Episode 29 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 29

As Charlie Ross and Catherine Southon battle it out on this fourth day to make a profit, they take in some historic sites on their trip from the south coast up to London.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts, with £200 each,

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a classic car,

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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That hurts.

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I'm going to go for it.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Goodness, gracious me.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Not nice to gloat. There we are.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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We're back on the road in the sunny south of England

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with two cheerful experts, Charlie Ross and Catherine Southon.

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I don't want to win the competition, Miss Southon,

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I just want to make you happy.

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Hah! Catherine is an expert in scientific instruments

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and the dark art of hypnosis

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when it comes to getting the price she wants to pay, that is.

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140. Look at this.

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130.

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130. I'm going to go for it, Joe.

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Charlie is an auctioneering supremo,

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especially when it comes to vintage Cars. And the odd bottle of ale.

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The last one I bought was 5p, I don't know if this is 4p or 6p?

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Our enthusiastic experts begin the trip with £200 each,

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but three auctions later,

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they still both have less than they started with.

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Charlie's meagre total has slipped further.

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He starts this leg with a measly £101.98

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Catherine's faring slightly better.

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Despite having dropped a few of her £105 bricks,

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she only has £172.20 left to spend this time.

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But they have each other and the sunshine, which is a bonus,

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considering their cute little 1966 Austin beady frog-eyed Sprite

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is entirely roofless.

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This week, the Road Trip sprits us eastwards

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along the south coast of England,

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starting in Corsham, Wiltshire, and finishing in Rye, East Sussex.

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Today, we're starting our journey in Lewes, East Sussex,

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and then heading north via Kent,

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culminating in an auction in Chiswick, West London. How lovely.

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Both experts have struggled to make a reasonable profit so far.

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But wouldn't it be lovely today if we both bought some items

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and then just they really did us proud at auction?

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In my case, it would be a miracle.

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Have faith, Charlie. You never know.

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Now, artist and designer William Morris wrote,

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"You can see Lewes lying like a box of toys

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"under a great amphitheatre of chalk hill."

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And indeed, this town is stuffed full of antique goodies

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just aching for a buyer.

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Antiques centre!

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It's a shame our experts don't have much cash left.

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Could you tell me what to buy?

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Still, it's shopping time and we're on Catherine's home turf here.

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-This is your sort of place, isn't it?

-It is. This is my comfort zone.

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First stop, Emporium Antiques. Four floors of furniture,

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all manner of lovely collectables

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and dealers whom Catherine knows well, this being her patch.

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-Hello, Michelle.

-How are you?

-I'm good, thank you.

-Are you going to introduce us?

-Yes.

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-Charlie, Michelle. Michelle, Charlie.

-Hello, nice to see you.

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-Have a look around and we'll see what we can see.

-I will.

-Is that all right?

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-I think you need to go down the back.

-Why?

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Because it's the more, sort of, cheaper area.

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Ooh! But knowing your way around is one thing,

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finding something you can afford is another.

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Oh, everything I like is too much money.

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I think sort of small, decorative...

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Oh, the pressure, the pressure!

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What have I found?

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Close your eyes. Open them.

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It's the Whitbread Silver Jubilee ale.

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How many bottles of this must they make? I buy this on every trip.

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Now, the first one cost 5p

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and made £12.

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The second one cost £2

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and sold for £2.

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This one is £4.

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It will probably sell for £2. Perhaps it's time to give up.

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On the other hand, it might make £12.

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Oh, Charlie, when will you ever learn?

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Michelle, I have a track record on tour

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of always buying a bottle of Jubilee commemorative beer.

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-Ah, OK.

-Now, it's over there,

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and it's got £4 on it. But I don't know.

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That can be £3, as it's you.

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Deal. I'm definitely having the beer,

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because that will keep my trend going.

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One purchase down for Charlie. Now, what's this Catherine's found?

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It's just a paperweight. Kosta Boda.

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It's quite nice though. Michelle, what's Kosta Boda?

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Scandinavian, I think it's Danish.

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Danish. If we say Scandinavian.

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Ah, let me enlighten you. Kosta Boda is actually a Swedish glassworks.

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It was formed back in 1742, but it was in the 20th century

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that it really came into its own

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with its stylish, artistic and functional designs.

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This swimming hippo has £65 on the ticket.

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-How much could that be?

-65 would be 55.

-Oh, Michelle.

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Can it be 30?

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I don't think so.

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-Shall I ask Steve?

-Yeah, ask Steve.

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I'm going to schmooze.

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-There's no way you could do 35 on it?

-I could speak to him.

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Steve phones the dealer.

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If I get it for £35, I stand a bit of a chance with it.

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What did he say, Steve?

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-40 quid.

-Huh?

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-40.

-Oh.

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I'm going to hold that as a sort of possibility.

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-Hang on to it, have a think.

-That's one to think about.

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I want to buy silver.

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That's the only thing that's doing well for me at the moment.

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Silver, silver, silver.

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Ah, a Cabinet stuffed with... silver.

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-Steve?

-Yeah.

-Can I just have a look in this cabinet?

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-It's almost like a miniature claret jug.

-A claret jug, isn't it?

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-I'm not sure what you'd use it for now though.

-Err, claret?

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"1894, Gibson and Langman."

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Cut glass and then silver mounted. Pretty handle there.

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What would he take then? Off that?

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What's it got? 65, yeah.

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60 quid at a push, maybe.

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Catherine's not getting the discounts she was hoping for,

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but maybe Steve can come to the rescue.

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I'll tell you what, have a look at this, it's not dear.

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But it might not be enough money for you that you want to spend.

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Rubens angels. No holes, no cheese grater. It's in good nick.

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It's moulded, isn't it? Hobnail moulded.

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Just a glass dressing table jar.

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-The angels are good.

-The angels are good.

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-34.

-That'll be 25.

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These little dressing table jars are really ten a penny.

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This is slightly different. It's got angels on the top.

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Rubens angels, after the artist.

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Hallmarked there for Birmingham.

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I'm still tempted by this,

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because I think it's such an elegant, beautiful shape.

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Time to phone the dealer.

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Barry, it's Steve at the Emporium.

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You've got a little sort of posh bottle.

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-What's the very best you'll do on this, Barry?

-Don't say posh.

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If he says posh, he's not going to give it to me at a reduced price!

