Episode 24 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 24

Antiques experts travel across the UK searching for treasures. There is more car trouble for Thomas Plant and James Lewis on the fourth leg of their tour of Scotland.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each, a classic car and a goal -

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-to scour Britain for antiques.

-That hurts.

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What do you think?

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-What have I done?!

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Put your back into it!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's the fourth day of this road trip and we're motoring along in a classic Morris Minor

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with our experts, Thomas Plant and James Lewis.

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-These gents seem to be bonding.

-How old are you, James?

-39.

-I thought you were 50!

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Thanks, Thomas.

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Thomas Plant is an experienced valuer and auctioneer with a huge font...

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-of knowledge.

-Wasn't the telephone invented in Scotland?

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Wasn't it? I think it was.

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He's up against James Lewis who's been in the antiques business for over 20 years.

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It's cracked, it's chipped - guaranteed profit.

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Thomas's original £200 starter pack has only risen to a tiny £220.66.

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-And he's feeling the pressure.

-I'm completely gutted.

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Whereas James's original £200

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has multiplied to a massive £1,032.92.

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Wow!

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-I'm pleased at that.

-I bet you are.

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This week, Thomas and James will be travelling over 800 miles,

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looping their way from the Scottish West Coast up to the Highlands,

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down to the Lowlands and back again, eventually finishing up at the country's capital city, Edinburgh.

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But on this leg they're starting off in Tarland, Aberdeenshire,

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and heading south for an auction in the ancient capital of Dunfermline.

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Just over 30 miles west of Aberdeen, Tarland is a quiet, pretty village with breathtaking scenery.

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-Wow, great views.

-Beautiful.

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-Go and spend some money.

-Are you coming in as well?

-No. I've got bigger fish to fry!

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All right, calm down. ..Don't forget to pick me up!

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Tower Workshop is a family-run business whose stock includes 17th-19th century antiques.

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Lovely.

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These sort of mirrors, encrusted with flowers,

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were made from the 18th century right the way through to the present day.

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With over £1,000 in his pocket, surely he can afford a splurge.

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I'm feeling under pressure. Under pressure.

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Owner George steps in and takes James to see his secret stash in the shed.

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-How much is the mangle?

-I would need £35 for that.

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Those things are an absolute nightmare. They should be worth so much more than they are.

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I'll get the guys to pull it out and you can have a better look.

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The quite nice thing is it's got a name, Northern Co-Operative Society, which was big up here.

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So you're buying a bit of social history here as well. It's not just a useful item.

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I've never used one, but it's in pretty good condition. The castors are still all there.

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It's all fairly original and it still works.

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I can see that making 15, 20, 25 quid at auction. 35, tops.

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Mmm. Nope. 35 is my bottom on it.

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Somebody will walk in and they'll say, "I'm going to have that."

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-And they'll think it's for nothing.

-It's got a bit of woodworm.

-All good pieces do.

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I've got a little bit myself!

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But, no, I think it's worth every penny.

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-There's no movement at all?

-Have a think.

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-Have a think.

-I'm thinking.

-What are you thinking?

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-I hate when people fight me over fivers.

-I was going to fight you for a bit more than that!

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-But 35, I think is, you know...

-Is it?

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-Yeah.

-Right. OK, decision made. That's a no.

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-OK.

-Let's move on.

-Let's try something else.

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George isn't making much headway with James,

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whereas Thomas is moseying five miles south to his first shop in Dinnet.

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Auld Alliance Antiques is a Road Trip regular.

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It's an Aladdin's cave, filled to the brim with bric-a-brac

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and where you can find anything, including the occasional gem,

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all curated by owner Dave and partner Jane.

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James is sort of thrashing me.

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And I just don't know what to do.

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I've got to stop looking at antiques and start looking at junk. It's the only way forward.

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Maybe Dave can point Thomas in the right direction.

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-Have you got some interesting things in your box?

-I just got it.

-Can I have a rummage?

-Yeah.

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-Has this been bought from the local auction?

-It's mostly rubbish.

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-As much as I like to buy antiques...

-Yeah!

-..in the past few weeks, they've been bombing.

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Thomas has spotted an assorted mix of period hunting and training crops.

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I quite like this one. And it's obviously for the military.

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It's got its little number there.

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-I like things like that. Has that got to be a lot of money.

-Not very much.

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-It wouldn't be more than a tenner.

-No, that's great.

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-And what's... This is a silver one.

-That's a hunting crop.

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And what's that one got to be?

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About 15.

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Hmm.

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I like those.

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-I like those. I'll have a think about those.

-Have a thinky-poo.

-A thinky-poo?

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Yeah, a thinky-poo.

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Looks like James has something to have a thinky-poo over, too.

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I've got a very interesting lamp.

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I bet you've never seen another one of these on your travels this week.

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Oh, my goodness. It's revolting.

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Look at that for a piece of interesting... A work of art!

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It's again a bit of social history.

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-How much is that?

-£20.

-It's vile!

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-I bet you make money on that.

-It's vile!

-I bet you make money.

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I don't want it! I don't want it!

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This is a Murano glass table lamp with figures in 18th-century dress.

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Murano is renowned for its quality and design, although James might not be keen on this one.

