Episode 25 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 25

Antiques experts travel across the UK searching for treasures. Thomas Plant opts for two wheels instead of four and James Lewis gets to the root of Auld Lang Syne.


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Transcript


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-TIM WONNACOTT:

-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts

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with £200 each,

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a classic car,

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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That hurts.

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What d'you think?

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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What have I done?

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So, will it be the high road to glory or slow road to disaster?

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-Put your back into it.

-Shut up!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah.

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On this Road Trip two auctioneers battle

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to be crowned King of Scotland.

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James Lewis is an auctioneer from Derbyshire,

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who's proved he has a magic touch

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when it comes to turning a profit.

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You don't often see something like that.

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While Thomas Plant runs a Berkshire saleroom

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and has proved that his acumen is matched only by his affability.

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Can I have a go on something else now?

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These two have been locked in a dynamic duel

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for the last four legs of the Road Trip

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and this final battle will decide which of them emerges victorious.

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Ah! That's my head!

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Whoops.

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Both our boys started this Road Trip with a cool £200.

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Over the last four legs,

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Thomas has managed to trade up his total to £298.18.

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Well done.

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While James has astonished all and sundry

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by turning his original 200 smackers into

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not £500, not £600, not even £900,

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but a whopping £1143.72.

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Crikey!

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Our pair are hitting the highways in a true Brit,

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the classic 1953 Morris Minor.

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She's a doughty old girl, but prone to the occasional tantrum.

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With my extensive knowledge of cars, I think the solenoid's gone.

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What the heck is a solenoid?

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Oh, no!

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Oh, Lordy!

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Surprisingly, they've managed to cruise the Morris Minor

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over the hills and glens of Caledonia,

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from the wind-blown west coast, through the stunning highlands

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and then back to the low country and Edinburgh.

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On today's show, they begin the final leg of their trip

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in Ayrshire's county town, Ayr,

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before touring round beautiful southwest Scotland

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and ending up at their auction

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in Scotland's craggy capital, Edinburgh.

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They're just outside Ayr but it seems that

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the Morris Minor is up to her old tricks.

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Think we might have a flat.

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-You think we've got a flat?

-Maybe.

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-I think you should pull over.

-Indeed.

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# Get your motor running... #

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-That's definitely not right.

-You'd better change it then,

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because you need to get back on the road, in search of antiques.

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But aren't you two handy?

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You're getting to be regular motor-heads.

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Looks all right.

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All part of a morning on the Road Trip, eh, chaps?

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Anyway, Ayr is justly celebrated by the poet Robert Burns

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for its honest men and bonnie lasses.

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That sounds very promising

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as Thomas drops James off at his first shop.

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Right. Well done.

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-Have fun.

-James is heading into his first shop,

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where dealer John will assist.

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Anything special you're after today?

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Trying to find something that might make a profit at auction.

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You can come right through to the gallery.

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With over £1,000 burning a hole in his pocket,

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James can afford to think big on this leg.

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But he's also determined to work out his strategy.

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At the moment, I'm trying to think about what will go with what,

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to build up a more expensive lot.

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That looks about as reliable as the car we're driving.

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It's got all four wheels, which is more than we almost did this morning.

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This tin-plate toy dates from around 1910

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and is marked up at £35 and there's another toy that takes his fancy.

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How about the bear?

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On the ticket is £65.

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And he...hah...seems to have pilfered your hat, James.

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Bear? Yes, we can give you a good price on the bear.

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£40. Do that for you.

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Looks better in my hat than I do.

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Suits your hat.

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He's big, isn't he?

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Yeah. Everybody loves a teddy bear.

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This might fit in with James's strategy

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to build up themed job lots.

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He's spotted another toy car, as well. The ticket says £20.

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What could the Chad Valley car be?

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-This little chap here with no key.

-This one?

-Yeah.

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Erm, do that for 15.

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15. And the other car?

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I'll do that one for 20.

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What deal could John do on all three items?

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The combined original ticket price was £120

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but James has got John down to £75 for the lot, so far.

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Would you take 50 the three?

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-Instead of 75?

-No. I couldn't do that.

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What could you do?

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I could let them go for 70.

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There's one more childhood-themed item

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that might make it into the job lot yet.

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Would you throw that christening gown in with them?

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Er...no.

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I wouldn't throw it in, but I'll give you a really good price on it.

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-Go on, then.

-£10. There you go.

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75 the lot, then.

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Make it 80.

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-Go on, 75.

-Make it 80.

-Oh, go on, then. Make it 80.

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THEY LAUGH

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I'm not hard enough.

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All right. £80.

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Deal done! That was child's play.

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Now he's spotted a military object,

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which has been pressed into use as an umbrella stand.

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It's a charge carrier that would have been used

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to contain a cordite charge for an artillery weapon.

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These were made from the 1700s

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through to the early 20th century, though this is quite a late example.

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It's priced up at £125.

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It's a fun thing. Is there much movement in it?

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Well, OK. £65.

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-Give you 50 for the stick stand.

-Can you go 55?

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-Go on then.

-Just so I've a bit of profit.

-Go on.

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-You got a profit out of that?

-Yeah.

-Good.

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A direct hit, and another lot in the bag.

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But, on his way out, he spots yet another item that takes his fancy.

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It's an early 20th century picnic hamper.

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How much is this?

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That? £50 would do for that.

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How flexible are you on price?

