Episode 2 Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 2

Antiques experts Charles Hanson and Christina Trevanion begin the second leg of their road trip in the city of Manchester, before making their way to auction in Birkenhead.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 2. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

'It's the nation's favourite antiques experts,

0:00:010:00:04

'with £200 each, a classic car and a goal -

0:00:040:00:08

'to scour Britain for antiques.'

0:00:080:00:10

-Going, going,... gone!

-Yes! I've fallen in love with a brick.

0:00:100:00:14

'The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.'

0:00:140:00:18

-YES!

-'There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.'

0:00:180:00:22

I feel antiqued out.

0:00:220:00:23

'So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?'

0:00:230:00:27

-BRAKES SCREECH Charlie!

-Sorry about that.

0:00:280:00:30

'This is the Antiques Road Trip.'

0:00:300:00:33

'This week has seen a bright new star hit the road.'

0:00:360:00:40

'As the head of jewellery in an established auction house,

0:00:410:00:45

'Christina Trevanion knows the importance of protecting your valuables.'

0:00:450:00:50

Go away! Go away!

0:00:500:00:52

'And having won the last leg,...

0:00:520:00:54

I don't believe it.

0:00:540:00:56

'..she's going to great lengths to stay on top.'

0:00:560:01:00

As it's my first road trip,...

0:01:000:01:02

'Cheeky.'

0:01:020:01:04

'Also vying for victory is Road Trip regular, auctioneer Charles Hanson.'

0:01:050:01:10

'And after defeat last time, he's gearing up for a fight.'

0:01:110:01:15

Christina, I'm ready for Birkenhead.

0:01:160:01:19

'Ha-ha! The chariot taking them into battle is this rather fetching 1969 Morris Minor.'

0:01:200:01:26

Yeah, let's get to a shop, Christina!

0:01:270:01:30

I'm mad for it. See, I'm mad for it.

0:01:300:01:33

'Whoa! He's excited.'

0:01:330:01:35

'New girl Christina began this trip with a bang,

0:01:370:01:40

'pushing her starting budget of £200 up to £203.50.'

0:01:400:01:45

'Charles also started with £200, but ended the day at a loss

0:01:480:01:52

'and has £172.20 to spend today.'

0:01:520:01:56

'The route for the week takes our intrepid road-trippers

0:02:020:02:04

'from Whaley Bridge in Derbyshire, over peak and dale

0:02:040:02:08

'to their final destination of Cobridge in Staffordshire,

0:02:080:02:11

'covering approximately 600 miles.'

0:02:110:02:14

'On this leg, they'll travel from Manchester,

0:02:160:02:19

'making their way to auction in Birkenhead, on the Wirral.'

0:02:190:02:22

'The world's first industrialised city,

0:02:280:02:31

'Manchester is today famed for its music, sport and culture.'

0:02:310:02:34

-You know, Manchester has so much to offer.

-It does?

0:02:370:02:40

Its diverse culture - you've got hip, funky antiques shops

0:02:400:02:44

and you've got the traditional Victoriana.

0:02:440:02:47

'Onward, chaps, to our first stop of the day.'

0:02:470:02:50

-CAR DOOR SLAMS

-OK, I'll race you in.

0:02:500:02:53

'Just like children. Mark you, Charles has some catching up to do.'

0:02:540:02:58

'The Levenshulme antiques village has 20 individual shops to explore,

0:02:580:03:02

'so happy hunting!'

0:03:020:03:05

Wow.

0:03:050:03:06

-Must stay focused. Not here to shop.

-'No, you're not, Christina.'

0:03:080:03:12

Ooh!

0:03:130:03:14

What do you think? Does suit me?

0:03:160:03:18

'Oh, smokin'! I'm happy to see she's not taking this competition sitting down.'

0:03:180:03:24

That's really nice. I like that.

0:03:250:03:27

That's quite fun. It's a good, sturdy... good, sturdy thing.

0:03:280:03:33

'She's smitten. Ticket price, £25.'

0:03:340:03:37

'But is shop owner Sally willing to deal?'

0:03:370:03:40

Um, I saw this chair. It caught my eye. I really quite liked it.

0:03:410:03:46

-Do you know anything about it?

-I think it's an artist's chair,

0:03:460:03:50

because it's got this little seat where you'd keep your paintbrushes.

0:03:500:03:54

Is there any flexibility on the price?

0:03:570:03:59

I was thinking, at auction, it'll make maybe £15.

0:03:590:04:03

And I need to make a profit against that pesky Charlie Hanson.

0:04:030:04:06

-Righty-ho.

-What's your thoughts?

-Um, well,...

0:04:060:04:09

-I could do it for 15.

-It's a deal. Thank you, Sally, you're a star!

-Thank you!

0:04:090:04:14

'Christina's off the mark, but Charles needs help

0:04:140:04:18

'and puts in a sneaky call to the auctioneer.'

0:04:180:04:21

My great passion, James, is often buy big, buy monumental, buy furniture.

0:04:210:04:26

And, um, I like buying it.

0:04:260:04:29

Don't buy furniture? OK. Don't touch it. Thanks very much.

0:04:290:04:33

See you in Birkenhead.

0:04:330:04:35

'The auctioneer's top tip - don't buy furniture.'

0:04:350:04:38

'That's easy advice to follow, Charles.'

0:04:380:04:41

'Or maybe not.'

0:04:420:04:44

'And what's this?'

0:04:440:04:46

'Christina's also getting the inside scoop from the auction house.'

0:04:460:04:51

Silver, lots of silver.

0:04:510:04:53

Charles has been on the phone.

0:04:540:04:56

'Watch out, Charles. She's onto you'

0:04:560:04:59

-Have you got something to tell me?

-No. No, about what?

0:04:590:05:03

'Don't lie, Carlos.'

0:05:030:05:05

-Have you been making any phonecalls?

-I may have phoned a friend.

0:05:060:05:10

-No, I gave the auctioneer a call.

-Oh, did you?

-In Birkenhead.

0:05:100:05:14

Were you going to tell me about this phonecall?

0:05:140:05:17

This is... Well, you know, it's payback time, you know.

0:05:170:05:20

I'm trying to get myself back in...

0:05:200:05:22

Charlie Hanson. Right, the gloves are off, baby!

0:05:220:05:26

'Feisty, eh? After buying furniture, Christina seeks something different

0:05:280:05:33

'and Barry's shop might be just the place.'

0:05:330:05:36

My goodness, there's a lot of stuff here.

