah, coffee. Rather fun.

0:30:410:30:46

Obviously if it was in London, you know, in Islamic week, it could probably make £100.

0:30:460:30:52

-It's a good thing. But we're selling in Buckie.

-Paid a fiver.

-Don't worry about it.

0:30:520:30:58

-Next are James's sentimental buys.

-If I was locked in a shed all my life...

-Right.

0:30:580:31:05

Not seen the world, and somebody presented me to these as what man has created,

0:31:050:31:11

I would find it difficult to be impressed, but they're probably very collectible.

0:31:110:31:16

I find them formulaic.

0:31:160:31:18

Wow. Thomas isn't pulling any punches.

0:31:180:31:22

-Ready, James?

-What have we got?

0:31:220:31:25

What does the jar say on the front? It looks like a tobacco jar.

0:31:250:31:29

-Honey Dew.

-It is a tobacco jar.

-Isn't that nice?

-Lovely.

0:31:290:31:33

Very unusual to have the gilded label.

0:31:330:31:36

What about the country walking stick, James?

0:31:360:31:39

-What on earth is that?!

-Exactly what I thought!

0:31:390:31:44

Either it's a self-defence or it's for hunting, fishing.

0:31:440:31:48

-I have no idea.

-That's interesting.

-It is.

0:31:480:31:52

The countryside theme continues with the brass scales.

0:31:520:31:56

These are quite fun. They're from... Auchtermuchty or something.

0:31:560:32:00

Have you heard of that before? J White and Sons.

0:32:000:32:05

-I like those. That's your best buy.

-You like the scales?

-Yeah.

0:32:050:32:09

-I think we've done rather well. I'm pleased with my lots and you've done all right, too.

-Thank you.

0:32:090:32:15

-At the auction...

-Good luck.

-Niceties apart, what do they think?

0:32:150:32:20

Thomas has bought really well. The items are interesting. I like the scales, the tobacco jar.

0:32:200:32:27

There will be profits in some places and a couple of losses, too.

0:32:270:32:31

The thing I really don't like is the Royal Crown Derby paperweights.

0:32:310:32:36

Never in a month of Sundays would I buy them.

0:32:360:32:40

If they make mega money, I'll feel sick because I saw them.

0:32:400:32:44

After travelling from Dunkeld up to Blair Atholl,

0:32:440:32:48

Nairn, Inverness and Auldearn,

0:32:480:32:51

James and Thomas head for the auction showdown in Buckie.

0:32:510:32:56

-Ah, breathe in that sea air!

-I don't know...

0:32:580:33:01

Oh, come on! You'll be fine. Get your bottom in here.

0:33:010:33:05

-I get all funny.

-You always do!

0:33:050:33:08

Family-run Cluny's in Buckie is the stage for our auction.

0:33:090:33:14

Auctioneer John Ferguson gives us a review of James and Thomas's lots.

0:33:140:33:20

Crown Derby, good lots. Should do well.

0:33:200:33:23

The marmalade slicer. Nice, original lot.

0:33:230:33:27

Reasonably confident, but it's all down to the day.

0:33:270:33:31

It certainly is. Thomas began with £284.22 and hasn't much change left

0:33:310:33:38

after spending £221 on five auction lots.

0:33:380:33:42

I didn't want to spend this amount.

0:33:420:33:45

Whereas James started this journey with an imposing £797.10

0:33:450:33:51

and spent a total of £257, also on five auction lots.

0:33:510:33:55

I've still got all that cash left!

0:33:550:33:59

Roll up! It's time to begin.

0:33:590:34:01

I feel that I could do badly today. I feel it in my bones.

0:34:010:34:06

-First up is James's Satsuma vase.

-£40 for the vase?

0:34:060:34:12

What will we say then? 40 or 30?

0:34:120:34:14

-20?

-Oh...

0:34:140:34:17

-Go on.

-20 bid. 22. I'm bid 5.

0:34:170:34:21

25. 25 in the room.

0:34:210:34:24

Do I see 28? 28.

0:34:240:34:27

Internet bidding!

0:34:270:34:29

Online at 32. In the room at 32.

0:34:290:34:31

-35. I'll get you all. 38.

-Fresh bidding. 40.

-42.

0:34:310:34:36

45. Do I see 8?

0:34:360:34:39

-48. 48.

-I told you. Good old John.

0:34:390:34:43

I'll take another wee one. 55.

0:34:430:34:46

"I'll take another wee one"!

0:34:460:34:49

At 58. All finished, then?

0:34:490:34:51

Well done, John.

0:34:510:34:54

The auctioneer got a good profit there.

