Episode 1 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 1

Antiques experts Charles Hanson and Christina Trevanion embark on a new road trip. They begin in Whaley Bridge, Derbyshire, before heading to auction in Liverpool.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 1. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

It's the nation's favourite antiques experts

0:00:020:00:04

with £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

0:00:040:00:09

-Going, going...gone.

-Yes!

-I think I've fallen in love with a brick.

0:00:090:00:13

-The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

-Yes!

0:00:130:00:18

There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

0:00:180:00:21

-I feel antiqued out.

-So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

0:00:210:00:27

-Charlie!

-Sorry about that.

0:00:270:00:29

This is the Antiques Road Trip.

0:00:290:00:32

It's the start of a brand-new Road Trip with a brand-new expert.

0:00:350:00:40

# Pretty woman, walking down the street... #

0:00:400:00:44

Christina Trevanion may be a Road Trip rookie,

0:00:440:00:46

but this shrewd Shrewsbury lady is the head of the jewellery department in a long-established auction house.

0:00:460:00:53

That looks a bit painful.

0:00:530:00:55

With plenty of antiques experience, she isn't afraid to use her female charms to get what she wants.

0:00:550:01:00

I'll give you a second kiss.

0:01:000:01:03

She's friendly.

0:01:030:01:05

Her competitive companion is Road Trip stalwart Charles Hanson,

0:01:050:01:09

a fully-fledged auctioneer from Derbyshire.

0:01:090:01:12

# Cos every girl's crazy 'bout a sharp-dressed man... #

0:01:120:01:17

With a passion for the traditional, an eye for detail

0:01:170:01:20

and the memory of a goldfish.

0:01:200:01:22

I've bought a really, really... What did I buy? What did I buy? Sorry.

0:01:220:01:27

Good grief! With a starting budget of £200 each,

0:01:270:01:30

young Christina and old hand Hanson are hoping to shake things up a bit. This is going to be fun.

0:01:300:01:36

You are a young lady. Maybe you can galvanise the antiques market to go hip.

0:01:360:01:42

-Hip?

-Go happening.

0:01:420:01:44

Oh, lordy!

0:01:440:01:47

In this battle of the sexes, Charles and Christina will go the distance

0:01:470:01:52

in their beautiful, vintage 1969 Morris Minor

0:01:520:01:55

if they survive the delightful spring weather and the gear changes, that is.

0:01:550:02:00

CRUNCHING OF GEARS

0:02:000:02:03

-Charlie!

-Sorry about that.

0:02:030:02:05

The route for the week takes our intrepid road trippers from Whaley Bridge in Derbyshire

0:02:070:02:13

over peak and dale to their final destination of Cobridge in Staffordshire,

0:02:130:02:18

covering approximately 600 miles.

0:02:180:02:20

But on this leg, our experts will start in Whaley Bridge

0:02:200:02:24

and end up at auction in Liverpool.

0:02:240:02:27

Situated in the High Peak, Whaley Bridge is a small, but vibrant town nestling in the hills

0:02:270:02:32

of the Goyt Valley.

0:02:320:02:34

I feel we might get lucky round here. This is a good place to start.

0:02:340:02:38

-Something in your waters?

-Yeah, there is.

0:02:380:02:41

Hardly surprising seeing as you are on Hanson territory, but will it give him the upper hand?

0:02:410:02:46

-We're here?

-You've got one small shop on the left-hand side.

0:02:460:02:50

-Have you been here before?

-No, I've got no idea.

-Are you sure?

-Positive.

0:02:500:02:54

-There's also one big shop over there.

-Right.

0:02:540:02:56

This is where you do this and you begin to feel the energy and the desire.

0:02:560:03:01

-They say small is beautiful. Do you want the small shop?

-I think I'll go small.

-I'll go big.

0:03:010:03:07

-I'll start small...

-OK, on your marks, get set, go!

0:03:070:03:11

Stop bossing the new girl about and get along to your first shop.

0:03:110:03:15

-This is my first shop.

-Yes, we know that, Charles. It's called Finders Keepers... Losers, weepers!

0:03:150:03:21

-Hello, sir.

-Good morning.

-Is it your shop?

-It is.

-I'm Charles Hanson.

-Hi, Charles. My name's Paul.

0:03:210:03:27

-Thank you for letting me come into your shop.

-No problem.

-Have you any quirky objects?

0:03:270:03:32

Anything which is maybe slightly peculiar what's just come in?

0:03:320:03:37

Apart from yourself, Charles?

0:03:370:03:39

-Follow me. This way.

-If you never ask, you don't get.

0:03:390:03:43

What about these two fellas here?

0:03:430:03:46

Not my taste. But what does he say to you?

0:03:460:03:49

He says to me, "Don't buy me, I might burst."

0:03:490:03:52

Oh, yeah. It's a tyre man.

0:03:520:03:55

Ha-ha! Carry on, Carlos. Tick-tock.

0:03:550:03:58

-Paul, is that your clock?

-Yes.

-Is it for sale?

-It is for sale.

-Made in China?

0:03:580:04:03

-It's made in China in the 1960s, I presume.

-Yeah, it's quite stylish.

0:04:030:04:07

You've got this wonderful, chrome outer ring which has had some tarnishing and rust.

0:04:070:04:12

I do like the way the numbers are almost in plastic,

0:04:120:04:16

the Arabic numerals. They've got a real '60s feel.

0:04:160:04:19

And what appears to almost be a Bakelite case, but it is a wooden, ebonised case.

0:04:190:04:24

Could our chap have fallen in love with this timeless timepiece?

0:04:240:04:28

-I don't like it.

-Oh, no.

-How much, Paul, is it?

0:04:280:04:31

-£45.

-Look at me. Paul, look at me.

0:04:310:04:34

-That's cheap.

-Eh?

-I think that's really cheap.

-It's a real gamble.

0:04:340:04:39

It's just so...awful. Not being cruel, Paul, but it is.

0:04:390:04:42

-It's just got that look.

-If you hear it chime, you'll buy it.

-Really?

0:04:420:04:47

-Yeah.

-Would you take £30 for it?

0:04:470:04:49

How about we do this? If I get it to chime, it's 35. If I don't, it's 30.

0:04:490:04:54

So the money's on the bell.

0:04:540:04:56

-Has that overwound it?

-No, it hasn't. It does that. It's fine.

0:04:580:05:02

-So if it chimes at five o'clock, it's £35?

-Yeah.

0:05:020:05:05

-Going, going...

-CLOCK CHIMES

0:05:060:05:09

-Sold, Paul.

-Excellent.

-£35. Thanks ever so much.