0:05:390:05:41

'Yeah, I'll say. Clever Christina's spotted some silverware.'

0:05:410:05:46

I'm trying to put together a lot of silver plate that will do well at the auction.

0:05:460:05:51

And, um, I think Barry might be my man.

0:05:510:05:55

'While Christina gathers her riches, Charles just can't tear himself away from furniture.'

0:05:560:06:02

MUSIC: "Just Leave Me Alone" by Michael Jackson

0:06:030:06:06

'No, no, no, Charles. Come on.'

0:06:060:06:09

Everything here is furniture.

0:06:110:06:14

'Because it's a furniture shop(!) Just follow Christina's lead.'

0:06:140:06:19

'Sneaky boy.'

0:06:200:06:22

-Don't you dare... Keep...

-Is it for sale?

0:06:230:06:25

Keep...

0:06:250:06:27

Go away! Go away!

0:06:270:06:29

No, this is... Barry's my mate now.

0:06:290:06:30

Yeah? How are you, mate? How are you, mate?

0:06:300:06:34

All falling apart very, very swiftly.

0:06:340:06:37

Ladies first. I'm sorry, Barry. I'll let you do a deal with Christina.

0:06:370:06:41

-Like the plate, by the way.

-Get out!

0:06:410:06:44

'Barry's got them fighting over him, now.'

0:06:470:06:49

'Well, he is a man with some bright ideas.'

0:06:490:06:53

I'm thinking, that's quite cool at the moment, isn't it?

0:06:550:06:58

'Christina's interest has been sparked by a pair of enamelled industrial downlighters.'

0:06:580:07:03

'But can she get them for the right price?'

0:07:030:07:06

-So, they were marked up at...

-50.

-For the pair?

-No.

0:07:080:07:12

-Yeah.

-That's each.

-Oh, go on, Barry.

-You can have them for 30 each.

0:07:120:07:17

But we would sell them as a pair. I'd want to put them in as a pair.

0:07:170:07:21

-Give me 50 quid the pair.

-50 quid the pair. Go on, Barry.

0:07:210:07:26

Thank you very much. I like those. Let's look at the silver plate.

0:07:260:07:29

'Can he do her another deal with a silver lining?'

0:07:290:07:33

20 pound for that one.

0:07:340:07:37

-20 for that one.

-Oh, Barry! What?

-Fiver each for those.

0:07:380:07:42

-What's that one got on it?

-Three pound.

-Three pounds on it.

0:07:420:07:45

I think the bowl is probably more saleable than the basket.

0:07:450:07:51

What about...

0:07:510:07:53

..20 for that?

0:07:530:07:55

'Ooh, he's happy with that. I think.'

0:07:550:07:57

-OK.

-20 quid?

-Yeah.

0:07:570:08:00

-Thank you ever so much.

-Thankin' you.

-You're a star. Off I trot.

0:08:000:08:04

There you go.

0:08:040:08:06

'She's one happy customer, walking away with a job lot.'

0:08:060:08:09

'The silver-plated pedestal rose bowl, a pair of trumpet vases,

0:08:090:08:13

'nut dishes,

0:08:130:08:16

'and Barry's thrown in an early 20thC silver napkin ring.'

0:08:160:08:20

'All for £20.'

0:08:200:08:22

'Good going, Christina. Crikey.'

0:08:220:08:24

'Right, Charles! You're up.'

0:08:250:08:27

Look at the planes. Look at the flag.

0:08:270:08:30

Look at the horns. I could be flying here.

0:08:310:08:34

Barry, is this all for sale outside here, as well?

0:08:360:08:38

-Yeah.

-Everything.

0:08:380:08:40

I quite like this man, down here. He's tired, he's a bit discoloured..

0:08:400:08:45

'He's a gnome, Charles.'

0:08:450:08:48

Where did he come from? Did your father make him, you say?

0:08:480:08:50

-Father-in-law made him, yeah.

-Really? Back to what, the 1930s?

0:08:500:08:54

-No, probably '50s.

-There's also one more down there, Barry, as well.

0:08:540:08:59

Another garden gnome. If I bought the two, what's your best price?

0:08:590:09:04

-£10 the pair.

-£10 the pair. If I said a fiver for the two together?

0:09:040:09:09

-No. No, you've got to pay a tenner the pair.

-Meet me halfway. Eight.

0:09:090:09:14

-I'm not meeting anywhere. Tenner the pair.

-Get out of here!

0:09:140:09:17

'I think Barry prefers Christina and I don't blame him.'

0:09:170:09:20

-If I bought the two, the best price between mates would be...

-£10.

0:09:200:09:25

-Not a penny less?

-Not a penny less.

-Thanks, mate(!)

0:09:250:09:28

'Hm! Stalemate. And after some consultation,...

0:09:280:09:32

-Charles can see it now.

-'..Charles buys one gnome for £5.'

0:09:320:09:36

OK, Chris. Yeah, I know. You and me now, mate. We'll ditch Christina.

0:09:380:09:42

OK, Chris. Happy? Yeah.

0:09:420:09:45

-We're off. See you later.

-Thankin' you.

0:09:450:09:47

'A talking gnome called Chris? I think he's losing it, that boy.'

0:09:470:09:52

'With that, he's off to his next shop.'

0:09:520:09:55

'Meanwhile, Christina's heading for a history lesson, by foot.'

0:09:550:10:00

'The Manchester Jewish museum is the only one of its kind outside London

0:10:000:10:04

'and can be found in a former synagogue.'

0:10:040:10:07

'The museum tells the story of Manchester's Jewish community.'

0:10:090:10:12

'Having been popular with traders since the 1740s,

0:10:130:10:17

'the city's cotton trade soon attracted Jewish entrepreneurs,

0:10:170:10:21

'who left a lasting legacy in Manchester and further afield.'

0:10:210:10:26

'Christina's come to hear all about it from curator Alexandra Grime.'

0:10:260:10:30

-This is beautiful.

-It is.

-It's breathtaking.

0:10:320:10:34

-It was built in 1874, the building.

-1874?

-It was originally a synagogue, as you can probably tell.

0:10:340:10:40

-Yeah.

-The community moved out in 1982 and it became this museum.

0:10:400:10:44

'The synagogue would've been a place of worship for the Sephardi Jews

0:10:440:10:49

'and is built in the style of their Spanish and Portuguese ancestors.'

0:10:490:10:54

They've done some paint-scraping and found what the columns used to look like.

0:10:550:11:00

-Very ornate. You can see some of the gilding.

-It would've been beautiful.

