Episode 15 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 15

Antiques experts Will Axon and Mark Stacey begin the final leg of their journey in Gosfield, Essex. They travel through Finchingfield and St Albans, before finishing in Ruislip.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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Going, going, gone!

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Yes!

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How do I look?

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat!

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Yes!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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I'm going to become a bin man!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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I like it when you're chasing me!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's all to play for on this fifth and final leg of the Road Trip

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between our hardy antiques experts, Mark Stacey and Will Axon.

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-Let's go for broke!

-Shall we?

-We've got no option, really.

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Our intrepid duo have made a pact to spend every penny they have

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in the aim of being crowned this week's winner. Brave boys!

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Mark's a seasoned barterer and has used all his experience to get that cheeky smile back on his face.

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While Will's cabinet fever has taken a turn for the worse.

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The walls seem to be closing in on me.

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Having started the week on £200, Mark and Will will finally both begin a leg

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with more money than they started with.

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Mark is in a rich vein of form with stonking great wins in the last two auctions.

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He has £296 to start this final leg.

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While Will's snapping at his heels with £251.86 to spend.

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So, as they prepare to risk everything for victory,

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our antique experts ride into battle in their noble white steed,

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a classic 1963 Triumph TR4.

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This week's Road Trip is whisking us through no less than five counties.

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The boys started the week in Hastings, East Sussex,

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visiting Kent, Essex, Suffolk and Hertfordshire

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before their final auction in the London suburb of Ruislip.

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Today, we're kicking off in Gosfield in Essex

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before finishing at an auction showdown in Ruislip.

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-Oh!

-This looks like it, Mark.

-This is it.

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Hoping the rain doesn't put a dampener on things,

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the boys' first stop is at Gosfield Shopping Village.

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-Cabinet Room, that sounds like us.

-Or the war room!

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This huge shop is the perfect place for the boys to start their battle to blow their budget.

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Don't forget our agreement, Will! Remember...

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-I'm up for it. Are you up for it?

-Absolutely! My word!

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We're going to do it, right?

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I like this. This is a really nice ink standish or a desk stand, really.

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And they've got down here, "A rare Regency desk tray. 1810".

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And it says here enamelled and gilded,

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but, actually, it's meant to be Boulework.

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Boulework was named in honour of the pre-eminent artist in the field of marquetry, Andre Charles Boule.

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He perfected the fashion of inlaying brass and tortoiseshell in the 17th and 18th centuries.

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In order to trade tortoiseshell and ivory, it must predate 1947,

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although it's still not to everyone's taste.

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It is in a terrible condition.

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I mean, it's got a lot of the brasswork missing,

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and some of the silverwork on it, I think is actually later.

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With a starting price of £135, dealer Glenn is on hand to give Mark a closer look.

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-You certainly can.

-I've just fallen in love with it.

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I think it's a lovely piece.

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It looks as if it's had a hard life, though, Glenn.

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I'm going to be very cheeky, Glenn.

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What could be the lowest price on that?

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We could go to 50, I think, for that one.

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50? Oh, gosh! That's really a shock to me.

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Because that's the sort of figure I was hoping to get it for.

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-Will you put a reserved on that for me?

-Certainly.

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A whopping £85 off the asking price, eh? Nice work, Mark!

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Now, what's Will up to?

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Now, I know Staffordshire's not hugely fashionable at the moment, but they're a good subject.

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Two huntsmen...

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..one with his crossbow and his spaniel,

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and the other one holding up a deer.

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You're right! They're not in vogue these days,

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and at £75 you'd better ask Beta if she's amenable to a deal.

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ALARM SOUNDS

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Oh, crumbs!

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Wasn't me!

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-There's a lot of silver.

-A lot of silver!

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Well, now you know you can't get them for a steal, Will!

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I mean, my budget sort of leaves me at sort of £50, really, for the pair.

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-I was thinking about that price.

-Were you?

-Yeah.

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-Oh, dear!

-So, are we agreed?

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Ooh!

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Strike while the iron's hot, why not?

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But Will's playing it cool

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and has also put his item on reserve.

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It looks like the long game for these two boys.

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It's a little piece, a gentleman would have it on his desk or in his library for keeping matches

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or vestas.

