Episode 3 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 3

Charles Hanson and Christina Trevanion start their day shopping in Liverpool, before heading through Wigan, Preston and ending up at auction in Lytham St Annes in Lancashire.


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'It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each,

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'a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.'

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-Going, going, gone!

-I've fallen in love with a brick!

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'The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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'There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.'

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I feel antiqued out!

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'Will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?'

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-GEARS CRUNCH

-Charlie!

-Sorry!

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'This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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'Yeah!

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'This week, we're with the dashing duo of the antiques world.

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'Auctioneer, antiques expert and all-round good guy Charles Hanson

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'had a shaky start...'

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I don't believe it! You conquered me today!

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'..but has fought hard to take back the lead.'

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LAUGHTER Thank you very much.

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'Hot on his heels is jewellery expert Christina Trevanion. She may be a Road Tip rookie...'

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-As it's my first Road Trip...!

-HE LAUGHS

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'..but she's got one thing on her mind.'

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-I NEED a bargain!

-Need a bargain!

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'And she's going to great lengths to get what she wants.'

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-That's it. The gloves are off, baby!

-LAUGHS

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'Charles started with £200

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'and after two trips to auction has made some impressive profits,

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'giving him £391.96p to spend today.

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'Also kicking off with £200,

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'Christina's seen a steady return on her purchases,

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'clocking up a respectable budget of £229.20p.'

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I thrive when I'm under pressure, and I do feel under pressure.

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Just impress me, just swank around, OK?

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When I see you at the next reveal,

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impress me, OK, because you have so far.

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'Their worthy steed for the journey

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'is this beautifully preserved 1969 Morris Minor.'

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Sorry.

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-CHRISTINA LAUGHS

-What happened?

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'Yet another car suffers at the hands of Hanson!'

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My knob's come off. Sorry. CHRISTINA LAUGHS

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-Do you want me to screw it back on?

-Could you screw my knob on, please?

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'Oh, try to behave, Charles!

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'The route for the week takes our intrepid road trippers

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'from Whaley Bridge in Derbyshire over peak and dale

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'to their final destination of Cobridge in Staffordshire,

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'covering approximately 600 miles.

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'On this part of the journey,

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'they'll kick off their shopping in Liverpool and work their way up

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'to the auction in Lytham St Annes in Lancashire.'

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-Oh, my goodness! Liverpool!

-Look at the horizon over there.

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It just captures an industrial age, doesn't it?

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'And as they skirt around the Wirral coast en route to the big city,

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'Christina's full of facts.'

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When the banana first came to England it was through Liverpool.

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-Really?

-Yeah.

-Are you serious?

-Yeah. What date do you think?

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I'm going to say, look at me...

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the first banana came into the UK via Liverpool in about 1684.

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No, Charlie.

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-OK. Hold on. 1720.

-No.

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-Hold on. 1715.

-Colder.

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-What year?

-1884 - the year of your birth.

-That late?

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-You've been doing homework?

-Yeah. I have.

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'Every day's a school day, eh, Charles?

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'Liverpool's wealth was in part due

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'to the city handling 40% of the world's trade

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'by the early 19th century.

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'Can our duo cash in on this rich heritage?'

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-I think Liverpool has so much to offer and to offer us as well.

-Yeah.

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There is a wealth of material.

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The sun's coming out. We're prospering. The day's good.

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'They're off to a great start(!)'

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-The car's running off.

-Is it? Sorry! Handbrake!

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'Or maybe not.'

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-Might not be here when we get back.

-It's my tactics, OK?

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-See you later.

-Bye.

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'With no sign of putting the brakes on,

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'Charles is starting in pole position.

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'Can his first shop of the trip and owner Trevor help him stay there?'

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-I'll go for a walk around. I'm on thrill chase today.

-Good.

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-To keep myself in the lead.

-Well, bright and optimistic is good.

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I'll be back in a second.

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I'm trying to impress Christina.

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A man is always underdressed without a waistcoat.

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'Quite the gentleman, isn't he?'

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That could be Christina on this cigarette card.

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'Cheeky boy!'

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It's a wonderful shop! There's everything here.

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'But is there anything you like, Charles?'

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What I quite like is down here.

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It's marked Ruskin.

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What has caught my eye is it's priced at...

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WHISPERING: ..£55!

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And that's really cheap. The problem is, it says "cracked".

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If it wasn't cracked, it could be worth £300 or £400.

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'Well, Charles, that's quite a find.'

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-Trevor?

-Yeah.

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-I couldn't look in your cabinet?

-You're welcome.

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I just noticed on this shelf down here a nice Ruskin bowl.

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Yes, it has a crack in it.

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-Has a crack.

-It's incredibly thin.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

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-You're circa 1920, aren't you, with this?

-I'm sure.

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It's Ruskin copying the great Chinese master potters

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in their flambe and other glazes.

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Trevor, what's your best price on that?

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-Charles...

-Trevor.

-..you're a nice guy.

-Yes, mate!

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-You don't give any nasty pressure.

-No.

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-£30.

-Trevor, you say 30. I'm always one to come back.

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I think one's got to negotiate and make a counter offer.

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-Would you take £25?

-I would, Charles.

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-Would you really, Trevor?

-Yes.

-Because it's just got to go?

-No.

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-Because it's as sunny as you are!

-'Ha ha! He's a jolly fellow!'

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I'm really excited.