0:34:540:34:57

When it went down and down... But...!

0:34:570:35:01

Next it's Thomas with his luxurious walking stick with pull-out priest.

0:35:010:35:06

£50. 50. 40.

0:35:060:35:09

-£20, surely.

-Oh!

-£20. 20 I'm bid.

0:35:090:35:13

At 20 bid now. 20 and 2. And 5. 25. 8.

0:35:130:35:17

28. And 30. 32. 35. 38.

0:35:170:35:22

40. £40. I'll take 2. 42. 45.

0:35:220:35:25

-At 45.

-Go on!

0:35:250:35:27

50. He shakes his head at 50.

0:35:270:35:31

Are we all done this time at £50?

0:35:310:35:34

Oh, 50. All right. £50.

0:35:350:35:38

Oh, dear. And with auction costs he'll lose more than that.

0:35:380:35:43

Well, he started at 20.

0:35:430:35:45

-Now will James's porcelain make a profit?

-22.

0:35:450:35:50

5. 25. 28.

0:35:500:35:53

And 30. 35. 40.

0:35:530:35:55

And 2. 5. 48.

0:35:550:35:58

-Go on, go on, go on.

-At 48.

0:35:580:36:01

-At 48. Where do you get them?

-Where are you?

-Calm down.

0:36:010:36:05

At £48, then. At 48.

0:36:050:36:08

48, well done. You've made a good profit on that.

0:36:090:36:14

Another good profit after commission.

0:36:140:36:17

I'm in trouble.

0:36:190:36:21

-Will Thomas's colourful glass bowl the crowds over?

-£10 I'm bid.

0:36:210:36:27

-At 10.

-It's started.

-12 now.

0:36:270:36:30

12 bid. 15.

0:36:300:36:32

At 15. Is that a bid? £18. Where are you?

0:36:320:36:35

- 22 here. - 22 online. Don't stop there.

0:36:350:36:39

-Go on!

-30's online.

0:36:390:36:42

-At 30 online.

-Don't stop!

-At 32. At 32.

0:36:420:36:48

Are we finished online? Bid's in the room, then. £32.

0:36:480:36:52

That was one that you thought was going to do really well.

0:36:520:36:57

It's a signed bit of glass.

0:36:570:36:59

Oh, dear, Thomas. That glass just didn't cut it.

0:36:590:37:03

-I'm quite disappointed today. I'm getting deflated.

-I'm gutted.

0:37:030:37:08

Will James prove he really has the Midas touch with his Chinese censer and Eastern coffee pot?

0:37:080:37:14

100, surely. 50, then.

0:37:140:37:17

50 I'm bid. At £50. At 50.

0:37:170:37:21

Do I see 5? At £50. At £50. At 50.

0:37:210:37:24

-Anybody at £50?

-No way!

-At £50. At 50.

0:37:240:37:29

55, thank you.

0:37:290:37:31

55. And 60. £60.

0:37:310:37:34

-It's profit.

-All done at £60?

0:37:340:37:37

Well, it's got to be at £60.

0:37:370:37:40

-Well...

-You made profit, though.

0:37:400:37:44

I have to say I'm gutted about that.

0:37:440:37:46

At least it's a profit, James.

0:37:460:37:49

-It's very disappointing.

-Isn't it? That could have made 300 quid.

0:37:490:37:53

Surely this decorative pot will change Thomas's fortunes.

0:37:540:37:59

-£30, then. 30. Shall I say 20, then?

-You see...

0:37:590:38:03

There's no point.

0:38:030:38:06

£20. Ah, thank you. 20. At £20.

0:38:060:38:10

And we have 22. 25. A new bidder at 25.

0:38:100:38:14

28 now. 28. 30.

0:38:140:38:16

32. Standing at 32. At 32. Is there another one?

0:38:160:38:20

Are we all finished and done, then?

0:38:200:38:23

Such is life.

0:38:260:38:28

Oh. Another loss and another blow for Thomas.

0:38:280:38:33

I would swap three of my Satsuma vases for one of those.

0:38:330:38:37

You can't help it.

0:38:370:38:39

Now will this mysterious Greek win over the bidders?

0:38:390:38:44

£50 for the bust? 40, then.

0:38:440:38:47

What?!

0:38:470:38:48

Don't you like them?

0:38:500:38:52

-40.

-Online. 45. Where are you?

0:38:520:38:56

45. 48.

0:38:560:38:58

50. 5. 60.

0:38:580:39:01

Yeah. You know it makes sense.

0:39:010:39:04

Go on! You can stick it in the loo for that!

0:39:050:39:10

65? Yeah? £70 is online.

