Episode 30 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 30

Antiques experts travel across the UK searching for treasures. Charlie Ross and Catherine Southon head to Rye to fight it out at auction.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each, a classic car and a goal -

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-to scour Britain for antiques.

-That hurts.

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-I'm going to go for it.

-The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-Goodness gracious me.

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Not nice to gloat. There we are.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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All this week, we've been on the highways and byways of southern England with our experts,

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Catherine Southon and Charlie Ross, making steady and sometimes not-so-steady progress.

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-It's just the gears.

-If we could have another week or two together, you'd be driving like Stirling Moss.

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Charlie ran his own auction house for 25 years,

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but his passion for antiques is as fresh as ever.

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-You've got an old man quite excited here.

-Catherine's an expert on scientific instruments

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and is blessed with unique haggling skills.

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Charlie and Catherine began their trip with £200 each,

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but after four auctions their finances look decidedly depleted.

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I'm not buying antiques any more. I'm not buying classic antiques. I'm buying tat.

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Charlie's had hefty losses and only two modest gains,

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leaving him just £110.06 to spend today.

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Catherine has yet to make her fortune, but she does have a slightly healthier balance

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with £183.74 to play with.

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Their travelling companion is this 1966 Austin Healey frog-eyed Sprite,

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but perhaps not for much longer.

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-My car's packing up!

-Charlie...

-My cars packing up!

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-Are you all right, darling? I'm just going to find the bonnet catch!

-You're very close to my legs!

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-Argh!

-Charlie! What are you doing?!

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Don't get oil on your shirt, darling.

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-Do you know what you're doing?

-I bet we've run out of petrol. There's a garage!

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-Has he gone?

-Crisis averted, the team effort saves the day.

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Our experts began the week at Corsham in Wiltshire

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and are meandering over 200 miles through some beautiful parts of southern England

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en route to their final destination, Rye in East Sussex.

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Today they've just lurched into Rochester in Kent on the final leg of their journey,

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passing through the garden of England, bound for the auction in Rye.

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Rochester is one of the Medway towns on the north Kent coast.

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It's home to England's second-oldest cathedral, founded in 604AD.

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The cathedral is gorgeous.

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-Fantastic.

-There's a rather splendid Norman castle, too,

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despite the siege of 1215 when the fat of forty pigs

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was used to burn the props under the south-east tower, which promptly collapsed.

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Keep your eyes peeled. Oh, look!

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-Ha ha ha! Now shall I leave the engine running for you?

-Yes.

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-I'm going to jump in.

-Good luck.

-Happy shopping.

-Have a lovely time.

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I will. Adios, amigos.

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In need of a quick buck, canny Charlie's after some intelligence from the auctioneer in Rye.

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Charlie Ross here. What are you selling like hot cakes?

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Yes. Little silver items always do well. I'll see what I can find. Bye bye.

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Memories is home to more than 10 dealers with stock ranging from china to furniture and silver.

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-And it has a Gallic surprise for Charlie.

-Aha!

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-Are you the boss?

-Yes, I'm Martine.

-French!

-Yes.

-Ca va!

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I need to rely on you to get me out of a hole.

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J'ai un petit peu de monnaie.

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Charlie's nearly remembered the French for, "I'm almost skint."

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His entente cordiale with Martine produces something frightfully British, but not silver.

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I love that tin.

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It's a tea caddy, but it's got Lord Roberts, Lord Kitchener, of course,

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and Major General Baden-Powell, who founded the Scout movement.

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-It just seems quite a lot of money to me. It's £35.

-Yes.

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That will make at auction £20 or £25, you see.

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-If it could be bought for 15 quid, I might make a bit of profit. Do you mind?

-No.

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Martine checks with the dealer.

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He wants to know what would be your very best on your tin.

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Yeah, he wants to pay a pound! Yes, yes.

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Really, Martine. Is Charlie's reputation that bad?

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Bob said to me he wants it for £1. I said yes. So he said... No, £15.

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A pound! No, I'm not so cruel, not so cruel.

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-So he said 15.

-I could have that for 15.

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What a result. One tea caddy and Charlie's off, but ignoring the auctioneer's advice.

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-Not far away, Catherine's going upmarket.

-Posh junk!

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-I like that.

-Cottage Style Antiques stocks everything from upmarket bits to architectural salvage

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-and Bill is in charge.

-What I'm trying to look for is something

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wild, wacky and worth lots of money.

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-Nothing wacky so far, but hang on a minute.

-What's that?

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I could torture Charlie Ross with this. Hee hee hee.

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Wacky, but possibly not worth lots of money, so the search goes on.

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-I like your jars.

-They're damaged.

-All of them?

-They're nice, but...

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Little ceramic pharmaceutical jars, aren't they?

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These jars probably date from the late-19th century and would have stored medicinal compounds,

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long before drugs had to be kept in tamper-proof bottles.

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I like the little one because that's got a really nice label on it.

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-A price label on it!

-£25. I like that.

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I like that one because it's got the original gilt label on, a painted label,

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and it's in rather nice condition. They just look so attractive. As a decorative item they're nice.