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Well, I can come and go, but not much.

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I'd be looking about 25.

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I could let you have it for 40, but no less.

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James is wondering if he can sweeten the deal

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by assembling another job lot.

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He's found a small boxwood device

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for finishing self-assembled paper cartridges,

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which would be fired from a shotgun.

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The cartridge would have been inserted into the device

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and the metal handle rolled over to close the end.

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Now he's picked up a set of miniature dominoes

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that date from around 1905.

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Combined ticket price for all three items is £90.

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What can James haggle John down to?

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65. Call it 60. There you go.

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55 and you've got a deal.

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-No, 60, come on.

-No.

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59.

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HE LAUGHS

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You are... Oh dear!

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-Come on, 59.

-I'm going to stand my ground.

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Oh well.

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-Go for the 59.

-55.

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-Can't do it. I just can't do it.

-57.

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57, Done.

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Oh, dear me!

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You have to be the hardest negotiator I have ever come across.

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Well, it's been fun. I've enjoyed it. Well done, you.

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Wow. With that masterly display of negotiating grit,

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James rounds up an absolutely bumper morning's shopping.

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Meanwhile Thomas has driven a couple of miles down the road

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to the neighbouring town of Prestwick.

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Prestwick is thought to be the only place in the UK

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that was ever visited by rock and roll legend Elvis Presley,

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who made a whirlwind pit-stop here, during his military service in 1960.

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Let's hope Thomas's first shop

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is more Hunk O' Love than Heartbreak Hotel.

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Either way, he's meeting dealer Gary.

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-Hello.

-Good morning.

-I'm Thomas.

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-Gary. Pleased to meet you.

-Gary?

-Yeah.

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Enough chatting - it's time to find some buys, Thomas.

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HONK

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There's Ayr.

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Is that Largs, there?

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L-A-R-G-S?

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What do you think, Thomas?

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My strategy has been

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buy at the low end and then sell, hopefully, better.

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And I think I might carry on with that strategy, cos it's worked.

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There's no point changing it if it's working.

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Spoken like a true traditionalist.

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He's spotted a collection that might bring in a sweet profit.

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Lovely tin. Look at that. "Home of Milady's Toffee."

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Love that one. Really nice.

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So decorative, aren't they? They're just lovely.

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Never bought tins before.

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Am I being really stupid?

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We'll soon find out.

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They date from the early 20th century.

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The combined ticket price for all the tins is around the £80 mark.

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What would you do as a really enticing deal?

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Charge you for the two really nice ones,

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which are in good condition,

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and I'll throw the rest in. That's 45 for the lot.

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Now, I, obviously, am selling at auction,

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so if I can give you... 45's a lovely price.

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It's a really fair price.

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-But I'd like to give you £30 for the lot.

-30?

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-OK. 30.

-30?

-Yeah.

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Brilliant. Thank you very much.

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-Can I give you some spondoolies?

-Pleasure.

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Before he leaves, he spots one more thing that takes his fancy.

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It's an octagonal Chinese plate, dating from the 18th century.

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Ticket price is a bargain £8.

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Can he get Gary down any further?

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Got...

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5.

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Deal.

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-Thank you very much.

-Pleasure.

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Done and dusted.

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Two lots in the bag from a very efficient morning's buying.

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Thomas is heading back to Ayr to meet James and hand over the car.

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-Aha!

-Hello.

-How are you?

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Very good. Buy much?

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-Seven things, actually.

-Oh, really?

-Yeah, three lots.

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I bought two lots. Maybe more things.

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-More than seven.

-No!

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-I've left it in the same place.

-Brilliant.

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-Thank you. Have fun.

-I will.

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James is happy with his morning's bumper buys,

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so he's taking the motor and heading over to Alloway,

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a suburb of Ayr.

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As a man of culture, he's keen to pay a visit to the local attraction,

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that tells the story of Ayrshire's most celebrated son

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and Scotland's national poet, The Robert Burns Birthplace Museum...

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...where he's meeting curator Amy.

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-Hi. How you doing?

-Hello.

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-I'm James. Nice to see you.

-Hi, nice to meet you.

-And you.

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-Wow. So this is the place?

-Yes, it is.

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This is the birthplace of Robert Burns.

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He was born in a room within that cottage.

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-Shall we go in and have a look?

-Sure, follow me.

-After you.

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Born in 1759 into a modest farming family here in Alloway,

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Burns went on to become both Scotland's bard

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and a writer loved around the world.

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His poems and songs, like Tam o' Shanter

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and Auld Lang Syne and My Love Is Like A Red, Red Rose,

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are still regularly performed and read today.

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Right, so this is the kitchen of Burns' cottage

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and this room is significant, not because it was a kitchen,

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but because it was also the bedroom and the place

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where Robert Burns was born. He was actually born in that bed.

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My goodness!

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Robert Burns only lived here until he was about six years old.

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-OK.

-And then they moved to another farm nearby.

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So what's the story? How did he go from

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being a boy here to Scotland's greatest writer?

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It is quite amazing that he did achieve so much.

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I think a lot of that came from the fact that his father, William,

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very strongly believed in educating his children,

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They weren't rich, by any means, but what little they did have,

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I think they spent wisely, towards the education of their children.

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Robert was educated until he was in his teens

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and, at that time, he went to work on the farm.

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He actually worked for other farmers at harvest time.