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What Trevor doesn't realise

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is that on the bottom it's dated 1917.

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It's also not cracked. Um...

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And I think it's really nice. I think it's worth £100.

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Hanson! Off and running!

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'Well, Charles, that might make you a pretty packet at auction.

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'Christina's got some serious catching up to do.'

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And there's 40.

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-Thanks very much, Trevor. Good to see you again.

-Good luck.

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'Her first shop was the stables

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'which served one of the first train stations in the world.

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'With so much history packed in, she'll have to work hard

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'to find the right piece for profit in this place.'

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It's so frustrating not being able to get at anything.

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I'm looking for one thing, possibly one or two things,

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which are going to make me big money.

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"Needle" and "haystack"... springs to mind.

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It'll be fine.

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'This labyrinth of antiques is putting our girl in a bit of a spin.'

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How do you get into anything?

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-I just want to tidy it all up!

-LAUGHS

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'With so much choice, Christina's turning to the auction house for divine inspiration.'

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So we're looking for jewellery and silver, ceramics and Chinese?

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Bye, bye.

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It's very much "smalls".

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In that case, furniture's out.

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-BREATHES IN

-No pressure(!)

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'Armed with that advice, there'll be no more horsing about.'

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It looks almost Picasso in inspiration, doesn't it?

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It's quite lovely. I like that.

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Quite a nice shape, very displayable.

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The kind of thing my granny would have loved and is coming back into vogue.

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'Christina's first find is an Italian art pottery jug.

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'Now she's on a roll.'

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So, these would have been carpet bowls,

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or ARE carpet bowls.

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You would have played your carpet bowls inside as a game.

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Like you play crown green balls now.

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You really want to make sure that they've got no chips to the glaze.

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These haven't, as far as I can see. They're nice decorative things.

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Together, they make quite a nice little display.

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'They're marked up at £6 each.

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'At last, she's bowled over,

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'but can she strike a deal with owner Paul?'

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Paul, what's your thoughts on...

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..a jug and some carpet bowls?

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-£20 the lot.

-That sounds like quite a lot of money.

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-That's cheap.

-No?

-I had hours of fun with them bowls.

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'Oh, he's a lot of fun.'

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I was thinking more like a tenner.

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-We're in 2013.

-I know.

-The war's over!

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-I'll take 15 quid for them.

-I'm still at a tenner.

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-Go on.

-They're cheap at 15.

-A tenner? I need the head start!

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-Split the difference at 12?

-Yeah. Go on.

-Yeah? Do me at 12?

-Yeah.

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Brilliant. You're a star. Thank you very much.

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'She knows how to get what she wants.

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'With deal at £12, it's time to hit the road once more

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'and make the short journey towards Prescot.

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'Sitting on the edge of town is our next stop, Knowsley Hall,

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'a 2,500-acre estate.

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'And all this beautiful countryside is inspiring our eager experts

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'to stage an impromptu rescue attempt.'

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Come on!

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Christina? LAMB BLEATING

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-Come on.

-Shoo him back here. I'll catch him.

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Oh, no!

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-Hey!

-There you go.

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'What a hero he is!

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'Now, hurry along, Charles, cos Christina has an important date.'

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-Gateway to heaven!

-Yeah, indeed!

-Who are you seeing here?

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I am ditching you for the delightful Earl of Derby.

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I can't compete with this guy!

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-I know.

-It's in my dreams, Christina!

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Absolutely beautiful.

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-Have fun shopping.

-Thanks(!) Ditch me! Enjoy yourself. See you later.

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-Go carefully. Bye.

-Bye.

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'The current resident of Knowsley Hall

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'is the 19th Earl of Derby.

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'His family's history is closely connected to the history of Britain

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'and includes a Prime Minister, a champion of William Shakespeare

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'and close ties to the royal family stretching back to Richard III.

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'Despite all that, it's the family's passion for horse racing

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'that's arguably been their biggest contribution to British life.

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'They created their namesake, the Derby,

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'the best-known horse race in the world.'

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GALLOPING HOOVES

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-You must be Lord Derby.

-Hi there.

-Thank you so much for having us.

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Your house is absolutely stunning.

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It helps that you've come on a sunny day. We haven't had so much of those of late.

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I'm very proud to be part of a long lineage here.

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The family have lived here for 600 years.

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-There's obviously been a link with horses.

-A huge link with horses.

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Going way, way back, pre-Civil War.

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Here at Knowsley in the park, there was a racecourse.

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-This is the park of this house?

-This is the park.

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That tower which was a lookout for the racecourse is still there.

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Very, very long races, they had in those days.

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It shows that that family link with racing goes on a long way.

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'It was the 12th Earl of Derby who started the Epsom Oaks in 1779,

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'and then the Derby a year later,

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'marking the beginning of the sport as we know it today.'

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The naming of the Derby was at a dinner party at Epsom,

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and a toss of a coin between Sir Charles Bunbury and Lord Derby.

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Derby won the toss, but Diomed, Sir Charles Bunbury's horse,

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-won the first running of the race.

-That's very diplomatic!

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It took another nine years till Derby could win it.

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'The family have had great success across the generations,

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'right up to today, with Lord Derby's own champion horse,

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'Ouija Board.

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'And of course, their name has gone beyond horse racing

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'and has spread into other sporting events.'

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It has flourished into all these wonderful international events!

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It's spread out into all these international events.

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We've gone beyond racing. We've got donkey derby and demolition derby.

