Episode 27 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 27

It's day two for Charlie Ross and Catherine Southon as they cosy up on their rainswept journey criss crossing England in the hunt for antiques to sell at an auction in Wareham.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts, with £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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That hurts.

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I'm going to go for it.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Goodness gracious me.

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Will it be the high road to glory or slow road to disaster?

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It's not nice to gloat.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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The sun is out in Wiltshire, and our lovable antiques experts -

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Charlie Ross and Catherine Southon - are jostling along famously.

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Oh, look at these animals! The little baby sheep!

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-Oh, sheep!

-Oh, look at the lamb!

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-I could do with a rack of lamb for supper.

-That's awful!

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Young Catherine has taken up the gavel,

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starting her own auctioneering business.

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And she's no slouch when it comes to driving a bargain, either.

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-40.

-Oh, come on!

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Old dog Charlie travels the world auctioneering fine vintage cars,

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and he's not too short on the old vroom-vroom-vroom himself!

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Mwah! This is the most golden day of my life!

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Our esteemed experts started the week with £200 each,

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but one auction later it's all change.

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Charlie had one devastating loss,

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so he starts this leg with a rather ephemeral £103.04.

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Catherine's profits soared.

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However, she now has a tangible £216.56 to play with.

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-You made a profit.

-# I'm in the money! #

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Our gorgeous couple are cosying up

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in a classic 1966 Austin-Healey Sprite.

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It has no roof...at all,

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but on a day like today, who cares?

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(BOTH) # I can see clearly now

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# The rain has gone

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# I can see all obstacles In my way #

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And there's a few of those!

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-# It's going to be a bright

-# Bright

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# Bright sun-shiny day #

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This week's road trip takes us on a leisurely route eastwards,

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starting at the Wiltshire countryside,

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skirting along the south coast

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and ending up in Rye, East Sussex.

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We're kicking off in Marlborough, criss-crossing through Wiltshire and Berkshire,

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popping over to Hampshire

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and ending up at an auction in Wareham, Dorset.

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Our experts are starting today's shopping in Marlborough,

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which was granted market-town status in 1204 by King John,

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he of Robin Hood fame.

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Antiques, Charlie!

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-Come on! Charlie! Come on!

-There's not much point me coming in. I haven't got any money.

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-I'll lend you some money. Come on.

-Ooh, Miss Southon!

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How very charitable of you, Catherine.

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Although I'm sure Robin Hood wore green tights, didn't he?!

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This large antique centre is a treasure trove of a place,

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with the wares of over 30 dealers.

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Surely there'll be something here for our competitive duo.

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Although Charlie's feeling the pressure...

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Alas, it's tough at the bottom!

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Come along, now, I'm sure you'll find something to get your teeth into.

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Eurgh!

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Gosh, what an extraordinary thing. It's a hammerhead shark!

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Or is it Miss Southon?! It looks rather like her!

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THEME FROM JAWS

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Just when you thought it was safe to go back into an antique shop...

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MUSIC BUILDS

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Ooh.

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-You know what this is, don't you?

-I don't.

-It's a wool winder.

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You pull that out...

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-1800s this was made. Isn't that...?

-That's lovely.

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Look how beautiful that's been made.

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So a wool winder, for winding your wool in and out.

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It's known as a swift. I think there's probably a little bit missing off the top.

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How much would you do on that? It's got 43 on it.

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-The best we would do on that would be 38.

-Right.

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-I can't push it to 35?

-36.

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36. Right. Yes, I might have a go on that one.

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That's not a bad price. But Catherine's pulling out all the stops now.

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£30 for the swift and we're done.

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-You said 35. £30 for the swift.

-I can't.

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-I can't do that.

-Can you not?

-No, I can't.

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-It's no good doing that!

-Look into my eyes!

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-I've been done with that before.

-You've got lovely eyes!

-Thank you. I hope that's not being recorded!

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Catherine, you are completely shameless!

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-I'm rubbish at making decisions!

-Go on, buy it. It's worth a go.

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-It's unusual.

-Oh, go on, then.

-Yes?

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-32? 33.

-35!

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-33.

-36.

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-Come on, give me 33.

-35.

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-(33.)

-35.

-(33.)

-35.

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Thank you!

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All that eye-fluttering got you absolutely nowhere.

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Well resisted, Gary!

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There was no negotiation there whatsoever!

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-There was.

-No, there wasn't!

-I'll give you a pound.

-Oh, pfft!

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Uh-oh, someone's earwigging in the next aisle.

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-Gary!

-Yes?

-Is she trying the female charms with you?

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-She's trying.

-You promised me they wouldn't work.

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-She's fluttering her eyelids.

-No, I'm not!

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-I'm just merely making friends!

-Miss Southon, how dare you?

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I haven't tried that with Bob yet.

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There's a nice little brooch there. I don't normally buy jewellery.

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It's a lady and a gentleman, arm in arm. A bit like Charlie and I, actually.

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The gentleman's tall and slender.

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Not quite like Charlie, but... you get the idea.

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Oh, you meanie!

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This Art Deco-style brooch is £48, but the dealer's not in

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so there won't be much room for manoeuvre.

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He probably would do 40 on that.

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40. He'd come down to 40. I quite like that.

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This is a lovely piece.

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-Do you think he'd come down to 38?

-He won't.

-He won't?

-He will do 40.

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So 40... 48 to 40.

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I might take a bit of a punt on that one.

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So Catherine's made up her mind.

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That's the wool winder and the silver-plated brooch for £75.

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Charlie still hasn't parted with any of his money, though.

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Maybe because he hasn't got very much.

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Dig deep, Charlie. Dig deep.

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Oh, beer bottles.

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"Royal Wedding Ale.

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"Specially brewed in celebration of the marriage of HRH Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer.

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"29th July 1981."

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I think that's really rather good. How much is that?

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Two pounds. So in my budget!

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I could buy so many of those!