0:11:000:11:05

They did a stencil from that and recreated what it would've looked like on that column over there.

0:11:050:11:11

-Very glitzy, really.

-Very glitzy and glam.

-Very glitzy.

0:11:110:11:15

'At the end of the 18th century,

0:11:160:11:18

'families from places like Corfu and Syria settled in the city.'

0:11:180:11:22

'As the population grew, they built up communities, places of worship

0:11:220:11:27

'and their businesses, particularly in the clothing industry

0:11:270:11:30

'and they went from strength to strength.'

0:11:300:11:33

One really interesting guy is called Benjamin Hyam.

0:11:340:11:37

What he's doing is selling ready-made garments, proper suits,

0:11:370:11:41

people can afford the suits and it really catches on,

0:11:410:11:45

-these ready-made, rather than tailored items.

-OK, gosh, wow.

0:11:450:11:48

-So this is the start of the high street shop.

-Absolutely.

0:11:480:11:51

-By 1851, he opens a shop like this.

-Is this his shop?

-This is.

0:11:510:11:55

Charles Dickens mentions this shop as does Benjamin Disraeli. They visit when they're in town.

0:11:550:12:01

I never would have had Disraeli as a man with a suit off the rack. Wow.

0:12:010:12:06

'In the decades preceding World War One,

0:12:070:12:10

'the population in Manchester increased, as Jews fled persecution'

0:12:100:12:14

'Fearing a backlash, the established community tried to Anglicise the new arrivals,

0:12:140:12:20

'opening schools to teach English and introducing them to some good old British staples.'

0:12:200:12:26

They had clubs aimed at organising their recreation,

0:12:260:12:31

-so they had brass bands and played cricket and things like that.

-Brass bands!

0:12:310:12:35

-Good old Lancashire tradition.

-I love it!

0:12:350:12:38

Which is why this item is fantastic. This is actually a washboard,

0:12:380:12:42

brought over in 1910.

0:12:420:12:45

You can see it's very worn. That's because it was never used as a washboard.

0:12:450:12:49

Leon actually used it as a cricket bat. I think it's such a great story

0:12:490:12:54

-He's come from Eastern Europe and made his washboard into a cricket bat.

-Very resourceful.

0:12:540:12:59

No better example of Anglicisation than that.

0:12:590:13:02

-Thank you so much for having us. I've learnt an awful lot.

-Thank you for coming.

0:13:020:13:07

'With only a gnome called Chris to his name,

0:13:090:13:12

'Charles hits the shops again.'

0:13:120:13:14

'This time, in Sale.'

0:13:140:13:16

'A thriving commuter town in Greater Manchester,

0:13:170:13:20

'Sale boasts the 250-year-old Bridgewater Canal.'

0:13:200:13:25

'At its peak, the canal carried more than three million tons of traffic,

0:13:260:13:31

'much of it fuelling the Industrial Revolution.'

0:13:310:13:34

'Today, it carries a lighter load, of ducks and leisure barges.'

0:13:340:13:38

I'm on a mission to outdo Christina.

0:13:410:13:43

My strategy is to really play big and that's the way I am.

0:13:430:13:48

I'm just going to go for it.

0:13:480:13:50

'With a strategy in place, Charles is pinning his hopes on the Manchester Antiques Company,

0:13:510:13:56

'and owner, John Long.'

0:13:560:13:58

-Hello.

-How are you?

0:14:000:14:02

Good to see you. I'll go for a wander.

0:14:020:14:04

Thanks, John.

0:14:040:14:06

'This could spell disaster for Charles. He's in a room full of furniture,

0:14:060:14:11

'but can he resist?'

0:14:110:14:13

A tenner. I mean, this is a tenner and it's a lovely luggage stand.

0:14:130:14:18

It's Victorian and if it could talk, what could it tell you?

0:14:180:14:22

'Oh, really, Charles. There's no telling you, old fruit.'

0:14:220:14:27

The fact is I've been told in Birkenhead, in no uncertain terms, by James, the auctioneer,

0:14:270:14:32

"Don't buy furniture."

0:14:320:14:35

So, maybe you wave it goodbye.

0:14:350:14:37

So long.

0:14:370:14:39

'By Jove, I think he's got it at last.'

0:14:390:14:41

That's a very nice, unframed oil on canvas.

0:14:420:14:46

-True.

-A portrait of a gentleman with his telescope,

0:14:460:14:52

with a sailing vessel in the background.

0:14:530:14:56

How much would that be, if I asked you a price?

0:14:560:14:59

-£75.

-God.

0:14:590:15:01

OK, I'll give it some thought.

0:15:020:15:04

'With his nemesis Christina in the lead, Charles has a fight on his hands

0:15:060:15:11

'and spots the perfect piece to take into battle.'

0:15:110:15:15

Maybe if I turned up to reveal my wares, wearing this,...

0:15:150:15:20

..she might take note of me.

0:15:210:15:23

'Oh, yeah? This replica 15thC suit of armour

0:15:230:15:28

'would have been made in the early 20thC

0:15:280:15:30

'for educational or theatrical purposes.'

0:15:300:15:33

'Crikey. Is Charles arming himself for war? He looks the part.'

0:15:330:15:37

Christina, I'm ready for Birkenhead.

0:15:370:15:40

'Or perhaps pistols at dawn.'

0:15:410:15:43

This is the time of William the Fourth, it's George the Fourth.

0:15:430:15:47

It's a duelling type pistol.

0:15:470:15:50

And, um, it's 180 years old.

0:15:500:15:53

And you can see that because this handle is just about to fall off.

0:15:530:15:58

But in a... Oops! It has fallen off, actually.

0:15:580:16:00

-'Silly boy!'

-Oh, dear me. That's just great, isn't it?

0:16:000:16:05

Might have to buy it now, regardless.

0:16:060:16:08

It is pretty tired, but I like it as it's in its original condition.

0:16:080:16:12

It would never... It could never be fired now and it's purely a relic.

0:16:120:16:17

And it could be cheap.

0:16:170:16:20

And that's it, really. It could be cheap.

0:16:200:16:23

-'He's gone

-gun-ho

-in this place, with three items in his sights.'

0:16:230:16:27

'The canvas, circa 1820,

0:16:270:16:29

'the coaching pistol and the armour

0:16:290:16:32

'all belong to John's son Wayne.'

0:16:320:16:34

'Can our Carlos cut a deal over the phone with our John... Wayne's son.'

0:16:340:16:39

Wayne, it's Charles Hanson. If you don't make an offer, you never know.