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And football thinks it owns this expression of the local derby,

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with Man U, Man City - here, it's Liverpool and Everton.

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In fact, we believe the origin of that expression, the local derby,

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comes from rugby league, a very popular sport round here,

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mainly played in the north of England.

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That, we believe, is where the original expression came from.

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What a sporting legacy to uphold!

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Quite a sporting legacy! Quite a family history!

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I'm very proud to be part of such an illustrious and long family history.

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-Thank you for sharing it with us.

-Great pleasure.

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'With Christina otherwise engaged,

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'Charles is trotting round the countryside....

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'..en route to Wigan in Greater Manchester,

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'one of the first towns in the country to feature a railway.

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'George Orwell also brought fame to the town

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'with The Road To Wigan Pier,

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'largely concerned with England's working poor.

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'Today, the area is the centre of a large regeneration project.

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'Can our Charles turn rags to riches at his next stop, JW Antiques?

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'Go for it, Charles.

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'He's certainly keeping his eyes peeled for a bargain!'

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I'm short-sighted.

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'Looking good, Charles!'

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No, it's not very good.

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When it comes to afternoon tea, you take a seat.

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"How are you, darling?" "How are you?"

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'Oh, Charles! First, it's an imaginary friend.

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'Now a tea party on the floor!'

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We've got some chips on the rims over there.

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We've got a nice set of three milk to cream jugs and a small jug.

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A condiment jar and cover for jam

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and that lovely condiment set - just gorgeous and so complete.

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'This Art Deco tea and coffee set dates from the 1930s

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'and has a price tag of £80

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'for the lot.

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'What's he up to now?

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'He's picking up items by the bucket-load, with the help of John.'

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The reason I quite like this bucket is because clearly it has some age.

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It's quite rustic. It's coopered.

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Which is this iron or... Yeah, it is, cast-iron binding.

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I think it's pine, isn't it?

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That's just quite a nice bucket.

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If I said to you, John, what sort of value on this bucket,

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what would you tell me?

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To a poor man from Derbyshire, John, looking to earn a buck at auction.

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'Let the man think, Charles!'

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-45.

-OK.

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-I'll give it some thought.

-No problem.

-He's saying...

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That man over there is saying how much?

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-< £25! £25. Do you know him?

-Yeah.

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-Oh, I know him.

-Good man. I'll give it some thought!

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'Oh, boss Will says £25.

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'There's no stopping you, Charles. He's spotted another piece.'

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I like this. This is of Newcastle, Newcastle on Tyne.

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They're flowering out in a great Deco style.

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It's called the crocus pattern. It's not in bad condition.

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Bit of wear and tear.

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'Charles is adding this crocus pattern pottery bowl

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'to the items on his wish list,

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'featuring the 18th-century peat bucket and the coffee and tea set.

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'Right, boys. Prepare yourselves. Hanson's ready to deal.'

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-I think you said the best on the bucket was 20.

-Yeah.

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'Actually, Charles, it was 25, but who's counting?'

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-OK. What's the best on the bowl?

-That is the best.

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-20?

-Yeah.

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What's the best price, John, on that big coffee set?

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I would value that at between 50 and 80 at auction.

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I want to buy it for about £40, but you've got your margins.

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If you want it for 50, you can have it. You'll make money on it.

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Yeah. It's tempting.

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If I said to you I'm going to buy the peat bucket for 20, 20 for that,

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and rather than paying 50 for that big set...

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..would you accept 40? You would?

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Thank you, John. I'll take the whole lot.

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'Chancer Charles wins again and walks away with the coffee and tea set for £40,

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'the pottery bowl for £20 and the bucket also for £20.

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'Bargains all round!

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'And joining Christina once more,

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'they bid farewell to another day of antique adventures.

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'So night-night, you two.

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'It's a brand new day - and new personas, apparently.'

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I'm Bonnie Prince Charlie, you're Lady Godiva.

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-Hang on a second!

-BOTH LAUGH

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-She didn't have any clothes on.

-Oh, yeah!

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'That's a thought.

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'Yesterday, Charles spent £105 and bought four items -

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'the Ruskin stoneware bowl dated 1917,

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'the Art Deco tea and coffee set, circa 1930,

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'the crocus pattern pottery bowl

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'and the late 18th century pine peat bucket.

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'Which still leaves him with a hefty budget of £286.96p

0:19:200:19:25

'to spend today.

0:19:250:19:27

'Christina, though, only parted with £12 and bought two items -

0:19:290:19:33

'the Chinese porcelain carpet bowls

0:19:330:19:37

'and the Italian art pottery jug,

0:19:370:19:39

'giving her £217.20p to see her to the end of the day.

0:19:390:19:45

'And their first stop is the Lancastrian city of Preston.

0:19:460:19:51

'Although it wears the crown of being England's newest city,

0:19:550:19:59

'Preston is steeped in history,

0:19:590:20:01

'with evidence of an Ancient Roman presence.'

0:20:010:20:04

-Adieu, Christine.

-Go conquer.

0:20:040:20:06

Morning has broken. Give me a song.

0:20:060:20:08

-Morning has broken.

-See you later. Just get on with your visit!

0:20:080:20:12

'As Christina heads off to the shops,

0:20:170:20:19

'Charles is in for an altogether more sensory experience.

0:20:190:20:23

'He's come to the impressive Harris Museum and Art Gallery

0:20:260:20:29

'for an appointment with the country's largest collection of scent bottles.