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During that time, he was inspired by a young lass

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that he worked with in the fields

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and that's when he wrote his first poem,

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Once I Lov'd A Bonnie Lass, to Handsome Nell.

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So the theme of love inspiring someone to write something great

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is a theme that carries throughout much of Robert's life.

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Burns continued writing throughout his young life

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and built up an impressive body of work.

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Amy's taking James across the road to the modern museum building,

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where she's going to show him some of the vast collection

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of Burns manuscripts that the Centre holds.

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-So.

-Blue paper?

-It may not look like much,

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lying there, but it is a Kilmarnock edition,

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which is the first published edition of Burns' work.

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There were 610 of them published in 1786

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and today less than 100 survive,

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and this one, as you can see, is still in its original blue wrapper

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and that's how it would have come from the publisher,

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from John Wilson, the publisher in Kilmarnock, yes.

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-Can I pick it up?

-Sure. Go ahead.

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This first edition of Burns' work brought him fame in Scotland

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and set him on the road to immortality.

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One of these Kilmarnock editions recently sold at auction

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for £40,000.

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And we have probably one of the most well-known works here.

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Oh! To A Mouse!

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-Wee fleeket...

-That's an S.

-Sleeket.

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Let e help you there, James.

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This poem, addressed to a field mouse,

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whose nest Burns has turned up with his plough,

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contains some of his most famous lines.

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Words worth remembering on the Road Trip, eh?

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-So this was the book that made him famous?

-That's right.

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So why so famous?

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I think the work struck a chord with people, really.

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He wrote about things everyone saw,

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so it appealed to people locally here, that were farmers,

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and also the gentry of Edinburgh, so it appealed to everyone.

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This universality and theme of brotherhood

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is central to what is, perhaps, Burns' best-known work.

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Next Amy has a very special treat in store for James.

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The next thing we have here is a fragment of Auld Lang Syne.

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-No way!

-Yes.

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It's written in Burns' own handwriting.

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-This is the original script?

-Yes.

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So Auld Lang Syne has got to be...

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got to be in the top ten most famous songs in the world.

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Yeah, it's popular the world over.

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In Japan it's played at the end of the working day.

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It makes me feel slightly strange, looking at that, you know.

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-It's just an incredible piece of history.

-I know, yeah.

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And it's just wonderful how it appeals to people across the world,

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because of the sentiments in it.

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You don't often see something like that.

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"We'll take a cup of kindness yet for auld lang syne."

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Oh, how amazing.

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This has been absolutely incredible. Thank you very much.

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-It was my pleasure. Thank you for coming.

-Wow.

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Meanwhile, James's auld acquaintance,

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Thomas, is still back in Ayr,

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at the same shop James visited this morning.

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Can he work the same magic with dealer John?

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-Hello.

-Hello there. Come right in.

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Thank you. I'm Thomas,

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and you've had my compadre James.

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Yes. Very nice it was, too.

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You see, I need something...

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..to beat him with, thrash him with.

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Not literally.

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Well, let's hope not. But a pretty object has caught Thomas's eye.

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I have a real passion for Scandinavian things

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and here we have a piece of Royal Copenhagen

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and it's simply marvellous.

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Simply a very interesting piece

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just because of the design, the style.

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Royal Copenhagen porcelain

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had been a manufacturer of Danish porcelain since 1775.

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This 1950s vase is priced at £40,

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and that's not the only Scandinavian beauty Thomas has spotted. Oh, no.

0:19:260:19:30

Oh. Didn't see this. Mm.

0:19:330:19:36

As a bit of a freak, when it comes to these things,

0:19:370:19:41

it says Holmegaard, Per Lutken.

0:19:410:19:45

It's quite an early biomorphic bowl.

0:19:450:19:49

Per Lutken was a glassmaker

0:19:500:19:52

at the Danish glass factory Holmegaard.

0:19:520:19:56

Many of his designs are considered 20th century classics.

0:19:560:19:59

This dates from around 1955. Ticket price is £40.

0:19:590:20:03

We could put that with the Copenhagen, the vase,

0:20:060:20:10

and make a lot.

0:20:100:20:12

You know, Danish stuff.

0:20:130:20:15

There could be another job lot here on the way,

0:20:150:20:19

but he's spotted yet another shiny item.

0:20:190:20:21

I quite like that hall mirror. It's quite a nice thing.

0:20:210:20:26

It's good. It's not that old, though.

0:20:260:20:28

-Can I lift it down?

-Course you can.

0:20:280:20:30

This 1950s mirror might appeal to a fan of retro style.

0:20:310:20:35

It's priced up at £45.

0:20:350:20:37

Cool, daddy-O!

0:20:370:20:39

Good bit of styling.

0:20:410:20:43

Well, it's for throwing light around the room.

0:20:430:20:45

Yeah, looks lovely.

0:20:450:20:47

It's not a bad look, though. I think it's a good, general sale.

0:20:470:20:51

Tick tock. Time's running out.

0:20:530:20:55

Thomas has found a lot of things he likes

0:20:550:20:58

but has yet to strike a deal on any of them.

0:20:580:21:00

And it looks like he's spotted something else -

0:21:000:21:03

an Art Deco travelling clock.

0:21:030:21:05

-There's no price on this.

-No.

0:21:140:21:16

Well, I was going to say, like the mirror...

0:21:160:21:19

..like the vase, like the bowl, quite like this,

0:21:200:21:24

but could we do all of that for 80 with this thrown in?