0:16:390:16:44

And I've got £167.20.

0:16:440:16:46

There's no way you could do me a deal for all three, is there?

0:16:460:16:50

Wayne wants you. I'm hoping son and fatherly love can do me a deal.

0:16:500:16:55

-You better win, he said.

-Huh?

-You'd better win.

0:16:560:17:00

-Is that a deal?

-It's a deal, yeah.

0:17:000:17:02

'It's victory for chancer Charles.'

0:17:020:17:04

-I've got 167 and 20 pence.

-Yes.

0:17:040:17:08

Could you leave me a pound? Make you 166.20?

0:17:080:17:13

I've got to go into Cheshire tomorrow with a pound.

0:17:130:17:16

'Now, that's pushing it.'

0:17:160:17:18

I'll pay you my entire budget for a pound change.

0:17:180:17:21

-OK.

-Going...

-Going...

-Going.

-Gone.

-Sold!

0:17:210:17:24

Thanks, John. Come 'ere, John. Thanks, John!

0:17:240:17:26

'It's enough to melt a heart of steel, this.'

0:17:260:17:30

'But wait, there's more.'

0:17:300:17:32

-Crikey. These aren't part of the armour, John?

-Yes.

0:17:320:17:35

Are they part of the suit of armour?

0:17:350:17:37

-They are.

-They came with the collection?

0:17:370:17:40

-They did, yes.

-Really? Well, that's a bonus.

0:17:400:17:43

As you say, en garde!

0:17:430:17:45

Oh, my goodness.

0:17:450:17:47

Hey, John, that's bigger than mine.

0:17:480:17:51

'Boys will be boys.'

0:17:510:17:53

'I think you'd best be off.'

0:17:530:17:55

'Having reached the end of day one, it's time to wind down and recharge,

0:17:570:18:01

'ready for more antique antics tomorrow.'

0:18:010:18:04

'Night, night, you two.'

0:18:040:18:06

'It's a new day and a new opportunity to brag about yesterday's purchases.'

0:18:080:18:14

-I had an amazing day yesterday.

-Have you spent everything?

-I barely slept. I was so excited.

0:18:150:18:21

Sun's shining. It's going to be a good day today.

0:18:210:18:24

'Gosh, they're chipper this morning.'

0:18:240:18:26

'Yesterday, Christina parted with £85 and bought three items -

0:18:260:18:30

'..the swivel artist's chair,

0:18:320:18:34

'a silver napkin ring,

0:18:340:18:36

'along with her collection of silver-plated wares

0:18:360:18:40

'and a pair of industrial downlighters.'

0:18:400:18:42

'Which means she has £118.50 to spend today.'

0:18:420:18:47

'Charles, meanwhile, has spent £171.20 on four lots -

0:18:490:18:54

'the gnome he's called Chris,

0:18:540:18:57

'an oil painting,

0:18:570:18:59

'the 15thC-style suit of armour,

0:18:590:19:03

'and the early 19thC coaching pistol,

0:19:030:19:06

'leaving him with one lonely pound to see him through the day.'

0:19:060:19:10

'First destination of the day is the market town of Knutsford.'

0:19:110:19:15

'Recorded in the Doomsday Book of 1086,

0:19:170:19:20

'Knutsford is perhaps best known

0:19:200:19:23

'as the home of 19thC Cranford novelist, Elizabeth Gaskell.'

0:19:230:19:28

-Bye.

-Bye.

0:19:350:19:36

With Christina heading to the shops, Charles heads back in time,

0:19:370:19:41

'at nearby Tatton Park, a beautifully preserved mansion,

0:19:410:19:45

'set within 1,000 acres of parkland'

0:19:450:19:49

'Perhaps its most intriguing former resident was the highly educated,

0:19:500:19:55

'very talented, some might say It girl of her generation,

0:19:550:19:59

'Elizabeth Egerton.'

0:19:590:20:02

-Good morning. How are you?

-I'm fine, thank you.

0:20:030:20:06

Good to see you. I'm hoping you might be Elizabeth.

0:20:060:20:08

No, I'm Caroline Schofield, House and Collections Manager at Tatton.

0:20:080:20:12

I'm here, not to learn about the house itself but more about a young lady called... Elizabeth?

0:20:120:20:18

-That's right.

-And her husband, who was...

-Wilbraham.

-Tell me more.

0:20:180:20:21

Elizabeth and Wilbraham lived at Tatton Park in the early 19thC,

0:20:210:20:26

and when they came here, the house was partly redeveloped.

0:20:260:20:31

Wilbraham had inherited it from his father William.

0:20:310:20:34

So they completed the house as it is today.

0:20:340:20:37

They really were an It and fashionable couple,

0:20:370:20:40

who were leading taste at Tatton in that late 18th century.

0:20:400:20:44

Elizabeth was educated in London,

0:20:440:20:46

so she was very knowledgeable and cultured,

0:20:460:20:49

but the house they developed was very much a family home.

0:20:490:20:53

They went on to have eight children together

0:20:530:20:55

and lived here very happily I think.

0:20:550:20:59

She sounds quite a catch. What a great catch.

0:20:590:21:03

'Elizabeth and her husband not only completed the house,

0:21:030:21:07

'but also furnished it in the latest style

0:21:070:21:10

'and built up the estate's impressive collection of literature'

0:21:100:21:14

Here's a little treat.

0:21:150:21:17

-This is a first-edition copy of Pride And Prejudice,...

-Oh, God.

0:21:170:21:21

..which is signed Elizabeth Egerton

0:21:210:21:24

and, um, was bought for her to read, here at Tatton.

0:21:240:21:29

-And this is a first edition from the year...

-1813.

0:21:290:21:33

It is a pleasure to just see some of her writings.

0:21:330:21:36

"Come Darcy" said he, "I must have you dance."

0:21:360:21:40

"I hate to see you standing about by yourself in this stupid manner. You had much better dance."

0:21:400:21:46

I like to dance. I like music as well.

0:21:460:21:48

'First a reading and now he's after a dance.'

0:21:490:21:52

"Well, there's only one place for it, Charles."

0:21:520:21:55

So this is the music room. And here you've got a manuscript book.

0:21:550:22:01

Elizabeth kept... had a number of manuscript books bound,

0:22:010:22:05

where she has copied down music,

0:22:050:22:09

probably from pieces that friends may have had,

0:22:090:22:13

or that family members may have had.

0:22:130:22:16

And they're sharing pieces of music between them,

0:22:160:22:18

and copying the notation down, so they can play the music themselves.