0:20:290:20:34

'Collected by a Mrs French in the 19th and 20th centuries

0:20:340:20:39

'and bequeathed to the museum through a mutual friend

0:20:390:20:43

'after her death in 1963.

0:20:430:20:45

'Incredibly, there are almost 3,000 items!

0:20:450:20:49

'Each known well by museum head of arts and heritage Alex Walker.'

0:20:510:20:56

-Good morning.

-Good morning.

-You must be Alex.

-I am, yes.

0:21:000:21:04

SNIFFS I can smell something.

0:21:040:21:06

-'Stop it, Charles!'

-You smell very nice!

0:21:060:21:08

I'm here to learn about Mrs French and her scent bottle collection.

0:21:080:21:14

We know that sadly she was a widow, but she did have a son.

0:21:140:21:18

Unfortunately, he was killed during the Second World War.

0:21:180:21:21

It seems to be after that that she really began to collect more.

0:21:210:21:26

'Mrs French's unique collection of bottles

0:21:280:21:30

'are renowned with collectors who flock from around the world

0:21:300:21:34

'to witness this "scent-sational" glimpse into the past.'

0:21:340:21:38

When you say scent bottle,

0:21:400:21:42

obviously I wear my smells and I'm sure you wear your...

0:21:420:21:47

-Do you like it?

-Oh, yes.

-Thank you! I could come here again!

0:21:470:21:50

Tell me, back in the 18th century,

0:21:500:21:53

the English scent bottle, what was its primary role?

0:21:530:21:56

We're used today to scent being a sort of luxury product,

0:21:560:22:01

very often associated with a couturier,

0:22:010:22:04

and the scent bottles themselves are part of the branding of the scent.

0:22:040:22:09

But not so much in the past.

0:22:090:22:12

You had your individual scent bottle filled by a chemist, a perfumer,

0:22:120:22:17

who would make up a recipe and decant it into your bottle.

0:22:170:22:22

'Our love of scent goes back to Egyptian times,

0:22:240:22:27

'but scent bottles have come a long way since then.

0:22:270:22:31

'Although most of Mrs French's bottles are Victorian,

0:22:310:22:34

'she collected some from as far back as the 1700s.'

0:22:340:22:38

The interesting thing about this

0:22:410:22:43

is the little mirrored patch box set in the side.

0:22:430:22:47

Of course, Alex, if you're off for a night out in 1780,

0:22:470:22:51

you can put your scent on, then check yourself out.

0:22:510:22:54

There's no warts. LAUGHS

0:22:540:22:56

I can see no smallpox, no scars.

0:22:560:22:59

I don't know!

0:22:590:23:01

'He sure does know how to charm a lady(!)

0:23:020:23:05

'Mrs French displayed many of her bottles in her home in Kent.

0:23:050:23:09

'One that stands out for its technical complexity

0:23:090:23:13

'was made by the glassmaker Thomas Webb in the early 1880s.'

0:23:130:23:17

The most remarkable thing is the very beautiful carved feathers.

0:23:180:23:22

It's really odd, isn't it? It's a duck's head, is it?

0:23:220:23:26

-Yes...

-Or a swan's head?

0:23:260:23:29

-I'm not very good on birds.

-I'm not, either, when it comes to birds.

0:23:290:23:34

What is so remarkable, in my opinion,

0:23:340:23:37

is this was Victorian novelty - I mean, that is so novel!

0:23:370:23:41

There was a period towards the end of the 19th century

0:23:410:23:45

when scent bottles became a medium

0:23:450:23:48

for producing novelty decorative objects.

0:23:480:23:51

-We have this one in the shape of opera glasses.

-I see.

0:23:510:23:57

-Just novelty items.

-Like that, but both lids would support scents.

0:23:570:24:02

I've got £300.

0:24:020:24:05

You've got 2,700.

0:24:050:24:08

Any in that price bracket... for sale?

0:24:080:24:11

-Don't ask.

-OK. That's a no, is it?

-That's a no.

0:24:110:24:15

Long may Mrs French's collection continue living in Preston.

0:24:150:24:19

'Charles's attempt at a deal may not have come up smelling of roses.

0:24:190:24:24

'Perhaps Christina will have more luck,

0:24:280:24:30

'as she's been making her way to the small village of Bretherton.

0:24:300:24:35

'With a recorded history going back over 800 years,

0:24:390:24:42

'perhaps Bretherton's biggest claim to fame is its association

0:24:420:24:46

'with the father of British astronomy, Jeremiah Horrocks.

0:24:460:24:50

'The perfect place for Christina to reach for the stars

0:24:520:24:55

'and steal back the lead.'

0:24:550:24:58

-Hello!

-Hello, Christina. It's lovely to see you.

0:24:580:25:02

-What's your name?

-Aiden.

-Nice to meet you, Aiden.

0:25:020:25:05

-Thank you so much for having us.

-You're welcome.

-How exciting.

0:25:050:25:09

I wonder what we can tempt you with. We want you to make a profit.

0:25:090:25:13

Oh, thank you! Well, I need to at the moment. I'm trailing.

0:25:130:25:17

-That's no good.

-I know!

-You won't trail when you've been here, darling!

0:25:170:25:21

'Ah, excellent, Christina, a partner in crime, eh?'

0:25:210:25:25

-Jewellery here.

-And silver there, brilliant.