0:21:240:21:29

No. I need...

0:21:290:21:31

It would need to be 90.

0:21:340:21:36

85?

0:21:390:21:41

Yeah, I'll go for 85.

0:21:410:21:43

-Good man.

-Good man.

0:21:430:21:45

TIM WHISTLES

0:21:450:21:46

Well haggled, Thomas.

0:21:460:21:48

He gets a £45 reduction on the ticket price

0:21:480:21:51

of the mirror, vase and bowl,

0:21:510:21:54

and the travelling clock thrown in for a fiver.

0:21:540:21:58

And with that, our boys are all spent up for the day.

0:21:580:22:00

So night-night, chaps.

0:22:000:22:03

The Scottish morn finds the sun shining

0:22:060:22:09

and the chaps back in the car and raring to go.

0:22:090:22:13

This is the very last buying day of their epic Caledonian Road Trip.

0:22:140:22:18

How are they feeling?

0:22:180:22:20

This is it. This is the final day before the auction.

0:22:220:22:26

Are you going to shed a tear?

0:22:270:22:29

-I've enjoyed your accompany.

-I've enjoyed your accompany, James.

0:22:290:22:33

It's been remarkably fun.

0:22:330:22:35

Weren't you expecting it to be fun?!

0:22:350:22:37

Charming!

0:22:370:22:40

So far, Thomas has spent £120 on five lots.

0:22:400:22:43

The collection of early 20th century tins,

0:22:440:22:47

the 1950s Danish vase and bowl...

0:22:470:22:49

..the '50s mirror...

0:22:510:22:53

the Art Deco travelling timepiece...

0:22:530:22:55

..and the Chinese plate.

0:22:570:22:59

He still has £178.18.

0:22:590:23:02

Meanwhile, James has splurged £192 on three lots.

0:23:020:23:07

The job lot of toys...

0:23:070:23:09

..the charge carrier-cum-stick stand...

0:23:100:23:13

..and the job lot of cartridge maker, dominoes and picnic hamper.

0:23:140:23:18

He still has £951.72 in his wallet.

0:23:180:23:22

They've driven south, to the rolling green of Dumfriesshire,

0:23:250:23:28

where James is going to drop Thomas off.

0:23:280:23:31

-Here we go.

-Drum..rang...Drum...

0:23:340:23:36

-lanrig...

-Lanrig.

-Drumlanrig Castle.

0:23:380:23:40

You'd better get the name right!

0:23:400:23:42

It's Drumlanrig Castle, near the town of Thornhill.

0:23:420:23:46

And, since Thomas has such a bountiful haul of lots already,

0:23:470:23:51

he's going to spend the morning

0:23:510:23:52

having a spin around The Scottish Cycle Museum,

0:23:520:23:55

which is in the castle grounds.

0:23:550:23:58

The 17th century pink palace of Drumlanrig

0:23:580:24:00

is home to the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry.

0:24:000:24:04

Pretty Scottish style, isn't it? It's amazing!

0:24:070:24:10

-Have fun.

-Spend some money.

0:24:120:24:15

That doesn't look anything like a bicycle museum, I'm quite jealous.

0:24:150:24:18

As well you might be. Thomas is meeting head ranger Richard.

0:24:180:24:23

-Hello.

-Hello, Thomas. How are you?

0:24:240:24:27

-What's your name?

-I'm Richard Riley. Pleased to meet you.

0:24:270:24:30

The museum charts the whole history of the noble bicycle,

0:24:300:24:34

from the very earliest machines, through the iron-framed boneshakers

0:24:340:24:38

and towering penny-farthing designs, and on to the present day.

0:24:380:24:43

But how on earth did the Bicycle Museum

0:24:430:24:47

come to be in the stable block of this magnificent castle?

0:24:470:24:50

It's here because of the connection to this bicycle.

0:24:520:24:55

Kirkpatrick Macmillan was a blacksmith

0:24:550:24:57

who served his time on the estate.

0:24:570:24:59

He learned his trade here on the estate.

0:24:590:25:01

Shortly after that, he set up his own forge.

0:25:010:25:04

In that forge in 1839,

0:25:040:25:05

Macmillan invented this fantastic machine here,

0:25:050:25:08

which is the first ever pedal bicycle that we know of.

0:25:080:25:12

The history of early bicycle invention

0:25:120:25:15

is an area hotly contested by historians to this day,

0:25:150:25:19

but Richard and the fans of Kirkpatrick Macmillan

0:25:190:25:21

are sure this Dumfriesshire man made a huge contribution

0:25:210:25:25

to the development of two-wheeled travel.

0:25:250:25:28

Being a blacksmith, why did he want to invent a bicycle?

0:25:300:25:34

I think he was just inquisitive.

0:25:340:25:36

I think he had seen a machine that predated this,

0:25:360:25:40

the Laufmaschine that was invented by Baron von Drais

0:25:400:25:43

in 1817, thereabouts.

0:25:430:25:45

The German Laufmaschine was shaped like a bicycle

0:25:450:25:48

but was propelled only by the rider

0:25:480:25:50

pushing off the ground with his feet.

0:25:500:25:52

I think what happened was Macmillan's seen the Laufmaschine

0:25:520:25:56

and he's thought, "I could make that mechanically propelled."

0:25:560:26:00

Like the Laufmaschine, Macmillan's cycle

0:26:000:26:03

was mainly made of wood but with metal treadles..