0:05:090:05:13

Ding-dong! And with that, it's time to head to his next shop on foot,

0:05:130:05:17

making the most of Britain in springtime.

0:05:170:05:20

The one thing about England is the weather.

0:05:200:05:23

Antiquing in a winter's wonderland is just wonderful!

0:05:230:05:27

Oblivious to the blizzard, Christina is getting stuck in at Whaley Bridge Antiques with owner Damien.

0:05:270:05:33

Have we got anything new and exciting?

0:05:330:05:36

-Cat badges?

-I've just had... I've got cat badges.

0:05:360:05:41

There's a little box of dogs that came out of an old lady's house.

0:05:410:05:45

-Are you wanting something you can make a few quid on?

-Hmm...

0:05:450:05:49

They're not old, but there are loads of them.

0:05:490:05:52

This hodge-podge of hounds even includes an egg-cup collie. Hardly pedigree, do you think?

0:05:520:05:57

-These are all resin, really.

-They are, but they're very cheap.

-Are they?

-You're after a profit.

0:05:570:06:03

-What are we talking, "cheap"?

-The box, 20 quid.

0:06:030:06:07

For a load of dogs?

0:06:070:06:10

-For a load of dogs.

-That does sound cheap, but they are resin.

0:06:100:06:14

But I do like that box behind you.

0:06:140:06:18

-# Hallelujah! #

-Not convinced by a box of plastic dogs, Christina has a vision.

0:06:180:06:23

-This came from a local church.

-So this would have been an alms box.

0:06:230:06:28

The 19th century alms box was used to collect cash for the poor.

0:06:280:06:32

There's a lovely groove on the top where the people have put the money in.

0:06:320:06:37

Yeah, it just looks worn and tactile. It's lovely. I like that.

0:06:370:06:42

-Yeah.

-How much is that?

-90 quid.

0:06:420:06:44

-£90? That sounds like a lot of money.

-I know.

0:06:440:06:47

That's almost half of her budget.

0:06:470:06:49

-At auction, I see that at maybe £40 to £60.

-Right.

0:06:490:06:55

-Yeah.

-So what can you do me that's quite close to that?

0:06:550:06:58

She's a trier all right, but then so is he.

0:06:580:07:02

Well, it might cost you a kiss, but you can have it for £60.

0:07:020:07:07

-Cheeky!

-A kiss for £60?

0:07:070:07:09

-Go on, 40.

-No, 60.

0:07:100:07:13

-I can do it for 60.

-£40.

0:07:130:07:15

-That's what it cost me.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

0:07:150:07:17

Well, surely, I should be paying 40 and then you get £20 for a kiss.

0:07:170:07:22

Surely! I'm not selling my kisses cheap.

0:07:220:07:25

A peck on the cheek is all I ask for. My wife will be watching.

0:07:250:07:29

I think your wife needs to watch you a bit closer, Damien.

0:07:290:07:33

-I love it, but I think it's a bit rich. I don't think I'll make any money out of it.

-Oh, you're good.

0:07:330:07:39

-I am very in love with that. What can we throw in for £60?

-60 and take the box of resin dogs.

0:07:390:07:46

-They don't...

-You'll make something out of those.

-Yeah, like a bonfire, eh? Woof!

0:07:460:07:52

-50.

-I can't take 50...

0:07:520:07:55

50 and the dogs. Go on, go on.

0:07:550:07:58

Go on. And you're my first one.

0:07:580:08:01

You're my first, first one.

0:08:010:08:03

-Go on. £50?

-£50.

0:08:050:08:07

-Sure?

-The box and a kiss.

0:08:070:08:09

-If we said £49 on the box and £1 for the dogs...

-Absolutely fine.

-Is that all right?

-Yes.

0:08:090:08:16

-I'll give you a second kiss.

-Good luck.

-Fresh!

-Thank you very much. You're a star. My first one down!

0:08:160:08:22

I wonder if the same technique would work for Charles Hanson?

0:08:220:08:26

-Talk of the devil!

-Charlie!

-How are you?

-How are you getting on?

0:08:260:08:29

Big question - how is the young pretender doing?

0:08:290:08:32

All right, but I don't think I should be telling you.

0:08:320:08:35

-Just go for it.

-You keep encouraging me to spend all this money. I think this is tactics.

-See you later.

0:08:350:08:42

-Good luck.

-With Christina up and running, Charles can now try his luck with the dashing Damien.

0:08:420:08:48

Pucker up, Carlos!

0:08:480:08:50

-Good morning.

-Good morning.

-How are you? Charles Hanson.

-Damien Wylde.

-Good to see you.

0:08:500:08:56

You've got some really good things. You've got some coins, some nice flatware. There's everything here.

0:08:560:09:02

-Where do I start?

-Have a look round and shout out if you want anything. We'll see what we can do.

0:09:020:09:07

-Thanks, Chris.

-Chris? Who's Chris?

-Damien.

-Sorry, Damien.

0:09:070:09:12

He never was one for names, old Charles.

0:09:120:09:14

-What you've got here is a silkwork.

-It's silkwork.

0:09:140:09:18

-It's probably been done in the 1880s.

-What a wonderful thing!

-What a shame it's in that condition.

-Yeah.

0:09:180:09:24

What is so nice, you've got battles going back to the Peninsula, the Waterloo, Inkerman...

0:09:240:09:30

-What a nice thing!

-The silkwork is for the Royal Lancastrian Regiment

0:09:300:09:34

and commemorates the battles they've taken part in, but it looks like it's been through the wars itself.

0:09:340:09:41

This, I love. What really puts me off is this condition.

0:09:410:09:44

-How much is it?

-I've got 60 on it.

-Yeah.

0:09:440:09:48

However, as it's you, how about 25 quid?

0:09:480:09:52

-You can't? Crikey me!

-Temptress.

-Crikey me!

0:09:520:09:55

It's your lucky day, Carlos. Quick, kiss him!

0:09:550:09:58

-They say, amongst Derbyshire people, you can do a deal. That is one good deal.

-You'll make money at that.

0:09:580:10:04

It might well make money, Damien, but young Charles has been distracted by a George III chest.

0:10:040:10:09

And he does love his drawers.

0:10:090:10:11

-The chest of drawers...

-You like the chest of drawers?

-I do.

0:10:110:10:15

Three short and three long drawers on this blade feet.

0:10:150:10:20

-Has it been here a while?

-No.

0:10:200:10:24

-This is 1790, 1800, lovely colour.

-The boards are good on the back.

0:10:240:10:28

Yeah. The scars of a patina which has been there for two centuries.

0:10:280:10:33

These handles aren't original. They don't look the most attractive.

0:10:330:10:37

-It should have little, round, wooden handles.

-I like the chest because it's period.