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-Cheers, mate, bye now.

-What did he say?

-55.

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-Did he?

-No, he didn't, but let's say 55.

-Oh, right, really?

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You know what they say, it's not what you know...

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I mean, I think the two together, 80 quid, is...

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for two fairly decent things, I think both saleable.

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And the hippo was 35.

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Well, actually it was £40 the last time I heard.

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-Yeah, it can be 35.

-Yeah?

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OK.

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25.

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-55, makes 80.

-Hungry hippo, 115.

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110 and we're done. We don't deal with fives, do we?

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Go on, 110, 110. OK, that's good, yeah.

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That's good, I've got a little mixture. There we are, my dear, 20...

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Smooth operator, Miss Southon.

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Charlie's notionally spent three whole pounds on a bottle of ale so far.

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But now, something else has caught his eye -

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an Art Deco lady's travelling clock.

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-I looked at that. I like that.

-That's not bad.

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Oh, please don't buy it, cos I found that.

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If you buy that and if that makes some money,

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I'm going to be very upset.

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You are really making me want to buy this, aren't you?

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Right, I don't know whether that can be within my budget.

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It doesn't look like it will come down a huge amount, but I love that.

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-It has got...

-Pretty.

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A little nick there, which is a shame,

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-but it's a really pretty enamelled clock.

-Pretty.

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It's a very pretty clock. It's got 115. I've got, I think,

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101 quid or something, so I haven't got to beg it.

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-I would say the normal trade could be about 100 quid.

-Yeah, quite.

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-I'd expect that.

-We could probably do a bit better than that.

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If whoever owns that could take 80 quid,

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I would buy it straight away.

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-I'll give him a ring.

-Yeah, thank you very much indeed.

-No problem.

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Best price on the clock? Yeah, sure, OK.

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-Ah, what's the verdict?

-£80, sir.

-Really?

-He'd like more.

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That is a great chunk out of your budget, Charlie,

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you brave or foolish fellow.

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Proper antique.

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Unusual for Ross.

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But if we can't make something on that,

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then, for the fourth time on this tour, I give up.

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-Steven, thank you very much indeed. I owe you 80 quid.

-80 quid.

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And you probably don't also know that I owe you three quid as well.

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-Three quid?

-Yes, I bought a bottle of beer.

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-A bottle of beer.

-20, 40...

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So, just to recap, Charlie spent £83 on yet another bottle of ale

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and an Art Deco travelling clock,

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while Catherine's parted with £110 for her hippo, a glass jug,

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and a silver-topped jar.

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Which means Charlie's late.

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-Come on!

-How long have you been sitting there?

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About five hours. How long do you take...?

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Nag, nag, nag.

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All this pitiful, "I've got no money."

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-Nag, nag, nag.

-Put it on the accelerator.

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Charlie and Catherine are leaving Lewes behind,

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heading ten miles south, to Seaford.

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This seaside town sits at the base of Seaford Head,

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at east end of the South Downs. In the Middle Ages,

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Seaford was one of southern England's main ports,

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persistently raided by French pirates. Ooh la la!

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Now all the residents need to worry about

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are a couple of new invaders - well, Catherine anyway.

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Charlie's dropping her off so she can do a spot of shopping.

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Bye-bye. See you later, have fun at your visit.

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-Have a lovely shop.

-Arrivederci.

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With just over £62 left in her pocket,

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it's time to explore Seaford's wares.

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And it's not long before Catherine spots something

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she really likes the look of in Mark's Antiques.

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Questions is, can she afford it?

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Best to ask the shop's owner. Yep, it's Mark.

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-Hi. I'm Mark.

-Hello, Mark, hi.

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Something caught my eye in your window. I was just walking past,

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-cos I think you're mainly jewellery, are you, here?

-No.

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-No, you do a bit of everything.

-Everything, many things.

-Ah.

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Well, what I saw in the window

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-was a beautiful Cloisonne enamel little pot.

-Certainly.

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Is it expensive, before you go to the trouble of opening it?

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-It is expensive.

-How expensive is it?

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The very best on it would be £650.

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-Have I got that sort of money?

-Er, no.

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Do you have things under £100?

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There are quite a few other nice silver items in the cabinet.

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-Shall I go and have a look in the cabinet?

-Do.

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-Are you flexible, Mark?

-I'm always flexible.

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Are you? That's my man. That's my guy.

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OK, I'm going to open this up.

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My eye is instantly drawn to the cocktail sticks.

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The enamel is not crisp. Can you see that here?

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The colours sort of slightly run into one another.

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Sterling silver cocktail sticks,

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terminating in a little cock, figure of a cock.

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But I'm not sure that they're really crisp enough.

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-Mark. From a distance, I love these.

-Yeah.

-But when you get up close...

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the enamel's not great on them, is it?

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I do like them, but there's also a borderline

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between naively painted and not-so-skilfully painted.

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-True.

-How much are they? I haven't even asked you. How much are they?

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-Or how much could you have them for?

-How much could I have them for?

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I like the way there's a real differentiation between those two.

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OK.

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Those you could have for £45.

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-45. How much did you have on them then?

-£60.

-Right.

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Would you do 40 on those, Mark?

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-I couldn't, no.

-Could you not?

-No.

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Here we go, Catherine's technique

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of repeating the price she wants to pay.

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-Oh. Are you sure you don't want to do 40.

-I cannot do 40, no.

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I think I'd have them for 40, but not 45.

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I know that's not a big difference, but it is when you're trying to win

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against Charlie Ross and try and make a profit.

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-OK, £40.

-Can I?

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It's a deal. And you're a lovely man.

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Flattery will get you everywhere.

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Well, with her shopping done today, Catherine can put her feet up.

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Charlie, meanwhile, is on his way to somewhere quite otherworldly.

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He's skimming 17 miles eastwards to Hailsham, East Sussex.

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Deep in the Sussex countryside

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lies the astonishing sight of the Observatory Science Centre.

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Showing Charlie around is Science Director Dr Sandra Voss.

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Wonderful. It looked stunning coming up the drive,

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-across the fields.

-Yeah. It is.

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Now, starting at the very beginning,

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it is the Royal Observatory

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commissioned by...

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King Charles II, 1675.

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There was an awful lot of ships being lost at sea,

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so they wanted to get a really good star catalogue.