0:22:180:22:23

So she's obviously quite an accomplished singer and pianoforte or keyboard player.

0:22:230:22:29

Seeing how this setting sits - this wonderful room with two big doors,

0:22:290:22:33

this is the music room and through there could've been an area

0:22:330:22:37

where you could have a little dance.

0:22:370:22:39

'Ha! Oh, do behave, Charles.'

0:22:390:22:42

So, if I go next door, you tickle the ivories,

0:22:420:22:44

and I'll have a little dance.

0:22:440:22:47

'With Charles dancing the afternoon away with his Elizabeth,

0:22:500:22:54

'Christina's having a ball all of her own.'

0:22:540:22:58

'What fun.'

0:22:590:23:01

'Her first shop of the day is on the smallest street in Cheshire

0:23:010:23:05

'and is the aptly named Knutsford Antiques Centre.'

0:23:050:23:09

'With three floors to explore, can this jewellery expert find a hidden diamond in the rough?'

0:23:090:23:15

My daughter would love that. Decoy duck. Fantastic.

0:23:170:23:21

'The duck may fall foul of her affections,

0:23:210:23:25

'but soon her cup runneth over.'

0:23:250:23:27

Oh, that's lovely. It's Charlie, look, Charlie dancing.

0:23:290:23:33

That's got to be Charlie, hasn't it?

0:23:330:23:35

'As well as Charles getting his groove on,

0:23:360:23:39

'this 19thC Staffordshire polychrome mug is decorated with couples dancing a jig.'

0:23:390:23:45

'Ticket price, £35.'

0:23:460:23:48

There's a little crack there which would be a bit of a concern.

0:23:490:23:53

'A cracking piece indeed.'

0:23:530:23:55

It's never going to make me a fortune, but it's a great print.

0:23:560:23:59

You can really sense that you're in the middle of the dance,

0:23:590:24:03

that enthusiasm and vibrance...

0:24:030:24:05

They're having a great time, aren't they? Proper shindig there.

0:24:050:24:09

I like that very much.

0:24:090:24:11

'If you're buying that mug, best seek out manager Gordon.'

0:24:120:24:17

-These little chappies caught my eye.

-Yeah.

-I thought they were fun.

0:24:170:24:21

-Now, Gordon,...

-Yeah?

-Bearing in mind it's cracked,...

0:24:210:24:25

'Oh, I see what she did there.'

0:24:250:24:27

What's your thoughts on...? It's marked up at £35.

0:24:270:24:31

'Here she goes.'

0:24:310:24:32

I need to be able to make a profit on it at auction

0:24:320:24:36

and at auction, I can see it fetching about 20 quid.

0:24:360:24:40

-So what d'you want to pay for it?

-10.

-No way. No way, I'm sorry.

0:24:410:24:46

-'Don't take him for a mug.'

-What's your absolute best price?

0:24:460:24:50

-About 30.

-30? Can you come down any more?

0:24:500:24:53

-Perhaps 28. That's your limit.

-Is absolutely that it?

-Yeah.

0:24:530:24:57

-What about 25?

-I couldn't take that much off.

0:24:570:25:00

-Go on.

-Cash, then.

-Cash? Oh, yes, of course.

0:25:000:25:03

-All right, I'll do it for 25.

-You're a legend. Thank you very much, sir.

0:25:040:25:08

'She's good at this bargaining lark'

0:25:080:25:11

'Now, with four lots, she's catching up with Charles and hitting the road.'

0:25:110:25:18

'But this time, our delightful duo are heading to nearby Congleton.'

0:25:180:25:22

BOTH SING # Take your heart away

0:25:230:25:25

# And play the game together... #

0:25:250:25:28

'Don't give up the day jobs, you two.'

0:25:280:25:31

'Sitting at the foothills of the Pennines,

0:25:310:25:33

'surrounded by beautiful countryside,

0:25:330:25:36

'this is a popular, historic market town.'

0:25:360:25:39

'Clutching his last pound, Charles is dropped off...

0:25:390:25:42

-Bye.

-Bye.

0:25:420:25:44

'..to fend for himself, at the Victoria Mill Arts Centre.'

0:25:440:25:48

It's a really nice antiques centre. There's so much stuff here.

0:25:500:25:53

But I've only got a pound.

0:25:530:25:56

That's £3, but it's really awful.

0:25:580:26:02

Sounds better - 100 pence.

0:26:030:26:05

It's not a pound. 100 pence.

0:26:050:26:08

'Hm! What a cunning bit of PR, eh?'

0:26:080:26:10

'But will it be enough to convince store owner Geoff?'

0:26:100:26:15

-That's quite nice.

-It is nice.

0:26:150:26:17

It's garish. To some people, it's unsightly.

0:26:170:26:20

But it catches the age, doesn't it?

0:26:210:26:24

'This stylish Art Deco vase is circa 1930.'

0:26:240:26:27

'Problem is, it's also circa £15.'

0:26:270:26:29

-That's 1,500 pence, isn't it?

-That's £15.

-£15.

0:26:320:26:36

-To you, Charles, it's a tenner.

-£10, yeah, well, we're close.

0:26:360:26:40

No blemishes. No chips.

0:26:400:26:43

It's 1,000 pence.

0:26:430:26:45

And I love it.

0:26:450:26:47

Somewhere in my pocket, I've got that.

0:26:470:26:50

And that is my entire budget gone.

0:26:500:26:53

But it's priced at £15 and all I have is that.

0:26:530:26:57

One solid pound.

0:26:570:27:00

And it's in good condition.

0:27:000:27:02

Would you, sir, actually take one pound for it?

0:27:020:27:05

Normally, no, of course. But this is exceptional, so I will.

0:27:050:27:09

You're happy for me to have that vase for a pound? Really?

0:27:090:27:13

It's a no-brainer. I'm going to flip you the pound, shake your hand.

0:27:170:27:21

-Here's that pound, up it goes, that's yours.

-Thank you.

0:27:210:27:25

-That's mine.

-Pleasure.

-And I'm absolutely overjoyed.

0:27:250:27:29

'Thrilling, eh? It has "great deal" written all over it. But just to be sure,...'

0:27:290:27:34

I'm going to wander round the stalls, just find out what they think of my vase for a pound.

0:27:340:27:40

Just see how much of a bargain it really is.

0:27:400:27:43

-How are you?

-I'm fine, thank you. That's mine.

-Is it?

0:27:430:27:46

-Do you like my vase, by the way?