0:10:370:10:43

-I also like the...

-The silkwork, the colours.

-But I think the silkwork is too ropey in its condition.

0:10:430:10:48

-Yes.

-Which leaves me with one big chest.

-Yeah.

-It's here, Chris.

0:10:480:10:53

Damien!

0:10:530:10:54

If I bought...the chest,

0:10:540:10:58

what's the best price?

0:10:580:11:00

Well, you see, I've got 320 on it.

0:11:000:11:02

-For this?

-Yeah.

0:11:020:11:05

I'm going to charge you £180 and I'm going to throw the Lancaster colours in. Now shake my hand.

0:11:050:11:11

I'd love to buy the chest, Chris.

0:11:120:11:14

Damien!

0:11:140:11:16

Sorry, Damien. Damien, I'd love to buy the chest.

0:11:160:11:19

I think the chest is worth 100 to 150.

0:11:190:11:22

I'd like to pay you 20, 40, 60, 80... £100.

0:11:220:11:28

-Because...

-Yes...

0:11:280:11:30

..it gives me a chance.

0:11:300:11:32

Another 20 and we've got a deal.

0:11:320:11:34

-Which is 20 for the chest and for the picture?

-Just for the chest.

0:11:340:11:38

I've got to be firm and I feel, Chris...

0:11:390:11:43

Damien! Crikey!

0:11:430:11:45

Damien, sorry. I feel it's a chest, Damien, which at auction is worth 100 to 150, so I'll leave it.

0:11:450:11:53

-I tell you what we'll do.

-Yes?

-Take the chest of drawers for 100. Take it for 100.

0:11:530:11:59

-Don't say that to me now.

-Yeah, take it.

-The roller-coaster of the romance of the Road Trip.

0:11:590:12:05

If you had remembered his name and offered him a kiss, you might have got there a bit quicker, Carlos.

0:12:050:12:11

And if I said for Queen and country, here's an extra £20...

0:12:110:12:16

-Yes.

-And I'll take the picture as well.

-Yes, you can.

0:12:160:12:19

-We've got a deal. So that's £120 all in.

-All in.

0:12:190:12:22

-For the picture and the chest. Are you happy?

-I'm happy.

-Are you sure? Look at me, Damien.

-I'm very happy.

0:12:220:12:28

-And I hope you'll be happy.

-Is that chest OK?

-The chest is brilliant.

0:12:280:12:32

I think that'll do two easy.

0:12:320:12:34

It's a wonderful Georgian chest and if you can't buy history for history's sake

0:12:340:12:39

-with a passion for what you enjoy, when can you?

-It's shabby chic. Enjoy, my friend.

-Thanks, Damien.

0:12:390:12:45

-There's your 120.

-Thank you.

0:12:450:12:47

Blimey, that's half his budget on the chest alone! He's bold, that boy!

0:12:470:12:52

At last, spring has sprung and just down the road, Christina has wasted no time at all in the shop

0:12:520:12:58

where Charles bought his swinging '60s clock from Paul. Stand by.

0:12:580:13:02

I do like the Schweppes box.

0:13:020:13:04

Everybody wants to buy the Schweppes box, but I like to keep them in the shop just to contain things.

0:13:040:13:10

-Obviously, they're in keeping.

-I like that a lot.

0:13:100:13:13

-You want to keep it?

-I do.

-There's a challenge.

0:13:130:13:16

-Uh-oh!

-No price would tempt you?

-Maybe. Everything's got a price.

0:13:160:13:20

But if I had to let it go, £25.

0:13:200:13:23

-And the contents?

-No, I don't think so.

0:13:230:13:28

-Go on, the contents and the box for £25.

-I don't think so. Charles said I had to watch out for you.

0:13:280:13:34

-I can see why now.

-Cheeky monkey!

0:13:340:13:37

Word travels fast in Whaley Bridge. Go easy on him, girl.

0:13:370:13:41

Would you let it go for any less?

0:13:410:13:44

-The bottom price would be 20.

-I'm not going to make any money on it at 20 quid.

-She's a terrier.

0:13:450:13:50

-A fiver?

-LAUGHTER

0:13:500:13:53

-Go on.

-No!

-Please.

-No.

0:13:560:13:59

Would you take any less?

0:13:590:14:01

Would you buy it at 15?

0:14:010:14:04

Over to you now, isn't it?

0:14:040:14:06

I'd give you ten quid now for it.

0:14:060:14:09

-What about the other fiver?

-No. I don't think I've got another fiver.

0:14:110:14:16

£150 at the last count, actually.

0:14:160:14:19

-Go on, a tenner. It's fun.

-Not for Paul, it isn't.

0:14:190:14:23

A tenner. Go on.

0:14:230:14:25

He's crumbling. Leave the shirt on his back, girl.

0:14:250:14:28

-Go on.

-OK, but...

0:14:280:14:30

-But?

-Deal.

-Yeah?

-Is it a deal?

0:14:300:14:33

Is it a deal? There was a "but" there somewhere.

0:14:330:14:36

There is a "but". I'd just like to apologise to all my customers that have tried to buy the crate.

0:14:360:14:42

-Has it been very popular?

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:14:420:14:44

-They can come to the auction.

-Absolutely.

0:14:440:14:47

-It's a deal.

-It's a deal.

-Thank you, Paul. You're a legend.

0:14:470:14:51

-Do I get the contents?

-No, sorry.

-It was worth a try.

0:14:510:14:54

Quit while you're ahead, young lady.

0:14:540:14:57

With three lots already under his belt,

0:14:570:14:59

young Charles has made tracks to Manchester for an arresting experience.

0:14:590:15:05

The Greater Manchester Police Museum is housed

0:15:050:15:09

in one of the city's earliest police stations, painstakingly restored

0:15:090:15:14

to reflect the realities of policing at the turn of the 19th century.

0:15:140:15:18

An offshoot of the town council, Greater Manchester Police Force was formed in 1839,

0:15:180:15:24

ten years after the Peelers of London.

0:15:240:15:27

One of the earliest forces, it was met with suspicion and resistance.

0:15:270:15:32

Punishments were harsh and often outweighed the crimes.

0:15:320:15:36

Charles is meeting curator Duncan Broady to find out more.

0:15:360:15:39

-Nice to meet you.

-Charles Hanson. I feel like saying, "It wasn't me."

0:15:390:15:44

It's quite daunting. I can see some handcuffs over there.

0:15:440:15:47

And clearly, it's all in keeping to what was then,

0:15:470:15:51

back in the 1870s, real punishment.

0:15:510:15:54

The tricky part was once you made the arrest, you had to walk through the streets with your prisoner.