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I wouldn't mind perhaps buying a couple of those.

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-How much can that one be?

-It's cheap now.

-At 25?

-Yeah.

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It could be cheaper!

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-It could be 20.

-Could be 20, right.

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That is almost a gift.

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So that's the small one.

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This is the medium-sized one. That's nice.

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-The label's all there. Lovely. And that's 30. How much could you do for the two?

-40 for the two.

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-40 for the two.

-And you're going to hit me with...

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I wasn't really going to, but as you've asked!

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Shall we say 35, then, as you assumed I was going to come down?

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-38.

-Have you had them a long time? 38?

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That's nothing. Well, 35 would... No, go on. 38.

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Bill, thank you very much indeed. I'm happy to buy those.

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So after one charm offensive from Miss Southon

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and one tactical error from Bill, her first purchase is in the bag.

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-That was a record. That was one purchase in about 1½ minutes.

-It's the quality of the gear.

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Well, the sign did say posh junk, Bill. There's lots of interest,

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-but what will sell best at an auction by the sea?

-They'd go mad for that at Rye.

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-Right on the coast?

-It is lovely. How much is that?

-£100.

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-Oh, Bill! We're talking big money. I can't do big money.

-Negotiable.

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-Would you like to look at it in the sun? You might be persuaded.

-He's a devil, isn't he?

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You are a devil, Bill! It is lovely.

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With the sun shining through it, it does look spectacular.

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This lovely turquoise blue colour on... Is that the sea? Yeah, that's the sea.

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One would hope. And this lovely vibrant red on the sun.

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It's absolutely beautiful. Really beautiful.

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Seeing as you've done a good deal on them jars,

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-you could go to about 60 on that.

-I'm not sure. I do love it.

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-60's too much?

-60's too much. What is your best, then?

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-55.

-Oh, really? Is that really the best you can do on that?

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-I'm not sure I want to take a gamble at 55.

-50 quid or we put it back in the workshop. How's that?

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Catherine isn't familiar with the market for stained-glass. Will she gamble at £50?

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I'm going to be bold and brave and shake your hand if I may at £50. The deal is done.

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Happy and brave, but £88 poorer, Catherine gets reassurance from Bill.

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-Thank you very much. I'm sure you'll do very well.

-Do you think?

-Yeah.

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-Thanks, Bill.

-Bye.

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Just down the road, Charlie's back on track, looking for silver as the auctioneer in Rye suggested.

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-There's a bit of English silver.

-Yes, that would be Georgian.

-Sugar tongs.

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-Sugar nips.

-Sugar nips.

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-Yes, they're lovely.

-There's no label. They must be free. Are they free?

-No!

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No, no, sorry. Even to you they wouldn't be free.

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-Oh, and nice, crisp marks.

-Yes, it's quite clear.

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Sugar nips have a scissor action to pick up sugar cubes,

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unlike sugar tongs which use a pinching action. These are Georgian.

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-I expect these are horrible expensive, aren't they?

-Yes, yes.

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-You're not supposed to say yes!

-They're not a pound.

-You say, "For you, Charlee,

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"une livre."

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-No.

-No.

-Never mind. How much are they?

-What about £50?

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You couldn't do those for £40, could you? If I went on my knees...

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-45.

-45?

-45. There you are.

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Martine...

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-mwah!

-45.

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So with the tea caddy at £15 and the sugar nips at £45,

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the Francophile has blown.

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-Soixante.

-Soixante. Merci beaucoup.

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Martine, thank you so much. May I do it the French way?

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-Wonderful!

-Three!

-Mwah! Trois!

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Ooh, la la! That was a good matin's work.

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The sun's out, temperatures are rising and Miss Southon has taken to the road again.

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She's making the short trip from Rochester to Chatham, another of the Medway towns,

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and a visit to the historic dockyard there. Does a tot of rum await?

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-Ahoy, sailor, I should say.

-Welcome to the dockyard at Chatham.

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Naval historian Richard Holdsworth is aboard HMS Gannet, poised to be Catherine's guide.

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It's 80 acres, 100 buildings and structures, 47 monuments

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and it's the complete dockyard of the Age of Sail.

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The origins of the dockyard are in Tudor times. Most of the fleet that fought the Armada

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left from Chatham in the months leading up to its attack.

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In the 17th century, it moved to this site and was established here from 1613.

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It was a site where they could build dry docks and slipways to build ships. It was the Royal Navy base.

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The dockyard closed as an operational naval base in 1984,

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but it has three vessels on display. The newest is the submarine HMS Ocelot,

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built at Chatham in 1962, and the oldest is HMS Gannet,

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-built nearby at Sheerness in 1878.

-Tell me about HMS Gannet.

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Gannet is the archetypal gunboat, the sort of ship when politicians stood up in Victorian days

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and yelled, "Send a gunboat!" this is what the navy would send.

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She epitomises everything this yard was about in the transition from sail to steam

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and she puts masts on the horizon and is a great flagship for us.

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In the Age of Sail, rope making was one of the many vital trades at the dockyard.

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This is the place that we still make rope today on equipment from 1811.