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The £20 George is asking, though, seems a steal.

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The price also includes a ruby glass figure of an Italian court

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and a sculpted bird. Gosh.

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Just buy the three pieces of me.

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-Would you like that in your furniture room?

-Em...

-No!

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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, James.

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-This is definitely the case with these two pieces

-Quack, quack.

-And the lamp.

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Three pieces. Do a deal, go on.

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James, I think you're tired. Do you want a little lie down?

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-They deserve to be ground up and put as road fill. They have nothing about them whatsoever.

-James...

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-We could light this up for you.

-I'll give you a tenner.

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-I can't do it for a tenner.

-A tenner for the three. You should be begging me.

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-I think it's a good thing, that.

-You don't! You know it's rubbish.

-I don't.

-You do!

-Do I?

-Yes!

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You just bought yourself a lamp.

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-You've really talked me into that.

-I think it'll do well. I'm on halfers!

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The art glass trio are very collectable, so James should be happy to snap them up.

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-I think he's met his match with this silver-tongued salesman, though.

-Should I have bought the mangle? No.

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I'll gie you a fiver off it, James. A nice thing of quality.

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-I don't want the mangle.

-In Dunfermline, they still use them.

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-I don't want the mangle.

-Think of that. Have a go.

-I'll give you 15 quid.

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-Oh, no, James.

-If it makes 35, after commission, I make 15 quid.

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-I can't do it.

-I know. Look, that's what I wanted to spend.

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-And that's what I've spent.

-Oh, dear.

-That's pathetic.

-That won't keep me going long.

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-Another two for the mangle. OK?

-Yeah.

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You just bought a mangle!

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-I'd have taken 15. I just wanted...

-Oh, don't you even start that!

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So George has managed to sell James a mangle, two glass figurines and a lamp that he doesn't want,

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all for £30.

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It's vile, it's disgusting, it has no class.

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It's cracked, it's chipped - guaranteed profit.

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I think George could sell anything. What a charming bloke!

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Let's see how Thomas is getting on. He's found a rather odd object.

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You sometimes want to go up to people and say, "Can I measure you up? I want to see what you're like."

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-Measure their proportions. Don't you ever feel that?

-Er, no.

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But this 19th-century steel contraption was used for measuring. They have a ticket price of £25.

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-I like those and I like the crops.

-You've got silver tops.

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It's quite sweet, that.

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-I like this.

-I'm not quite sure what it is, but it's got an adjustable...

-No, it's good, that.

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It's adjustable height. It might be for hanging game or something.

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-Can that be a good price?

-Yeah.

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Och...

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-I'll do it for £15 or something.

-Oh, yeah. Brilliant.

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-Can I buy that?

-Yeah.

-15? That's £15. That's great.

-Yeah.

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-I can't decide about those dividers.

-The what?

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-I think he's referring to the calipers.

-How much are the dividers?

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-They're calipers.

-Did I say anything?

-You didn't.

-I didn't.

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-Not a sausage.

-A tenner.

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Thomas's bill comes to a grand total of £50.

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Right. Time for some negotiations.

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-Can I give you a straight 50?

-Yeah, I suppose so.

-You suppose so?

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Not quite what I was expecting.

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There's £50.

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Well, at least he stuck to his plan of buying the curious. Let's hope it pays off.

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Whilst in Tarland village, James decides to take a break to pay homage

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to the nearby MacRobert Trust.

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The foundation for the Trust is at Douneside House, which has a remarkable, but tragic story

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and has left a permanent legacy with the RAF.

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Complete with 15 acres of magnificent gardens and grounds with spectacular views,

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this was the MacRoberts' family home until Lady MacRobert's death in 1954.

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-Great to see you.

-James, welcome to the MacRobert Trust. And to Douneside House.

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Chief Executive of the MacRobert Trust, Bob Joseph, shows us around.

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The story starts with Sir Alexander MacRobert, co-founder of the British India Corporation,

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and his American-born wife Lady Rachel MacRobert.

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The family were extremely wealthy, but they were also philanthropic.

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He built for his workers in India the Georgina MacRobert Hospital.

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He was awarded his knighthood in 1910

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-for his generosity in India.

-Gosh.

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Sir Alexander MacRobert died in 1922, leaving behind his wife and their three sons,

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Alasdair, Roderic and Iain. Sadly, this was only the start of a terrible family tragedy.

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-Three boys, all killed in aviation.

-Oh, really?

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One before the war in 1938 and two during the war

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in 1941.

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Within five weeks of each other. Can you imagine that?

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Her very first response was to sit down at the desk and write a cheque for £25,000

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which she sent to Sir Archibald Sinclair, the Secretary of State for Air,

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and she said, "Please buy a bomber." The only stipulation she made was

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that the bomber should be named MacRobert's Reply, "my reply to the loss of my sons".

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Lady MacRobert had shown incredible fortitude in the face of tragedy.

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The chosen bomber was a Stirling and in October, 1941,

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it was handed over to Flying Officer PJS Boggis,

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who flew it on 12 missions.

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-Looking in great order, but the original one didn't survive.

-It did not survive the war.

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It crashed over Denmark with the loss of seven crew.