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I think that's fab.

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I would've thought that must be what I would call a collector's item.

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-Bob, this is your happy moment.

-It is, sir.

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I think that's all I can really afford in my budget.

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-It's £2, isn't it? No discount?

-No discount, I'm afraid.

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Seeing as you're such a nice chap, you can have a free gift, sir.

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-What, Royal Wedding ale?

-Absolutely.

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-I've got to pay you something. Could I find a coin?

-You can find a coin, yes.

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I hope I can find a small coin!

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Oh, no! I think that's five...

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-..I think it's 5p!

-That'll do fine, sir.

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-Would you take five?

-Very well.

-You're a gentleman!

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BOTH: Thank you very much.

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Royal Wedding ale, 5p!

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-Bob, if it doesn't sell, I'll drink it and think of you. Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Last of the big spenders, eh?

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With their shopping completed in Marlborough, it's time for Charlie and Catherine to hit the road,

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if only they could remember where they were going.

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Hold on. Where did we just go? We were in...Marlborough.

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-We were in Marlborough.

-We were. And we're going to Hungerford.

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-We're going to Hungerford.

-All right? OK with that?

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-Yes. Good job I'm driving!

-No, I disagree.

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Just to clarify, our experts are leaving Marlborough in the dust

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and heading ten miles east to Hungerford in Berkshire.

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Hungerford! Twinned with "Ligueil"!

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Hungerford Arcade Antique Centre is one of the oldest antique centres in the country

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and houses the goodies of over 100 dealers.

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Now, it's just a case of finding a super helpful one, like our Rita here.

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Have you got something that you managed to buy for very little that you could let me have?

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-I've got a beautiful

-Orifice

-crystal bowl.

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Orrefors, I think! Not orifice, darling!

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That would never do! I can't have an orifice bowl!

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That wouldn't be allowed!

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Orrefors I think is what you mean! Where is it?

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Ooh, how lovely!

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Ooh, lovely cutting on that! Goodness gracious me!

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-It's called "Thousand Windows".

-Is that the pattern?

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-Because of the cut.

-How interesting.

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"Thousand Windows" bowls and vases were designed by artist Simon Gate

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for the Swedish glass manufacturers Orrefor in the early 20th century.

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They were so named because of the clever design,

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which made it appear as if there were multiple lenses in the glass.

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The ticket price on this one is £150,

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way over your meagre budget, Charlie.

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-Look, listen to this...

-PING ECHOES

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-It's that glorious sound!

-Isn't that fabulous?

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-PING!

-# Mmmmm! I don't like the price!

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# I'd like it to be So much cheaperrrrr! #

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What sort of money is that to me?

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-You know, on a wet day...

-A wet day.

-..with me putting my arm around you?

-And you've only got £100.

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Well, I've got to buy about five things with £100, darling.

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If you bought this for 75,

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I can find four things for you elsewhere for the 25.

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That's quite good. Let's put that on one side. I'm in such a...

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Oh, I'm in such a quandary, darling!

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While Charlie thinks about that one,

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Catherine has found a rather attractive German game skewer. As you do...

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This is silver-plated. It's stamped with the letter "O"

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and telling us that it's silver-plated.

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-It's a letter opener.

-Are you sure about that, Catherine?

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But it's got a lovely little bird on the top, a game bird.

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-I'm guessing it's a...

-A grouse.

-Yes.

-I think so.

-I like it.

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-It's fun, anyway. You can just imagine opening your letters.

-Absolutely.

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It's priced at 59, Adrian.

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If you could get that for me at a reasonable price...

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25 would be delicious, but...

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-Well, she's a delicious lady, but I'm not sure. We can try.

-OK!

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Antique Centre manager Adrian just needs to track down the dealer Sharon.

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If I can get that for about £30, I think that's going to make me a little profit.

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That's absolutely brilliant.

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I'm very, very happy with that. And I haven't even bought it yet!

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You've got 59 on it.

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What would be your bottom price?

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Oh, gosh. Erm... I was hoping for a little bit less than that.

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Can we say 30?

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Shall we meet in the middle, then, on that and say 35?

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38. OK, Sharon, I think you've got yourself a deal on that one.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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-I think it's stylish and fun!

-I reckon so, too.

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-There's your phone...

-Oh, yes!

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-..here's my letter opener, there's my hand.

-My hand.

-All you need now is the cash.

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Catherine's up and running. Now, what about cash-strapped Charlie?

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I'm in a real muddle here, financially.

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Can you do your bowl for £50, or does that really...?

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-Why not?

-Why not?!

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-Because it's not a lot of money, really!

-I know!

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That's the real reason!

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£100 off? I'd snap that up, Charlie!

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Oh, go on. I'll have the bowl, darling!

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I'll have a bit of silver, as well.

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The little bottle, which I love the shape...

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-Yes.

-It's shaped rather like you, if I may say so, Rita!

-Oh, I wish!

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-I wish!

-It's got those rather nice curvaceous lines!

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Dirty beast! It's £55, but Charlie would like it cheaper.

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Could I have that little thing for £20? That would be £70 for two.

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You couldn't do 75?

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For you, darling, I'd do absolutely anything. I'd stand on my head if you like. 75.

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-Is that all right?

-Can you do that?

-Yes.

-God, I do love you.

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Melt into my arms and tell me I'm the only one for you.

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You're gorgeous! You are gorgeous!

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You charmer!

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-40...

-So £75 later,

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Charlie's now the proud owner of an Orrefor bowl and a perfume jar,

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so he's off to his next shop.

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Can Catherine work some of her magic on the charming Rita?

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That's what I like.

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-So, what it is is a travelling barometer thermometer...

-It is.

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..in a little gentleman's case.

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-Is it working, Rita?

-Complete working order, yes.

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-It's lovely, that is.

-Yes.

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I should think, once upon a time, when this was bought, it was quite a smart gift.