0:15:540:16:00

You had no van or car to collect you, so handcuffs were vital to make sure that the person couldn't escape.

0:16:000:16:06

So here I am at the desk back in 1879

0:16:060:16:09

and I could be brought in for some probably quite minor crimes.

0:16:090:16:13

Yes, indeed.

0:16:130:16:15

-It could be "drunk and incapable".

-Yes.

-Or "drunk and disorderly".

0:16:150:16:19

-It wasn't me.

-Or there was even one that the Manchester Police had

0:16:190:16:24

which was "drunk and refusing to fight".

0:16:240:16:26

This was somebody in such a state of intoxication

0:16:260:16:29

that they couldn't even summon the strength to fight the officer before they were arrested.

0:16:290:16:35

I'm quite a coward, so maybe that's me in that regard. But I'm no drunk. Can you tell?

0:16:350:16:40

As well as police paraphernalia, the museum also has a vast archive of early criminal records,

0:16:400:16:46

detailing the day-to-day workings of the genuine Victorian station.

0:16:460:16:51

We've got one or two examples of documents from the collection here,

0:16:510:16:56

starting with this large book which is known as a thieves' album.

0:16:560:16:59

It looks fascinating, absolutely fascinating.

0:16:590:17:02

Here, for example, on this page, you've got a man called John Melville

0:17:020:17:08

who, to me, looks a fine man of society.

0:17:080:17:11

And he's 29 years old.

0:17:110:17:14

On the 5th of July, 1904, he's stolen four umbrellas.

0:17:140:17:19

He has received stolen property in Blackpool.

0:17:190:17:24

This goes on throughout the book.

0:17:240:17:26

-So you've got different characters.

-Different characters with different offences.

0:17:260:17:31

This lady has been convicted a few times.

0:17:310:17:34

Mary Ann Riley. What's her trade here?

0:17:340:17:38

-Is that "prostitute"?

-It is "prostitute".

-Crikey me!

0:17:390:17:43

-"Stealing growing celery."

-"Stealing growing celery."

0:17:430:17:47

"Sentenced to reformation for five years." Just amazing.

0:17:470:17:51

But whether charged with soliciting or stealing celery,

0:17:510:17:55

there's one place you were sure to end up - in the chokey.

0:17:550:17:58

In these cells, you would spend the night before going to court the next day to the magistrates.

0:17:580:18:04

-So that's why there's only four cells?

-Four cells, but as many as 12 people per cell on a busy night.

0:18:040:18:10

-12 per cell?

-Yes.

-And I can see my name is up there as well, Duncan.

0:18:100:18:15

-Yes, we have it on the board there.

-It wasn't me.

-I think you need to go inside, Charles.

0:18:150:18:21

Charles Samuel Hanson, you are hereby charged and will be suitably detained at Her Majesty's pleasure.

0:18:210:18:28

It's actually quite comfortable.

0:18:280:18:31

It's like almost being on a plastic sun lounger.

0:18:310:18:34

But I think, after a while, you would become slightly uncomfortable.

0:18:370:18:42

And with that, the first day of our trip draws to a close.

0:18:440:18:48

-I do hope someone remembers to free the Road Trip One.

-Let me out.

-Ah!

0:18:480:18:53

Night-night.

0:18:530:18:55

It's the start of a brand-new day and the chance to leave the wintry weather behind.

0:18:550:19:01

-This is pretty cool. I didn't think we'd go open-top today.

-No.

-I should have listened to you.

0:19:010:19:06

-What a difference a day makes!

-Exactly.

0:19:060:19:09

-Bikini weather by next week.

-Oh, my God!

-No, not you, Charles.

0:19:090:19:14

So far, Christina has spent £60 on three lots - the 19th century alms box, the selection of dog ornaments

0:19:150:19:22

and the wooden bottle crate, leaving her with £140 for the day ahead.

0:19:220:19:26

Charles, meanwhile, has spent £155 also on three lots - the 1960s retro clock,

0:19:260:19:31

the George III chest of drawers and a Victorian military silkwork,

0:19:310:19:37

giving him just £45 to splash on today's shopping.

0:19:370:19:41

Our eager experts are heading to their first destination of the day - Southport.

0:19:420:19:48

Founded in 1792, Southport was originally sparsely populated

0:19:480:19:52

and dominated by sand dunes,

0:19:520:19:55

but that all changed at the turn of the 19th century with the onset of the Industrial Revolution

0:19:550:20:01

and the influx of day-trippers who came to enjoy the seaside in the sunshine. No time to paddle today.

0:20:010:20:08

-It's a feast. Just feast your eyes.

-It looks fabulous.

0:20:080:20:11

Right, so you're here and I'm off to a vintage antiques emporium.

0:20:110:20:15

-Spend hard, OK?

-Will do.

-Just go for it. Impress me.

-OK.

-Go for it.

-Will do.

0:20:150:20:21

Christina may be the new kid on the block, but hopefully, she'll take Charles' advice with a pinch of salt

0:20:210:20:27

and form her own shopping strategy at the Royal Arcade.

0:20:270:20:30

Oh, my goodness!

0:20:300:20:32

-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hi, I'm Christina. Nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you too. Welcome to Southport.

0:20:320:20:38

-Thank you very much. It's Caroline?

-Caroline.

-Caroline and Christina. Goodness me!

0:20:380:20:43

-Where do I start?

-Help yourself.

-Browse away, OK.

0:20:430:20:46

With 60 different dealers under one roof, there's plenty to choose from.

0:20:460:20:51

There's so much.

0:20:520:20:55

You'd be moaning if there wasn't. Come on, Christina. Chop-chop!

0:20:550:20:59

This is really quite unusual with this yellow glazing.

0:20:590:21:03

I've not seen one with that bright colour before and, to a collector, that could be quite interesting.

0:21:030:21:09

Christina has spotted a limited edition piece of Prattware,

0:21:090:21:13

issued as a souvenir from the British Empire Exhibition of 1924, courtesy of stall-owner Roy.

0:21:130:21:18

That's quite fun and unusual with the yellow, really unusual.

0:21:180:21:22

-It is, yeah.

-I quite like that.

0:21:220:21:25

-That little crack in there worries me slightly.

-Probably just a firing crack.

0:21:250:21:30

Yeah, we've got a crack in there.

0:21:300:21:33

It's been extended there. What's your price on that one?

0:21:330:21:37

The very bottom figure would be 66.

0:21:370:21:40

£66?

0:21:400:21:42

-Here she goes.

-Could you do it for 60?

0:21:420:21:44

-No.

-Go on.

-I can't.

-Go on.

0:21:440:21:47

£60 would be brilliant. I'd be happy at 60.

0:21:470:21:50

-65 would be... That would be it.