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-So he said we do need to make a good star catalogue.

-Yeah.

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But we need an observatory for that.

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Initially, the observatory was built in Greenwich,

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but was later moved here in 1947

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because the London smog was hampering visibility.

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So they had to reconstruct all of the...

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They did have to reconstruct them, without plans or anything.

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Hadn't they got any plans?

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No, they had pictures and postcards

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and a chap who knew what he was doing.

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Now, are we allowed to go into one of these domes?

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-I think so. Would you like to go into this one?

-Please. I'd love to.

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So come on into our smallest dome.

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And this one is a 13-inch astrographic refracting telescope.

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My first reaction is

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it looks like a gun off a battleship. It's extraordinary!

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-Battleship grey.

-Battleship grey,

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and of course all this was owned by the Royal Navy.

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Owned by the Admiralty, so everything was battleship grey.

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And this was built when?

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It was built in 1890.

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And it was commissioned for a project called the Carte du Ciel,

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-which was involved with about 17 other observatories.

-Yeah.

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Making a map of the sky. Exactly.

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Back in 1890, this telescope was cutting-edge technology,

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made by British manufacturers.

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-You look through there?

-Yeah, you do.

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I can switch this one on if you like.

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We take the brakes off.

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And then we can come and move it.

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Would you like to come and just have a try?

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How phenomenal! Oh, I see, you just peep through there.

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-Yes, there's two telescopes.

-Yeah, but I can't see anything, can I?

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Can't you do something with the roof?

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We could do something with the roof, yes.

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Oh, my goodness. This is James Bond!

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This is extraordinary!

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This telescope tracks perfectly

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opposite the Earth's rotation.

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So it perfectly tracks what you're looking at.

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What a feat of engineering and science that is.

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-And still working perfectly well.

-Oh, it's beautiful.

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-Am I allowed to spin it round or will something awful happen?

-You can spin it round.

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Just press this button there and see what happens.

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Oh, my God.

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We're moving. Oh, no we're not.

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I need to look at the floor, otherwise I'm going to fall over.

0:17:160:17:20

You're full of tricks, aren't you?

0:17:200:17:22

This amazing dome can rotate 360 degrees

0:17:220:17:25

so the telescope can look at any area of the sky.

0:17:250:17:30

-Press the button.

-Yeah, yeah.

-Stop!

0:17:300:17:33

-Let's see.

-Perfect, I'm good at this.

-Perfect.

0:17:330:17:36

Now, that really was quite an experience.

0:17:360:17:38

-I'm going to come back here when it's dark.

-Yes.

0:17:380:17:40

-And we move onto another dome?

-Yeah, I think.

-Come on.

0:17:400:17:43

The domes were built from copper

0:17:430:17:45

because, when it weathers, it turns green,

0:17:450:17:48

so blending into this beautiful countryside.

0:17:480:17:51

And each one houses telescopes capable of different magnifications.

0:17:510:17:54

-It's like a space rocket.

-It's absolutely beautiful.

0:17:560:18:00

The other telescope is a bit of machinery.

0:18:000:18:04

It sort of talks to you.

0:18:040:18:05

Something to do with that kind of balanced weight being round,

0:18:050:18:08

-as opposed to the other one being square.

-Yes.

0:18:080:18:12

This is the Thompson 26-inch refracting telescope.

0:18:120:18:16

But, again, there's the two telescopes on this one,

0:18:160:18:19

with the guidoscope on top. Can you see that one?

0:18:190:18:22

The guide one just to get the clues to roughly where you are in the sky.

0:18:220:18:25

The guidoscope itself was built in 1860

0:18:250:18:28

and that was really significant in Greenwich.

0:18:280:18:30

It was called the Great Equatorial Telescope.

0:18:300:18:34

-And it was the biggest telescope they had at the time.

-It must be a very tall man

0:18:340:18:39

-to have a look there.

-We have to do something a bit different in this one

0:18:390:18:43

to make it safe and comfortable

0:18:430:18:44

to actually look through the telescope.

0:18:440:18:46

We just press this button,

0:18:460:18:48

and we're away.

0:18:480:18:51

Oh, my goodness, what's happening?

0:18:510:18:54

-We're on a rising floor.

-Are we going up

0:18:540:18:56

-or is the machine going down?

-We're going up.

0:18:560:18:59

Telescope technology has left these astonishing machines behind

0:18:590:19:03

and found more suitable locations.

0:19:030:19:05

Nowadays, the world's most powerful telescopes

0:19:050:19:08

sit on the top of mountains and extinct volcanoes,

0:19:080:19:11

where astronomers have much longer and clearer viewing times.

0:19:110:19:15

It's just a really uncanny thought

0:19:150:19:17

to think that you can move tons and tons.

0:19:170:19:21

-How many tons?

-12 tons. 12 tons like that. Yes.

0:19:210:19:24

It's beautifully balanced. It's just absolutely beautifully balanced.

0:19:240:19:28

The observatory is open to the public,

0:19:280:19:30

but for Charlie, his visit has now sadly come to an end.

0:19:300:19:34

He has another hard day's shopping ahead.

0:19:340:19:37

So, sleep tight, dear experts.

0:19:370:19:40

Day two and getting into focus,

0:19:450:19:47

our duelling duo are raring for another day's spend, spend, spend.

0:19:470:19:50

There's an antiques shop.

0:19:500:19:53

Good morning! How are you?

0:19:530:19:55

-I'm fine, and you?

-Lovely to see you.

-Thank you.

0:19:550:19:58

Oh, I'm going there. Yes.

0:19:580:20:01

-Charlie!

-Ross, go, you are on fire!

0:20:010:20:04

You are so shallow, Charlie Ross!

0:20:040:20:07

Charlie and Catherine have left East Sussex in the dust

0:20:070:20:11

and are heading for Sevenoaks in Kent.

0:20:110:20:13

So far, Charlie has spent exactly £83

0:20:140:20:17

on an Art Deco travelling clock and a bottle of Silver Jubilee ale.

0:20:170:20:21

That leaves him with a trifling £18.98 to knock about with.

0:20:210:20:25

Catherine, on the other hand, has spent £150 on four items.

0:20:260:20:30

A Victorian carafe, a silver-topped jar,

0:20:300:20:33

a set of cocktail sticks and a crystal hippo, as you do.