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Still determined to help, Lady MacRobert donated a further £20,000

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to purchase four Hurricane fighters in 1942.

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They were sent to RAF operations in the Middle East. Three were named for her sons, the fourth for her.

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These acts of generosity cemented a charitable legacy for the MacRoberts' name.

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Ever since this very first aeroplane,

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-there has always been a MacRoberts' Reply...

-Really?

-..in the Air Force.

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-Even now?

-Even now. It's currently a Tornado GR4.

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-Somewhat different.

-15 Squadron, RAF Lossiemouth.

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And we see it here quite a lot because we're essentially in the training area.

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Buried in the gardens at Douneside, Lady MacRobert's spirit still informs the work of the Trust

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which helps the forces, young people and the countryside as this is what her boys would have wanted,

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should they have lived.

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Lovely. I think we need a few more like her.

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Thomas drives 40 minutes east to Drumoak for his last shop of the day.

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Drumoak is a quaint village in Aberdeenshire. Located nearby lies the grounds

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of the 13th-century Drum Castle, the oldest intact castle owned by the National Trust for Scotland.

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Thomas is in a hurry to close the gap on James,

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although if you were driving behind him, you wouldn't know it.

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Mm.

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His final destination appears to be a caravan site.

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-Hello!

-Hello.

-How are you?

-Fine, thank you.

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-This is your lock-up, is it?

-This is the lock-up!

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Dealer Susan keeps everything and anything here. She had to start selling out of necessity

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as there was no more room in her house to keep all the bits she started collecting.

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-This is the strangest place I've ever bought antiques.

-Oh! I'll try to take that as a compliment.

-It is!

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Don't be put off, Thomas. There are hidden treasures within this storage trailer. Get rummaging.

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This is a Road Trip first. This is like doing a valuation, going to somebody's house

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as an auctioneer. I spend my life on my knees.

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I'll have to get these trousers laundered.

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-Getting dirty might have paid off.

-Got some pens here.

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Ah, my knees, my knees, my knees.

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This is a nippy number three.

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-That must be good.

-It's fine and rare. Fine and rare, Susan.

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Thomas has unearthed a marbled, Art Deco, Conway Stewart, 14-carat-gold-nibbed fountain pen

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with matching pencil and two spare pencils.

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-Oh, yes. They're kept in a 1935 Cadbury's Jubilee tin.

-They're quite sweet, really.

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And people like them. They look good.

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And then you've got this extraordinary Victorian thing.

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Like an oil lamp. I can't remember if I've sold one of these before.

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It just needs a bit of replacing, but it's for something.

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I wonder if it's a table lighter.

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It is, Thomas. A 1920s, silver-plated, gentleman's cigar table lighter, as an oil lamp.

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However, that and the pen set don't appear to have a ticket price.

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That's handy. They might even be free!

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-That would be good, wouldn't it?

-How much for these?

-Four pens and a tin.

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£20.

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I'll give you a tenner for them.

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£20 and I'll give you that genie lamp as a pressie.

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-As long as you promise to win.

-James Lewis has got £1,000 burning a hole in his pocket.

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-He's spent £1,000...

-So why didn't I get James?

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Do you prefer me or James?!

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Yes, Susan. We don't always get what we wish for.

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-It doesn't stop Thomas trying.

-I know it sounds mean of me, but £20 is a bit too much.

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-How about 15?

-I still...I still think that 15...

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-They're fun little things.

-With the lamp thrown in.

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15 with the lamp.

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Do me £10 for those two. Go on.

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-And if you don't win, you come back and buy me ice cream.

-I promise.

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-Done.

-I promise. Thank you very much.

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Cor, that Susan's nice. I wonder if she'll get her ice cream.

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The boys have had a hard day's shop so it's time to rest up. Nighty night.

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It's the start of a new day and we join James Lewis and Thomas Plant in their Morris Minor

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enjoying the open road and the majesty of the Scottish countryside.

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-Look - cows!

-Thomas, you're so easily impressed.

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So far, Thomas has spent £60 on four lots - two contraptions,

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two hunting and training crops

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and a 1930s Conway Stewart writing set.

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The lucky boy was also given this 1920s cigar table lighter by the lovely Susan,

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leaving him with £160.66 for today's shopping.

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I'll buy you ice cream. I promise.

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Whereas James has spent £30 on two items that he didn't even want.

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A Murano glass table lamp and two glass figures,

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plus an 1870s Aberdeen mangle, meaning he's very much in the money still with £1,002.92.

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You really talked me into that one!

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The boys are heading 50 miles south to Kirriemuir,

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however, there's been a hitch.

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The Morris has broken down.

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We have been smelling a funny smell, haven't we?

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I thought that was you.

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-To be honest with you, James...

-Do you know what you're looking for?

-Not really.

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Neither would I!

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-Can I suggest we get a taxi?

-Or hitch.

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The gents still have plenty to do,

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so Thomas gets a lift from a kind neighbour as he wants to explore Kirriemuir.

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Thank you very much. Thank you. Have a lovely day.

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Whilst James takes a taxi half an hour east to Letham,

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as he wants to get back to business.

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-Hello there.

-Hello.