-65?

0:21:500:21:54

It looks like she's met her match.

0:21:540:21:56

65... Go on then.

0:21:560:21:58

-Let's go £65. I'll shake on that with you. £65 and wish me lots of luck.

-All the best.

-I'll need it.

0:21:580:22:04

And once she starts, there's no stopping her.

0:22:040:22:08

-"Very rare piece, Art Deco at its best." I like that.

-It's quite different.

-Yeah.

0:22:080:22:13

It's quite fun. I like that.

0:22:130:22:16

The Art Deco cigarette or cheroot holder has a price tag of £36,

0:22:160:22:20

but Christina is hoping she can get the price down to £15 with a phone call to the absentee stall-owner.

0:22:200:22:27

-Will you do 20?

-I just don't see it at a profit at 20.

0:22:280:22:32

She doesn't think she'll make the profit. He'll meet you halfway at 18.

0:22:320:22:38

-Halfway?

-Halfway?

0:22:380:22:40

-15, please, would be brilliant.

-She's begging now. She's on her knees. 15?

0:22:400:22:45

-OK, it's a winner.

-Yay! Brilliant.

0:22:450:22:47

All right. Bye, Paul. Bye.

0:22:470:22:49

-Fantastic.

-There we go. How was that?

-Art Deco at its best.

0:22:490:22:53

Well done. Fantastic. You're a lady of negotiation skills. Can I take her with me? She's brilliant.

0:22:530:22:59

No, you cannot. Leave her alone.

0:22:590:23:01

Lovely. Thank you very much.

0:23:010:23:03

-Caroline, thank you so much for your help.

-It's nice to have you here.

-Wish me luck.

0:23:030:23:08

Meanwhile, just down the road, her rival Carlos is in John Nolan Antiques

0:23:080:23:13

where he is really up against it.

0:23:130:23:16

John, I might need your help. I've got £45 to spend.

0:23:160:23:19

-Time is the essence.

-You want me to choose something for you?

0:23:190:23:23

-I love these, but these are too much, aren't they?

-There's a pair of those. They're quite early.

0:23:230:23:29

What could they be, price-wise?

0:23:290:23:31

They're lead-glazed earthenware and they're quite nice.

0:23:310:23:35

-Are they drug jars?

-They are, yes. They come from a chemist.

0:23:350:23:39

-They're almost like a Whieldon glaze.

-They're beautiful.

0:23:390:23:42

Whieldon glaze, after the 18th century potter Thomas Whieldon,

0:23:420:23:47

is a brown earthenware effect, usually achieved with manganese oxide,

0:23:470:23:51

but with a price tag of £90 for the pair, they might not turn out to be best-sellers.

0:23:510:23:56

-I bought them in about 1980 in Liverpool.

-Yeah.

0:23:560:24:01

-And I've still got these...

-Really?

-..in 2013.

0:24:010:24:05

-So you've had these in your shop...

-I've had those in my shop for the best part of...

-33 years? Oh, my!

0:24:050:24:11

That means one thing to me - cash them in, get them sold.

0:24:110:24:15

-I'll tell you what. I'll keep one.

-Yes.

-It'll be a remembrance of your visit.

-Yeah.

0:24:150:24:20

And you have one. £45 and we've done a deal.

0:24:200:24:24

But you know, John, sometimes in life, in love, you don't want to break up. You want to stay together.

0:24:240:24:30

You don't want to get divorced. They've been together here in your shop since 1980.

0:24:300:24:35

Wouldn't you want to say goodbye to them both and say,

0:24:350:24:38

"Goodbye, missus, goodbye, mister, let's wave them both off together?"

0:24:380:24:42

-John, look at me.

-At £45, they're a good buy.

0:24:420:24:46

-For the pair?

-Goodbye. They're yours.

-Are you being serious?

-Yes.

-You've bought them.

0:24:460:24:51

Ha! BOGOF, eh? Buy one, get one free.

0:24:510:24:54

-You're saying £45...

-You've got yourself a deal.

0:24:540:24:58

They've been here since 1980 when I was two years old.

0:24:580:25:02

For £45, let's take them on.

0:25:020:25:04

-OK, you'll be known as the man who sold these.

-Who bought something which maybe was a big mistake.

0:25:040:25:10

And with that, Charles has spent every penny of his £200 budget. That's a very bold move indeed.

0:25:100:25:17

With her shopping completed,

0:25:170:25:20

Christina has travelled on to Liverpool

0:25:200:25:23

where she is planning to take a break, quite literally.

0:25:230:25:26

In the heart of the city lies Thurston's,

0:25:260:25:29

a family business synonymous with the sport of billiards since 1799.

0:25:290:25:33

As well as making traditional tables,

0:25:330:25:36

the shop houses a world-class collection of billiards and snooker heritage,

0:25:360:25:41

built up by the late owner, Norman Clare. Christina is meeting his son Peter to find out more.

0:25:410:25:47

This looks amazing. Absolutely amazing.

0:25:470:25:49

It's part of our showroom, but it has some of our collection as well.

0:25:490:25:54

-I believe you're a bit of a dying breed.

-We could be, yes.

0:25:540:25:57

Or rare breed, rather than dying breed. Sorry about that.

0:25:570:26:01

Snookered! Time for a potted history.

0:26:010:26:04

In mid-14th century Europe, bilhard was a lawn game similar to croquet.

0:26:040:26:10

By the following century, it had moved indoors and been raised on to a table,

0:26:100:26:15

the green baize representing the grass it had once been played on, but early tables didn't have pockets

0:26:150:26:21

and that wasn't the only thing that was different about the game. Cue Peter.

0:26:210:26:26

Until about the late 1890s, there wasn't a specified size for a table,

0:26:260:26:31

so you could have had a table which was 16 foot long by only four foot wide or whatever else.

0:26:310:26:36

-It wasn't until quite late on that it was specified that a table was 12 foot by six foot.

-OK.

0:26:360:26:42

For a billiard table which is what we play snooker on.

0:26:420:26:46

-What are these...?

-The things that...

-They look like golf clubs.

0:26:460:26:50

They do rather. There's an example of one. It's called a mace.

0:26:500:26:54

The early cue is just a small part of the quirky collection thought to be one of the largest in the world.

0:26:540:27:00

When did the mace... Or how did it develop?

0:27:000:27:04

-I assume it then became a cue.

-It did, yes.

0:27:040:27:07

If you take the mace... We've got one over here.

0:27:070:27:10

-If you take that as being a mace...

-That's the mace.

0:27:100:27:14

This is quite a good quality one in that it's also got the sighting line down it.

0:27:140:27:19

The idea would be that you would stand something like that and it was a push shot.