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-British made! There we are!

-Yes.

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-Short & Mason. So barometer, and on the side, thermometer.

-Yes.

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Let's see if the temperature's rising in here.

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Ooh, yes! The temperature's rising!

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-What have you got on that?

-95.

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-95... You call it a weather station.

-Yes.

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95. What could you do on that, Rita?

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Erm, what about 50?

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Any chance of a little bit more?

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-45?

-45...

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-I can't go lower than that!

-You can't go lower than 45.

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I think that's pretty fair.

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-I tell you what, if you let me have that for 40, I'll have it.

-40!

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-Is that cheeky?

-I don't know if I can do it for 40!

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-You can't do 45?

-I suppose I could, but I'd love to do 40.

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-I would do it for 40 for you.

-Ah, will you?

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Oh, go on, then. Definitely 40. I'm definitely having that at 40.

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Ooh, she drives a hard bargain, that one.

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Charlie has arrived at Dairy House Antiques in Semley with less than £30 in his pocket.

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Dear old thing!

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But can owner Sue find something that fits Charlie's budget?

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-I would like a bit of silver.

-A silver thimble?

-Yes!

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-Or perhaps two?

-Or three?

-No, probably two!

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One for each of my fingers! That would be rather good!

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-Who are they by?

-A couple of Charles Horner.

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-Charles Horner, the hatpin man.

-Yes.

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-He's a good maker, isn't he?

-Not bad.

-Not bad at all.

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Oh, aren't they pretty?

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-What prices have we got on these?

-Erm...

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20 quid on that one and 20 quid... That's 40 quid.

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Are these buyable for half price?

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-20 quid?

-No. Can't do half price. No!

-No!

-I can't do half price.

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It looks like one Charles Horner and one cheaper thimble is the way forward.

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This is what it's come down to, Miss Southon -

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Roscoe looking at thimbles.

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-You can do better on that one.

-I could do that and one of...

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-What, for 20 quid?

-For 25. Come along!

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Well, why don't I do those two?

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Is that the right two?

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Ssh! I've switched 'em!

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-Yes, why don't you?

-I'm a member of The Magic Circle, you know?

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When you look in your cupboard, you'll find them all gone!

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Top work, Charlie. And with £25 agreed for the thimbles,

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that's your shopping all stitched up for today.

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Catherine has put her purse away and is travelling 35 miles east from Hungerford

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to the country estate of Stratfield Saye.

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She's come to meet Lord Douro, son of the eighth Duke of Wellington,

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at his country home,

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for it's here the funeral carriage

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for the first and most famous Duke of Wellington is kept.

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Wow. This is quite spectacular.

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Isn't this something?

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This was made specially, of course,

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for to carry the coffin from Horse Guards

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all the way to St Paul's.

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The first Duke of Wellington was born in 1769

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and went on to become one of Britain's most famous military heroes.

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He led the Allied armies against Napoleon,

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ultimately defeating him at the Battle of Waterloo in June 1814.

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Up there, of course, are the names of some of the more important battles.

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-Here is "Waterloo" written...

-Oh, yes.

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And then there are the lion's heads all the way along.

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-This, I believe, you said is the bronze cannon.

-And it's taken from,

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melted down, some of the cannons captured at Waterloo,

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and they used the bronze to make into this enormous structure.

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-I think that's fabulous.

-I know.

0:17:470:17:49

I think that is absolutely fabulous that the cannons were melted down to make this carriage.

0:17:490:17:53

You get the real sense of size here.

0:17:530:17:57

-Was the coffin...?

-On the very top.

-It was on the very top.

0:17:570:18:00

In fact, if the coffin was still there,

0:18:000:18:03

it wouldn't have fitted in here!

0:18:030:18:07

After his death, Parliament decided the Duke should have a full state funeral

0:18:070:18:11

to honour his achievements.

0:18:110:18:13

But that gave the craftsmen very little time to create this grand carriage.

0:18:130:18:18

The craftsmen who were asked to do the construction,

0:18:180:18:21

they knew they had no more than three weeks to get it done,

0:18:210:18:27

and I'm sure they all had to work day and night without stopping.

0:18:270:18:31

Queen Victoria was determined that there should be

0:18:310:18:34

full public recognition at the funeral,

0:18:340:18:37

and so this carriage was meant to symbolise

0:18:370:18:39

the importance which the government and the people

0:18:390:18:43

attached to this funeral.

0:18:430:18:46

It was reported that over a million people crammed into the streets of London

0:18:480:18:52

to watch the funeral procession go by.

0:18:520:18:56

Wellington will forever be associated with his horse, Copenhagen,

0:18:560:19:01

who he famously rode for 12 hours nonstop

0:19:010:19:04

during the Battle of Waterloo.

0:19:040:19:07

His trusty steed died long before the Duke,

0:19:070:19:10

but the memory lived on at the funeral, symbolised by a riderless horse.

0:19:100:19:15

Famously, the riderless horse was in the procession,

0:19:150:19:20

led by the groom, John Mears.

0:19:200:19:23

And that, I believe,

0:19:230:19:26

everybody found that a very moving moment when that passed.

0:19:260:19:29

This funeral is the largest Britain has ever seen,

0:19:300:19:34

and the Duke's popularity continued to grow long afterwards.

0:19:340:19:39

With the passage of time, he became even more revered

0:19:390:19:42

and more acknowledged than right at the beginning.

0:19:420:19:46

So it was an extraordinary life.

0:19:460:19:49

He remained Commander in Chief right up to the day of his death.

0:19:490:19:52

That's quite an achievement, isn't it? That really is.

0:19:520:19:55

It's been such a pleasure for me. Thank you for your time.

0:19:550:19:59

-I do appreciate it.

-Delighted you could come and see it.

0:19:590:20:02

Well, what a treat for Catherine.

0:20:020:20:05

The time has come for our experts to rest their weary heads.

0:20:050:20:09

Night-night.