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-It's too difficult to talk about. Shall we go and have a look?

-Let's go.

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The present ropehouse was built in the 1780s and '90s,

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just in time to supply the 20 or so miles of rope needed for each ship during the Napoleonic Wars. Gosh.

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It's an amazing building and structure.

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-But you haven't seen anything yet.

-I've never seen anything like this.

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At its peak, the ropery was producing enough rope each year to reach to Istanbul.

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When it was built, it was the longest brick building in Europe at 1,135 feet.

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The navy needed rope at 120 fathoms in length.

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That would be 700 feet. They needed that to moor ships in 30 metres of water

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and because of the process when you twist the rope together they contract,

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you needed a building that's longer.

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Rope making here is still on a commercial basis, as well as keeping the craft alive.

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Master ropemaker Fred Cordyer and his team are in the final two stages of finishing a rope.

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First, they take three strands and twist each one individually to make it tougher,

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then they take the three toughened strands and turn them into a finished rope,

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-using a lot of skill and a wooden cone with three grooves.

-The rope's put into those grooves.

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When they start the machine again, they twist together

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and it pushes the top cart, with Fred on board, right the way down the floor.

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And this is a sort of skill that's been handed down, man and boy, since the mid-18th century.

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That is astonishing.

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-Now, of course, you can answer the question when you're asked - how long is a piece of string?

-Yes!

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What did he say again? 700 feet?! That's enough string to tie up Catherine's visit rather neatly.

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Charlie's made his way from the Medway to the pretty Kent market town of Faversham.

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He's still got £50.06 burning a hole in his pocket.

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-Hello!

-Hello.

-Are you Anne?

-I am.

-I'm Charlie!

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-Nice to meet you.

-Lovely to see you.

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Anne Squires has lots of beautiful antiques for sale,

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but that still leaves the old codger with a weight on his shoulders.

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I'll admit it now. I'm not the richest man in the world.

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And if I make you an offer, I'm not being mean. I simply haven't got any more money!

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Come on, Charlie. You could still do a lot with £50.

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-Not to mention the 6p.

-What a splendid shooting stick!

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Isn't that lovely? That's a Rolls Royce model!

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That's what old Churchill used to sit on when he was painting. Lovely. Probably about my height, too.

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-But will it take my weight?

-You'll find out in a minute!

-Yes!

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Don't break it if you can't afford to pay for it. Why don't you find yourself a proper seat?

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-That's better.

-I feel the weight of the world on my shoulders.

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On the other hand, there's furniture here. It's a Victorian walnut centre table

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that very sensibly somebody has cut down to be a coffee table.

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There isn't such a thing as a Victorian or Georgian coffee table.

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It's got lovely walnut. It's got ebony stringing here

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and I think ebonised cross-banding round the outside.

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-It's £180.

-More than three times your budget!

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Thankfully, Anne has a bright idea.

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Oh, a Chinese blue and white vase. How old is that? 18th century?

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The glazing, to me, looks almost 20th century,

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but actually looking at the bottom, the glazing here,

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I would say it's 18th century.

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Is it damaged? To be honest, it's only a nick that's been rather badly glued back in.

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You could get that out and re-restore it. I would say if that was perfect

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it would be worth £100-£150 at auction.

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The price tag says £85. Cheap, but not cheap enough.

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Where would be the sort of swimming pool bottom level on that?

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-Well, can you afford £60?

-Do you know, it sounds pathetic, but I haven't even got £60.

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Ah. I like it, actually. I love the colours.

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Love the patterns. Love the little dogs down the side.

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-Tell me what your budget is.

-Could I buy it for £40?

-Ooh!

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-That's a little bit...

-Is it?

-..low.

-It's a pathetic offer, but I am short of cash.

-You are.

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-It would leave me a tenner for tomorrow.

-Could you do £50? It wouldn't leave you anything.

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It would. It would leave me 6p to play with tomorrow.

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And I really don't want to walk into a shop with 6p in my pocket!

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Even an old cheapskate like me.

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I could walk into a shop with £5 and 6p tomorrow. Could you do 45?

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Does that get you out of trouble? I can see you visibly wilting and sagging!

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-Well, why not?

-Well, because you might be unhappy.

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-And sad.

-I won't be unhappy at all.

-And call me horrible names when I go out of the door!

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-It's my vase and I can let you have it for 45 if I want to.

-Chinese. Anything can happen!

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Put it there! Thank you. Mwah!

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It's another triumph for that old snogger, Charlie.

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Time to rejoin Catherine and take a well-earned break. Night-night.

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A new day dawns, beautiful and sunny, but our experts have different ideas on how to spend it.

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-I think we're going shopping together.

-I'm just going to sit in the hedgerows.

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Would you like that? Don't make a face like that!

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So far, Catherine's spent £88 on two ceramic pharmaceutical jars and a stained glass window,

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leaving a generous £95.74 for today's purchases.

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I'm worried now. It's a big gamble.

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Charlie started with less and he's already spent £105 on a tea caddy,

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some silver sugar nips and a Chinese vase. That leaves him with a miserly £5.06.