-I love it.

-Do you really?

0:27:460:27:49

-Do you like my vase, by the way?

-I do.

0:27:490:27:51

-Why do you like it?

-Just the Art Deco style.

0:27:510:27:54

What's it worth at auction?

0:27:540:27:56

-40 quid, 45.

-£40. Thanks, mate.

0:27:560:27:59

-Maybe 40.

-Did you hear that? £40. I can't go wrong.

0:27:590:28:02

-£40?

-Fantastic. You're my friend as well.

0:28:020:28:06

£40 all day long. Thanks, mate.

0:28:060:28:08

-Or I'll eat my hat.

-Or he'll eat his hat. Thank you.

0:28:080:28:11

'With Charles now penniless, it's over to Christina.'

0:28:110:28:15

'And she's making her way from Congleton to Wheelock.'

0:28:150:28:19

Ah, Wheelock. Here we are.

0:28:190:28:22

'We know that, Christina. Named after the river Wheelock,

0:28:220:28:25

'this little village is surrounded by countryside.'

0:28:250:28:28

'Can Christina up her game and charm Richard, in Hidden Treasures,

0:28:280:28:33

'into giving her a bargain?'

0:28:330:28:35

Hi. I'm Christina. Nice to meet you.

0:28:360:28:38

What have we got that's a bit fresh, that will make me a fortune,

0:28:390:28:44

that I can beat Charlie Hanson with? Come on! Hit me with it.

0:28:440:28:47

'Careful, Christina. There's a brick in there.'

0:28:470:28:50

Hey, what's the brick?

0:28:500:28:52

Er, that's a... the Royal Wedding of Charles and Diana.

0:28:520:28:56

It's one of a run of bricks

0:28:560:28:59

that was used for a prison that they actually laid the foundations for.

0:28:590:29:04

A Royal Wedding prison brick!

0:29:070:29:10

-How much is on that?

-Er, £22.

0:29:100:29:13

I think that might be a little bit risky.

0:29:130:29:16

'The brick's no building block for profit.'

0:29:160:29:18

'But can Christina see money in this early 20thC till?'

0:29:180:29:22

'Ticket price, £25.'

0:29:220:29:24

This is quite a sophisticated one.

0:29:250:29:27

The ones I've seen before haven't got a till roll with them.

0:29:270:29:31

You would've just had your cashier's drawer.

0:29:310:29:33

And it's still got the workings in the top of it as well.

0:29:330:29:37

So I'm quite pleased. I think it's quite fun.

0:29:370:29:40

-'She likes it!'

-As it's my first road trip,...

0:29:400:29:43

'Can Richard resist her persuasive charms?'

0:29:430:29:46

-£25 sounds like an awful lot of money.

-Does it? Oh.

0:29:460:29:49

Go on, what's your best price?

0:29:500:29:53

-20.

-For a newbie? Any less?

0:29:530:29:56

-I'll do it for 15.

-Will you?

-Yeah.

-£15.

0:29:560:30:00

-I quite like that. Go on, you've got yourself a deal.

-Great.

-Brilliant.

0:30:010:30:05

'Ker-ching! A deal at £15. for the pine till.'

0:30:050:30:09

'Right, Christina, are we off?'

0:30:090:30:11

I think I've fallen in love with a brick!

0:30:120:30:15

'You've done what?'

0:30:150:30:17

No, I can't buy a brick. That's stupid.

0:30:170:30:20

Five pounds and it's yours.

0:30:200:30:22

A pound. I'll give you a pound for the brick. I'll do it for a pound.

0:30:230:30:27

It's such a risk. I'm going to lose money on it.

0:30:270:30:30

-Since it's your first series, go on, then.

-Really?

-I'll do a pound.

0:30:300:30:33

I can't believe I've just bought a brick!

0:30:330:30:36

'She's only gone and bought a brick'

0:30:360:30:38

Thanks very much. Oh, God. I'm never going to live this down.

0:30:380:30:42

'Let's hope she's laying some foundations for a decent profit with that purchase!'

0:30:440:30:50

'With everyone shopped out, Christina joins Charles in Congleton,

0:30:500:30:54

'to get a measure of the competition.'

0:30:540:30:58

So, first and foremost, Christina, I'm playing catch-up.

0:30:580:31:01

I might just catch you with this lot.

0:31:010:31:04

Oh! Ooh!

0:31:040:31:07

-What is that?

-He's called Chris.

-He's your mate Chris.

0:31:080:31:11

-He's my mate Chris, OK?

-What's he holding?

0:31:110:31:14

I meant to put a couple of flowers in there for you but I forgot.

0:31:140:31:18

Over here is my great man, who is looking out to sea,

0:31:180:31:22

seeing the clipper ship and holding his telescope.

0:31:220:31:25

He was in the shop for many years. I bought him for £40.

0:31:250:31:29

Well done.

0:31:290:31:30

Oh, my goodness! Oh, wow!

0:31:300:31:33

My friend here, Christofel, is ready for battle.

0:31:330:31:36

He's awes... Oh, very jealous. He's awesome!

0:31:360:31:40

-Isn't he amazing?

-And his sword and everything.

0:31:400:31:43

Finally, a real knight in shining armour. I want him!

0:31:430:31:46

OK, thanks. Did you hear that?

0:31:480:31:50

It's a replica sword, it's blunt,

0:31:500:31:52

and importantly, being a replica, it's part of the whole attire.

0:31:520:31:57

-It's an educational aid and they belonged together when they were made originally.

-It's brilliant.

0:31:570:32:02

He's wonderful, isn't he? He cost me £116.20.

0:32:020:32:07

-Really? I'm nervous.

-Well, I told you. I'm back.

0:32:070:32:11

'Charles has amassed a strong arsenal. Can Christina follow suit?'

0:32:110:32:16

Oh, my goodness. The auctioneer was very upbeat about silver plate.

0:32:170:32:21

You've got a lovely array of pierced, cast silver plate.

0:32:210:32:26

Yeah. And...

0:32:260:32:28

-Silver.

-A napkin ring. Is it silver?

-Yeah, it is.

-Wow. That's heavy.

0:32:280:32:33

That's lovely quality. Look at me. I reckon that little lot cost you...

0:32:330:32:38

-..£32.

-Hm. Well, 20.

-Oh, that's cheap. That's really cheap.

0:32:390:32:42

-I thought, especially with that napkin ring.

-Alone.

0:32:420:32:45

-Now, you've bought a brick.

-'That's what I said.'