0:20:330:20:37

And now has a mud-wallowing £22.20 left in her coffers.

0:20:370:20:40

But a lack of money isn't going to stop our experts

0:20:400:20:43

in their antiques quest.

0:20:430:20:44

I don't think I'll be in the fine furniture room.

0:20:440:20:47

I'm not sure you'll be in the antiques section either.

0:20:470:20:50

Is there a bric-a-brac section, do you think?

0:20:500:20:53

-Just for me.

-Wonderful, perfect.

-It's going to be out of my price range.

0:20:530:20:58

Have a lovely day.

0:21:000:21:02

-Enjoy your shopping. How much is it you've got? £17?

-Get on with it.

0:21:020:21:06

Actually, he's got £18.98.

0:21:060:21:10

This shop is bursting with gorgeous antiques

0:21:120:21:14

and a large restoration workshop.

0:21:140:21:16

It's run by former butcher Eddie.

0:21:160:21:18

Nice to see you, Eddie. Now, I'm in a pathetic position

0:21:180:21:21

and I'll come clean with you.

0:21:210:21:23

I'd love to buy all your lovely furniture.

0:21:230:21:26

I started my week with a couple of hundred quid

0:21:260:21:28

and it's been going steadily down ever since.

0:21:280:21:30

But I bought something for 80 quid yesterday,

0:21:300:21:33

so I've got a pathetic amount of money to spend.

0:21:330:21:36

-May I look round?

-Please do.

0:21:360:21:37

-I'll give you a call if I can find something.

-Yeah.

-Thank you.

0:21:370:21:40

Yes, Charlie, you could do with putting some meat

0:21:400:21:43

onto your bony budget.

0:21:430:21:45

So is there anything here you can actually afford?

0:21:450:21:48

That's very Chiswick, very rustic.

0:21:480:21:51

A salting trough. Rough hewn.

0:21:510:21:55

Look at these cut chisel marks, just literally made out of a chunk of wood.

0:21:550:22:00

Before the days of refrigeration,

0:22:000:22:02

salt was commonly used to preserve meat.

0:22:020:22:05

Sides of meat would have been rubbed with salt

0:22:050:22:07

and then laid in troughs like this one,

0:22:070:22:08

drying them out and thereby providing food for the winter months.

0:22:080:22:12

It would look wonderful

0:22:120:22:14

on a big dining table

0:22:140:22:16

with bananas and oranges and any manner of fruit.

0:22:160:22:20

Won't be in my price range, of course.

0:22:200:22:22

But it's £46. And what have I got?

0:22:220:22:25

I've written it down on the back of my hand so I don't forget.

0:22:260:22:29

£17.98.

0:22:290:22:31

Charlie, your maths really is appalling.

0:22:310:22:34

You have £18.98, I'm pleased to tell you.

0:22:340:22:38

What would you salt in there, a bit of pork?

0:22:380:22:40

-Yeah, a bit of pork.

-Yeah. That's not elm, is it?

0:22:400:22:43

Beech? Would it be beech? It's beech wood, yes, yes.

0:22:430:22:46

I mean, it's got all the elements that I like to see,

0:22:460:22:49

a few wormholes. I love to see a few wormholes.

0:22:490:22:52

That's right, yeah, gives it a bit of flavour.

0:22:520:22:55

I'm not sure it's the flavour you want!

0:22:570:22:59

-Do you want to know what I've got left in my kitty?

-If you must.

0:22:590:23:03

I've got about 15 quid left,

0:23:030:23:06

-and it's got £46 on it.

-£46.

0:23:060:23:09

Is it yours? I presume it's yours.

0:23:090:23:11

It belongs to one of the ladies that's got the pine shop in here.

0:23:110:23:15

She does the pines, one of the dealers.

0:23:150:23:17

-Is she lovely?

-She's lovely, yeah. I could ring her and ask her.

0:23:170:23:20

-Well, nothing ventured, nothing gained. Off you go.

-OK.

0:23:200:23:23

I'm going to sit here and pray.

0:23:230:23:25

-Do your best, Eddie.

-OK.

0:23:260:23:28

Eddie tries the dealer but gets her answer phone instead.

0:23:300:23:33

Would you like me to go ahead with it?

0:23:330:23:35

And I'll speak to you later. OK, thank you, bye-bye.

0:23:350:23:38

I'm not sure whether you're looking happy or sad, really.

0:23:380:23:42

What's the verdict?

0:23:420:23:43

I haven't spoken to her, I couldn't get through to her, actually,

0:23:430:23:46

but I think I could do the deal with you anyway.

0:23:460:23:49

-Are you sure?

-Yeah, sure.

0:23:490:23:51

-You haven't made a mis-take?

-Mis-take!

-Oh, no!

0:23:510:23:55

-Are you sure with that?

-Yeah, that's fine, that's fine.

0:23:550:23:57

My lifelong savings.

0:23:570:24:00

Well, while Charlie makes his way to his next shop with £3.98,

0:24:020:24:06

Catherine's travelling nine miles north to the village of Downe.

0:24:060:24:09

She's coming to visit the former house

0:24:120:24:15

of one of the most famous naturalists

0:24:150:24:18

the world has ever known.

0:24:180:24:20

This is Charles Darwin's family home.

0:24:200:24:24

And showing Catherine round is Julie Paternaude of English Heritage.

0:24:240:24:29

-Wow.

-This is Darwin's study,

0:24:290:24:32

where he spent most of his 40 years, essentially,

0:24:320:24:36

working on his book.

0:24:360:24:38

-This is where he wrote Origin Of Species?

-It is.

0:24:380:24:42

In 1859, Charles Darwin published a book that was to rock the world.

0:24:420:24:46

The Origin Of Species set out his theory

0:24:460:24:48

that populations evolved over a number of generations

0:24:480:24:51

through a process of natural selection,

0:24:510:24:54

going against the dominant, and his wife's, Christian beliefs.

0:24:540:24:57

He used to sit on that chair.

0:24:590:25:02

He used the board and the papers to write.

0:25:020:25:05

I like especially the way that he's organised his books.

0:25:050:25:09

He spent five years on the Beagle on his trip.

0:25:090:25:12

And because space was so condensed,

0:25:120:25:15

he had to kind of develop a way to organise and file his things.