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Martine...mwah!

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Which could be a bit of a challenge.

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Catherine and Charlie are now heading to the village of Bethersden in Kent

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before their auction at the historic port of Rye in East Sussex.

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The typically Kentish village lies about five miles west of Ashford.

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In days gone by, so-called Bethersden marble was quarried here.

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It isn't actually marble, but looks similar when polished.

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-Also in Bethersden is the opportunity for a very bad joke.

-Look!

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Get inside. I'll give you a ride with your old friend Mr Shaw and his son Rick.

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-Rickshaw! Are you happy?

-I don't know about happy...

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Me take you on buying trip, madam!

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This is more fun than buying antiques.

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Come on, darling. Let's go shopping.

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Well, if the car breaks down again, that's Plan B sorted.

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The Antiques Barn has 3,000 square feet of diverse delights, courtesy of 18 dealers.

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Groovy!

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-Charlie could really rock'n'roll in these.

-Crikey!

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Rock'n'roll Rossco!

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Now I'm drawn to this. This is charming.

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This is Napoleonic. Prisoner of war.

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It's made with tiny little strands of straw that have been woven in to make this lovely mosaic pattern.

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I'm thinking it was a needle case, but actually it could be a vesta with a striker on the bottom.

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This looks like it's been made from bone. These were made using whatever materials prisoners found.

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Straw, bone, mutton bone. Whatever they could use, really.

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It's just such a neat little thing.

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Catherine's quite taken with the vesta case, but at £65 it seems she's not ready to commit.

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There are plenty of other temptations and Linda Coleman is on hand to throw them in her path.

0:21:340:21:40

I like that. A propeller barometer.

0:21:400:21:46

-When you say propeller barometer...

-Yes, possibly from the centrepiece of an old propeller.

0:21:460:21:52

-So you think this has come... and then been made into a barometer.

-Yes, yes.

0:21:520:21:58

-It's lovely.

-Beautiful.

-Does it work?

-Oh, yes.

0:21:580:22:02

The frame is beech and mahogany,

0:22:020:22:05

but it's hard to identify the exact origins of this piece.

0:22:050:22:09

Catherine wants to know more and she'd like a reduction on the £120 price tag.

0:22:090:22:14

-How much can you do on that?

-90.

0:22:140:22:17

-I still can't stretch that far.

-I'm afraid that would have to be...

0:22:190:22:23

Unless I can find out a better price. I'll give the seller a nudge.

0:22:230:22:27

While Linda checks whether the seller is prepared to be nudged, Catherine's eye roams.

0:22:270:22:34

Aren't these gorgeous? Can you ever believe that a lady would be able to get

0:22:340:22:39

her slender arm in one of these kid leather gloves? Look how tight that is.

0:22:390:22:45

They've probably never been worn.

0:22:450:22:47

They look to be in perfect condition. Absolutely delightful.

0:22:470:22:53

Well, the gentleman can't tell you much more about it, apart from he thinks it's a First World War

0:22:540:23:00

-aeroplane propeller, and that's it. But he will squeeze down to 75.

-Right, OK.

0:23:000:23:06

-Very kind.

-That's the absolute.

-I need to do some thinking, if that's all right.

-No problem.

0:23:060:23:11

Meanwhile, Charlie's struggling to get started on today's shopping spree.

0:23:110:23:17

Not going to be easy shopping with a fiver. Actually, I'm lying.

0:23:170:23:21

-Five pounds 6p.

-Think positive, Charlie. 6p could make all the difference.

0:23:210:23:27

I've seen something round here, I think. Oh, my goodness, me.

0:23:270:23:31

CLINK Breakages must be paid for, so just break a fiver!

0:23:310:23:36

-I can see you've got a sense of humour. ..Now that I like.

-It's really sweet, that little frame.

0:23:380:23:44

-Did it cost lots of money?

-It could be a fiver. It could be.

0:23:440:23:49

You've got an old man excited here. That looks really sweet.

0:23:490:23:53

It is a beautiful little frame.

0:23:530:23:56

-It would look lovely with a little portrait in there.

-It would.

-In fact...that would look gorgeous!

0:23:560:24:02

Look, she's already agreed a fiver, Charlie. You don't need to flirt.

0:24:020:24:07

Catherine's had a breakthrough. A camera-shy dealer has agreed to sell the vesta case for just £25,

0:24:070:24:15

a reduction of £40.

0:24:150:24:17

-But she has a new problem.

-I've been slightly foolish.

0:24:170:24:22

I've bought my vesta case, but it doesn't leave me with as much money as I thought.

0:24:220:24:28

I haven't got my sums correct. I now have just over £70 and a few pence.

0:24:280:24:32

The lady that owns the barometer, she said 75 was her absolute bottom.

0:24:320:24:38

So I'm going to try her at 70. See what happens.

0:24:380:24:42

Hi, there. I've been terribly foolish because I've spent some money and I know you said £75

0:24:420:24:50

-was your best.

-Absolutely. That would be.

0:24:500:24:54

-There's no way I could go any further.

-We couldn't pinch it to 70?

0:24:540:24:58

And a few pence.