0:32:450:32:49

-It's a very special brick.

-OK, let me guess. Coronation Street?

0:32:490:32:54

No, it's a Royal Wedding 1981 - year I was born, very special year -

0:32:540:32:59

Charles and Diana, C and D, brick.

0:32:590:33:01

I would say that brick probably cost you... £20?

0:33:010:33:04

-Oh, close.

-How much?

-A pound.

-Oh, it didn't?

0:33:040:33:07

-One pound?

-And my pound lots do well.

0:33:070:33:10

-So I have high hopes for my brick.

-You're good at the pound lots.

0:33:100:33:14

-My career is ended. I bought a brick.

-Well done.

0:33:140:33:17

-At the moment, Charlie, I'm bricking it.

-Oh!

0:33:170:33:20

'Should she be so worried, Charles?'

0:33:200:33:22

'You're an old hand at this lark. Come on, be brave.'

0:33:220:33:25

Christina's bought some really steady items

0:33:250:33:28

and Christina is my steady Eddy.

0:33:280:33:30

I'm convinced, with her £1 brick and other items, she'll make profits

0:33:300:33:34

But I'm not in to just be steady.

0:33:340:33:37

I'm in to really impress Christina and go all out

0:33:370:33:39

or to say to Christina "At least I tried."

0:33:390:33:42

I'm surprised at how mediocre Charlie's stuff was.

0:33:420:33:46

I thought he'd go a bit whacky. And then...

0:33:460:33:48

he revealed his literally knight in shining armour,

0:33:480:33:51

which I think will absolutely annihilate me.

0:33:510:33:54

He'll trip off into the sunset with a huge profit after that knight in shining armour. I'm very jealous.

0:33:540:34:00

If I were a gambling man, I'd say "Hanson, you're odds-on favourite

0:34:000:34:05

"to take the auction and take the mantle of being in the lead."

0:34:050:34:08

'Well, there's only one way to find out,

0:34:080:34:11

'so onwards and upwards to the auction in Birkenhead.'

0:34:110:34:14

If you saw me, dressed in the saleroom in that suit of armour,

0:34:160:34:21

what would you think that body is worth?

0:34:210:34:24

I would think it's got to be better than how you're dressed currently.

0:34:240:34:28

Oh, thanks(!)

0:34:280:34:30

'The town of Birkenhead runs along the bank of the river Mersey

0:34:300:34:34

'and has boasted a ferry service for over 800 years,

0:34:340:34:37

'when Benedictine monks would have gone back and forth to Liverpool,

0:34:370:34:41

'..rowing.'

0:34:410:34:43

-Good luck, partner.

-Good luck.

-Auction number two.

0:34:430:34:46

Auction number two. Let's go.

0:34:460:34:48

'Our daring duo are going into battle in today's general sale at Kruger Gibbon.'

0:34:480:34:54

'They both got advice at the start,

0:34:540:34:56

'so what does auctioneer James Gibbon think now?'

0:34:560:35:00

'Have they bought good lots or not?'

0:35:000:35:02

'Look at his tash.'

0:35:020:35:04

I think the gnome has to be my favourite lot.

0:35:050:35:08

It's silly and quirky. They're fun. And very British.

0:35:080:35:12

I think some of the things will fly and some of them are going to die.

0:35:120:35:16

But that's part of the game, that's the fun,

0:35:160:35:19

and let's face it, the buyers will decide today.

0:35:190:35:22

'Christina started this leg in the lead with £203.50.'

0:35:220:35:27

'She splashed out £126 on five lots

0:35:270:35:31

'and still has £77.50 in cash.'

0:35:310:35:34

'Just like last time, Charles has spent his entire £172.20 budget

0:35:350:35:40

'and has come armed with five lots.'

0:35:400:35:43

'Over to the first of today's two auctioneers -

0:35:430:35:46

'moustachioed James Gibbon.'

0:35:460:35:48

'Let battle commence!'

0:35:480:35:50

'First up is Christina, but will it be treasure or travesty?'

0:35:520:35:56

I'll start at 10. £10? 10 I have.

0:35:560:35:58

12 I have. 14.

0:35:590:36:02

-16.

-My heart.

0:36:020:36:04

-16, new bidder at the back.

-Come on!

0:36:040:36:07

-18. The lady's back in.

-1,800 pence.

0:36:070:36:10

-20 by the door.

-Good price.

0:36:100:36:12

She's back again. 22.

0:36:120:36:14

-It's a rollercoaster.

-'Ow!'

0:36:170:36:20

'More of a travesty, actually, as that £2 profit will be wiped out

0:36:200:36:24

'after auction-house costs.'

0:36:240:36:26

'Another one now for Christina, the 19thC Staffordshire mug.'

0:36:270:36:32

-'Can auctioneer Adrian Kruger help

-jig

-her into a profit?

0:36:320:36:35

Start me on this, please, at £15.

0:36:350:36:38

-Come on!

-10 to start, thank you.

0:36:380:36:40

-You've got 1,000 pence.

-12 I have.

0:36:400:36:43

14 I have. 16. 18.

0:36:430:36:46

-20.

-Ooh!

-22.

0:36:460:36:48

20 I have. £20 it is.

0:36:480:36:50

Breaking even.

0:36:500:36:52

-Well done.

-Darling, I paid £25 for it.

0:36:520:36:55

-Did you? I thought it was 20.

-'Oh, do pay attention, Charles.'

0:36:550:36:59

'It's going downhill for our girl with her second loss of the day.'

0:36:590:37:04

'Can Charles do any better? He's certainly all fired up.'

0:37:040:37:08

-£10 I have.

-Come on.

-I have 12.

0:37:080:37:10

14.

0:37:100:37:12

16. 18. 20.

0:37:120:37:14

-22.

-Excellent.

-24. 28.30.

0:37:140:37:17

32. 34.

0:37:170:37:19

-36. 38.

-Buy history and you live the dream.

0:37:190:37:22

-Do they realise the handle's falling off?

-Shh!

-44.

0:37:220:37:25

-£44 I have.

-Well done, Charles. Brilliant.

0:37:250:37:29

I'm selling at 44.

0:37:290:37:31

-Thank you very much.

-How much did you give for it?

-A tenner.

0:37:310:37:35

-Oh, well, very good.

-Thanks, mate.

0:37:350:37:37

'Even he's impressed. And with that, Charles is off!'

0:37:390:37:42

'Can trusted friend Chris do any better for him?'

0:37:440:37:47

Start me off at £10 on the gnome.