0:25:250:25:28

I'm not an expert on jewellery.

0:25:280:25:30

'Well, Aiden, luckily our girl is, so move aside.'

0:25:300:25:33

That's nice, that little pepper.

0:25:330:25:36

'This Edwardian silver pepperette has caught Christina's eye.'

0:25:360:25:41

Nice Birmingham hallmark.

0:25:410:25:43

I can see it's got a blue glass liner, which really helps.

0:25:430:25:47

-And it's got some original pepper!

-LAUGHS

0:25:470:25:50

-It just screams Art Nouveau, doesn't it?

-Yeah.

0:25:500:25:53

-So...

-What's it got on it?

-You've got £80 on that.

-£80?

0:25:530:25:57

-You like a bargain, don't you?

-I NEED a bargain.

0:25:570:26:01

You need a bargain!

0:26:010:26:03

How's 40?

0:26:030:26:05

'Half price? He's trying hard, Christina.'

0:26:050:26:08

-That's a big drop.

-Wow! That is a big drop! Incredibly kind.

0:26:080:26:11

-We want you to make a profit.

-Thank you.

0:26:110:26:14

'Huh! Team Christina all the way!'

0:26:140:26:17

-Oh, that's nice.

-They are nice, those.

0:26:170:26:20

Chester as well. Those are lovely.

0:26:200:26:23

Great you've got the original box and there's still six.

0:26:230:26:26

-You've got a good eye, haven't you?

-I try! Not so far! I'm losing!

0:26:260:26:30

You're picking nice pieces.

0:26:300:26:33

'The case of six Edwardian silver buttons dates from 1903

0:26:340:26:38

'and are priced at £125.'

0:26:380:26:41

I would look at those and I would say 80 to 120 at auction.

0:26:420:26:46

-Right.

-Can you do something like 75...?

-Oooh!

0:26:460:26:51

I know you're pretty! It's that smile you've got, isn't it?

0:26:510:26:55

Good job not all my customers have got smiles or I'd be broke!

0:26:550:26:59

CHRISTINA LAUGHS Go on, then. We want you to win.

0:26:590:27:02

-Brilliant. Can we do it at 75?

-75.

0:27:020:27:04

I don't know how much money I've got. I'm spending too much money!

0:27:040:27:08

-You've run out.

-I think I might have done!

0:27:080:27:10

'Relax, Christina. There's still £102.20p in your kitty.

0:27:100:27:15

'So, can Aiden tempt you with yet more goodies?'

0:27:150:27:19

I should be looking at this!

0:27:190:27:22

Everything that I'm buying for £1 makes me most profit.

0:27:220:27:26

-It's ridiculous.

-How about that for a bargain?

0:27:260:27:29

Oh, he's cute. Dogs.

0:27:290:27:32

-Yeah, good subject.

-We're a nation of animal lovers.

0:27:320:27:35

It's got to be the right price, though. It's not silver.

0:27:350:27:39

Going off that, you can't lose at £1, can you?

0:27:390:27:42

£1? Are you serious? Aiden, it's a deal. Thank you.

0:27:420:27:45

-It's only cos you're smiling!

-Brilliant, thank you.

0:27:450:27:49

-I'm a sucker for a smile.

-I'll take it.

-You're welcome.

0:27:490:27:52

'A silver-plated dog for a £1 note?

0:27:540:27:57

'You'd have to be barking mad to say no, Christina.

0:27:570:28:00

'Added to the buttons and the pepperette,

0:28:000:28:03

'she's walking away with a silver haul.'

0:28:030:28:05

Shall we call it 115?

0:28:050:28:08

-How much is it?

-116.

-Go on, then!

0:28:080:28:11

'She's done it again!'

0:28:110:28:13

Thank you very much. Ah! What a gentleman!

0:28:130:28:16

'And a kiss to seal the deal.

0:28:160:28:19

'Back on the road, Charles is also turning on the charm.'

0:28:220:28:25

-You've got the X factor!

-Don't be daft!

-You have! Those eyelashes!

0:28:250:28:29

-If I've got the X factor, what have you got?

-It's a good question.

0:28:290:28:33

-You have natural talent.

-Thank you very much. You can come again.

0:28:330:28:38

'Don't encourage him, Christina.

0:28:380:28:41

'They're making the short journey to the village of Eccleston,

0:28:420:28:45

'home to Olympic gold cyclist extraordinaire, Sir Bradley Wiggins.

0:28:450:28:51

'And two old weaving mills -

0:28:550:28:57

'one converted into an Aladdin's cave of antiques and collectables.'

0:28:570:29:02

It's called Bygone Times.

0:29:020:29:05

-It says, "Begone with you!"

-"Buy me then be gone?"

-Exactly. Find the bargains!

0:29:050:29:09

-'He's in a hurry!'

-Let's get shopping.

0:29:090:29:12

-Which way are you going?

-That way.

-OK. See you later.

0:29:120:29:16

Good luck.

0:29:160:29:18

'And they're off, scouring their final shop of the day.'

0:29:190:29:24

This basket here. Ah!

0:29:240:29:27

This man is almost a lookalike for Charlie Ross!

0:29:270:29:30

Charlie, would you mind? Thanks, mate. You're a good man.

0:29:300:29:34

'How rude!'

0:29:340:29:36

WOLF WHISTLE

0:29:360:29:39

LAUGHING

0:29:390:29:40

He's going to get so lost! Think I ought to give him a map?