0:25:000:25:02

-For you, yes. Go on, then.

-You could pinch it to 70?

-I'll pinch it to 70 just for you.

0:25:040:25:10

-That's really sweet of you.

-Not a problem.

0:25:100:25:13

-Because I think that might be all right. Incidentally, how much are they?

-The little gloves?

0:25:130:25:19

-A fiver to you?

-I have 74p!

0:25:190:25:24

-74p?

-Mmm.

-Cheeky!

0:25:240:25:27

-You've got to try.

-Go on, then.

-Can I?!

0:25:270:25:32

Yes, go on.

0:25:320:25:34

You are absolutely wonderful!

0:25:340:25:37

And with that, Catherine's spent every penny of her £183.74,

0:25:370:25:43

making that last 74p really count.

0:25:430:25:46

-Is that all right?

-Wonderful. Thank you.

-Absolute pleasure. Thank you.

0:25:460:25:51

-Farewell!

-Bye-bye!

-Wish me luck.

0:25:510:25:54

I think Charlie is more in need of luck.

0:25:540:25:57

May I reiterate it's not easy with a fiver?

0:25:570:26:02

-Come, come. Look what can be done with 74p.

-I just need something to jump out at me,

0:26:020:26:09

-then try the old Rossco negotiating skills. I don't suppose this will be a fiver?

-No.

-Fair enough.

0:26:090:26:15

I thought that had a pound sign and a fiver after it.

0:26:150:26:20

-It's actually 65!

-It's 65, that one!

0:26:200:26:23

Time is short, money is short and Charlie's feeling the heat in more ways than one.

0:26:230:26:30

While Charlie flaps, Catherine's chilled out and as cool as a...

0:26:300:26:35

chocolate ice cream. Has she got him licked?

0:26:350:26:39

Perhaps not.

0:26:410:26:43

Oh, I like that. Silver, Birmingham.

0:26:430:26:47

Probably 19... About 1930, I should think.

0:26:470:26:51

1920s, 1930.

0:26:510:26:53

It's got damage, but it is hallmarked silver, tortoiseshell bottom. It's a little coaster.

0:26:530:26:59

It's a genuine antique. It really is a bit bashed,

0:26:590:27:04

but "So what?" is what I say if they take a fiver.

0:27:040:27:08

It's priced at £12.

0:27:080:27:11

Selling tortoiseshell is restricted by international law, but as this coaster was made before 1947,

0:27:120:27:18

-it's still legal to sell it.

-Louise! I've found a very pretty silver little...

0:27:180:27:24

-Have you not seen that?

-No.

-Isn't it fun?

-You can have it for a fiver.

-That's fantastic!

0:27:240:27:30

-You've a good chance with that.

-A silver coaster and a smile. All for a fiver.

-Thank you for that!

0:27:300:27:36

-You're welcome.

-Wonderful!

0:27:360:27:39

Lucky Charlie.

0:27:390:27:41

Next he makes his way 12 miles down the road to the village of Northiam in East Sussex

0:27:420:27:47

to meet a man called Phil Collins. Not that one. They're going to talk about cars.

0:27:470:27:53

Charlie's auctioned hundreds of millions of pounds of vintage cars so he'll like this place.

0:27:530:27:59

-Oh, I'm in seventh heaven here!

-Told you.

0:27:590:28:02

Phil?

0:28:020:28:03

-Charlie.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:28:030:28:06

Phil used to be a jockey, but after a serious injury left him unable to drive real cars for nine months,

0:28:080:28:15

a friend introduced him to the world of pedal cars.

0:28:150:28:18

His collection started with one and it's grown into a full-scale museum.

0:28:180:28:24

-How many do you have?

-580 altogether.

-580?!

-Yes.

0:28:240:28:30

-Is this the biggest collection in the world?

-No, it isn't. I think we're sitting in third.

0:28:300:28:36

-Who are your rivals?

-George W Bush has got a collection. It's a private one.

0:28:360:28:42

-He's into the 600-mark.

-Gosh! Phil's competing in the major league.

0:28:420:28:46

I wonder if the former President buys his cars in the same places.

0:28:460:28:51

-Where did you find that?

-In a junk shop.

-Really?

0:28:510:28:54

I think it was £17 10 shillings.

0:28:540:28:57

-Not 50p. 10 shillings.

-10 shillings!

0:28:570:29:01

The oldest car in Phil's collection is a De Dion, dating from around 1905.

0:29:010:29:08

We found this in a barn in Salisbury and we had to scrape the tyres off the floor.

0:29:080:29:12

But the upholstery, paintwork, lamps were all as.

0:29:120:29:17

-It looks as if it would almost go without pedalling. It's got a radiator.

-Only a dummy one!

0:29:170:29:23

Something to put your whisky in!

0:29:230:29:26

Charlie's tour includes a privileged peek at Phil's workshop

0:29:260:29:31

where he restores old cars and has just started making new ones.

0:29:310:29:37

-I recognise that chap! Jaguar.

-XK.

-XK-120?

0:29:370:29:42

-120.

-How long will it take to make that?