0:25:150:25:20

Six years after he returned

0:25:200:25:21

from his round-the-world voyage on the Beagle,

0:25:210:25:24

Charles Darwin settled here, in Down House.

0:25:240:25:27

He moved here in 1842 with his wife, Emma.

0:25:270:25:30

They had two kids and she was pregnant with their third.

0:25:300:25:33

-How many children did he have?

-In all, they had ten children.

0:25:330:25:37

-Really?!

-But three of them passed away.

-Oh, good grief.

0:25:370:25:40

Tell me a bit about Emma, his wife.

0:25:400:25:42

Emma was basically running the house.

0:25:420:25:45

She taught the children when they were younger.

0:25:450:25:49

Darwin didn't think that girls needed to learn maths or science.

0:25:490:25:52

Really? That's interesting.

0:25:520:25:54

Well, I mean, it's, you know, it's the times.

0:25:540:25:56

He was a very loving father, not a very typical Victorian parent.

0:25:560:26:00

And he didn't mind them coming in and playing games.

0:26:000:26:05

I think that's wonderful.

0:26:050:26:06

I feel very privileged to be standing in here,

0:26:060:26:09

in the room where he wrote Origin Of Species.

0:26:090:26:12

With seven children knocking about,

0:26:120:26:14

the Darwins needed a large living room.

0:26:140:26:17

Yeah, it's the family room, it's the drawing room.

0:26:170:26:19

It's where everything basically happened

0:26:190:26:22

that isn't Darwin's work.

0:26:220:26:25

Emma would sit at her piano, she loved to play.

0:26:250:26:28

-Was she a musician?

-She was. Apparently,

0:26:280:26:30

-she took lessons from Chopin.

-Oh!

0:26:300:26:33

She would play to amuse herself essentially,

0:26:330:26:36

but also to please and let Darwin relax a bit.

0:26:360:26:41

She also loved to read to him as well.

0:26:410:26:42

Emma was a big fan of Dickens and Sir Walter Scott as well.

0:26:420:26:47

Obviously, you can see the family library here.

0:26:470:26:50

I'm getting a wonderful picture of a real family atmosphere in here.

0:26:500:26:54

The paintings behind are of the young couple

0:26:540:26:57

when they were first married, or a few years later.

0:26:570:27:01

It's actually quite nice to see that picture of him in early life

0:27:010:27:04

because, when we think of Darwin,

0:27:040:27:06

we always associate the picture that we know from later life,

0:27:060:27:09

when he's a lot bigger and he's got a hat.

0:27:090:27:11

Or the picture that's on the back of the £10 note with the beard.

0:27:110:27:16

Darwin is known most famously for writing the Origin Of Species,

0:27:160:27:20

but the bulk of his work was as a botanist,

0:27:200:27:23

and he spent every day in the garden and greenhouses, observing plants.

0:27:230:27:27

Head gardener Rowan Blake continues his work today.

0:27:280:27:32

This is really quite something.

0:27:320:27:34

Is this an original greenhouse that was built?

0:27:340:27:37

-It is, yeah.

-For Darwin?

-Yes, yeah.

0:27:370:27:40

We're in the oldest section of the greenhouse.

0:27:400:27:44

And then he gradually added more and more sections on.

0:27:440:27:48

Darwin used his greenhouse to carry out various experiments

0:27:480:27:51

in his quest to understand the natural world.

0:27:510:27:54

This plant, the Venus flytrap,

0:27:540:27:56

he wanted to find how little force was needed

0:27:560:27:59

to touch the hairs and make the traps shut.

0:27:590:28:01

Emma Darwin, his wife, had very, very fine hair.

0:28:010:28:04

Darwin cut the tiniest piece of Emma's hair possible

0:28:040:28:07

and inserted it into the Venus flytrap.

0:28:070:28:10

When it closed, he realised it wasn't the weight triggering the plant,

0:28:100:28:13

it was the nutrients in the hair itself.

0:28:130:28:16

He didn't just write about diversity in the Origin Of Species.

0:28:160:28:20

He also wrote very, very good books on plant science.

0:28:200:28:25

He wrote about how carnivorous plants work,

0:28:250:28:27

he wrote about how climbing plants work.

0:28:270:28:30

This plant, for example,

0:28:300:28:32

he saw how it was growing up a piece of rope in the greenhouse,

0:28:320:28:34

and he said, "Isn't that interesting, how it's rooting into the rope?"

0:28:340:28:38

It's from South America. He wrote to Asa Gray,

0:28:380:28:40

the botanist he used to speak to about South America, and he said,

0:28:400:28:44

"Does it grow up the mossy bark of trees?

0:28:440:28:46

"And it roots into it, and the leaves are round on the sunny side."

0:28:460:28:50

And they said, "Well, yes, it does.

0:28:500:28:51

"How did you know about its environment that it's growing in?"

0:28:510:28:54

and he said, "I've got it growing up a piece of rope

0:28:540:28:56

"and I've been observing how it's rooted into that piece of rope".

0:28:560:28:59

It's fascinating, cos when we think of Darwin,

0:28:590:29:01

we're sometimes quite narrow-minded

0:29:010:29:04

and tend to think of the Origin Of Species,

0:29:040:29:06

but actually, what went on here, all the research,

0:29:060:29:09

-was a huge part of his life.

-Yeah.

0:29:090:29:12

Charles Darwin changed the way we viewed the world

0:29:120:29:15

due to his careful observations of the natural behaviour around him.

0:29:150:29:20

What a fascinating visit for Catherine.

0:29:200:29:22

While she learns about natural selection,

0:29:220:29:26

the Charlie Ross species is travelling to the village of Otford.

0:29:260:29:30

He's struggling to survive in a competitive jungle

0:29:300:29:32

with only £3.98 to spend in his last shop of this leg.

0:29:320:29:37

-Hello, sir.

-Hello there. Charlie, how are you? All right.

0:29:370:29:40

-Pleased to meet you.

-Your name is?

-Joe.

0:29:400:29:42

-Joe. And you're in control, are you, here?

-Well, I try and be.

0:29:420:29:46

You've got a lot of people in here, have you, with things?

0:29:460:29:49

Yeah, at least 26 different dealers. 26 dealers.

0:29:490:29:51

-Do you mind if I go and have a look?

-Yeah, look round.