0:29:420:29:45

'Not a bad idea, girl.

0:29:450:29:48

'With the clock ticking, Charles is feeling the pressure.'

0:29:500:29:55

-Any bargains in there?

-I don't know.

0:29:560:29:58

I feel antiqued out! It's just huge.

0:30:000:30:03

'After an hour of searching,

0:30:030:30:05

'Charles makes a last mad dash for a final purchase

0:30:050:30:09

'across the road.'

0:30:090:30:12

Ah, hello.

0:30:120:30:14

-Sir, Charles Hanson. Your name is?

-Darren.

-Hi, Darren.

0:30:140:30:18

-Are you English?

-Yes.

-OK, fine. Sorry.

0:30:180:30:21

-Can I wander round?

-Course you can.

-I'm going to be really quick.

0:30:210:30:25

'Already armed with five lots, Christina decides to ditch shopping

0:30:280:30:32

'for an altogether more relaxing experience.'

0:30:320:30:35

Enjoy this sunshine!

0:30:350:30:37

'Time's running out, Charles.'

0:30:400:30:42

I'm struggling here.

0:30:420:30:44

-There's a nice little wall stand that I bought this morning.

-Oh, yes?

0:30:440:30:48

-From over the road.

-I love the chandelier. How much is that?

0:30:480:30:52

-1,200.

-OK. I'll leave it.

0:30:520:30:55

-There you go, Charles.

-That's quite nice, actually.

0:30:550:30:58

'Has he finally found his last lot in this late Victorian wall rack?'

0:30:580:31:03

What I love about this is the turning.

0:31:050:31:09

Are they walnut?

0:31:090:31:12

-I think they are, yeah.

-Walnut and ebonised on mahogany shelf tiers.

0:31:120:31:17

-It is, what, 1880?

-Yeah.

0:31:170:31:20

1870. And you'll tell me, Charles, it's how much?

0:31:200:31:24

45 to you.

0:31:240:31:26

-You wouldn't take 30 for it?

-No.

0:31:260:31:28

-In cash.

-No.

-Darren look at me.

-No, it's got to be £40.

-For me?

0:31:280:31:33

-No less?

-Yeah. £40. I think you'll get a profit out of it.

0:31:330:31:37

I'll take it. Go on. Sold.

0:31:380:31:40

That's my fifth item.

0:31:400:31:42

I'm happy. Good man.

0:31:440:31:46

'At last, he's walking away with the wall rack,

0:31:470:31:51

'but will Christina think it's worth the wait?

0:31:510:31:54

'Time to bare all, Charles. Well, almost.'

0:31:540:31:57

-Are you ready?

-Yeah. I'm ready, baby.

-Be kind.

0:31:580:32:02

OK, close your eyes.

0:32:020:32:04

One, two, three. Voila!

0:32:040:32:06

Oooh!

0:32:070:32:09

-That's nice.

-There's one more down there.

0:32:090:32:13

-Is there?

-Yeah, yeah.

-This is very nice.

0:32:130:32:15

It's got style. They're pansies. What's it worth?

0:32:150:32:19

-Violas.

-Are you serious?

-That's the pattern name!

-Oh, is it?

0:32:190:32:23

-Viola.

-Is that a flower?

-They're a type of pansy, I think.

0:32:230:32:27

-I'm not a floral guy.

-You've bought for the sale that we're going to.

0:32:270:32:32

-Like the bowl?

-I do. Is that Ruskin?

0:32:320:32:34

-Have a look.

-It's very thin for Ruskin.

0:32:340:32:37

It is very thin and high-fired, almost a Chinese flambe.

0:32:370:32:43

-Wonderful iridescent colours.

-It's in good condition. What's it worth?

0:32:430:32:48

-What's it worth?

-Yeah.

-35, 40 quid?

0:32:480:32:50

-What did you pay for it?

-£55.

0:32:500:32:53

-No, £25.

-Did you?

-Yeah.

-Perfect.

-Thank you.

-Well done.

0:32:530:32:57

I'm pleased. I haven't gone to town on the spending.

0:32:570:33:00

-God willing, Christina!

-You've played it safe?

0:33:000:33:04

'But how do things stack up against his rival's riveting items?'

0:33:040:33:08

Oh, oh...

0:33:090:33:11

What draws me in straight away, Christina, I must admit,

0:33:110:33:15

are the buttons.

0:33:150:33:17

-I'm sure you'll tell me they're Birmingham or Chester.

-Chester.

0:33:170:33:20

Let me guess a date. They look to be about 1904.

0:33:200:33:23

-Ooh, 1903.

-They're very nice.

-One out.

-You know how it is.

0:33:230:33:28

'He's good!'

0:33:280:33:29

-They're pierced in that great formal organic style.

-What's the best bit?

0:33:290:33:33

-They come with their box and they're complete!

-Yeah!

0:33:330:33:37

I reckon you spent on those buttons... Look at me. ..£70.

0:33:370:33:41

-Oh. 75.

-Oh, they're good. They're very nice.

0:33:410:33:44

-Like your dog!

-Do you?

0:33:440:33:46

I quite like your dog. Tell me about him.

0:33:460:33:49

-He is... Well, what do you think?

-He's not silver, is he?

0:33:490:33:53

Is he silver? Not silver. Is he silver?

0:33:530:33:55

-Is he silver!

-He is silver plate.