0:27:190:27:24

As the game developed, players wanting to attempt more skilful shots

0:27:240:27:30

used the tail end of the mace.

0:27:300:27:32

The French word for "tail" is "la queue", hence the cue got its name.

0:27:320:27:36

Anywhere where there's been a UK influence and they use UK-style cues will still have a flat on the butt.

0:27:360:27:43

So you could push... But is that legal now?

0:27:430:27:47

It wouldn't be now, no.

0:27:470:27:49

Balls. Now, what about billiard balls?

0:27:490:27:52

We think that the early balls were made of wood, then they went to ivory.

0:27:520:27:58

In about the 1860s, I think it was,

0:27:580:28:01

so many elephants were being killed for ivory,

0:28:010:28:05

for the ivory trade in general, not just for billiards,

0:28:050:28:09

that there was a prize offered in the States of 10,000 dollars

0:28:090:28:13

for somebody to invent something to replace the ivory billiard balls.

0:28:130:28:17

And one of the first things made in plastic and sold in plastic commercially was billiard balls.

0:28:170:28:24

Brilliant.

0:28:240:28:25

By the mid-19th century, billiards wasn't just a game for the aristocracy.

0:28:250:28:30

It was a game for every man and every woman.

0:28:300:28:33

But now there were many variations - carom, snooker, pool, each putting a different spin on the cue sport.

0:28:330:28:41

But anyone of note would have had a table of their own.

0:28:410:28:44

So, Peter, any really famous people that I would have heard of that have got a Thurston's table?

0:28:440:28:50

Yes. Charles Dickens. And he bought a few accessories off us.

0:28:500:28:54

-They actually kept the cheque. Although it's been slightly damaged, we've got it here.

-My goodness!

0:28:540:28:59

-And it's on Coutts Bank.

-Of course.

0:28:590:29:02

And it's for nine pounds, four shillings.

0:29:020:29:05

-That was for his table?

-I think it was for accessories for his table.

0:29:050:29:10

-And dated 1860-something.

-1860-something or other.

0:29:100:29:14

-It's actually signed by Dickens?

-Yeah.

-That's amazing. That is a claim to fame!

0:29:140:29:20

Ha! And it can all be found right here in The Old Cue-riosity Shop!

0:29:200:29:26

All shopped out and still in Liverpool, our happy campers have reconvened

0:29:280:29:33

at the rather posh Croxteth Hall as they show and tell.

0:29:330:29:37

Let's hope they don't give themselves a showing up as well.

0:29:370:29:41

-I'm really nervous.

-Don't be.

-I am.

-Prepare to be utterly...

0:29:410:29:45

-I can't wait.

-..unamazed. Drum roll!

0:29:450:29:48

Oh, I like.

0:29:480:29:50

-I do like. No, I do like.

-What have I bought?

-No, I like. Thanks for coming.

0:29:500:29:56

-I love your... Are they Border Fine Arts?

-No, resin.

-They're very nice.

0:29:560:30:00

From the box of dogs to the box of the gods.

0:30:000:30:04

-I needed some divine inspiration.

-"For the holy souls." You might make a profit.

-I love this.

0:30:040:30:09

-Is it a collection box?

-Yes, I think it's an alms box.

0:30:090:30:13

-OK, of course.

-But I just love the way that it's been worn.

0:30:130:30:16

-You can see where the coins have gone in.

-I love that Gothic back.

0:30:160:30:20

It's 1880, 1890... I really rate that.

0:30:200:30:23

I also love and one of my great passions... I say "passion". I knew the late Mr Pratt from Shropshire.

0:30:230:30:29

-Your Prattware pot.

-Ta-da!

0:30:290:30:31

-With base and...

-Oh, I like it. That's lovely.

0:30:310:30:35

-A little bit late, I think.

-It doesn't matter.

0:30:350:30:38

I was appealing to memorabilia and Pratt pot lid collectors.

0:30:380:30:42

I think it looks 1860s, but obviously, it's the '20s.

0:30:420:30:46

But a good object. You've bought a really nice mix.

0:30:460:30:49

-How much were your dogs?

-How much do you think?

0:30:490:30:52

They're a good collection. They look happy. They appear to be in good condition.

0:30:520:30:57

-I reckon the dogs cost you something in the order of £45.

-No way.

-How much?

-A pound.

0:30:570:31:03

-A pound?

-Yeah.

0:31:030:31:05

-£1 for...

-A pound per dog?

-No, just £1.

0:31:050:31:07

-Where were they from?

-I sort of did a little bit of sweet-talking.

0:31:070:31:12

Could that stray purchase make Christina the leader of the pack? It depends on what she's up against.

0:31:120:31:19

-Come on, Charlie.

-Are you ready?

-Oh, my goodness!

0:31:190:31:23

Oh! Oh, my... Oh!

0:31:240:31:26

-I love this.

-Really?

-Yeah, mahogany chest of drawers. How much did you pay for that?

-Have a guess.

0:31:260:31:33

Did you pay 150 quid for it?

0:31:330:31:35

-It's what they call in the trade a oner. £100.

-100 quid?

0:31:350:31:39

-£100.

-Where do you buy a chest of drawers today for 100 quid?

0:31:390:31:43

In an antiques shop in Whaley Bridge, obviously.

0:31:430:31:46

Next!

0:31:460:31:48

-I love this.

-You know, that's retro, we are in Liverpool, it's swinging, it's '60s...

0:31:480:31:54

-It's just got the look.

-It's very funky. I like that.

0:31:540:31:57

There is a bit of wear and tear on the chrome.

0:31:570:32:01

-Yeah, but it's funky. It's very Austin Powers.

-Exactly.

0:32:010:32:05

-It's very Charlie Hanson!

-Thank you very much.

-Yeah, baby!

0:32:050:32:08

Well done. I'm very impressed. You've gone traditional, funky and with what's selling in the sale.

0:32:080:32:15

Quite the diplomat, Christina.

0:32:170:32:19

But this is the bit where you tell us what you really thought.

0:32:190:32:23

I love how Charlie's antiques are a complete reflection of him.

0:32:230:32:28

He's gone uber-traditional with his mahogany chest of drawers. He got a good deal there.

0:32:280:32:33

And he's gone completely wacky with his clock which is Charlie through and through.

0:32:330:32:38

He has spent a lot of money, so we'll see what happens.

0:32:380:32:41

I stood by my feast and looked at Christina's famine and thought, "Check my kit out."

0:32:410:32:46

I've bought a really good chest.

0:32:460:32:49

I've bought two fine vases and I've bought a really... What did I buy?

0:32:490:32:53

What did I buy? Sorry.

0:32:530:32:55

Good Lord! Keep up, Carlos. Tick-tock!