0:29:420:29:46

-It takes me roughly 20-30 hours from start to finish.

-That's pretty speedy work, I reckon.

0:29:460:29:53

-You just keep them?

-This is built for a customer.

-Right.

-To their specifications.

0:29:530:29:59

Red carpet, blue seat.

0:29:590:30:01

Phil's cars range from around £1,300 for a fibreglass self-build kit

0:30:010:30:07

to £6,000 for an exquisite and unique alloy model like this one.

0:30:070:30:13

I think that's just wonderful. I'm going to put my order in!

0:30:130:30:17

-It's been a real delight.

-A pleasure.

-Thank you so much.

0:30:170:30:21

Better start saving, Charlie. For now it's back to reality. The plan is to meet with Catherine

0:30:210:30:27

in a Kentish vineyard so that they can reveal their purchases

0:30:270:30:32

-and then drown their sorrows or toast their success with some tasty local tipple.

-Ready?

0:30:320:30:39

Yeah.

0:30:390:30:40

These items here,

0:30:400:30:43

we have a price range from 74p up to £70.

0:30:430:30:47

Right. I'm going to say you wouldn't have paid £74 for anything other than the barometer.

0:30:470:30:53

-Wrong?

-£70. You're right.

0:30:530:30:55

-A bit chancy on that.

-Was it a silly thing to buy?

0:30:550:30:59

Yes, very silly. If you bought any of those things for 74p,

0:30:590:31:04

-you did unusually well. Which was it?

-Gloves.

0:31:040:31:08

-74p?!

-Yeah. Aren't they lovely?

-They're 30 quid's worth. 40 quid.

-They're beautiful.

-Are they kid?

0:31:080:31:15

-Kid leather gloves. Immaculate.

-You stole those.

0:31:150:31:20

-And these?

-Little medical jars.

0:31:200:31:22

They're lovely. 19th century. And they cost... You didn't spend all your money, did you?

0:31:220:31:28

-£38. I did spend all my money!

-70, 80, 90, 110, 120...

0:31:280:31:34

-I thought you had...

-Forgotten something crucial?

0:31:340:31:38

-Blimey! It's Tiffany!

-Not quite!

-It's a Tiffany window!

0:31:380:31:44

That's glorious. It's not quite Tiffany, but isn't that fun?

0:31:440:31:50

-And such amazing condition!

-Don't look too closely!

-I like that. I love leaded glass.

0:31:500:31:56

That's fab. That's worth...£120.

0:31:560:32:01

-I love you, Charlie!

-Do you?

-I do!

0:32:010:32:04

-What did you pay?

-50 quid.

-Then you are a creep! Fabulous.

0:32:040:32:09

Are Charlie's buys fabulous, too?

0:32:090:32:12

Argh!

0:32:120:32:13

Right.

0:32:130:32:14

Catherine sees potential in the Chinese vase.

0:32:140:32:19

-This to me looks very attractive.

-I would agree with that.

0:32:190:32:22

I was thinking for a moment it might be 18th century, but it's 19th.

0:32:220:32:27

-But I just had to take a gamble.

-It's got a big chunk out of it.

-A little, tiny chunk.

0:32:270:32:32

-But that's my gamble. I bought some very, very lovely 18th century...

-Sugar nips.

0:32:320:32:38

..silver sugar nips. They're crisply marked, got to be London.

0:32:380:32:43

And I haven't looked at the maker yet. What are they worth?

0:32:430:32:47

-40? 50?

-That's not what the man wants to hear.

-How much did you pay?

0:32:470:32:52

40, 50.

0:32:520:32:53

Finally, I had a fiver left today and I bought a hallmarked silver and tortoiseshell coaster.

0:32:530:33:01

-I saw that in the cabinet.

-I know.

-I didn't pick it up.

-You wouldn't.

0:33:010:33:06

-No ringing endorsement, then.

-Shall we say cheers to our success

0:33:060:33:11

-and bonne chance?

-I've just enjoyed the time. It's been fabulous.

0:33:110:33:15

Fabulous is all very well, but what did they really think?

0:33:150:33:18

Catherine's bought rather a mixed bag. I'm not wildly impressed by the barometer in the propeller.

0:33:180:33:25

I think the sugar nips were very clever. He paid £40

0:33:250:33:30

and I said they were worth £40, £50.

0:33:300:33:33

I think they'll probably make £80.

0:33:330:33:36

My vase, frankly, has got to make a couple of hundred quid. Or I've lost!

0:33:360:33:41

It's OK. It's got a great look to it. I think it'll make about £60.

0:33:410:33:46

So it's been an eventful final leg, lurching into Rochester in Kent and heading through the countryside

0:33:460:33:53

into East Sussex and today's auction in Rye.

0:33:530:33:57

-And the events just keep coming.

-What have you done?!

0:33:570:34:02

I fell down some stairs and I've hurt my leg.

0:34:020:34:06

-I fell down the stairs and I pulled a ligament.

-In your knee?

-Mm.

0:34:060:34:11

-Put your bottom in.

-Right.

-Hang on. One at a time, darling. Oh, dear.