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-I'm James.

-I'm Barbara.

-Wow! This place is full!

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It's not been a great start to the day, so let's hope Lovejoy Antiques cheers him up.

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Shop owner Barbara is on hand if needs be.

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I'm interested in everything, really. I don't mind having a gamble at something

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that's a few hundred pounds. I'd prefer something expensive.

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Really? Actions speak louder than words.

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-Oh, £1,445.

-Yes. Break the piggy bank.

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Has he spotted something to make him part with his cash?

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The creamware jug made somewhere around 18...

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1830, 1840, probably.

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Yep, it's 19th century with a painting that commemorates the iron bridge over the River Wear

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in Sunderland.

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One of the most famous iron bridges of its time. However, it's slightly damaged.

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Hand-painted, which is nice.

0:21:460:21:48

Creamware doesn't matter so much if it's damaged

0:21:480:21:52

because it's very soft and, therefore, it chips very easily.

0:21:520:21:56

But they're not easy things to sell.

0:21:560:21:59

I have it on at 190,

0:22:000:22:02

-so 150 would be my best.

-OK.

0:22:020:22:05

-I was thinking about two figures.

-130.

0:22:050:22:09

I'm going to be really cheeky.

0:22:090:22:12

£60 to £100 is what I think it would go for at auction.

0:22:120:22:16

Oh, no, I couldn't.

0:22:160:22:19

Anywhere close?

0:22:200:22:22

How would 110 suit you?

0:22:220:22:24

105?

0:22:250:22:27

Tiny bit...?

0:22:290:22:31

100 is the best.

0:22:330:22:35

-Very, very best.

-OK.

0:22:350:22:37

-In that case, I'll buy your jug.

-Right.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:22:370:22:43

-100.

-Thank you very much.

0:22:450:22:47

Back in Kirriemuir, Thomas has taken time out to feel inspired.

0:22:470:22:53

It's a charming and historic town in the county of Angus

0:22:530:22:57

and is best known as the birthplace of JM Barrie, the creator of Peter Pan.

0:22:570:23:02

Believe it or not, this unassuming terrace

0:23:030:23:06

is where world-famous playwright James Matthew Barrie was born

0:23:060:23:10

to handloom weaver David Barrie and Margaret Ogilvy, the daughter of a stonemason,

0:23:100:23:16

now part of the National Trust for Scotland. Thomas will find out how Barrie's story began.

0:23:160:23:22

-Hello.

-Hi, Thomas. How are you doing?

-Good, thank you.

-Let me tell you about this room.

0:23:220:23:27

John McKenna is our tour guide.

0:23:270:23:29

The room we're in just now is the family living room.

0:23:290:23:33

Everything happened in here - cooking, eating, sleeping.

0:23:330:23:36

-Who slept there?

-That would be the children. It's a box bed.

0:23:360:23:40

The kids would all be squeezed in in concertina fashion and Mum and Dad would have next door.

0:23:400:23:46

Barrie was the ninth of ten children

0:23:460:23:50

and this is where he would have heard the fantastical stories from his mother and grandmother,

0:23:500:23:56

those that found their way into his writings, particularly Peter Pan.

0:23:560:24:01

However, this room also holds sad memories.

0:24:010:24:04

When he was six years old, there was a tragedy in the family.

0:24:040:24:07

His brother, within a couple of days of his 14th birthday, died in a tragic skating accident.

0:24:070:24:13

-They brought the body home and presented it on the table for the wake.

-No?

0:24:130:24:19

-That affected Jamie Barrie deeply.

-That's awful.

0:24:190:24:23

Barrie's mother Margaret was devastated by David's loss.

0:24:230:24:28

When he heard her crying, he tried to console her

0:24:280:24:32

by mimicking his deceased brother and dressed up in his clothes. How sad is that?

0:24:320:24:37

My opinion is that's the way Barrie always consoled himself about his brother's death,

0:24:370:24:43

knowing the fact that his brother won't ever grow up to be a man,

0:24:430:24:47

and he then invented this whole fantasy about Peter Pan and this Neverland.

0:24:470:24:52

-So Neverland, never grow up?

-Yeah.

0:24:520:24:54

The ground floor of the cottage has been transformed to resemble Barrie's London apartments,

0:24:540:25:00

including the desk on which he used to write his now famous stories.

0:25:000:25:04

That is the original manuscript for Peter Pan, the play.

0:25:040:25:08

Really?

0:25:080:25:10

1904 was the original stage production.

0:25:100:25:13

And what's really interesting about it is Barrie actually wrote five different endings.

0:25:130:25:18

I'd love to find out what the other four were.

0:25:180:25:21

This room holds many artefacts, including Barrie's glasses

0:25:210:25:26

and a letter from his dear friend, Captain Scott of the Antarctic.

0:25:260:25:30

When they discovered Scott's body, they found a letter written to JM Barrie.

0:25:300:25:36

They were great friends and Scott, here he is dying in the tent in the wilderness of the Antarctic,

0:25:360:25:42

pleading with Barrie to look after his children.

0:25:420:25:45

"..in a very comfortless spot.

0:25:450:25:49

"Hoping this letter may be found and sent to you,

0:25:490:25:53

"I write a word of farewell."