0:26:030:26:06

If you look at the technology that's on Macmillan's bike here,

0:26:060:26:09

it was pre-existing within his blacksmith's forge.

0:26:090:26:13

A lot of the grinding stones that he would use

0:26:130:26:15

used the same treadle system,

0:26:150:26:17

similar to an old Singer sewing machine.

0:26:170:26:20

Macmillan was used to using this machine on a day-to-day basis.

0:26:200:26:24

He was known to cycle down to Dumfries on a regular basis.

0:26:240:26:27

This 14 mile journey must have been bracing on Victorian roads.

0:26:270:26:32

Thomas is about to find out for himself

0:26:320:26:33

as Richard and bicycle collector Alex

0:26:330:26:36

give him a shot on this replica Macmillan cycle.

0:26:360:26:40

First thing you do is put your leg over. This is the saddle here.

0:26:420:26:46

-That's the one.

-OK.

0:26:460:26:47

Now put your feet onto the treadles

0:26:480:26:51

to give you an idea of where you're at. OK?

0:26:510:26:53

What we'll do is, we'll head off and if you just get the motion...

0:26:530:26:57

OK? Alex has got you behind.

0:26:570:27:00

Whoa, whoa, whoa.

0:27:000:27:02

How do I turn?

0:27:030:27:05

By gosh, I think he's got it.

0:27:080:27:10

I'm attempting a turn.

0:27:100:27:12

I don't know if I should.

0:27:130:27:15

Oh! Nearly!

0:27:160:27:18

# Bicycle, bicycle, bicycle I want to ride my... #

0:27:180:27:21

RICHARD APPLAUDS

0:27:210:27:23

It's quite hard work, isn't it?

0:27:230:27:25

You've achieved one of the things that you must do before you die,

0:27:250:27:28

and that's ride a Macmillan bicycle.

0:27:280:27:30

Well, that has been a wonderful experience - can I have a go on something else now?

0:27:300:27:33

You're keen.

0:27:330:27:35

Bicycle collector Derek is going to let our lad

0:27:350:27:37

have a shot at the boneshaker, a design form the 1870s.

0:27:370:27:42

Its name refers to the sort of comfort a rider might expect.

0:27:420:27:46

It's amazing that it's still got this spring in it.

0:27:460:27:50

Oh, no. Whoops.

0:27:510:27:53

Right. Thank you.

0:27:560:27:58

# I want to ride my bicycle... #

0:27:580:28:00

I like the little bell!

0:28:000:28:02

What an elegant machine.

0:28:070:28:08

Gosh! He's the Road Trip's answer to Bradley Wiggins.

0:28:080:28:12

A cycling all-rounder.

0:28:120:28:14

-Very well done.

-Thank you very much. It's been a real pleasure.

0:28:150:28:18

And I must go and buy some antiques now to try and beat James.

0:28:180:28:21

Indeed you must, so get on your bike!

0:28:210:28:24

I'm not going to dismount... Oh, my...!

0:28:250:28:27

Meanwhile, James has driven on to the nearest town, Thornhill,

0:28:300:28:34

and he seems to have acquired some interesting eyewear.

0:28:340:28:37

I feel like Toad of Toad Hall. Bah!

0:28:380:28:42

I'm saying nothing.

0:28:420:28:44

This monument in the pretty country town of Thornhill

0:28:450:28:49

commemorates the 19th century Scottish explorer

0:28:490:28:52

Joseph Thomson, a local boy famed for his African expeditions.

0:28:520:28:56

Let's hope James can embrace that spirit of adventure

0:29:010:29:04

as he heads into Rosebank Antiques,

0:29:040:29:07

where he's meeting the lovely Pauline.

0:29:070:29:10

-Hello there.

-Hello.

-Hi, I'm James.

0:29:120:29:14

-I'm Pauline.

-Nice to see you.

0:29:140:29:16

He's only just arrived but James has spied something.

0:29:160:29:18

-Fun, isn't he?

-Yes, he's lovely.

0:29:240:29:27

Love the expression.

0:29:270:29:29

Unusual, being a lion.

0:29:290:29:31

It's a Staffordshire pottery figure of a lion sitting with a lamb,

0:29:330:29:36

dating from the 19th century.

0:29:360:29:39

Staffordshire figures can be highly collectible

0:29:390:29:42

and rare figures fetch huge sums.

0:29:420:29:45

But any damage can decrease their value considerably.

0:29:450:29:49

On the ticket is £155.

0:29:490:29:51

What could he be?

0:29:540:29:56

-100?

-Good.

0:29:570:29:59

It's the hole in the back that's the killer.

0:30:050:30:08

I didn't know whether that was in the mould.

0:30:080:30:10

No, I think it's been dropped at some point.

0:30:100:30:14

He must have been dropped on something sharp, mustn't he?

0:30:140:30:17

It's a strange place to be damaged.

0:30:170:30:18

He's lovely at the front. Lovely face.

0:30:200:30:22

Staffordshire's really gone off the boil,

0:30:220:30:25

but they either want it and pay really good money for it,

0:30:250:30:29

or very, very difficult to get any money.

0:30:290:30:31

As the morning ticks on, one more thing catches his eye.

0:30:310:30:35

It's a 19th century clock movement, which has become separated

0:30:350:30:38

from the clock case it belonged to.