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You keep them in here.

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But it's just a sweet little thing, because you've got a sort of Alpine walker here

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with his backpack there...

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and his walking cane.

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And this is like a barrel here.

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This item's also marked at £135.

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Are you going to aim low again, Mark?

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Do you think if I bought the two items that I could get that for £70?

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-70, plus the 50 for the...?

-Yes.

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120 in total.

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-I think we could do that.

-Can we do that?

-I think we can.

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-Well, let's shake hands on that, shall we?

-Thanks very much.

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Cor! You're on fire, Mark!

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But Will seems to have fallen into that old theme trap again.

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I might have fallen into a stag and deer theme,

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because, look, there's quite a stylish bronze stag at the back there.

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I mean, it's very much in that sort of Art Deco style.

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And having been reduced in price several times,

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it now has a ticket price of just £80.

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If I was going to be interested in it, it would have to be a sort of similar...similar figure

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to my last lot, sort of £50.

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Mmm...so £50 off?

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-Bearing in mind...

-It's already...you see?

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Well, that's because no-one else has bought it, so I'm doing him a favour.

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No alarm bells ringing for you, then, Will!

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-I think we can...

-Do you think we could do that?

-Yeah, yeah.

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-Do a favour.

-You see, this is very difficult for me,

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because as soon as you say, "Yes", I feel like I ought to say, "Deal!"

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But our cunning expert is looking to add one more item to his bundle,

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hoping he can knock more money off when it's time to pay.

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This caught my eye.

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They've got it down as a French ebony and ivory inlaid watch box,

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circa 1840, so we don't have to worry about the fact that it's got ivory in it.

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Mmm...pre-1947 ivory's not everyone's cup of tea,

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but, at £75, Beta is back again to talk shop.

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I know your price already!

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You do, don't you?

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Hey! I think we all do, Will! £50?

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-I might throw a cat among the pigeons and say 40 this time instead of 50!

-Oh!

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You will disappoint me!

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45.

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-Oh, go on, then! Well, I'll tell you what, put it with the other bits...

-Uh-huh.

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-..and I'll come up in a minute and we'll tot it all up and see where we're at.

-OK.

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That's £145 for the three items, Will,

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over half of your remaining budget.

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Now to negotiate a deal on the bundle.

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130?

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40?

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I'm going to be really mean and say 135.

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-135.

-It's a deal! Good!

-Deal.

-Lovely. Oh, lovely, lovely.

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Lovely jubbly! So, that works out at £45 for each. Well done, Will.

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But methinks your nemesis will be happier after that shop.

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Mark's taking control of the wheels after that shopping extravaganza and is heading to Suffolk,

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to the rather impressive surroundings of Kentwell Hall in Sudbury.

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But we're not here to admire this beautiful home, rather to hear of its salacious past,

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where infidelity began one man's road to ruin.

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And, you know, our Mark loves nothing more than a bit of scandal.

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Waiting to meet him is the Hall's present owner, the larger-than-life Patrick Phillips.

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-Strange things have happened...

-Really?

-..in this house over the centuries,

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-and it's one of the intriguing parts of living in a house like this...

-I bet!

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-..is picking up all these bits.

-It is!

-And the more scandalous they are, the more I like it.

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I love scandal. Shall we start?

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LAUGHTER Why not?

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Richard Moore's father originally inherited the house from his uncle, the Lord Mayor of London,

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Sir John Moore. When Richard wed Sydney Arabella Cotton in 1796,

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they made Kentwell their marital home.

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But it was a marriage not without its troubles,

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for within these walls lies a story of passion and intrigue.

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But why would we start the scandalous tour in the kitchen?

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Ah! Well, this is, of course, one of the places where the staff congregate,

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and they were peeking through this door, so we hear, or read,

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-and they could see the stairs at the end of the corridor.

-Oh, yes, of course!

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And the wife of the owner of the house, Mrs Moore,

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was seen ascending those stairs with the new young steward

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-with whom she'd spent many an evening going over the house accounts.

-Well, of course!

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He was checking the figures.

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Shall we move on?

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Patrick's bringing Mark into the library to tell us more.

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-We're getting into the thick of the tale.

-Are we?