0:25:530:25:57

If I was in the Antarctic and I was writing a farewell letter,

0:25:570:26:02

I wouldn't be writing to somebody who was godfather to my... Well, I might do.

0:26:020:26:08

That's the high regard people had for Jamie Barrie,

0:26:080:26:10

and it's only when you see something as significant as a letter of this nature,

0:26:100:26:15

you realise there was more to the ma than we can ever encapsulate in his writings.

0:26:150:26:20

Although he was married to actress Margaret Ansell for 15 years,

0:26:200:26:24

Barrie had no children.

0:26:240:26:27

He drew upon his own childhood experiences for his inspiration

0:26:270:26:31

and he sat in this very seat to write a lot of his celebrated work, including Peter Pan.

0:26:310:26:38

-Can you tell me what that is?

-It's a pirate. And what's that up there?

0:26:380:26:42

-It's a galleon.

-Oh, it is a boat.

0:26:420:26:45

Then over here, you've got Tinker Bell.

0:26:450:26:48

So Barrie's sitting here, runs out of inspiration and what does he do?

0:26:480:26:52

He's trying to visualise...

0:26:520:26:55

He's taking it out of his head and making it into a form,

0:26:550:26:58

so that he can draw from that form to continue with his play or his novel.

0:26:580:27:03

Barrie remained devoted to the town of Kirriemuir

0:27:030:27:07

and kept in touch with his friends and family whilst pursuing his London literary life.

0:27:070:27:13

In 1930, he donated a cricket pavilion and a Camera Obscura to the town

0:27:130:27:17

and was made a Freeman of Kirriemuir in recognition of his literary achievements.

0:27:170:27:22

He was very humble. He could have been buried in Poets' Corner.

0:27:220:27:26

And he was buried in Kirriemuir with his family.

0:27:260:27:30

This man of modest origin received a baronetcy, the Order of Merit and many other honours.

0:27:300:27:36

However, if you visit his grave, you'll simply see "James Matthew Barrie".

0:27:360:27:42

Unassuming to the very end.

0:27:420:27:45

-Thank you very much, John.

-I'm glad you've enjoyed yourself.

-It's been a real, real pleasure.

0:27:450:27:50

Meanwhile, as the Morris Minor is still out of action,

0:27:500:27:54

James takes a taxi from Letham and heads south to Glencarse for his final shop.

0:27:540:27:59

Oh, dear, he is really pooped!

0:28:000:28:03

-I hope you find lots of bargains.

-Thank you.

0:28:030:28:08

Springing into action, James enters Michael Young Antiques.

0:28:080:28:13

Established in 1887, this shop is third generation.

0:28:130:28:17

-Ah, Michael!

-Hello.

-James. Nice to see you.

0:28:170:28:20

It has an extensive collection of fine quality items,

0:28:200:28:24

dating from the Georgian and Victorian eras.

0:28:240:28:27

-How flexible are you on these?

-They're 150.

0:28:270:28:30

What do you suggest?

0:28:300:28:33

I was thinking a lot less.

0:28:330:28:35

These are four assorted, nine-carat gold brooches.

0:28:360:28:40

They include an amethyst and an Art Deco, nine-carat gold bar.

0:28:400:28:45

-I was thinking £20 each, something like that.

-80 quid?

0:28:450:28:49

Do you want to make it the round 100

0:28:500:28:52

I think they've got to be worth 100.

0:28:520:28:55

Four gold brooches, should be a profit in those.

0:28:550:28:58

Right, OK, I'm going to think on those.

0:28:580:29:02

Back on the road and in a cab, Thomas is making his way to join James at Michael Young Antiques.

0:29:020:29:09

I'm quite excited about the next shop. It's my last shop of this leg.

0:29:090:29:13

If something catches my eye and it slips in with another lot, I'll do it. Otherwise, I don't really mind.

0:29:130:29:19

Interesting tactics for your last "wow" item for auction!

0:29:190:29:24

Hello, James.

0:29:240:29:26

Fancy seeing you here!

0:29:260:29:28

I thought I might have had a bit more of a head start.

0:29:280:29:32

Thomas wastes no time in scanning the shop.

0:29:320:29:35

Oh, sugar!

0:29:370:29:39

Steady!

0:29:390:29:40

Back on the other side of the shop, James seems to have found his star buy.

0:29:400:29:45

I quite like that.

0:29:450:29:48

This is such a rare thing.

0:29:480:29:50

A bit of Chinese bronze.

0:29:500:29:53

That surface would have been polished, so you would literally have had it as a hand mirror.

0:29:530:29:58

So you put the loop there through the back,

0:29:580:30:02

put your hand through there and use it as a hand mirror for dressing, put it on a lady's dressing table.

0:30:020:30:09

Before the use of bronze mirrors, people simply reflected their faces by filling a basin with water.

0:30:090:30:16

This mirror is apparently from the Song Dynasty, 1200 AD,

0:30:160:30:20

and is priced at £200, but Michael is open to negotiation.

0:30:200:30:24

Do you want to give me 100 for it?

0:30:240:30:26

If I paid you 100, I'd lose.