0:30:380:30:40

The ticket price is £40.

0:30:400:30:43

What would be the best on the movement?

0:30:450:30:48

Erm...30.

0:30:500:30:52

He's interested, but he can't get his mind off the Staffordshire lion.

0:30:520:30:57

Did you buy him well? Is there much movement in there?

0:30:580:31:02

-There's a little bit.

-Yeah?

0:31:020:31:04

-Could I make you a cheeky offer?

-You can.

0:31:040:31:06

You can always say no! 50.

0:31:060:31:09

A little bit more.

0:31:100:31:13

Will Pauline cut him a deal

0:31:130:31:14

for both the clock movement and the lion?

0:31:140:31:17

Will you take 20 for that and 60 for that?

0:31:180:31:21

-Yeah.

-Yeah? Would you?

-I would, yeah.

0:31:210:31:24

-Leaves you a profit?

-Yeah.

-Brilliant.

0:31:240:31:26

-In that case, you've got a deal.

-Thank you.

0:31:260:31:28

Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:31:280:31:30

I have no idea about this.

0:31:300:31:33

I think he's really interesting, I think he's an interesting thing.

0:31:330:31:38

Deal done, but James is going to take one more little item, as well -

0:31:380:31:42

a miniature gaming table, priced at only £4.

0:31:420:31:44

He's still game for a haggle, though.

0:31:440:31:47

Guess I could add that in with that little lot, couldn't I?

0:31:500:31:53

Couple of quid.

0:31:540:31:56

-Will you take a couple for that one?

-Yeah.

-Brilliant, thanks.

0:31:570:32:00

The miniature gaming table is a snip at £2.

0:32:000:32:03

He'll add it to the job lot of hamper,

0:32:030:32:06

cartridge tool and dominoes he bought yesterday.

0:32:060:32:08

And he's off!

0:32:080:32:09

Thomas and James both have five lots assembled for auction,

0:32:140:32:18

so they've repaired nearby to the stunning Solway coast

0:32:180:32:22

to unveil their purchases.

0:32:220:32:24

First to clock in is James.

0:32:250:32:27

There we go.

0:32:270:32:29

Look at that.

0:32:310:32:32

-So, eight day longcase clock movement?

-Yes.

-Nice thing.

0:32:320:32:36

Lovely. Good painted dial.

0:32:360:32:39

And how does he think the job lot

0:32:400:32:42

of toys and Christening gown will play out?

0:32:420:32:44

Lehmann tin-plate toy, early 1900s.

0:32:440:32:48

-Nice looking thing, been painted.

-Yeah.

0:32:480:32:50

Nice bear. Mary Thorpe English bear, lovely.

0:32:500:32:53

Now the damaged but intriguing Staffordshire lion.

0:32:530:32:56

-He's a handsome chap, isn't he?

-Isn't he?

0:32:560:32:59

It's a lovely Staffordshire figure.

0:32:590:33:00

There are lion collectors out there.

0:33:000:33:03

I know of one who would fall in love with this immediately.

0:33:030:33:07

I love it. It's very nice.

0:33:070:33:09

Kind words from Thomas.

0:33:090:33:12

Now, what will James think of his haul?

0:33:120:33:14

First, the bargain piece of porcelain.

0:33:140:33:16

Lovely!

0:33:160:33:18

-It's all there.

-18th century one.

0:33:180:33:20

Chinese blue and white is what everyone's after.

0:33:200:33:23

Fiver paid.

0:33:230:33:25

-Fiver?! A fiver?!

-A fiver.

0:33:250:33:27

HE LAUGHS

0:33:270:33:28

Well, that's a pretty damn good start.

0:33:280:33:31

Hmm, he might be getting worried, Thomas.

0:33:310:33:33

-I recognise the mirror.

-The mirror, yeah.

0:33:340:33:36

It's lovely, the mirror.

0:33:360:33:38

1950s, so decorative.

0:33:380:33:41

These are fun. You sell a lot of tins, don't you?

0:33:410:33:43

We well tins, as well. Oh, yeah. Fun. Fun.

0:33:430:33:46

-OK., how much were they?

-35 quid.

0:33:460:33:48

Well, that's 40, isn't it?

0:33:500:33:52

Now that they've seen all their rival's buys,

0:33:530:33:55

what do they really think, huh?

0:33:550:33:57

Thomas, as usual, has bought a really mixed bag.

0:33:590:34:02

The tins are a little bit specialist,

0:34:020:34:04

but the Chinese plate, that's a great one,

0:34:040:34:06

that should show a great profit.

0:34:060:34:08

But there's nothing there that I think will win in the competition.

0:34:080:34:12

It is all about the lion.

0:34:120:34:15

What a good thing. Well done, James.

0:34:150:34:18

The only criticism, I would say -

0:34:180:34:20

the bear, the Lehmann car and the other car.

0:34:200:34:25

Those three together appeal to three different people,

0:34:250:34:28

so that could be an Achilles heel.

0:34:280:34:30

Thomas and James have wandered the rolling Scottish lowlands

0:34:320:34:35

and are heading for their final auction

0:34:350:34:37

in the majestic capital of Edinburgh.

0:34:370:34:39

Edinburgh's picture-postcard streets and volcanic vistas

0:34:430:34:47

reflect its rich and varied history.

0:34:470:34:49

In the 18th century, this city,

0:34:490:34:51

which cradled the Enlightenment thinkers,

0:34:510:34:54

was also known as the Athens of the North.