0:33:550:33:58

-OK. Nation of animal lovers.

-£15.

-Do you know what?

0:33:580:34:03

What's the most money that we've been making on our items?

0:34:030:34:07

If you dared told me he was 100 pence...

0:34:070:34:10

I'll go berserk!

0:34:100:34:12

-How much?

-£1.

-No, he wasn't? Goodness me, Christina!

0:34:120:34:15

You have done it again! Would you swap with me?

0:34:150:34:19

Exactly. You're pausing because you wouldn't.

0:34:200:34:23

-Put it there. I'll see you in Lytham St Annes.

-Take care.

0:34:230:34:27

I'll try to!

0:34:270:34:29

'She wouldn't say it to his face,

0:34:320:34:34

'but come on Christina, tell us what you really think - amongst us.'

0:34:340:34:38

I have to be honest, I think he's bought some pretty things...

0:34:380:34:42

..but I don't think there's anything that's going to make a fortune.

0:34:430:34:47

The bucket's nice. Market-fresh, great.

0:34:470:34:51

But it's a bucket, isn't it?

0:34:510:34:53

I'm really excited.

0:34:530:34:55

Yes, I would swap some of my items for hers,

0:34:560:34:59

but I'm still very content to sit pretty.

0:34:590:35:01

Christina, watch, girl - and learn.

0:35:010:35:04

'Ooh! That's fighting talk, Charles.

0:35:040:35:07

'It doesn't look like it's letting up on the road, either.'

0:35:070:35:10

-Would you like me to...

-Get off my hair!

-I'm trying to protect you from the rain!

0:35:100:35:17

'They're heading to auction

0:35:180:35:20

'in the seaside resort of Lytham St Annes near Blackpool.

0:35:200:35:23

'Consisting of neighbours, the 19th-century planned town of St Annes

0:35:250:35:29

'and its older counterpart Lytham,

0:35:290:35:32

'this area has been a popular holiday destination since Victorian times.'

0:35:320:35:38

Christina, I'd love to say to you, "It's lovely being by the seaside."

0:35:380:35:43

CHRISTINA LAUGHS But it's not, is it, really?

0:35:430:35:45

-It's blowing a gale!

-It would be beautiful if the sun was shining.

0:35:450:35:50

-But we're in Britain.

-Yeah.

0:35:500:35:52

'Today, they're going to Gerrards auctioneers and valuers.

0:35:540:35:58

'While Christina gets a measure of the competition,

0:35:580:36:01

'Charles has dreams of hitting the ocean waves.

0:36:010:36:05

'But what of their own offerings?

0:36:050:36:07

'Does auctioneer Jonathan Cook think they'll sink or swim?'

0:36:070:36:12

Some of them, I think, will do well. Others might struggle a bit.

0:36:140:36:18

The peat bucket would appeal to a lot of dealers on the internet.

0:36:180:36:23

Lots of dog lovers out there. They're going to want it.

0:36:230:36:27

Looks like their dog they've got at home.

0:36:270:36:30

Sure it'll do well.

0:36:300:36:32

'Charles started this leg in the lead with £391.96p.

0:36:340:36:40

'He's parted with £145 and is offering up five lots.

0:36:400:36:44

'Christina began with £229.20p

0:36:450:36:48

'and has also bought five items, at a cost of £127.

0:36:480:36:54

'Today's auction is in the room, over the phone and online,

0:36:580:37:01

'so take it away, Jonathan.

0:37:010:37:04

'First up is Christina and her silver-plated dog.'

0:37:050:37:09

£20 on the net. Any advance on 20?

0:37:090:37:11

-£20!

-Where'd that come from?

0:37:110:37:14

Any advance on 20 in the room? 22 on the net.

0:37:140:37:17

24. 26.

0:37:170:37:19

-Well done. I don't believe this.

-All finished at £28...?

0:37:190:37:23

-Brilliant!

-Yay!

0:37:250:37:27

'That profit will keep you out of the doghouse for a while, Christina.

0:37:270:37:32

'Can Charles also rack up a profit with his first lot of the day?'

0:37:330:37:38

Bids there at £28.

0:37:380:37:40

At 28. 30. £32? On the net at 32.

0:37:400:37:45

34. 36.

0:37:450:37:47

At £36 on the net. Any advance in the room? At £36...

0:37:470:37:52

'Do sit still, Charles.'

0:37:520:37:54

-..At 40, £40.

-Calm down!

0:37:540:37:56

42 on the phone! At £42, then. Sell away at 42...

0:37:560:38:02

'After all the time he took to find it,

0:38:030:38:06

'his £2 profit will be wiped out by auction house costs.

0:38:060:38:10

'Shame.

0:38:100:38:12

'Back to Christina.

0:38:130:38:15

'Will her horsey Italian jug see her galloping into profit?'

0:38:150:38:20

£10 on the net. £10 on the internet. Any advance in the room...?

0:38:200:38:24

-They don't like my jug.

-It's a profit.

0:38:240:38:27

-They don't like my jug.

-It's a profit, though, isn't it?

0:38:270:38:31

-You're warming up still.

-OK. I'd better warm up quickly.

0:38:310:38:35

'Indeed, Christina,

0:38:350:38:37

'as most of that small profit will be eaten up in costs.

0:38:370:38:41

'Charles again, now,

0:38:410:38:43

'with his late 18th-century pine peat bucket.'