0:32:550:32:58

Oh, yeah, a wonderful retro clock.

0:32:580:33:01

I've bought quality and, Christina, check out my kit!

0:33:010:33:04

It's not all about you. What did you think of the competition?

0:33:040:33:08

The dogs, I know, are a girl's best friend and also a man's best friend.

0:33:080:33:13

They are a nice pack of dogs, but they're not Beswick, they're not Doulton. They're just ornamental.

0:33:130:33:19

Next time, Christina, put a bit more oomph into the whole aspect of buying collectable.

0:33:190:33:24

I think they're so cheap, even I would have said "no".

0:33:240:33:28

Really? With both experts quietly confident,

0:33:280:33:31

we'll find out who's bought best as they head off to auction.

0:33:310:33:35

# Pigeons, widgeons, seagulls, sparrows, all the birds come here to nest... #

0:33:350:33:39

Liverpool may be famed for its Liver Birds, but it's the Liver Dogs that are bothering Charles.

0:33:390:33:44

How much is that doggy in the window?

0:33:440:33:47

-Those dogs are so cheap and I know they're going to woof away.

-I don't know about that.

0:33:470:33:52

That's giving me a bit of a worry.

0:33:520:33:54

Our experts go head-to-head at Adam Partridge Auctioneers & Valuers.

0:33:540:33:59

Today's sale is an antiques, collectors' items and specialist maritime auction.

0:33:590:34:04

How exciting! It's very nerve-racking, isn't it?

0:34:040:34:07

Whilst Charles has a tinkle...

0:34:070:34:09

-..Christina advertises her wares.

-Can everyone see it?

0:34:110:34:14

Let's find out if auctioneer Chris Surfleet thinks they've spent their money wisely.

0:34:140:34:20

What I'm most concerned about, being an antique auction house, is probably the little collection of dogs.

0:34:200:34:26

However, having said that, lots of collectors have come,

0:34:260:34:29

not just people looking for period antiques, looking for all sorts of things, and they will find a home.

0:34:290:34:35

Christina started out with £200 and has spent £140 on five lots,

0:34:350:34:40

leaving her with a thrifty little cash reserve of £60.

0:34:400:34:44

Charles also started with £200, but he's blown the lot

0:34:440:34:48

on four lots, a risky strategy, but will it pay off?

0:34:480:34:51

It's my nervous energy.

0:34:510:34:54

Over to today's auctioneer, Adam Partridge.

0:34:540:34:57

First up for Charles, it's the George III chest,

0:34:570:35:01

but will it be a drawer for both the saleroom and the online bidders?

0:35:010:35:06

-Handsome-looking chest...

-Handsome-looking chest.

0:35:060:35:09

-Give me 60? 50, I have. At £50. 55 now?

-Come on.

0:35:090:35:13

-At £50. Where's 5? Online at 55.

-Online. It's going to Jamaica!

0:35:130:35:18

-70? 70 bid.

-Keep going.

-At 5. 80? 80 bid. At 5 now?

0:35:180:35:22

-85 online.

-Keep going.

-Worth more. 90 bid. At £90.

-Keep going.

0:35:220:35:26

-At 5 online, 95.

-Good.

-At 95, it's still cheap.

0:35:260:35:29

-Come on, it's cheap.

-At 95. Give me 100?

-Come on.

0:35:290:35:33

-100.

-Keep going.

-110, sir? 100 only.

0:35:330:35:35

-Go on.

-110's online.

-Yes!

-Well done.

-It needs one more to break even.

0:35:350:35:40

-It is cheap.

-Is there any more? At £110.

0:35:400:35:43

110. Come on. At £110. Any advance now?

0:35:430:35:47

At £110. Anyone else?

0:35:470:35:49

I'm off and running, going, going, going...

0:35:490:35:52

-Gone! 110.

-Well done.

-Which means I've lost a fiver. Happy days(!)

0:35:520:35:56

It might be a £10 profit, but that will be wiped out

0:35:560:36:00

once the commission is paid.

0:36:000:36:02

First up for Christina, it's the 19th century pine alms box

0:36:020:36:06

with religious inscription. Let us pray!

0:36:060:36:09

I'm starting at 25. I'll take 30. And 5. And 40.

0:36:090:36:13

And 5. And 50. Lady's bid, 50. 5 behind.

0:36:130:36:16

60 now. 65.

0:36:160:36:18

70. 75. 80.

0:36:180:36:21

-Keep going. Keep going. Go on.

-75. I'll take 80 somewhere?

0:36:210:36:26

Final chance. We're selling at the back of the room at £75 in white...

0:36:260:36:31

You are on the road and you've just blown away the master. Well done.

0:36:310:36:36

A handsome mark-up. Christina proves she's not green about the gills.

0:36:360:36:40

Back to Charles now and his next timely offering.

0:36:400:36:45

-£20, the clock. It must be worth that.

-It must be worth that.

0:36:450:36:48

-It's got the style, it's got the look. It swings.

-Very stylish.

0:36:480:36:52

-Sir, do you like it?

-£20?

-No.

-Give me 10 then.

0:36:520:36:55

Let's see some bidding. 10. And 15, sir. And 20. Have another one.

0:36:550:36:59

-It's 20 in the cap. At £20.

-I'm in trouble.

0:36:590:37:03

It's in the middle at £20. Anyone else? At 20.

0:37:030:37:06

-Are you all done?

-It swings.

-At £20, the clock at 20. Any more?

0:37:060:37:10

-It's fine.

-When you hear that bang,

0:37:120:37:15

it's like nailing a nail into a coffin.

0:37:150:37:18

For whom the bell tolls, Carlos. The clock fails to strike a note with the bidders.

0:37:180:37:24

It didn't swing so much as... Swung.

0:37:240:37:26

They say swing high, swing low and that swung low.

0:37:260:37:29

The drinks will be on Christina if she can repeat her success

0:37:290:37:33

-with the pine advertising crate.

-£20, the crate?

0:37:330:37:36

-£20?

-He's got £20.

0:37:360:37:38

-No, he hasn't...

-I've got 10 bid. I'll take 15.

0:37:380:37:41

At 15 here. £15, the crate here.

0:37:410:37:44

-At £15. Any more? At £15.

-Well done.

0:37:440:37:47

-At £15...

-Come on, Adam.

-You've done it.

0:37:470:37:50

-Anyone else?

-You haven't made a loss yet.

-20 at the back there. 5 now?

0:37:500:37:54

25. And 30? 25 down here in the cap.

0:37:540:37:57

-£25. Last chance?

-I like it.

-At £25 in the cap then...

-What a man!

0:37:570:38:02

-I don't believe it!