0:30:260:30:28

-So you don't want to give me 100.

-I think that's the most it would make.

0:30:280:30:33

For me, I love it.

0:30:330:30:35

But how frustrating it would be...

0:30:350:30:38

if the room just didn't understand it and didn't respond to how wonderful it is.

0:30:380:30:43

Is 50 quid any good?

0:30:430:30:45

Is there anything else you want?

0:30:450:30:48

James has got his eye on two promising lots.

0:30:480:30:51

Michael wanted £100 for the four gold brooches, so maybe he'll reduce the price of the mirror.

0:30:510:30:57

That, we were talking about 50.

0:30:570:31:00

Would you take 120 if I bought the two, that and that?

0:31:000:31:03

Let's do it and see how they go.

0:31:030:31:06

-Yeah.

-We've got a deal. Thank you. Thank you.

0:31:060:31:10

Over on the other side of the shop, Thomas seems to have spotted something.

0:31:100:31:15

This is a 19th century, cast-iron fountain spout.

0:31:150:31:18

-Superb.

-Yeah.

-It'd be nice to have that in your garden, wouldn't it?

-It would be.

0:31:180:31:23

-What would you expect to get for that?

-20 quid or something.

0:31:230:31:27

-I don't know what it's worth, but I'd take 20 quid for it.

-A bit of fun?

-Yeah.

0:31:270:31:32

-I quite like that.

-Yeah, it's fun.

0:31:320:31:35

I like that very much. I do think that's rather fun.

0:31:350:31:38

Could I... I have to ask.

0:31:380:31:41

-Could I ask... Could I give you 15 for it?

-You could, yes.

0:31:410:31:45

-Would you accept that?

-I'd be glad for you to have it.

0:31:450:31:48

I hope you put it up in your garden instead of an auction room.

0:31:480:31:52

-I'd love to put it up in my garden. I think that's fun.

-Yes.

0:31:520:31:56

-So, 15?

-Thanks very much indeed.

-Thank you very much, Michael.

0:31:560:32:00

Well, Thomas's tactic was not to spend big.

0:32:000:32:03

This bespoke water feature definitely ticks that box.

0:32:030:32:07

I think he's lovely.

0:32:070:32:10

Well, would James agree? It's time for the gents to reveal their lots.

0:32:100:32:15

Come on, what have you got?

0:32:150:32:17

It doesn't look that much, but there you are. I've gone for random things.

0:32:170:32:24

You certainly have. I like them.

0:32:240:32:26

-Nice.

-This is an agricultural measurer.

-Is it to measure girth?

0:32:260:32:31

To measure girth.

0:32:310:32:33

Put that down before someone gets hurt!

0:32:350:32:38

-This is silver. This is nice.

-No?

0:32:380:32:41

-A solid silver-mounted one?

-Yeah, it's 1895. Bend over.

0:32:410:32:46

Oh, Thomas!

0:32:470:32:50

-And this is First World War.

-Oh, it's a regimental one.

-Yeah, yeah. Artillery.

0:32:500:32:55

-And it's got the early number on. Look, 4273.

-Oh, put it down!

0:32:550:33:00

James looks worried. What will Thomas think of his items though?

0:33:000:33:05

That's a big, showy lot, isn't it, the lamp?

0:33:050:33:09

-That's impressive.

-Impressive? It's vulgar.

-No, it's great.

0:33:090:33:13

-Look at that!

-It's marvellous. I think there's £150 there.

0:33:130:33:18

-Don't be ridiculous!

-There is, there is.

-It's chipped.

0:33:180:33:22

-It's going to make good money. How much did you pay for it?

-I paid 100. Is that too much?

-Far too much.

0:33:220:33:28

-I paid a tenner.

-How did you do that?

-I thought it was just horrid.

0:33:280:33:32

-Oh, I love that.

-Very nice, very early.

0:33:320:33:36

Chinese.

0:33:360:33:38

-And presumably it's bronze?

-Hmm.

0:33:380:33:40

-It's a mirror because that would be polished. It's very early. 1300s, 1400s?

-Yeah, I think so.

0:33:400:33:47

-50 quid.

-Oh... £50?

0:33:470:33:50

-I want it.

-You can't have it.

0:33:500:33:53

-Four lots. Where's number five?

-A-ha!

0:33:530:33:56

It's blending into its surroundings so well.

0:33:560:33:59

Is it?

0:33:590:34:01

It looks like it should be in a railway station. So it's a mangle.

0:34:010:34:05

Is it heavy?

0:34:050:34:07

-Oh, God, that's heavy!

-That's heavy. It would've been fun getting that in the Morris.

-What did you pay?

0:34:070:34:13

-20 quid.

-Perfect.

0:34:130:34:15

Well, let's see if I get a whipping at the auction, eh?

0:34:150:34:19

-I don't think you will, James.

-I'm sure I will.

0:34:190:34:22

In your dreams! Let's find out what they really think.

0:34:220:34:25

Oh, Thomas has been so careful. Not a single risk.

0:34:250:34:30

Everything he's bought will be a profit.

0:34:300:34:33

All those lovely bits of big Murano figures. £10?!

0:34:330:34:38

-Going to make 100. On the whole, he's done rather well.