0:39:100:39:15

75, eh? Yeah?

0:39:150:39:18

That'll do. £75.

0:39:180:39:19

All done?

0:39:190:39:22

Break even.

0:39:220:39:24

Well, James. At least he looks like he's gone to a good home.

0:39:240:39:28

-A minor loss.

-It could have been a considerable one.

0:39:280:39:33

Can these scales tip the balance in Thomas's favour?

0:39:330:39:38

-Auchtermuchty.

-It sounds German.

-It's not German!

0:39:380:39:43

A set of brass and cast-iron Auchtermuchty balance scales.

0:39:430:39:50

-There we are. Auchtermuchty!

-From the horse's mouth.

0:39:500:39:53

£20 bid. At 20. 22.

0:39:530:39:56

5. At 25. 28 now. 28. And 30.

0:39:560:40:00

32. 35.

0:40:000:40:02

-38. At 38.

-Go on!

-He's online.

0:40:020:40:06

42's online. At 42.

0:40:060:40:09

42.

0:40:090:40:11

-45.

-45. Go on.

0:40:110:40:13

-45 online. 45.

-It's online.

0:40:130:40:16

48. And 50 online.

0:40:160:40:19

-At 50.

-Let them have it.

-Anyone want involved at 50?

0:40:190:40:23

-Come on, Scotland!

-At £50. It's online.

0:40:230:40:27

At 50.

0:40:270:40:29

Ohh.

0:40:290:40:31

-A small profit, yes?

-Yes, yes, yes.

0:40:310:40:35

At last, a profit, but Thomas still isn't happy.

0:40:350:40:40

-I'm going to go on strike.

-You can't!

-And buy poor items. Poor quality.

0:40:400:40:46

James bought this Derby duo with his heart and not his head.

0:40:460:40:51

So will his gamble pay off?

0:40:510:40:54

100, then. One I'm bid. At one I'm bid.

0:40:540:40:58

At 100.

0:40:580:41:01

120. 140. 160.

0:41:010:41:04

180. 200.

0:41:040:41:06

220's there. I need 240. Sorry, 240 is in the room. 260.

0:41:060:41:11

-260.

-280. 280 I have.

-This pair of animals are really taking off!

0:41:110:41:16

320.

0:41:160:41:18

I have 340 with me. 360. Are we all done?

0:41:180:41:22

Finished at 360?

0:41:220:41:25

-I'm pleased at that.

-I bet you are!

0:41:250:41:29

So it's a stash of cash for James. Well done.

0:41:290:41:33

For what they were,

0:41:330:41:35

it was still cheap. Great profit.

0:41:350:41:38

Thomas is now hoping his marmalade cutter will sweeten the crowd.

0:41:380:41:42

-12. 15. Now at 15.

-Profit.

-Profit.

0:41:420:41:46

18 I'm bid. 20's online.

0:41:460:41:49

-Online!

-Online. Anybody who makes marmalade with this, I'll buy a jar off you.

0:41:490:41:56

I was at £20 online. 22's online.

0:41:560:41:59

-Oh!

-22. Anybody else? 22.

0:41:590:42:02

-There must be somebody else.

-Somebody must want marmalade.

0:42:020:42:06

Online it's 22.

0:42:060:42:08

-Go on!

-Keep it going!

-At 28.

0:42:080:42:12

Are we all done and sure at £28?

0:42:120:42:15

-Well, it was a profit.

-A good profit.

-You finished on a high.

0:42:160:42:21

A profit, but not enough to promote him from the bottom division.

0:42:210:42:26

Thomas started this leg with £284.22

0:42:270:42:31

and after paying auction costs he's made a loss of £63.56,

0:42:310:42:36

leaving him with £220.66.

0:42:360:42:39

James, however, is rising to the Premiership.

0:42:440:42:48

He started with £797.10

0:42:480:42:50

and, after costs, made a profit of £235.82,

0:42:500:42:55

giving him a massive £1,032.92 going forward.

0:42:550:43:00

What an extraordinary amount! Unbelievable.

0:43:000:43:05

-Soon you'll be able to get a mop out and wipe the floor with me. You already have.

-Oh, come on.

0:43:050:43:11

You just need that one lucky find.

0:43:110:43:14

-Right! I need some bargains!

-Come on!

0:43:140:43:18

-This is the fightback.

-The fightback begins now.

0:43:180:43:23

Next time: James has worked out a winning formula for the auction.

0:43:240:43:29

It's cracked, it's chipped - guaranteed profit.

0:43:290:43:33

-And Thomas resorts to promising treats.

-I'll buy you ice cream.

-Done.

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