0:29:510:29:54

You do know that my budget is severely limited?

0:29:540:29:58

-Well, we'll see.

-I've got £2.98.

-Oh, dear.

0:29:580:30:02

-It's hopeless. Never mind.

-You'll find something at the right price.

0:30:020:30:06

I will find something. Thank you.

0:30:060:30:08

Oh, I do feel an idiot shopping with £2.98.

0:30:080:30:13

Actually, Charlie, you have £3.98.

0:30:130:30:15

But who's counting? Not me.

0:30:150:30:17

Oh, I say, there's something I'd buy.

0:30:170:30:20

Oh, surprise, surprise, not within my price range.

0:30:210:30:24

It's never-ending, this shop.

0:30:260:30:28

-Hello, I'm Charlie.

-Hello, how nice to meet you.

0:30:280:30:30

-Nice to see you.

-Yes, nice to see you.

-What's your name, my dear?

-My name's Elaine.

0:30:300:30:34

-Elaine. Is this your...?

-It is.

0:30:340:30:37

It's wonderful. Everywhere I go,

0:30:370:30:38

everybody seems to be manning their own department.

0:30:380:30:41

I'll tell you straight up,

0:30:410:30:43

I have been shopping for two days, and I have got left £2.98.

0:30:430:30:48

-Oh, my goodness me!

-I'm not saying anything.

0:30:480:30:51

Is there anything there you could recommend?

0:30:510:30:54

-For £2.98?!

-That I could have for £2.98.

0:30:540:30:57

How about this?

0:30:570:30:59

I can see several things there that I don't think are going to be...

0:30:590:31:02

-This is quite unusual, do you know what that is?

-Curling!

-Yes.

0:31:020:31:05

-It's a curling stone.

-Well, it's not really a curling stone.

0:31:050:31:09

Well, it did have whisky in it at one time,

0:31:090:31:11

-but I'm afraid the whisky is gone now.

-Oh, the whisky. Have you ever curled?

0:31:110:31:14

Yes, I have, a long time ago.

0:31:140:31:16

-Have you?

-Yes I did, in the Highlands of Scotland.

0:31:160:31:19

-I mean, these are heavy, aren't they?

-Very heavy. But great fun.

0:31:190:31:22

-This one's not heavy.

-No.

0:31:220:31:23

This one would make you feel very light-headed if you drank the contents!

0:31:230:31:27

Peter Thomson of Perth.

0:31:290:31:31

How fantastic. Does that say Gleneagles Scotch Whisky?

0:31:320:31:36

There we go, so that's a very good Scotch.

0:31:360:31:39

What a wonderful Scotch decanter.

0:31:400:31:42

This can't be in my price range though, can it?

0:31:420:31:44

If you talk to me very nicely, I might be able to do you a deal.

0:31:440:31:48

-I can talk so sweetly.

-Very sweetly!

0:31:480:31:50

-You wouldn't believe it.

-OK, what...

0:31:500:31:52

-£2.98 is what I have.

-Oh, £2,98!

-£2.98.

0:31:520:31:56

Do you know, I'm going to let you have a go with it.

0:31:560:31:59

Let's see if you can make a profit with it.

0:31:590:32:01

Charlie, you're blessed to have met the lovely Elaine.

0:32:010:32:04

-£2.98.

-Cos it's all I've got.

0:32:040:32:07

That will help the holiday fund to Acapulco.

0:32:070:32:10

It won't get you to Acapulco.

0:32:100:32:12

So, that's our expert shopping all done and dusted

0:32:130:32:16

and now, it's that moment when they have to reveal all to each other.

0:32:160:32:20

What a lovely place to be. In a leafy glade,

0:32:200:32:23

with a green Miss Southon.

0:32:230:32:26

Green and navy.

0:32:260:32:28

-This is lovely.

-This looks worryingly familiar, Charlie.

0:32:280:32:31

-I'm afraid there is something there, Catherine, that you will probably recognise.

-Oh!

0:32:310:32:35

It's not all bad news, not all bad news.

0:32:350:32:38

And there's another thing Catherine will recognise.

0:32:380:32:41

Very nice, I am instantly drawn to that.

0:32:410:32:43

-I saw that in Lewes.

-Yeah.

0:32:430:32:45

-I love it.

-It's lovely. It's got one little nick on it.

-Oh, has it?

0:32:460:32:50

I think they dated it a little earlier than it is,

0:32:500:32:52

I mean, they said 1900 on the ticket.

0:32:520:32:55

-I think it's about 1920.

-1920, isn't it?

0:32:550:32:57

Yes, it is. I think they were a little optimistic there.

0:32:570:32:59

But that, of course, we needn't talk about, because you'll hate it.

0:32:590:33:02

-No, I'm not even going to bother going there. I love that, by the way.

-I bought my salting trough.

0:33:020:33:07

I thought, in a nice big house, on a kitchen table or a dining table,

0:33:070:33:11

-with fruit in it, do you think?

-Beautiful.

0:33:110:33:13

Yeah, a really, really great idea.

0:33:130:33:15

-£15.

-That's very good. And what's the curling stone?

0:33:150:33:19

It is a whisky decanter.

0:33:200:33:24

-Oh, that's fabulous.

-Isn't it super?

0:33:240:33:26

It could make an inkwell, couldn't it?

0:33:260:33:28

-Do you know how much it was?

-No.

0:33:280:33:30

£2.98. Well, you told me to spend most of my money on one thing.

0:33:300:33:33

I did. So you've gambled it on that.

0:33:330:33:35

It's going to be really interesting to see what that makes.

0:33:350:33:37

If that goes over £100, I shall be standing in the saleroom

0:33:370:33:41

crying my eyes out.

0:33:410:33:43

No wallowing now, Catherine. Time to move on.

0:33:430:33:45

Miss Southon! Oh, it's a hippo!

0:33:450:33:47

I got the glass hippo, but it's by Kosta Boda.

0:33:470:33:51

Oh, it's really nice. What date is it?

0:33:510:33:54

It's only about 1970, it's not that old.

0:33:540:33:56

I don't think it's going to make big bucks.

0:33:560:33:59

-What do you think about this? I've got to show you this.

-Fabulous. Is that George III?

-It's beautiful.

0:33:590:34:03

-No, it's not. It is Victorian. It's 1894.