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Now, tell me, tell me more, Patrick.

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When the staff saw Mrs Moore and the steward ascend by the backstairs together,

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-they knew something was afoot, because she would be expected to ascend by the main stairs.

-Yes.

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And so they all beetled across into here...

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and were listening for sounds above.

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And they report that they heard two lots of footsteps upstairs,

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and they heard the creaking of the bed...

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The next day, when the staff go up to the bedroom,

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they make close inspection of the bedding,

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the condition of which they report to their Lordships.

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I would love to be one the Lordships, wouldn't you?

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And it was in this great dining room that Sydney Arabella's scandalous shenanigans were finally exposed.

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Mr Moore and Mrs Moore were dining a deux in here.

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A butler was standing wherever butlers stand,

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and an altercation arose between Mr Moore and Mrs Moore,

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and Mrs Moore took the water carafe and poured it all over the head of Mr Moore.

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-In front of the butler?

-In front of the butler...

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and stormed out of the room.

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So, the butler used this incident to explain to Mr Moore

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that did he know that his wife had been doing more than the accounting with the steward?

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Anyway, Mrs Moore was immediately banished from the house by Mr Moore...

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"Get out of here, you..." whatever it was they said in those days.

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-So, there was no question? He took the word of the butler and out she went.

-And out she went.

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Well, we must assume she and her lover lived happily ever after.

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Ironically, it was the aggrieved Mr Moore's life which took a sorry turn.

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Through gambling debts, the money he had spent on the house and the divorce,

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his finances spiralled out of control.

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The house was sold, but, sadly, his debts were insurmountable and he was committed to a debtors' prison,

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where he died soon afterwards.

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-Well, that was a juicy little tale from the early 19th century.

-I hope it didn't shock you!

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I need to go and lie down and get over it.

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A juicy tale, indeed.

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So, while Mark's mopping his brow,

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Will's travelled east to Finchingfield in Essex,

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hoping he can add to his auction arsenal.

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Finchingfield, a picture-postcard village with its duck pond, village green and medieval cottages,

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was once home to the author of The Hundred And One Dalmatians, Dodie Smith.

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Will's arrived at Finchingfield Antiques and he's not wasting any time.

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With just over £100 left, you'll need to pick wisely.

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An 18th-century hand-blown bottle.

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With a good deep base.

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Obviously, the deeper the base, the more glass you've got to use,

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hence it's more expensive to make,

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which is why, when you get some very good early-vintage wines,

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they tend to have a very deep base to them.

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He's not had much luck with glass on this trip, but it doesn't seem to have put him off.

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Now, this I like, this little...

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..glass rummer...

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I mean, from the shape, it's going to be circa 1800, 1810.

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It's only £40, which seems reasonable.

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Time to get owner Peter involved.

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Right.

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There we are.

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I just wanted to check the... check the condition.

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Right, it's just got a little nibble here and there, but...

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PING!

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-Nice ring.

-Perfect.

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Perfect!

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Star-cut base, square foot...

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-Can you move a little on the price for me?

-What would you like me to move to?

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-20.

-20?

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I'll do you an absurdly ridiculous price...

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of 25.

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-25?

-Mmm.

-It's worth taking a punt at that, isn't it?

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-I think so.

-£25.

-Mmm.

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Will just can't help himself.

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He's going back to the wine bottle to try and match them up,

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but with no price on it, Peter's making a call to the dealer with an offer of a tenner.

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And it's good news!

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-Done.

-Nice one.

-It's all yours.

-That's all right, isn't it, for a tenner?

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-I think it's a nice thing.

-Yeah, it is, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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Sounds like you're trying to convince yourself there, Will.

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Are you going to leave it there or...? No. Aha, thought not.

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Another piece of glassware, is it?

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There's quite a nice cordial glass here as well

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which would sit quite nicely with my two lots so far.

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Trouble is it's had a repair and it's just got some nibbles on the base as well.

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With £39 on the ticket, Will has offered £25 for the glass and Peter's worked his magic again!

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-Is that a deal?

-It's a deal.

-Good work.

-You've done it.

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Well done.

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Nice going, Will. That's £60 for the group.

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It's the end of a busy day and time for our experts to have a well-earned rest.