0:34:540:34:56

Let's hope that some of those smarts have rubbed off on Thomas and James

0:34:580:35:02

as they head for their auction.

0:35:020:35:04

Ramsay Cornish Auctions, in the Leith area of the city,

0:35:040:35:07

holds both specialists and general sales.

0:35:070:35:10

50 to start it quickly.

0:35:100:35:12

Auctioneer Martin Cornish will be presiding, but before he

0:35:120:35:15

takes the gavel in hand, what does he make of our lads' buys?

0:35:150:35:19

The lion, I think, is lovely. It's incredible.

0:35:190:35:22

Lovely condition, the enamelling on it is fantastic,

0:35:220:35:25

so I think there'll be quite a lot of interest in that.

0:35:250:35:28

I think what we might struggle to sell,

0:35:280:35:30

the Copenhagen vase and, also, the Danish dish,

0:35:300:35:35

so I think that might be the lot

0:35:350:35:36

that's going to do less well than the others.

0:35:360:35:39

Thomas Plant started this leg with £298.18.

0:35:400:35:43

He spent £120 exactly and has assembled five lots.

0:35:430:35:47

James Lewis began rich as Rockefeller

0:35:500:35:53

with £1,143.72.

0:35:530:35:56

He's spent £274 and also has five lots to show for it.

0:35:560:36:02

The auction is about to begin.

0:36:050:36:08

First up is Thomas' Chinese blue and white plate.

0:36:090:36:12

30 to start it? 20?

0:36:120:36:14

20 I'm bid.

0:36:140:36:15

25, 30, 35...

0:36:150:36:17

40 here.

0:36:170:36:19

At £40, 45...

0:36:190:36:21

50, 55, 60...

0:36:210:36:23

65, 70, 75, 80...

0:36:230:36:27

85, 90, 95, 100.

0:36:270:36:29

£100.

0:36:290:36:31

On commission at £100.

0:36:310:36:32

Last call at 100.

0:36:320:36:34

WHISPERING

0:36:360:36:38

What an astonishing profit for the outlay of a fiver.

0:36:390:36:42

Good show.

0:36:420:36:44

One for James now, as his job lot of toys

0:36:450:36:47

and Christening gown comes under the hammer.

0:36:470:36:49

Will it charm the saleroom?

0:36:490:36:50

50 for the lot to start it quickly.

0:36:520:36:54

-Oh, God!

-Oh, early bath for you.

0:36:540:36:56

£50 I'm bid for the lot.

0:36:560:36:57

55, 60, 65...

0:36:570:36:59

70, 75...

0:36:590:37:00

-At 75 for the lot.

-No. No!

0:37:000:37:03

75, 80, 85...

0:37:030:37:05

90.

0:37:050:37:06

Gentleman at the back, at £90.

0:37:060:37:09

At £90, for the lot at 90.

0:37:090:37:13

Hardly a disaster

0:37:130:37:15

but might Thomas finally be breaking James' winning streak?

0:37:150:37:18

Next it's Thomas' Danish vase and bowl.

0:37:220:37:24

30 to start? 20 to get them going?

0:37:240:37:27

20 I'm bid. At £20, 25, 30...

0:37:270:37:30

355. Lady's bid at 35.

0:37:300:37:32

-Bit more.

-On the right now at £35.

0:37:320:37:36

At 35, at 35.

0:37:360:37:38

What a pity. The room doesn't seem as keen

0:37:380:37:40

on Scandinavian design as Thomas is.

0:37:400:37:43

Up now, it's another lot for James -

0:37:450:37:47

His hamper, shotgun cartridge tool, mini gaming table and dominoes.

0:37:470:37:52

50 to start it quickly.

0:37:540:37:56

50 I'm bid.

0:37:560:37:58

55, 60, 65, 70, 75...

0:37:580:38:01

80, 85. 85, new bidder.

0:38:010:38:05

90, 95, 100.

0:38:050:38:07

At £100, 110, 120...

0:38:070:38:10

Well done.

0:38:100:38:11

At 120. Last call at 120, at 120...

0:38:110:38:15

That was touch and go, though, wasn't it?

0:38:150:38:16

But, in the end, a picnic of a lot for James.

0:38:160:38:20

But still not quite enough to catch up with Thomas.

0:38:200:38:22

But it's Thomas's sweet collection

0:38:240:38:27

of 1900s biscuit and confectionery tins up next.

0:38:270:38:31

Will the punters bite?

0:38:310:38:33

30 to start them. 20?

0:38:330:38:35

20 I'm bid for all the tins. At £20 I'm bid. £25, 30...

0:38:350:38:39

35, 40. At £40.

0:38:390:38:42

On the right at £40. Gentleman's bid.

0:38:420:38:45

At £40 for all the tins, at 40, at 40...

0:38:450:38:49

A modest profit, but a win nevertheless,

0:38:490:38:51

and Thomas is still in the lead today.

0:38:510:38:53

Now James's charge carrier.

0:38:530:38:56

Can it stage am assault on the saleroom? Boom boom.

0:38:560:38:59

50 to start it. 30.

0:39:010:39:03

30?!

0:39:030:39:05

40, 45, 50, 55, 60...

0:39:050:39:07

65, 70...

0:39:070:39:08

It's got long legs. It's got loads of legs.

0:39:080:39:12

100, 110, 120.