0:20:090:20:11

Day two and the heavens have opened.

0:20:150:20:17

In the absence of our roof, our experts have had to put on their thinking caps.

0:20:170:20:22

My eyebrows are drenched

0:20:220:20:25

and my eyelashes are so wet I can't see!

0:20:250:20:29

They must make hoods for these cars, mustn't they?

0:20:290:20:32

So far, Catherine has spent £153 on four items -

0:20:330:20:38

a silver-plated game skewer, a travelling weather station,

0:20:380:20:42

an Art Deco-style brooch and a wool winder,

0:20:420:20:45

leaving her with £63.56 still to play with.

0:20:450:20:49

Thank you.

0:20:490:20:50

Charlie, on the other hand, has spent £100.5 on four items -

0:20:520:20:57

two silver thimbles, a bottle of ale,

0:20:570:21:00

an Orrefor bowl and a perfume jar with a silver lid.

0:21:000:21:03

That leaves him with a gargantuan £2.99 to spend today.

0:21:030:21:08

-Tell me I'm the only one for you.

-You're gorgeous!

0:21:080:21:12

Catherine and Charlie are heading southwest

0:21:120:21:15

towards the city of Salisbury in Wiltshire.

0:21:150:21:18

At last.

0:21:200:21:21

I feel disgusting.

0:21:210:21:24

You look gorgeous.

0:21:240:21:26

Remember the challenge - buy something decent.

0:21:260:21:28

Something really nice with three pounds and fourpence.

0:21:280:21:31

Er, actually, Charlie, you've only got £2.99.

0:21:310:21:36

And a bath hat.

0:21:370:21:39

It's cold and it's wet,

0:21:390:21:42

-I've got £3.04...

-No, you don't!

0:21:420:21:46

..Miss Southon's winning, I'm losing,

0:21:460:21:50

-and I want to go home.

-You've got £2.99, you old codger.

0:21:500:21:55

A-ha, it's seems that Charlie's made another mistake here.

0:21:550:21:59

He appears to have forgotten he bought a bottle of old ale for 5p,

0:21:590:22:03

so his budget is actually even smaller than he thinks.

0:22:030:22:07

I found something for £5 downstairs

0:22:070:22:09

and I'm really hoping that they'll take £3.04.

0:22:090:22:12

£22. I don't think that's going to come down to £3.04.

0:22:120:22:17

Excuse me. I'm afraid it's £10. £3.04 wouldn't do it?

0:22:170:22:22

No, it wouldn't, you poor, deluded fellow!

0:22:220:22:26

Being an auctioneer of vintage cars, these should be up Charlie's street, and they look cheap.

0:22:260:22:32

These are old motor racing programmes

0:22:320:22:36

from meetings in the '50s and '60s.

0:22:360:22:39

Amazing, those wonderful old Maseratis

0:22:390:22:42

and BRMs they used to race then.

0:22:420:22:44

The programmes are quite collectable

0:22:440:22:46

and they're very well priced here - £5.

0:22:460:22:50

There's one of Silverstone, which is my local race track,

0:22:500:22:53

and that's from an international meeting of 1961.

0:22:530:22:57

The trouble is, it's priced at £5,

0:22:570:22:59

-and I only have £3.04.

-Oh, my gawd, I give up!

0:22:590:23:04

Peter! I wonder if I may borrow you for a moment.

0:23:040:23:07

There's a programme down here for £5.

0:23:070:23:10

-Do you want to have a look?

-May I?

0:23:100:23:12

Now, I have, in the world,

0:23:120:23:16

£3.04!

0:23:160:23:18

HE CHUCKLES

0:23:180:23:21

Would it be too rude to offer you £3.04?

0:23:210:23:25

-I'm sure that will be fine.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

0:23:250:23:27

£3.04 - Silverstone catalogue.

0:23:270:23:32

Worth?

0:23:320:23:34

£3.04.

0:23:340:23:36

And now, Charlie, you are officially in the red.

0:23:360:23:41

With his shopping definitely over,

0:23:420:23:44

Charlie only has a short trip across Salisbury

0:23:440:23:47

to visit the former home of a prime minister.

0:23:470:23:49

Arundells is the house Sir Edward Heath lived in for the last 20 years of his life,

0:23:490:23:55

and curator and long-time employee Stuart Craven is going to show Charlie around.

0:23:550:24:00

-Ah!

-Hello. Charlie Ross.

-Stuart Craven. Pleased to meet you.

-Lovely to meet you.

0:24:000:24:06

Leader of the Conservative Party,

0:24:060:24:08

Ted Heath became prime minister in 1970

0:24:080:24:11

for less than four years,

0:24:110:24:13

but one of the most difficult periods of recent British history.

0:24:130:24:17

The most extraordinary collection of photographs I think I've ever seen.

0:24:170:24:22

Yes, it is. It's a little document of history, in fact,

0:24:220:24:26

on all his peers of the time,

0:24:260:24:28

whether they be religious leaders or royalty.

0:24:280:24:31

Gandhi, Chairman Mao, Khrushchev, Castro...

0:24:310:24:35

-Never-ending!

-It's an element of history, isn't it?

0:24:350:24:39

And Margaret Thatcher. Did they get on?

0:24:390:24:41

Notoriously not, according to the Press.

0:24:410:24:43

But, in fact, she spoke very warmly at a funeral here in 2005.

0:24:430:24:48

-Ahh.

-He never used to speak about it much,

0:24:480:24:51

so I guess it was all history.

0:24:510:24:54

Ted Heath collected works of art

0:24:540:24:57

and the house is a showcase for many famous artists, such as Lowry.

0:24:570:25:02

But he also has a painting by a more unexpected artist.

0:25:020:25:06

WSC - initials I recognise.

0:25:060:25:08

-Absolutely. Winston Spencer Churchill.

-Yes.

0:25:080:25:11

-I love that. I love the colours.