-Schweet!

0:38:030:38:07

Next up for Charles, it's the Victorian military silkwork,

0:38:070:38:11

but will it help win the battle?

0:38:110:38:13

-There we go.

-It's started. I've come alive.

0:38:130:38:16

-At £20.

-Come on, come on, come on.

0:38:160:38:19

-It's surely worth a bit more. 25.

-Yes!

0:38:190:38:22

-30 bid. 5?

-One for the road!

-£30. Anyone else now?

0:38:220:38:26

-At 30... Thanks for coming.

-Quite right. Hey, that's my line!

0:38:260:38:30

Anyone else? It's not expensive at £30. We'll sell at £30 then...

0:38:300:38:35

Brilliant. That's £10 profit. I'm back in business.

0:38:360:38:39

Not a storming victory, but a profit nonetheless.

0:38:390:38:43

Next up for Christina is that rather unusual Pratt pot lid and base.

0:38:430:38:48

I'm bid £30. I'll take 5 now. 30 bid. 5. 40.

0:38:480:38:51

40 with me here. At £40. Any more now?

0:38:510:38:54

-At £40, it's my bid.

-Come on!

-I'll take 5 in the room.

0:38:540:38:58

-Are you all done then?

-No!

-He's trying.

0:38:580:39:01

We're selling at £40 for the lid with base...

0:39:010:39:04

Ouch!

0:39:060:39:08

Christina's luck runs out as she makes her first loss

0:39:080:39:11

which means Charles could be in with a shout.

0:39:110:39:14

Come on, Carlos, time to play catch-up with your next lot,

0:39:140:39:18

the pair of Whieldon-style pottery jars.

0:39:180:39:21

-Give me £100 for them?

-Come on.

-£100 for these?

-Come on.

0:39:210:39:25

-80?

-Come on.

-Come on.

0:39:250:39:27

£80? 60? Someone give me £50 to start off? £50?

0:39:270:39:31

-50.

-You've got a bid.

0:39:310:39:33

-I'm off and running.

-And in profit at your first bid.

-I'm delighted.

0:39:330:39:37

-£50. Where's 5 now? Online or in the room?

-There's got to be another bid.

0:39:370:39:42

-Come on, online. They are cheap.

-At 50.

-I think they're cheap.

-Anyone?

0:39:420:39:47

If they make 50, I'm making a big loss.

0:39:470:39:49

-I have to pay commission.

-We're selling at £50...

0:39:490:39:53

Oh, oh... I've been shot, I've been shot. The gavel's down.

0:39:530:39:58

Young Carlos takes another blow in the battle of the sexes

0:39:580:40:02

as once again, the tiny profit will be wiped out by commission.

0:40:020:40:06

Some might think Christina is barking mad

0:40:060:40:09

with this next little lot.

0:40:090:40:12

Always popular. Bid me £10 for this canine collection?

0:40:120:40:16

-£10 online. At £10. I'll take 15?

-£10!

-10 is bid, internet.

0:40:160:40:20

At £10. At £10.

0:40:200:40:22

-Come on!

-Anyone else for these, surely?

-Sell them.

0:40:220:40:26

-More, more, more!

-We're selling online then at...

0:40:260:40:29

-15 seated. 15 on the sofa.

-15.

-At £15 then.

0:40:290:40:33

£15. Selling at... 20 online.

0:40:330:40:36

-Oh, no!

-£20. 5 in the room. 25 in the room this time.

0:40:360:40:39

-25?!

-At £25. You're all out. It's this side now.

0:40:390:40:43

-At £25...

-It's slightly embarrassing.

-That's fantastic.

0:40:430:40:47

I don't believe it. £25. Put it there. Put it there.

0:40:470:40:51

A tail-wagging profit as newbie Christina teaches old dog Hanson some new tricks.

0:40:540:40:59

You are in... What are you in? You're in the money.

0:40:590:41:02

-Not hugely yet.

-You're in the money.

0:41:020:41:05

One lot to go.

0:41:050:41:07

Christina's final lot is the Art Deco cigarette holder,

0:41:080:41:12

but will it leave her with a smoking profit?

0:41:120:41:14

Bid me £10?

0:41:140:41:17

Oh, it's all gone quiet. Come on, come on, come on.

0:41:170:41:20

-- Yes, sir. - 10 is bid.

-10 online.

0:41:200:41:23

-At £10.

-Well done.

-Thank God!

0:41:230:41:26

-At £10. Anyone else?

-Come on, one more, one more.

0:41:260:41:29

-On a cheroot holder modelled with a crouching cat.

-Keep it there.

0:41:290:41:33

-Selling online at a tenner...

-There goes the cat.

-Is that good?

0:41:330:41:36

It might be.

0:41:360:41:38

-At £10...

-One more, one more.

0:41:380:41:41

Well done. Well done, partner. Well done.

0:41:420:41:45

You can't win 'em all, Christina,

0:41:450:41:48

a lesson that you'll learn well here on the Road Trip. Just ask Charles.

0:41:480:41:52

All I know is that you won today and I'm playing catch-up.

0:41:520:41:56

-The first and last time, don't worry.

-Hanson is playing catch-up.

0:41:560:42:00

-When the going gets tough...

-Go and have a cup of tea.

-Yeah.

0:42:000:42:04

Charles Hanson started this leg with £200 and after auction costs,

0:42:040:42:09

he has made a loss of £27.80,

0:42:090:42:11

sending him through to the next round with a less than satisfying £172.20.

0:42:110:42:17

Newcomer Christina Trevanion also started with £200.

0:42:190:42:24

After costs, she has made a profit of £3.50... Wow!

0:42:240:42:28

..taking her total to £203.50 and she claims the first victory of this Road Trip.

0:42:280:42:34

-I can't believe it. You've conquered me today.

-Really?

-You have.

0:42:340:42:39

-No, £3.50 profit, that's hardly conquering!

-Yeah, but even so, it's a start.

0:42:390:42:44

Hanson is now falling back, £170 or thereabouts. You are in the lead.

0:42:440:42:49

-More importantly, I've got the keys.

-Which means what?

-Thank the Lord I'm driving!

0:42:490:42:54

-On to...

-Manchester.

0:42:540:42:57

-You know, if I can't make money in Manchester...

-Yeah?

-..when can I?

-Yeah, baby.

-Yes, baby.

0:42:570:43:03

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, Christina Trevanion makes a shock purchase.

0:43:050:43:10

Oh, God, oh, God! I'm never going to live this down.

0:43:100:43:14

And Charles Hanson prepares to fight back.

0:43:140:43:17

Christina, I'm ready for Birkenhead.

0:43:170:43:20

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:390:43:42