0:38:430:38:46

£25. 26. At 26. 30.

0:38:460:38:50

-£30. Five. 40.

-Yay!

0:38:500:38:53

Five. 50. £50. Any advance on 50?

0:38:530:38:57

'There's a bucket-load of profit there for you, Charles. Well done.

0:38:580:39:03

'Can Christina follow suit with the Art Nouveau silver buttons?'

0:39:040:39:09

£28. £30. 32.

0:39:090:39:11

34. 36. 38. 40.

0:39:110:39:14

42. 44. 46.

0:39:140:39:16

£46 on the net. 48. 50.

0:39:160:39:19

Five. 60. Five.

0:39:190:39:22

At £65. Any advance in the room?

0:39:220:39:25

-Come on!

-£65.

0:39:250:39:27

'Ah! It's a blow, with a £10 loss.

0:39:290:39:32

'Staying with silver,

0:39:330:39:35

'can her pepperette sprinkle her with profit?'

0:39:350:39:38

Starting off at 28. 30. 32. 34. 36.

0:39:380:39:42

-Brilliant.

-At £36. 38. 40.

0:39:420:39:45

-You're in profit.

-At £40. 42. 44...

0:39:450:39:48

'A lot of interest here, Christina.'

0:39:480:39:50

..Five. 60. Five. 70. 75.

0:39:500:39:55

-80. Five.

-Oh!

0:39:550:39:58

One more! Go 88.

0:39:580:40:00

88?

0:40:000:40:01

£88. 90.

0:40:030:40:05

Thank you anyway, madam.

0:40:050:40:06

£90, are we all sure?

0:40:060:40:08

'£51 profit on the pepperette!

0:40:090:40:12

'That's not to be sneezed at! Ha!

0:40:120:40:15

'Over to Charles and his crocus pattern pottery bowl.'

0:40:150:40:20

-£10. Any advance on ten?

-A tenner!

0:40:200:40:22

-It's lovely, in perfect condition.

-£12. 14 on the net.

0:40:220:40:26

-Keep going.

-14. 16.

0:40:260:40:29

-18. 20.

-Oh, yes!

0:40:290:40:32

Sell away at 20...

0:40:320:40:34

-It's one of mine. Thanks.

-No-one would have guessed(!)

0:40:340:40:38

'It may be in perfect condition, but it's breaking even.

0:40:380:40:43

'No profits here, Charles.

0:40:430:40:45

'Next is Charles's tea and coffee set, circa 1930.'

0:40:460:40:50

£50 bid on the net. 55.

0:40:500:40:53

-Go on.

-60. Five.

0:40:530:40:55

-70. 75.

-Keep going, boy.

0:40:550:40:58

-£80 on the net.

-Keep going.

-It's going to sell. £80...

0:40:580:41:02

'Cor! He's doubled his money with that lot.

0:41:030:41:05

'Will Christina's carpet bowls help her roll into bigger profits?'

0:41:050:41:11

Tenner at the back. £10. Gent's bid at ten.

0:41:110:41:14

At £10. Any advance on ten?

0:41:140:41:16

12 on the net. 14.

0:41:160:41:18

No further interest.

0:41:180:41:20

-No interest at all...

-Get on with it!

0:41:200:41:23

-Are we all sure?

-Bring that gavel down!

0:41:230:41:25

'Another £9 in the bank, Christina.

0:41:260:41:30

'Last up is Charles, with his Ruskin stoneware bowl.

0:41:300:41:34

'Can he capitalise on its good condition?'

0:41:340:41:38

-Nice thing this.

-It IS a good thing.

-Start it off at £100.

0:41:380:41:42

110. 120...

0:41:430:41:45

Go on, boy! We're riding!

0:41:450:41:47

..140. 150.

0:41:470:41:50

-160.

-Keep going, boy.

-£170, all finished...?

0:41:500:41:54

'It's a cracker! £145 profit. Wow!'

0:41:560:42:01

-That was absolutely phenomenal.

-Can't believe it. Thank you.

0:42:010:42:06

'You are out of this world, Charles, with two auction wins in a row.

0:42:060:42:10

'Well done.

0:42:100:42:11

'Christina Trevanion started with £229.20p.

0:42:130:42:17

'After auction costs, she's made a profit of £42.74p,

0:42:170:42:22

'which makes her total for the next round...

0:42:220:42:25

'But, having started with £391.96p,

0:42:310:42:34

'Charles Hanson has made a hefty profit, of £151.84p after costs,

0:42:340:42:40

'increasing his lead and giving him £543.80p

0:42:400:42:45

'to flash on the next leg.'

0:42:450:42:47

-Shall I drive?

-Yes, why not?

0:42:490:42:51

You've made such a phenomenal profit. I'm slightly in shock still.

0:42:510:42:55

-I literally cannot believe it.

-I love Lytham!

-I bet you do.

0:42:550:43:00

Long live Lytham.

0:43:000:43:02

-Let's go. On to Leeds.

-Off we go.

0:43:020:43:05

HONKS HORN

0:43:050:43:07

-'Next on Antiques Road Trip...'

-Wheeee!

0:43:100:43:14

'..a knight in shining armour...'

0:43:140:43:16

I feel underdressed. I feel open to damage.

0:43:160:43:19

'..and a damsel in distress.'

0:43:190:43:22

-SCREAMING:

-I don't like spiders!

0:43:220:43:24

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:280:43:32

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:320:43:35