-Is it?

0:34:030:34:07

But isn't it just so elegant?

0:34:070:34:09

It's the most gorgeous, gorgeous shape.

0:34:090:34:11

Surely it's worth £100, is it not?

0:34:110:34:13

Well, I would like to think so. I paid 55 for it.

0:34:130:34:17

Yes, she's done it again.

0:34:170:34:19

This, of course, you bought simply because you did so well with the last ones.

0:34:190:34:23

No, but I bought it simply because it's got Rubens cherubs on,

0:34:230:34:27

-Rubens angels.

-Yeah.

0:34:270:34:29

And I thought that was a nice little touch.

0:34:290:34:30

It is a nice thing. How much?

0:34:300:34:33

-20.

-(20?)

0:34:330:34:36

You've bought well again. No wonder I'm losing.

0:34:360:34:38

But I bought that purely because of the cherubs.

0:34:380:34:41

-I'm not sure I want to look in there, do I?

-Go on.

0:34:410:34:44

-It's a set of coffee spoons.

-No.

0:34:440:34:47

-Are they silver?

-Sterling silver.

-Yeah.

0:34:480:34:51

-Although the enamel is perfect, they are quite naively...

-It's poor quality.

0:34:510:34:54

-No. They're quite naively painted.

-Poor quality.

-Ouch!

0:34:540:34:59

I really love them. Reminds me of France.

0:34:590:35:02

What would you pay for them? French cockerel.

0:35:020:35:04

What would I pay for them?

0:35:040:35:06

I would pay 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30,

0:35:060:35:09

35, 40.

0:35:090:35:11

-No, stop doing this. I'd pay £50 for them.

-Oh.

0:35:110:35:16

-What did you pay for them?

-40.

0:35:160:35:19

What do you mean, "Oh?" 50's more than 40.

0:35:190:35:22

Yeah, but it would be nice if you said a little bit more than that.

0:35:220:35:25

Sorry, I'd pay about 120.

0:35:250:35:27

Yeah, that's about right. Thanks, Charlie. Always been my friend.

0:35:270:35:30

You've done really well with your money.

0:35:300:35:33

Good luck, Charlie.

0:35:330:35:35

You've done really, really well again.

0:35:360:35:39

And you've done well, too.

0:35:390:35:40

Very cordial. But what do they really think?

0:35:400:35:43

Catherine's done it again, she's bought really, really well.

0:35:430:35:47

Her oil bottle is delicious and will double the money.

0:35:470:35:50

I have to say, when I first saw it, I thought it was late 18th century.

0:35:500:35:53

It's late Victorian but, nevertheless, it's wonderful.

0:35:530:35:56

He surprised me with that clock.

0:35:560:36:00

I know he's had a sneaky look at it when we were in Lewes.

0:36:000:36:04

And I looked at it as well, but I absolutely loved it.

0:36:040:36:07

I thought it was a beautiful thing, it's very vibrant.

0:36:070:36:10

The one concern I have about it

0:36:100:36:11

is the little bit of damage to the enamel.

0:36:110:36:14

Personally, I think that's going to put off a lot of potential buyers.

0:36:140:36:19

Charlie and Catherine kicked off this leg in Lewes, East Sussex,

0:36:190:36:23

and travelled steadily north, winding their way through Kent.

0:36:230:36:27

Their destination for today's auction is in Chiswick, West London.

0:36:270:36:30

-(SINGS) I got a good feeling...

-Have you?

-Yeah, I don't know why.

0:36:350:36:39

I'm not surprised. You've got such lovely things.

0:36:390:36:42

It all hinges on the clock though, doesn't it?

0:36:420:36:45

Have you seen the estimate on the clock?

0:36:450:36:47

Yet again, it's a mere fraction of what I paid.

0:36:470:36:50

It's just because of the chip.

0:36:500:36:53

I'm good at chips. Close the door, come on.

0:36:530:36:56

That's got a chip on it now.

0:36:560:36:58

Chiswick Auctions is our theatre of dreams today.

0:36:580:37:02

A buzzing saleroom full of gorgeous collectables.

0:37:020:37:05

So does auctioneer Tom Keane think our experts have chosen wisely?

0:37:050:37:09

The cocktail sticks might do all right, they're silver.

0:37:090:37:12

The little Art Deco clock's OK, but what is it worth?

0:37:120:37:17

30, 40 quid, 50 quid on a good day. So I'm not confident.

0:37:170:37:20

I really feel like a man walking towards the gallows

0:37:200:37:23

walking towards the rostrum today.

0:37:230:37:24

Catherine started this leg with £172.20

0:37:240:37:28

and spent £150 on four auction lots.

0:37:280:37:31

Charlie kicked off with £101.98

0:37:320:37:35

and managed to mess up his figures again.

0:37:350:37:38

He thinks he's spent every penny, also on four auction lots

0:37:380:37:42

but, in fact, he has £1 left over.

0:37:420:37:44

Good luck, you two, you need to do well today.

0:37:440:37:49

Look, when you haven't got much money to spend,

0:37:490:37:51

-you buy what you can.

-You do.

0:37:510:37:54

You told me to buy something expensive, I did.

0:37:540:37:57

And it's going to blow up in my face.

0:37:570:37:58

You don't know that, Charlie.

0:37:580:37:59

Look sharp, it's Catherine's crystal hippopotamus up first.

0:37:590:38:05

£20 for it. Bidding 20, 25,

0:38:050:38:09

28, 30, 32, 35.

0:38:090:38:11

£32, is that it?

0:38:110:38:14

£32 and going at £32.

0:38:140:38:16

£32 and gone.

0:38:160:38:17

Oh, dear, it did "Kosta lotta",

0:38:170:38:19

and that's an even bigger loss after the auction house

0:38:190:38:21

takes its well-earned commission.

0:38:210:38:23

Didn't lose much.

0:38:230:38:25

Now, Charlie has one hit and one miss with his ale purchases.

0:38:250:38:29

-How will this one fare?

-£5.

0:38:290:38:31

Oh, is that a bid? You don't even drink, Tony.

0:38:330:38:35

You're just feeling sorry for him. £5, anyone at 6? £5.

0:38:350:38:40

All the excitement's over, I'm afraid.

0:38:400:38:43

You did well there, Charlie, well done.