-This is interesting,

0:25:110:25:14

because Sir Edward was concerned that Winston never signed his paintings.

0:25:140:25:18

Sir Edward was concerned that the value of this might depreciate,

0:25:180:25:21

so he said, "Sir, could you sign the painting?"

0:25:210:25:24

He took it back to Winston Churchill,

0:25:240:25:26

and there you see the signature on the bottom right.

0:25:260:25:30

-He was very delighted with that.

-Yes.

0:25:300:25:32

Got it home and discovered the original signature on the bottom left.

0:25:320:25:36

-Double signed!

-He was very pleased with that.

0:25:360:25:39

Proud of the fact that it was the only double-signature Churchill.

0:25:390:25:44

ORCHESTRAL MUSIC

0:25:440:25:47

But there was far more to Ted Heath

0:25:470:25:49

than a life on the international stage.

0:25:490:25:52

He conducted between 50 or 60 of the world's leading orchestras - an amazing feat -

0:25:520:25:57

including all the orchestras in Europe and the Americas.

0:25:570:26:00

You've got to be an amazingly accomplished musician to conduct.

0:26:000:26:05

Playing an instrument is one thing,

0:26:050:26:07

but being in control of four or five different facets at the same time...

0:26:070:26:11

Absolutely. I think he was quite accomplished.

0:26:110:26:14

He said that if politics hadn't shaped his life, he might've gone into the music industry,

0:26:140:26:19

and I think he probably would've been very good.

0:26:190:26:21

As well as an accomplished musician, Heath also wrote several books

0:26:220:26:27

and was a world-class sailor.

0:26:270:26:29

He came from a humble background.

0:26:290:26:31

-His mother was a lady's maid and his father a carpenter.

-Yes.

0:26:310:26:35

So to achieve that level of greatness,

0:26:350:26:38

-I think, is a wonderful achievement.

-I mean, huge drive.

0:26:380:26:41

To take up sailing at 50

0:26:410:26:44

and then within a few years, win things like the Admiral's Cup -

0:26:440:26:47

-quite remarkable!

-I wish I could achieve one thing as great as that, let alone three.

0:26:470:26:51

It's been the most wonderful trip.

0:26:510:26:53

I'd like to have been here for a week really.

0:26:530:26:56

Well, sadly, you can't do that, Charlie.

0:26:560:26:58

But you can go and put your feet up for a while.

0:26:580:27:02

Back in the city centre,

0:27:020:27:04

Catherine's following in Charlie's footsteps

0:27:040:27:06

by heading into the Salisbury Antique and Collectors Market.

0:27:060:27:10

Unlike Charlie, however, she has over £60 to spend,

0:27:100:27:13

and owner Peter's going to help her spend it.

0:27:130:27:17

What about that cayenne pepper with the devil?

0:27:170:27:21

-Is that silver on the top?

-Yes. That's Birmingham 1913.

0:27:210:27:26

Now, that is lovely. I like that.

0:27:260:27:29

You've got a little devil on the top of a spoon.

0:27:290:27:34

You'd use your spoon, that would go in your jar,

0:27:340:27:38

and pull out your little bit of pepper.

0:27:380:27:40

I think that's fabulous.

0:27:400:27:42

It's actually marked up at £78. That's a bit punchy.

0:27:420:27:46

I'd really need to get that down to 50 in order for me to buy it.

0:27:460:27:51

But will the dealer be willing to let it go for that?

0:27:510:27:55

That's very nice. It's nice when people say they'd like me to beat Charlie!

0:27:550:28:00

Thank you very much for your time.

0:28:000:28:02

Bye-bye.

0:28:020:28:04

Lovely man.

0:28:050:28:07

£50 - what a good deal. But not good enough for Catherine.

0:28:070:28:11

Peter, I am very tempted by the devil.

0:28:110:28:16

Can I do £48?

0:28:160:28:18

Oh, come on, Peter! 48.

0:28:180:28:21

-She's got a nerve.

-49.

0:28:210:28:24

49? You won't go to 48?

0:28:250:28:28

Go on, then, 49! One pound!

0:28:280:28:31

That's a very limp handshake there, Peter.

0:28:310:28:34

-Do you not mean this?

-Naughty!

0:28:340:28:36

Well, that's Catherine's shopping over. Thank goodness.

0:28:360:28:40

Now, it's time for our experts to reveal all to each other. Well, almost.

0:28:400:28:45

It's been nothing but a disaster, but I will show you my disasters.

0:28:450:28:49

# Ta-ta-ta-da! #

0:28:490:28:51

-Ohh!

-Maybe not so bad.

0:28:510:28:55

-I love this.

-Catherine's spotted the little perfume bottle.

0:28:550:28:58

But not everything about it is quite how it should be.

0:28:580:29:01

-I bought it while it was in the cabinet.

-Yes.

0:29:010:29:04

Not a good idea. Always look at the items.

0:29:040:29:07

-It has got...the wrong top.

-Oh, no!

0:29:070:29:11

It's pathetic, isn't it?

0:29:110:29:13

It looks beautiful. I love the shape and the cut.

0:29:130:29:16

-I'm just hoping somebody in the back of the room will -

-Be as stupid as you are.

-Ouch!

0:29:160:29:21

That's a little unkind, but quite true.

0:29:210:29:23

Most of my money went into the Orrefors glass.

0:29:230:29:26

Since buying it I have done some research.

0:29:260:29:29

The good news is, I've found one on the market for 690.

0:29:290:29:34

-Right.

-Which is encouraging.

-Yes.

0:29:340:29:37

Less-than-encouraging news

0:29:370:29:38

is that I've also found one at £12.50!

0:29:380:29:43

So we have the gamble of all gambles there!

0:29:430:29:47

Now, enough of my rubbish. Let's get onto your goodies.

0:29:470:29:50

I'll show you my goodies. They're oddities.