-If he doesn't make a profit, the world's bonkers.

0:34:380:34:44

This leg of the road trip started north in Tarland,

0:34:440:34:48

worked its way to Dinnet, then east to Drumoak,

0:34:480:34:52

then 50 miles to Kirriemuir with a stop in Letham,

0:34:520:34:55

and then south to Glencarse before ending up in Dunfermline for the auction.

0:34:550:35:00

Dunfermline has one of the best preserved medieval landscapes in Scotland.

0:35:000:35:06

It's also well known as the birthplace of Scottish-American industrialist Andrew Carnegie

0:35:060:35:12

who led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century.

0:35:120:35:16

At last, the Morris is back on the road.

0:35:160:35:20

-Profits or losses?

-Realistically, I should be in for a profit.

0:35:200:35:24

Well, you played it safe, so here's hoping.

0:35:240:35:27

Family-run business Castleblair Auctions is today's battleground.

0:35:270:35:32

Auctioneer Paul Heggie predicts Thomas and James's fortunes.

0:35:320:35:37

The mangle, I like.

0:35:380:35:40

A lot of people don't like them, but I do. We seem to be able to sell them very well.

0:35:400:35:45

I was really surprised with the font It's a really, really nice piece.

0:35:450:35:49

It's not often that you see these turning up for auction, so I was quite surprised.

0:35:490:35:55

Thomas began this leg with £220.66

0:35:550:35:59

and spent a cautious £75 on five auction lots.

0:35:590:36:03

Thank you very much.

0:36:030:36:06

However, James started with an impressive £1,032.92

0:36:060:36:10

and spent £250, also on five auction lots.

0:36:100:36:14

You talked me into that one!

0:36:160:36:18

Right, take your seats. We're off!

0:36:180:36:21

-You've been given a booster seat.

-I've been given a booster seat, James!

-You little man, you!

0:36:210:36:27

First up is Thomas's 19th century, cast-iron fountain head.

0:36:270:36:31

-£28.

-28.

-Underbidders are out. 28. Bid 30.

0:36:310:36:35

32. 35. 38. 40.

0:36:350:36:38

42. 45. Book bids are out at 45. We're on the floor at 45.

0:36:380:36:42

48. 50.

0:36:420:36:45

5. 55 I'm bid now. All finished at 55? Last call at 55...?

0:36:450:36:50

-55. Was that 55?

-Well done, well done.

0:36:500:36:53

That water feature has given Thomas a great start and boosted his morale.

0:36:530:36:58

Fighting back, making back that profit.

0:36:580:37:02

James splashed the cash with this damaged Creamware jug.

0:37:020:37:06

Will his spending pay off?

0:37:060:37:08

-Lots of bids on this again. I can start the bidding at £35.

-Oh, no.

0:37:080:37:12

-You'll be fine.

-38. 40...

-Calm down.

0:37:120:37:15

-Calm down.

-48. 50.

0:37:150:37:18

-Calm down.

-Book's out at 55. On the floor at 55. All finished at 55?

0:37:180:37:22

60. 5. 70. 5.

0:37:220:37:26

-80 to my left.

-Oh!

-Calm down, James.

0:37:260:37:29

-Last call, £80...?

-No!

0:37:290:37:31

-You lost money on that one.

-JAMES PRETENDS TO SOB

0:37:310:37:35

How dramatic! But this loss of £20

0:37:350:37:38

would dent James's extraordinary lead.

0:37:380:37:42

-There you go.

-If you spend more than £100...

-You make a loss.

0:37:420:37:46

Will Thomas's hunting and training crops whip the crowd into a frenzy?

0:37:460:37:51

£50 for it? 50? 40? 30 to start it? £30 bid.

0:37:510:37:54

30 bid. 30 on the lot. £30. 32.

0:37:540:37:57

35. 38. 40.

0:37:570:38:00

42. 45.

0:38:000:38:02

48 to my left. At £48. New bid at 50

0:38:020:38:05

On the book bid at 55. 60.

0:38:050:38:08

Book's out at 60. We're on the floor again at 60. All finished at £60?

0:38:080:38:12

-60, that's not bad.

-Well done.

-That's a good profit.

0:38:130:38:17

Definitely. Thomas seems to be moving in the right direction.

0:38:170:38:21

Sweet smell of profit!

0:38:210:38:23

James is now pinning his hopes on this group of gold brooches.

0:38:240:38:28

£75 bid on the book. 75. 75.

0:38:280:38:31

80. 5. 90. 5.

0:38:310:38:34

100. 100 here at... 5. 110.

0:38:340:38:37

All finished at 110? Last call at 110...?

0:38:370:38:40

-Good profit. Really good profit.

-I'm pleased.

0:38:400:38:44

Thank goodness! And no more dramatics!

0:38:440:38:47

-You look sort of smug.

-Smug?

0:38:490:38:51

£40, that's brilliant, really, isn't it?

0:38:510:38:55

Thomas got a real bargain with this pen set.

0:38:550:38:58

Let's hope it's not a write-off!

0:38:580:39:00

-I can start on the book at 15 then..

-Told you.

0:39:000:39:04

16. 18. 20. 22.