0:34:110:34:17

Hang on. I can't get in now.

0:34:210:34:23

Aargh!

0:34:230:34:24

Charlie, it's our last auction. That's sad.

0:34:250:34:29

Come with me, Miss Southon, with your wonky leg.

0:34:290:34:33

Wonky leg or not, our catastrophe-prone couple have a date at Rye Auction Galleries

0:34:330:34:38

which holds regular antique, collectable and general sales.

0:34:380:34:43

So what does auctioneer Kevin Wall make of our experts' choices?

0:34:450:34:50

Some items will do rather well. Some not so well.

0:34:500:34:53

I am worried about the Napoleonic vesta case. I do believe it to be more 1930s reproduction.

0:34:530:35:00

The Chinese vase would have been nice without the nibble to the top.

0:35:000:35:04

The restoration is not very good. It's let the price down quite a bit.

0:35:040:35:09

The estimate has come down to about £20-£40 for that vase.

0:35:090:35:14

Charlie started this leg with £110.06

0:35:140:35:18

and blew all but 6p on four lots.

0:35:180:35:21

Thank you for that. Mwah!

0:35:220:35:25

Catherine began with £183.74

0:35:250:35:28

and spent every single penny to buy five lots for the auction.

0:35:280:35:32

-Go on.

-You are wonderful!

0:35:330:35:37

The moment of truth is imminent, but first Charlie has a question.

0:35:370:35:42

-Are you comfortable?

-I'm all right.

-Will you last long enough?

-I'm fine. I'm really excited.

0:35:420:35:48

First up are Catherine's two ceramic pharmaceutical jars.

0:35:480:35:53

Who's going to start me at £40? 20, then.

0:35:530:35:57

-10, then.

-Oh, come on!

-10. 12.

0:35:580:36:01

-15. 15's with the gentleman.

-Still going.

0:36:010:36:05

Do I see 18 now? They've got to go. At £15.

0:36:050:36:08

I'm heartbroken for you(!)

0:36:080:36:12

Ha! Bitter medicine for Catherine, but a spoonful of sugar for Charlie.

0:36:120:36:16

There's hope for the old dog yet.

0:36:160:36:18

-Next up, Catherine's bargain buy. The kid leather gloves.

-£40 for them?

0:36:180:36:24

-Kid leather.

-That's a bit steep!

0:36:240:36:27

At £10 I'm bid. At £10 only.

0:36:270:36:30

-Do I see 12 for these?

-Come on!

0:36:300:36:33

She's begging you!

0:36:330:36:35

12 I've got here. At £12 only.

0:36:350:36:38

-That's a hell of a return on 74p!

-We're off. 18. 20.

0:36:380:36:43

-They're well worth it, sir. 20. 2?

-Good man!

0:36:430:36:48

At £20. At 20 only. At £20, then.

0:36:480:36:51

Disaster! They only cost 74p.

0:36:520:36:55

A deal beautifully handled ends in a whopping profit for Catherine.

0:36:550:36:59

In percentage terms, the best we've had.

0:36:590:37:02

Now it's Charlie's silver and tortoiseshell coaster.

0:37:020:37:06

-I've got to start it at 25. 28 I'm bid. At £28.

-What?!

-At 28.

0:37:060:37:12

-At £28. All done here, then? 30 on the net now!

-Ooh!

0:37:120:37:17

-They've woken up!

-Oh, I say!

-All done? Going to go.

0:37:170:37:22

At £30.

0:37:220:37:23

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:37:250:37:27

Charlie leaps into the lead, but Catherine's not giving up.

0:37:270:37:31

I think we'll be even Stevens.

0:37:310:37:34

-Catherine's straw work vesta case is next.

-At £30 I'm bid. £30.

0:37:340:37:41

30. Is it 2? 32 on the net. 35.

0:37:410:37:44

-I told you this would go on the net!

-35. 38. 40.

0:37:440:37:48

-Keep going!

-42. 45.

0:37:480:37:52

48.

0:37:520:37:54

-Come on.

-50.

0:37:540:37:56

5.

0:37:560:37:57

-60.

-Oh.

0:37:570:37:59

-Well worth it, sir.

-It is.

-She's begging you.

0:37:590:38:03

60 there. At 60, sir. 60.

0:38:030:38:06

-Is it 5? 65. 70, sir?

-Oh, it's worth it.

0:38:060:38:10

Don't lose it for a fiver, sir. At £65. 70!

0:38:100:38:14

At £70. In the room now at £70.

0:38:140:38:18

With you, sir, at £70, then.

0:38:180:38:21

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:38:210:38:24

That's ignited things for Catherine. She's in the lead.

0:38:240:38:28

That could be the nail in my coffin.

0:38:280:38:30

Don't give up. The auctioneer thought silver could do well here.

0:38:300:38:35

-I've got a couple of bids here.

-A couple of bids!

-22. 25. 28.

0:38:350:38:39

-30's here. At 30.

-That's a bit cheap.

0:38:390:38:43

-5.

-On the internet.

-The internet's on fire now.

0:38:430:38:47

-40 on the net.

-Less than I paid!