0:29:500:29:53

Ohh!

0:29:530:29:55

First up, it's Catherine's silver grouse.

0:29:550:29:59

-Isn't that lovely? A paper knife with a grouse on the top.

-Lovely.

0:29:590:30:02

It is a paper knife, isn't it?

0:30:020:30:04

It's not a meat skewer for game?

0:30:040:30:08

-It could be!

-I think that's what it is.

0:30:080:30:10

-I think it would have a sharper edge.

-It probably would.

0:30:100:30:13

I think that is a game skewer.

0:30:130:30:17

Yes, Charlie, you're right, and a quality one at that.

0:30:170:30:21

-£38 - it's brilliant, isn't it?

-It's fantastic.

0:30:210:30:25

Now, this contains all the money

0:30:250:30:28

-that I'm going to give you to help you along the way.

-Which is nothing, of course!

0:30:280:30:33

It doesn't really. It contains this, a nice little weather station.

0:30:330:30:36

-That's lovely.

-Art Deco. I thought that was quite nice.

0:30:360:30:39

-Has it got a maker's name on it?

-Short & Mason.

0:30:390:30:43

-Never heard of them.

-I have to say, I hadn't actually, either.

0:30:430:30:46

But apparently, they're terribly well-known in the 1930s.

0:30:460:30:49

Now, what will Charlie make of Catherine's wool winder?

0:30:490:30:53

-It's a bit of an iffy one. You know what it is, don't you?

-It's not something I would buy.

0:30:530:30:57

It's what I call a wool winder.

0:30:570:30:59

-Yes, a wool winder or a swift.

-A swift, yes.

-It's...

0:30:590:31:02

I mean, I paid £35 for it

0:31:020:31:05

and I bought it because I thought it was really nicely made.

0:31:050:31:08

These things break so easily, and it was a really nice one, in good condition.

0:31:080:31:13

-Yes.

-But £35... I mean, who wants it?

-Not me.

0:31:130:31:16

-No!

-I should think the shopkeeper

0:31:160:31:19

-was only too thrilled to see you come along!

-I think so.

0:31:190:31:23

I don't think he liked it. Next!

0:31:230:31:25

Do you know what it is? I must admit, I wasn't that sure.

0:31:250:31:28

It depends what happens here.

0:31:280:31:30

Ahh. I do.

0:31:300:31:33

Erm...

0:31:330:31:35

-HE GROANS

-It's not perfume

0:31:350:31:37

and it's not snuff and it's... Tell me.

0:31:370:31:40

-Pepper.

-Oh, is it?

-Cayenne pepper.

-I didn't know that!

0:31:400:31:44

-Cayenne pepper.

-With a devil on top! For the heat! That's great!

0:31:440:31:49

-I think that's the best lot you've got.

-It's nice, isn't it?

0:31:490:31:53

-Well done.

-I wish you lots of luck, Charlie.

0:31:530:31:56

-Horrible weather for buying, isn't it?

-I know.

0:31:560:31:59

-But it's been fun, hasn't it?

-It has! Good luck!

-And you!

0:31:590:32:02

Very sportsmanlike.

0:32:020:32:04

Better get the real lowdown now, though.

0:32:040:32:06

I just feel sorry for him about that glass bottle with the silver top. Such an easy mistake to make.

0:32:060:32:12

I probably would've had a good look at it. I would've checked in case it was chipped.

0:32:120:32:16

I'm not mad keen on her wool winder. Frankly, who wants a wool winder?

0:32:160:32:20

I think it's going to be an interesting competition,

0:32:200:32:24

but I may slightly have the edge. Who knows?

0:32:240:32:28

Catherine and Charlie's second leg started in Marlborough, Wiltshire,

0:32:290:32:32

then took them through four counties

0:32:320:32:35

and will conclude at an auction house in Wareham, Dorset.

0:32:350:32:38

Here we are. Oh-ho!

0:32:380:32:42

-Wonderful.

-Wareham is where it's at!

0:32:420:32:46

Right, in we go.

0:32:460:32:49

Er, in you go. I've got a phone call to make.

0:32:490:32:53

-Hm... I'll see you in a minute.

-I'll see you later.

0:32:530:32:56

What's that rascal Charlie up to?

0:32:560:32:58

This lovely auction house began its life auctioneering off livestock.

0:32:580:33:02

Nowadays, you can find all manner of antiques and collectables

0:33:020:33:05

poised to go under the hammer.

0:33:050:33:08

So, what does auctioneer John Condie think of our experts' items?

0:33:080:33:12

Some of them are quite quirky and unusual.

0:33:120:33:14

I was fascinated by the bottle of beer.

0:33:140:33:16

We usually sell them by the crateful, rather than on their own.

0:33:160:33:20

And I'm not quite sure about the WMF skewer.

0:33:200:33:25

I'd like to have seen that with a few other items.

0:33:250:33:28

But otherwise, I think they'll do OK.

0:33:280:33:31

Catherine began with £216.56

0:33:330:33:37

and spent exactly £202 on five auction lots.

0:33:370:33:41

There's my hand. All you need now is the cash.

0:33:410:33:43

Charlie started this leg with £103.04

0:33:430:33:47

and spent a grand total of £103.09 on five auction lots.

0:33:470:33:53

I have absolutely nothing in the world.

0:33:530:33:57

And I think our Charlie has finally twigged his mistake.

0:33:580:34:02

Time to call an old friend.

0:34:020:34:05

Is that the delicious Rita? I've got a confession to make.

0:34:050:34:08

I spent too much money, Rita! Do you know why I'm phoning you?

0:34:080:34:13

I want a reduction!

0:34:140:34:17

I've spent 5p too much!

0:34:170:34:20

Would you be prepared to do that? You really are the best.

0:34:200:34:24

Now I'll be able to go forth into the auction and beat that Miss Southon.

0:34:240:34:29

Oh, for goodness sake, Charlie, you'll give us all a bad name!