0:38:430:38:45

It's a profit, it's a profit.

0:38:450:38:47

Catherine's Victorian carafe is up next.

0:38:470:38:51

Right, Miss Southon,

0:38:510:38:53

I'm with you all the way, hon.

0:38:530:38:54

Not a bad lot. £100 for it.

0:38:540:38:57

£50 for it.

0:38:570:38:59

£50, 55, take 55, 55.

0:38:590:39:03

You're 60, 65. 70?

0:39:030:39:06

At £70.

0:39:060:39:09

-Come on, you've got £100.

-Disappointing.

0:39:090:39:11

But that is a profit. Cheer up, you two.

0:39:110:39:15

If I were you, I would be well, well upset.

0:39:150:39:19

It's just one of those things, isn't it?

0:39:200:39:22

You're taking it jolly well.

0:39:220:39:24

That was my only hope.

0:39:240:39:25

They both clearly hoped for a lot more. Oh, well, onwards and upwards.

0:39:250:39:29

Charlie's whisky decanter.

0:39:290:39:31

£20 for it. £10 for it.

0:39:310:39:34

12, 14, 16.

0:39:340:39:36

At 14, give me 16, 16 bid, we want 18.

0:39:360:39:40

At £16.

0:39:400:39:43

-Here we go, here we go.

-18, new bidder, from the Scotsman.

0:39:430:39:46

I'm getting excited.

0:39:460:39:47

£18, at £18 I'm going to go. £18.

0:39:470:39:51

Charlie's on a roll. That is a decent profit.

0:39:510:39:55

I tell you what, I'm not buying antiques any more.

0:39:550:39:57

I'm not buying classic antiques, I'm buying tat.

0:39:570:40:00

It's Catherine's cocktail sticks next.

0:40:020:40:05

£30. £30 for the lot, £30,

0:40:050:40:08

£32, 32 there, 35,

0:40:080:40:12

38, 40, 42, 45, 48,

0:40:120:40:14

50, 52, 55, 58.

0:40:140:40:17

£55, are we done?

0:40:180:40:21

Going all done. At £55, your last chance.

0:40:210:40:25

Stick it to me. That's a great profit.

0:40:250:40:28

Not enough to please Catherine, though.

0:40:280:40:30

I'm walking through treacle. You've made about £6.

0:40:300:40:34

It's Charlie's Art Deco timepiece now,

0:40:350:40:37

the one Catherine wanted to buy.

0:40:370:40:39

£50 for it. Should make more.

0:40:390:40:42

£30 for it. Bidder at £30,

0:40:420:40:44

32, 35, 38, 40, 42,

0:40:440:40:47

45, 48, 50, 55,

0:40:470:40:49

-60, 65, 70.

-Good.

0:40:490:40:53

-65, give me 70 for it.

-Come on.

0:40:530:40:56

Are we done at £65? Going back to America, isn't it, yes?

0:40:560:40:59

Sadly, that's a loss for Charlie.

0:41:000:41:02

-When it started rattling along...

-I know.

-I really thought it'd make 100.

0:41:020:41:06

-Positive bidding.

-I know.

0:41:060:41:08

It's Catherine's last item. Her silver-topped jar.

0:41:080:41:11

-Start me at £20. £20 for it. Thank you, bid at 20.

-Bid at 20.

0:41:110:41:15

22, 25 there, 28 there. It's going all over the place.

0:41:150:41:19

-32, 35, 38, 40.

-Fantastic.

0:41:190:41:22

-£38, give me 40, at £38.

-Well done.

0:41:220:41:25

-42. Right at the back at £40.

-£40.

0:41:250:41:30

-Double your money.

-Last chance at £40, it's gone.

0:41:300:41:34

That's an excellent profit for Catherine,

0:41:340:41:35

putting her firmly in the lead.

0:41:350:41:38

Well done. Finished with a bang.

0:41:380:41:40

# Double your money.

0:41:400:41:42

# Try and get rich. #

0:41:420:41:44

It all hangs on Charlie's trough now.

0:41:440:41:47

He needs a decent profit to catch Catherine up.

0:41:470:41:50

£30 for it. £20 for it.

0:41:500:41:54

Bid at £20, 22, 25,

0:41:540:41:56

28, 30, 32, 35,

0:41:560:41:59

35 bid, 38, 40, 42, 45, 48. That's better.

0:41:590:42:04

At 45. At £45, 45 and gone.

0:42:040:42:08

That's another good profit for Charlie,

0:42:090:42:11

but is it enough to overtake his competitor?

0:42:110:42:14

I'm very happy with that.

0:42:140:42:16

-Charlie, that's amazing.

-Very. What do you mean amazing?

0:42:160:42:20

45 quid!

0:42:200:42:22

Cost 15, made 45!

0:42:220:42:25

Come on.

0:42:260:42:28

So, Charlie started this leg with £101.98

0:42:290:42:32

and has made a profit of £8.08 after auction costs.

0:42:320:42:37

That leaves him with a slightly inflated £110.06

0:42:370:42:41

to carry forward.

0:42:410:42:43

But Catherine has edged ahead yet again

0:42:430:42:46

and began this leg with £172.20

0:42:460:42:49

and made a profit of £11.54, beating Charlie by just over £3.

0:42:490:42:53

That leaves her with a grand total of £183.74

0:42:530:42:56

to spend next time. Oo-ah.

0:42:560:43:00

The sun is shining, Charlie.

0:43:040:43:06

And I made a profit, about £8.

0:43:060:43:08

-What did you make?

-I made 11. But never mind.

0:43:080:43:12

One auction to go.

0:43:120:43:14

You won't believe it, but I can still catch you.

0:43:140:43:16

-Have you got your swimming costume?

-No.

0:43:160:43:18

Let's go to the seaside.

0:43:180:43:20

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:210:43:23

Catherine confuses a dealer into a bargain.

0:43:230:43:27

-40 for the two.

-What are you going to hit me with?

0:43:270:43:29

I wasn't going to hit you with anything, but as you've asked.

0:43:290:43:32

And Charlie comes over all Continental.

0:43:330:43:36

May I do it the French way?

0:43:360:43:38

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:580:44:01

As Charlie Ross and Catherine Southon battle it out on this fourth day to make a profit at auction, they take in some historic sites on their road trip from the south coast of England up to London.


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