0:38:470:38:50

-42, sir.

-Thank you. Come on, team.

-They need to be 80.

-50.

0:38:500:38:55

-Get going!

-At £50 on the net. Looking very sad again.

0:38:550:39:00

At £50.

0:39:000:39:03

Well, he's smiling through the tears, but he's done the maths.

0:39:030:39:08

That's another famous C Ross loss.

0:39:080:39:11

Now will Catherine's First World War propeller barometer take off?

0:39:110:39:17

Got to start in at £25. 28.

0:39:170:39:20

-30. 32. 35. 38.

-Going like the clappers.

0:39:200:39:24

-40 is it now?

-Keep going!

-At £38.

-She's bidding over there.

0:39:240:39:29

-Stop it!

-42. 45.

-She's bidding.

0:39:290:39:33

-55. 60.

-Go on, Southon, go on!

0:39:330:39:35

-Go on, Southon!

-80. 5.

-Cor, I don't believe this!

-Keep going.

0:39:350:39:41

At £80.

0:39:410:39:43

Hmm. After commission, that barely reached cruising altitude.

0:39:430:39:49

-It is a marginal loss.

-I know.

-After commission.

0:39:490:39:53

-Next up, Charlie's patriotic tea caddy.

-£20.

0:39:530:39:58

10, then? 10. 12. 15.

0:39:580:40:00

18. 20. 2.

0:40:000:40:02

-25. 28?

-Come on.

-25's still here.

0:40:020:40:06

28? Still with you at 25.

0:40:060:40:08

-Any downstairs? 28. 30.

-A gentleman with impeccable taste in the front row.

-38.

0:40:080:40:14

38 is here. At £38.

0:40:140:40:18

Yours, Thrilled of Rye.

0:40:180:40:21

That's a tidy profit and puts the two neck and neck.

0:40:210:40:25

The stained glass window is Catherine's final lot, her make-or-break purchase.

0:40:250:40:32

-It's worth a lot more than £50.

-I can't bear this.

-50 I've got.

0:40:320:40:36

-Here we go.

-5. 60. 5.

0:40:360:40:39

-The buyer of the tea caddy is going like the clappers.

-90. 5.

0:40:390:40:43

-100. 110.

-Keep going.

0:40:430:40:46

120?

0:40:460:40:48

110 I have here. £110.

0:40:480:40:51

-All done, then?

-Come on!

-110.

0:40:510:40:53

-That's put a smile back on my face.

-It's a hefty profit and Charlie knows it.

-Well done.

0:40:530:41:00

That, I think, seals your victory.

0:41:000:41:02

Short of a miracle.

0:41:020:41:05

-So could the Chinese vase produce a miracle?

-35. 38, do I see?

0:41:050:41:11

-40. 2.

-Come on, come on. We've got a long way to go here.

0:41:110:41:16

-Add 100, come on.

-48.

0:41:160:41:18

48. 48. Do I see 50?

0:41:180:41:21

-At £48.

-He did his best.

0:41:210:41:24

Best, yes, but miracle? No. With a loss after costs.

0:41:240:41:28

Thank you, sir. You've done your best.

0:41:280:41:31

Well, it's been quite a journey, but have Catherine or Charlie gone from rags to riches?

0:41:310:41:37

Charlie started the final leg with £110.06

0:41:370:41:41

and made a petite profit of £26.12 after auction costs,

0:41:410:41:46

leaving him with just £136.18 at the end of the trip.

0:41:460:41:51

Catherine, on the other hand, kicked off with £183.74

0:41:510:41:56

and earned a healthy £58.16, making her not only today's winner,

0:41:560:42:02

but champion of this week's Road Trip with £241.90.

0:42:020:42:07

All the money our experts make will go to Children In Need.

0:42:070:42:11

-Come on, dear.

-You don't have to call me "dear", Charlie.

0:42:110:42:16

-Just because I'm hobbling, I'm not old.

-These prima donnas when they've won a competition...

0:42:160:42:22

Not very gallant, Charlie, considering you've been trying to impress the girls all week.

0:42:220:42:29

Melt into my arms...!

0:42:300:42:33

Blimey! My glasses are steaming up!

0:42:330:42:36

You're gorgeous.

0:42:360:42:38

I can't see that myself.

0:42:380:42:41

Catherine's been no slouch on the flirting front, either.

0:42:410:42:46

Oh, move out the way. I'm moving in.

0:42:460:42:48

You've got lovely eyes.

0:42:480:42:51

I like you stroking my hand.

0:42:530:42:55

# The female of the species is more deadly than the male... #

0:42:550:43:01

Lovely man.

0:43:010:43:03

Thank you!

0:43:030:43:05

But we all know that really they only have eyes for each other.

0:43:050:43:10

-Thank you.

-You look gorgeous.

0:43:120:43:14

# Going to the chapel and we're gonna get married... #

0:43:140:43:21

By the end of this trip, I could be in love with you.

0:43:210:43:25

-I thought we already were in love?

-Aha-ha!

0:43:250:43:30

Settle down.

0:43:310:43:33

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0:43:500:43:52

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