0:34:290:34:32

I've got good vibes today.

0:34:320:34:35

-So have I.

-Good!

-I'm really confident!

0:34:350:34:37

That's what we like, a positive attitude.

0:34:370:34:40

Off we go.

0:34:400:34:42

First up is Catherine's Art Deco travelling weather station.

0:34:420:34:46

£30 for it. £30 bid, straight in.

0:34:460:34:49

-£30. 35. 40.

-You're holding my arm very tight!

0:34:490:34:53

45. 50. 55.

0:34:530:34:56

60. £60 in the middle.

0:34:560:34:59

-Bit more!

-£60. 65 anywhere?

0:34:590:35:03

-OK.

-Well done!

-That's all right.

-Profit!

0:35:030:35:06

The sun was shining on that barometer.

0:35:060:35:08

A decent profit for Catherine.

0:35:080:35:10

-Don't be disappointed.

-No, I'm happy with that.

0:35:100:35:13

It's Charlie's perfume bottle next,

0:35:130:35:16

remember - the one with the dodgy lid?

0:35:160:35:18

20?

0:35:180:35:20

15, then?

0:35:200:35:21

-CHARLIE GROANS

-£15. 18 now.

0:35:210:35:26

20. 22.

0:35:260:35:28

22, gentleman in the middle.

0:35:280:35:30

-25.

-That's better!

-25 now.

0:35:300:35:33

25, close to me? 25?

0:35:330:35:35

-£25, then.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:35:350:35:39

-Not bad.

-I have to say, for a mistake, it's quite good.

0:35:390:35:43

Too right, Charlie, it could've been worse. But technically, it's a loss.

0:35:430:35:48

I've got £25 to go shopping with. Oh, no, less commission!

0:35:480:35:52

Catherine's wool winder is next.

0:35:530:35:55

Charlie wouldn't buy it, but maybe somebody else will.

0:35:550:35:58

-£40.

-He's asking big.

-40?

-He's not getting it, though.

0:35:580:36:03

20 - I heard a voice there. £20 bid.

0:36:030:36:06

-It's going to be sold for 20.

-He's opened it up.

-22. 25. 28. 30.

0:36:060:36:10

-Here we go.

-£30 bid. 32, sir. 32. 35.

0:36:100:36:15

-Come on!

-38.

0:36:150:36:17

-40 bid. 40.

-It's nearly a profit!

0:36:170:36:21

-42. 45.

-Yes!

-48.

-I'm glad I bought that now!

0:36:210:36:26

Gentleman in the middle at 48. £50, anybody else?

0:36:260:36:30

-Ooh!

-I'm going to sell at... Comes back in at 50. £50.

0:36:300:36:35

The lady there at 50.

0:36:350:36:38

-Very good.

-I'm glad I bought that.

0:36:380:36:40

It wasn't just the gorgeous man that I bought it from! There was a reason!

0:36:400:36:45

Never believe the Doubting Thomases, or Charlies, Catherine.

0:36:450:36:48

The wool winder did well.

0:36:480:36:50

-It's all right, Miss Southon!

-BOTH: Come on!

0:36:500:36:53

Next up, Charlie's bottle of ale,

0:36:530:36:55

bought with a whole 5p he didn't actually have.

0:36:550:37:00

-Rare item.

-Very rare, sir!

-£10 for it.

0:37:000:37:04

-Don't make me break the barrier.

-No, do. Bring it down!

0:37:040:37:09

£5, then.

0:37:090:37:10

-Ohh! £5!

-We've got a £5 bid.

0:37:100:37:15

£5, I'm bid. Five. Six. Seven. Eight.

0:37:150:37:20

-Ooh!

-Nine.

0:37:200:37:22

Ten. 11.

0:37:220:37:24

-12. £12 bid.

-12 pounds!

0:37:240:37:28

Expensive beer. £12 on the bottle of beer.

0:37:280:37:31

-I'm going to sell it.

-£12! Charlie!

0:37:310:37:34

Yay! Well done! LAUGHTER

0:37:340:37:38

Thank you, sir!

0:37:380:37:40

Cheers. That bottle of ale has made Charlie a decent profit

0:37:400:37:44

and put him right back in the game.

0:37:440:37:47

-You've got to drink it now.

-I'm never buying anything for more than 5p again!

0:37:470:37:51

It's Catherine's game skewer next. Will she get skewered?

0:37:510:37:54

This is probably one of my best items, actually.

0:37:540:37:57

I've got an opening bid of £10.

0:37:570:37:59

Oh. That's not very exciting!

0:37:590:38:02

-£12, anybody else? 12 here.

-Oh, no!

-Come on, Miss Southon.

-15, sir?

0:38:020:38:07

-15. 18.

-It's WMF! Did he say that?

-20.

0:38:070:38:11

£20. Gentleman in the middle.

0:38:110:38:14

-I'm really disappointed with that.

-22, anybody else?

0:38:140:38:17

-£20, I'm going to sell it.

-That's just not on.

0:38:170:38:21

-I have to say, Catherine -

-I don't believe that at all.

0:38:210:38:25

That's the one thing that I really don't understand.

0:38:250:38:28

Yes, that's a blow, and the first loss of the day.

0:38:280:38:33

-Chin up, darling.

-No, no. I just find that a bit odd.

0:38:330:38:37

Disappointing, isn't it?

0:38:370:38:39

Charlie's silver thimbles are up next.

0:38:400:38:42

£40 for the two.

0:38:420:38:44

-30, then. Thank you. £30 bid.

-Ooh! Well done.

0:38:440:38:49

30. £30. 35, anyone else?

0:38:490:38:52

-Starting at 30.

-Maiden bid at 30. Anyone else?

0:38:520:38:56

What about 32?

0:38:560:38:58

I'm going to sell them, then, if no-one else comes in.

0:38:580:39:02

Ohh!