0:39:120:39:14

120.

0:39:140:39:15

-Well done!

-Go on, go on.

0:39:150:39:17

At 120, standing at the back, in the room, at 120

0:39:170:39:21

and I'm selling, last call.

0:39:210:39:22

-Super.

-Well done.

-Super.

-Good.

0:39:220:39:25

A shaky start but it recovers to victory

0:39:250:39:29

and that puts James in the lead.

0:39:290:39:30

Now it's Thomas' Art Deco travelling timepiece.

0:39:310:39:34

10 to start it. 10 I'm bid.

0:39:360:39:39

10 I'm bid for this. At £10 I am bid.

0:39:390:39:41

12, 14, 16. 16 in front.

0:39:410:39:44

At £16, for the travelling timepiece, at £16.

0:39:440:39:48

-Oh, that's cheap.

-Still.

0:39:480:39:50

At 16...

0:39:500:39:51

-Profit.

-It's profit.

0:39:510:39:52

Once again, a lot bought for £5 does the business for Thomas,

0:39:520:39:57

but it's not enough to retake the lead.

0:39:570:39:59

Another timely lot now, as James' clock movement is up.

0:40:000:40:04

80 to start it. 80 I'm bid.

0:40:050:40:08

£80 I'm bid. At £80, 85, 90...

0:40:080:40:11

95, 100.

0:40:110:40:13

At £100.

0:40:130:40:15

-Brilliant.

-110...

0:40:150:40:17

110. Nobody else now? Going on at 110, at 110...

0:40:170:40:23

-Brilliant.

-Good result.

0:40:230:40:24

Time simply runs away with James as he widens his lead yet again.

0:40:240:40:30

The last two lots in this whole shebang now -

0:40:310:40:34

first, the retro 1950s mirror for Thomas.

0:40:340:40:37

30 to start it. 20.

0:40:370:40:39

20 I'm bid. 25, 30, 35...

0:40:390:40:41

40, 45, 50. 50 on my left.

0:40:410:40:45

At £50. 55.

0:40:450:40:47

At 55 down beside me, at 55.

0:40:470:40:50

-Last call and I'm selling at 55.

-Oh that's brilliant.

0:40:500:40:54

It's a nice little earner, but it's not the flyer he needs.

0:40:540:40:58

Last of all, the Staffordshire lion.

0:41:000:41:02

Will it roar?

0:41:020:41:03

-200 to start it.

-Crikey!

0:41:040:41:07

200 I'm bid.

0:41:070:41:08

210, 220...

0:41:080:41:11

230, 240...

0:41:110:41:13

250, 260, 270...

0:41:130:41:15

280, 290, 300...

0:41:150:41:18

320. I'm selling it at 320. Nobody else...

0:41:180:41:23

340, 360. At 360 now.

0:41:230:41:26

On the phone, last call at 360, and I'm selling it...

0:41:260:41:30

It's a great profit to end on.

0:41:310:41:32

Indeed it is. The star lot at the last gasp,

0:41:320:41:36

and James Lewis has done it again.

0:41:360:41:40

Well done, James. Well, it's been a pleasure.

0:41:400:41:42

Thomas, you are such a gent.

0:41:420:41:44

-It has been a pleasure.

-You thoroughly thrashed me.

0:41:440:41:47

Thomas Plant started this leg with £298.18

0:41:490:41:54

After paying auction costs,

0:41:540:41:56

he made a respectable profit of £81.72,

0:41:560:41:59

meaning that he ends this Road Trip with £379.90.

0:41:590:42:04

Well, Thomas, at least you're smiling, boy.

0:42:040:42:08

James Lewis, meanwhile, somehow began with £1,143.72

0:42:090:42:15

and made a startling profit of £382

0:42:150:42:20

in this auction and finishes victorious with £1,525.72

0:42:200:42:26

Wow.

0:42:260:42:28

Thomas and James have had an extraordinary Road Trip,

0:42:320:42:36

full of camaraderie and competition.

0:42:360:42:39

Don't worry, that fighting's only for fun...I think.

0:42:390:42:43

But, at the end of the day, this journey's really

0:42:430:42:45

all been about one temperamental old girl...

0:42:450:42:48

the beloved Morris Minor.

0:42:480:42:51

-Get out and push, Thomas.

-Put your back into it!

0:42:510:42:53

# You're once...

0:42:530:42:55

Bye!

0:42:550:42:56

# Twice...

0:42:560:42:58

Can I just suggest we get a taxi?

0:42:580:42:59

# Three times a lady...

0:42:590:43:01

Oh, no!

0:43:010:43:03

# And I love you... #

0:43:060:43:11

-I hate this car!

-Don't be nasty.

0:43:110:43:14

# I love you. #

0:43:160:43:19

Next week on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:190:43:22

we're with a right couple of charmers

0:43:220:43:24

where Catherine Southon has no shame...

0:43:240:43:27

-Hello.

-What a pleasure to meet you.

0:43:270:43:28

Move out of the way, Charlie. I'm moving in.

0:43:280:43:30

..and Charlie Ross gets all hot under the collar.

0:43:300:43:33

Blimey, you're making an old man's glasses steam up here!

0:43:330:43:36

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:380:43:43

In the final leg of their trip around Scotland, Thomas Plant opts for two wheels instead of four and James Lewis gets to the root of the popular New Year's anthem Auld Lang Syne.


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