0:37:470:37:49

Tenner. Thank you. A lady with class and distinction. 12, thank you.

0:37:490:37:54

12. Are we going 14? 14.

0:37:540:37:57

16.

0:37:570:37:58

18. 20.

0:37:590:38:01

-They're all over each other.

-Like a rash.

-22.

0:38:010:38:05

24. 26.

0:38:050:38:07

-Keep going, Chris.

-28.

0:38:070:38:10

30.

0:38:100:38:11

32. £32.

0:38:110:38:14

I'm selling at 32.

0:38:140:38:16

-Sold to you, madam.

-Well done, you.

0:38:160:38:18

-'£27 profit there, Charles. Now, that's

-gnome

-joke!'

0:38:180:38:22

'Back to Christina. She's trying to build up profits, brick by brick.'

0:38:240:38:28

Who'll start me on this one at £10?

0:38:280:38:31

-Come on.

-Five to start, thank you.

-I'll take it at five.

0:38:310:38:35

-Six I have.

-How could you do that?

-Seven I have. Eight pounds.

0:38:350:38:39

Nine pounds. 10.

0:38:390:38:41

-£11 I have. 12?

-Deal.

-£12 I have to the lady on my left.

0:38:410:38:46

All finished, then, at 12.

0:38:460:38:48

'Who'd have guessed that, eh? Profit at last.'

0:38:480:38:51

'And from an old brick, no less.'

0:38:510:38:53

'Now for Charles's £1 offering - the Art Deco vase.'

0:38:540:38:58

Very, very stylish. Lovely piece.

0:38:580:39:00

-Why didn't they do this with my last piece?

-I'll start the bid at £10.

0:39:000:39:04

£10 I have. 12 I have. 14 I have.

0:39:040:39:06

16. 16 I have with the gentleman in the middle.

0:39:060:39:09

16 I have. Do I see 18? 18 I have.

0:39:090:39:12

-20? 20. It's selling at 20.

-Man!

-22 I have.

0:39:130:39:17

All finished, then, at £22.

0:39:180:39:21

'I say, Charles, that's a flowery profit.'

0:39:220:39:25

'Christina's combined her swivel chair and pine till,

0:39:260:39:30

'hoping it'll make her a pretty packet.'

0:39:300:39:33

And I'm straight in with a commission bid at £30.

0:39:330:39:37

-Yes!

-You've done it.

0:39:370:39:40

-32.

-Yeah!

-I'm going to go 34.

0:39:400:39:43

36 I'm at. It's in the room at £36.

0:39:430:39:46

I'm selling at 36. Are we all done?

0:39:470:39:50

36, ladies and gentlemen.

0:39:500:39:52

'So close, but her profit will again be eaten up by costs.'

0:39:520:39:56

'Can Charles do any better with his maritime canvas? Anchors aweigh!'

0:39:590:40:03

A lot of interest in this on commission.

0:40:030:40:06

'Commission bids, eh? This could get interesting.'

0:40:060:40:09

I can go 30, 35, 40, 50, 60...

0:40:090:40:13

-Here we go.

-70, 80,...

-Hanson, you're rolling.

-90, 100,...

0:40:130:40:18

-'I say, it's flying.'

-140. £160 I have.

0:40:180:40:22

-Oh, Hanson!

-£160 I have.

-Oh, my God.

0:40:220:40:25

Are we all gone at £160?

0:40:250:40:28

Looks like we are.

0:40:290:40:31

£120 profit.

0:40:310:40:33

-I'm just going to go home now.

-Put it there.

0:40:330:40:36

'So childish. So that's plain sailing into hefty profits, Charles'

0:40:380:40:41

'Full steam ahead, old boy.'

0:40:410:40:44

'Christina's got one lot left.'

0:40:450:40:47

'But can they light up her life?'

0:40:470:40:50

-I have commission bids on these.

-Oh!

0:40:500:40:52

I can start them with me at 50, 52, 55, 60.

0:40:520:40:56

-65, 70, 75, 80...

-Well done.

0:40:570:41:01

85, £90 I have on commission.

0:41:010:41:04

Brilliant.

0:41:040:41:06

£90 I have on commission. All done at £95 on commission?

0:41:060:41:10

-Ah, thank you, darling.

-No, well done.

0:41:110:41:14

'It's good, but with Charles already in the lead and with one lot to go,

0:41:140:41:18

'looks like she's lost this battle.'

0:41:180:41:20

'So, is Charles charging towards victory?

0:41:200:41:25

Commission bids again I have on this. I can start it 100, 110,...

0:41:250:41:30

-Great, we're off.

-See? Perfect.

0:41:300:41:33

120 I have. 125. I go 130.

0:41:330:41:36

135 and it's in the room.

0:41:360:41:38

-140 I have.

-Keep going.

-150 I have.

0:41:380:41:41

160, 170, 180, 190.

0:41:420:41:46

-Brilliant.

-200.

-Oh, God.

0:41:460:41:49

-Come on!

-Are we all finished and done at 220?

0:41:490:41:53

-We are.

-Well done, Charlie. APPLAUSE

0:41:530:41:55

Thank you!

0:41:550:41:57

Thank you. Thank you very much!

0:41:570:41:59

'Soak up that applause, Charles. You deserve it.'

0:41:590:42:03

'And with that, the new girl loses her lead.'

0:42:030:42:05

'Christina Trevanion started this leg with £203.50.'

0:42:090:42:13

'After auction costs, she's made a profit of £25.70,

0:42:130:42:18

'which makes her total for the next round £229.20.'

0:42:180:42:22

'But with everything to prove, Charles Hanson began with a reduced £172.20,

0:42:270:42:33

'and has made a magnificent profit of £219.76 after costs.'

0:42:330:42:40

'This gives him a head start with a whopping £391.96 to spend next time'

0:42:400:42:46

-I really can't believe it.

-No, quite seriously, I can't either.

0:42:490:42:53

-And now you drive me home, don't you?

-No, you can drive.

-Why?

0:42:530:42:56

-Because I'll let you.

-Really? Are you sure?

-Just this once.

-Great.

0:42:560:43:00

The day gets better and better and better. Honestly.

0:43:000:43:04

'On the next leg of the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:050:43:09

'Christina proves she's got to grips with life on the road.'

0:43:090:43:13

Oh, my goodness.

0:43:130:43:15

'And Charles runs into an old friend.'

0:43:150:43:17

This man is almost a lookalike of Charlie Ross.

0:43:170:43:21

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd.

0:43:400:43:42