0:39:020:39:04

The thimbles have sold for more than Charlie paid.

0:39:040:39:07

-But...

-It's a loss, isn't it?

-It is.

-Once you take the commission...

0:39:070:39:12

It's Catherine's Art Deco-style brooch up next.

0:39:120:39:16

We've got a couple of bids already. I'll start at 15,

0:39:160:39:19

20, 25, 30.

0:39:190:39:22

-Come on! Keep going!

-£35 in the room.

0:39:220:39:26

-40. 45.

-Come on. It's a good thing, this is.

-£45 bid.

0:39:260:39:30

-45. 50 anywhere?

-Come on, I need 50!

-Near me at 45.

0:39:300:39:36

-Ooh!

-50.

-New bid!

0:39:360:39:38

-£55.

-Go on!

0:39:380:39:42

55 and selling...

0:39:420:39:45

-It's a profit!

-That's a smidge of a profit, isn't it?

0:39:450:39:50

Well, it's £15, which is not to be sniffed at.

0:39:500:39:53

I feel like I'm scraping every single penny.

0:39:530:39:57

It's hard work to get your money back in this game.

0:39:570:40:00

Yep, it's not easy.

0:40:000:40:02

So here comes Charlie's big gamble, with the 5p reduction.

0:40:020:40:07

£50 for the Orrefors.

0:40:070:40:09

-Oh, dear.

-40, then.

0:40:090:40:12

-Charlie!

-£40 bid. Thank you very much.

0:40:120:40:17

-40. 45. 50.

-Ooh, Charlie!

0:40:170:40:21

-Hold on, hold on.

-55. 60.

-Ooh.

0:40:210:40:23

-It's getting there.

-£60 on my left.

-It's worth more than that.

0:40:230:40:27

65, anybody else?

0:40:270:40:29

-£60. 65.

-Gentleman in the hat!

0:40:290:40:32

-Come on, madam!

-65. 70.

-Ooh!

0:40:320:40:36

£70? £70 on my left.

0:40:360:40:39

70, then.

0:40:390:40:41

Five now. 75. 75.

0:40:410:40:45

-Madam, you know it makes sense!

-80, anybody else?

0:40:450:40:48

75. 80 bid there. £80.

0:40:480:40:51

-She doesn't know if she wants it now.

-She does.

0:40:510:40:54

-£80.

-Madam, I'm eternally gratefully!

0:40:540:40:57

-Roscoe still lives!

-And the gamble paid off.

0:40:570:41:01

-That was a bit of excitement.

-There is a Lord, isn't there?

0:41:010:41:05

And now, onto Catherine's devilish cayenne pepper pot.

0:41:050:41:10

£50 for it?

0:41:100:41:12

-Come on.

-50.

-Oh, come on.

-£40, then.

0:41:120:41:15

-Come on!

-£30?

-Please! Desperation here!

0:41:150:41:20

20. £20. 25?

0:41:200:41:24

-Yes.

-30.

0:41:240:41:26

-Oh.

-30 here.

-Don't get me excited.

0:41:260:41:29

-Come on.

-35 now. 35.

0:41:290:41:32

-Ooh, Miss Southon.

-£35 bid. 35.

0:41:320:41:35

-35. I'm going to sell it.

-Dear, oh, dear!

0:41:350:41:38

I thought you lot in Wareham were going to go for these things!

0:41:380:41:42

Another blow for Catherine, sadly.

0:41:420:41:45

I can't believe that, actually.

0:41:450:41:48

It's the last lot of the day -

0:41:480:41:50

Charlie's Silverstone programme.

0:41:500:41:52

£10 bid. Thank you very much. £10.

0:41:520:41:55

Where are all these people for my lots?

0:41:550:41:57

-£12, anybody else?

-£12?!

-£12 here. 15, sir?

0:41:570:42:01

-15. 18, sir?

-Well...

-18 bid now. 18.

-Unbelievable!

0:42:010:42:07

-20, anybody else?

-Charlie, you are amazing.

0:42:070:42:11

-Charlie...

-I didn't imagine that!

0:42:110:42:13

Hats off to you today because you have done brilliantly.

0:42:130:42:16

With nearly £15 profit on that programme,

0:42:160:42:19

I'm inclined to agree.

0:42:190:42:21

Considering you had a pile of old rubbish,

0:42:210:42:24

you have turned it into gold!

0:42:240:42:28

And what an auction it's been.

0:42:280:42:30

Catherine started this leg with £216.56

0:42:300:42:34

and has made a loss of £21.60, after auction costs. Bad luck.

0:42:340:42:39

That leaves her with a grand total of £194.96 to carry forward.

0:42:390:42:44

Don't look so stern.

0:42:440:42:46

Charlie, on the other hand, has bought wisely, making him today's winner.

0:42:470:42:52

He kicked off the day with £103.04,

0:42:520:42:55

but managed to make a profit of £32.26, after costs,

0:42:550:42:59

bumping his total up to £135.30 to spend next time.

0:42:590:43:05

Great!

0:43:050:43:07

-Don't you love Wareham?

-I do. And the sun is shining!

0:43:070:43:11

Charlie is happy and he is back in the game.

0:43:110:43:14

All is right with my world, Miss Southon.

0:43:140:43:17

Yee-ha!

0:43:170:43:19

BOTH: Bye, Wareham!

0:43:200:43:23

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:230:43:25

Catherine cranks up the charm offensive....

0:43:250:43:28

-She's a hard lady.

-Oh, I'm not!

0:43:280:43:31

I like the fact that you're stroking my hand.

0:43:310:43:33

..and Charlie runs into trouble.

0:43:330:43:36

I'm at a hell of a disadvantage being male here!

0:43:360:43:39

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:390:43:42

It's day two for Charlie Ross and Catherine Southon as they cosy up on their rainswept journey criss crossing southern England in the hunt for antiques to sell at an auction in Wareham, Dorset.


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