0:39:040:39:07

-25. Book's at 25...

-Told you, 25!

0:39:070:39:09

£25. All finished at 25? Last call at £25...?

0:39:090:39:13

Pleased? Show some sort of reaction!

0:39:130:39:16

An excellent profit for Thomas who also has his poker face on.

0:39:160:39:21

Now time for that 1870s Aberdeen mangle that James didn't want.

0:39:210:39:27

-Lots and lots of interest in this.

-It's quite attractive.

0:39:270:39:30

I can start the bidding here at...£60.

0:39:300:39:33

Underbidders are all out. 60 bid, 60 on the lot.

0:39:330:39:36

£60 on the mangle. At £60. 65.

0:39:360:39:38

70. We're on the book at £70.

0:39:380:39:41

All finished at £70? Book bid at 70. Last call at £70?

0:39:410:39:44

-Hmm.

-What do you mean, "hmm"?

0:39:440:39:47

The unloved mangle has had the last laugh

0:39:470:39:50

as it's wrung out a great profit for James.

0:39:500:39:54

-Would you have paid 35 for it?

-No. I would've left it.

-So would I.

0:39:540:39:57

Next up is the cigar lighter that Thomas got for free.

0:39:570:40:02

£5 for it then?

0:40:020:40:04

-£5 bid. 6.

-There are five or six hands up.

0:40:040:40:07

10. 12. 15.

0:40:070:40:10

-Lady's bid at £18...

-£18? I'm not worried about that.

0:40:100:40:13

Last call at £18...?

0:40:130:40:15

Could have made a bit more, but it doesn't matter.

0:40:150:40:18

This silver-plated, genie style wick trimmer

0:40:180:40:21

gave Thomas a much-needed, although petite profit.

0:40:210:40:25

James really did value this ancient mirror,

0:40:250:40:28

but will the crowd see its worth?

0:40:280:40:30

£50 bid. Thank you. 50. 5.

0:40:300:40:33

60. 5. 70.

0:40:330:40:35

-5.

-Calm down, James.

-80.

0:40:350:40:37

-Let it go.

-5. 90.

0:40:370:40:39

5. 100. And 10 on the lot.

0:40:390:40:42

110. New bid at 120. 130.

0:40:420:40:46

-See? I told you.

-All finished at £130? Last call at 130...?

0:40:460:40:51

-Yay.

-There you are.

-That's all right.

-Come on.

0:40:510:40:54

All right? Surely that profit is something to shout about!

0:40:540:40:58

Now leave me alone.

0:40:580:41:00

Don't... You're such a baby.

0:41:000:41:03

Will these quirky, 19th century contraptions

0:41:030:41:05

yield Thomas the profit he needs?

0:41:050:41:08

At £10 shall we start it then?

0:41:080:41:11

£10 bid. 10. 12.

0:41:110:41:14

15. 18.

0:41:140:41:16

New bid at 20. 20 at the back. At £20. 22.

0:41:160:41:19

25. 28. Last call at £28...?

0:41:190:41:24

-Ohh... 28.

-What do you mean, "Ohh?"

0:41:240:41:27

What do you mean, "Ohh?" It's a profit.

0:41:270:41:30

Yes, James, it is, but Thomas won't see much of his £3 profit

0:41:300:41:34

after auction costs.

0:41:340:41:36

James didn't want this glass family of figurines

0:41:360:41:39

or the Murano table lamp.

0:41:390:41:42

-I can start with the book bid at 20.

-20.

-20 bid on the lot. 22. 25.

0:41:420:41:46

28. 30. 32.

0:41:460:41:50

35. 38.

0:41:500:41:52

-40.

-They're in the room.

-42.

0:41:520:41:54

45. 48. 50. New bid at £50.

0:41:540:41:58

All finished at £50? Last call at £50...?

0:41:580:42:02

-50.

-Very good.

-£40 profit.

-Yeah.

0:42:020:42:05

I thought it should have made another...

0:42:050:42:08

There should be a one in front of that.

0:42:080:42:10

The classic design of Murano speaks for itself

0:42:100:42:13

and at last, its value has been appreciated.

0:42:130:42:16

-You thought it was worth 150?

-They're rare things. Like that, in that condition, they're rare.

0:42:160:42:22

Thomas started this leg with £220.66.

0:42:220:42:26

After paying auction costs and making a profit of £77.52,

0:42:260:42:32

that leaves him with a decent £298.18.

0:42:320:42:36

James started with a whopping £1,032.92

0:42:380:42:43

and after auction costs, made £110.80 profit,

0:42:430:42:47

boosting his piggy bank to £1,143.72

0:42:470:42:53

and making him the clear winner of this leg.

0:42:530:42:56

So how do you feel? A profit? That's a rare thing for you, Thomas.

0:42:590:43:03

There's no need. There's no need to behave like that, Mr Lewis.

0:43:030:43:07

Maybe this is the start of Thomas's fightback.

0:43:070:43:11

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, our chaps have trouble on four wheels.

0:43:110:43:17

We might have a flat.

0:43:170:43:19

And fun on two!

0:43:200:43:22

I'm attempting a turn.

0:43:220:43:25

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