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Nighty-night.

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It's a brand-new day for our treasure hunters

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as they wind through the country in search of their next adventure.

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-Are we shopping together again in the morning?

-I think so, yes.

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Oh, let's hope it's as big as yesterday's.

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Well, I hope so, otherwise it could be very push and shove!

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Are you sure this is the best road to be taking a classic Triumph down, boys?

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-Don't cramp me... Oh! Oh, God!

-I don't think we're going to find any antiques down here, Mark!

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Oh, I knew it! What have you done?

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Oh! Oh!

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-There's a ford! I'm not going through that in this.

-No, we're not going through there, no.

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Well, looks like it's the long road to success for you two now!

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These roads aren't built for these cars.

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So, as the boys try to find dry land,

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let's recap on what they've bought.

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Mark has spend £120 on two items,

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a Continental silver spill holder and an ink standish.

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That means he still has a mighty £176 left to spend.

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Will, on the other hand, has parted with £195 on a pair of Staffordshire figures,

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a bronze stag, an ebony and ivory watch box, and a collection of glassware,

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which still leaves him with £56.86 to spend on his last lot.

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The boys are heading over 50 miles south-west into Hertfordshire

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to resume shopping in St Albans.

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In Roman Britain, Verulamium was the second biggest city after Londinium,

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and was built very near the present city centre,

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and it's within the centre that the boys are looking for Fleetville Vintage Emporium.

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Ah! Here it is. Don't worry, boys,

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it looks more than big enough for the both of you!

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-I'm Mark.

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Georgina is the lady to help you around this indoor flea market.

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-Nice to meet you.

-Hi, Will.

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These are what you call a gu vase because of the shape.

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You've got this slender body and then this central knop.

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But at £120 it's a bit out of your league, Will.

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Well, I suppose it might be worth a chance.

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You fancy your chances with Georgina, don't you?

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I want to see this!

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-I've got something like £56.58.

-Oh!

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-Oh!

-And I want to spend out. I don't want to walk out of this shop with a penny in my pocket.

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You've actually got another 28p, Will! But I don't think that will sway this deal!

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Oh, that's... I don't think I could do that.

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I understand. I thought it would be worth a cheeky ask.

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If you borrow some money from Mark...

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I could do that for 80.

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You don't know him very well, do you?

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So, no joy for Will, but Mark has found something to gee him up.

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Now, this is quite interesting.

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This, I think, is from a horse on the Manchester Ships Canal, if you see the MSC.

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I'm almost sure they would have belonged to a horse

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that was pulling maybe the barges or the canal boats.

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The blinkers would have been used to prevent the horse from being distracted on the towpath.

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They're late-Victorian and are priced up at £35.

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I love it, I think it's got character,

0:19:010:19:04

-I think it's got social history on its side...

-Absolutely.

0:19:040:19:07

You want to see me make a small profit on it?

0:19:070:19:09

Well, seeing as you're stressed...

0:19:090:19:11

I think I will try and help you out. Do you want to do the deal at 20?

0:19:110:19:16

-I'd rather do it at 15.

-Oh, Mark!

0:19:160:19:19

Because then it gives me a bite.

0:19:190:19:21

-Well...

-And I haven't finished shopping yet.

-No, I do appreciate that.

0:19:210:19:25

You know, I might find another thing.

0:19:250:19:27

-OK.

-I might not, mind you!

0:19:270:19:29

-OK, seeing as I got a kiss and a hug...

-Oh, my gosh!

0:19:320:19:36

-It's 10, then?

-No, it was...

0:19:360:19:38

15 it is!

0:19:390:19:41

10! Come on, kiss and a hug, go!

0:19:410:19:43

Oh, you old smoothie! Our Georgie is a game girl, you know!

0:19:440:19:47

Now, as luck would have it, Will has bumped into Riccardo, the owner of the gu vase he was interested in.

0:19:470:19:52

Can he resurrect the deal?

0:19:520:19:55

I've got £56.86 in my pocket.

0:19:550:19:58

-I want to give it a punt, see what happens.

-Yeah, OK.

0:20:010:20:03

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:20:030:20:05

-Oh, lovely work!

-We can do that.

-Shall we do it?

-Yeah.

-Good!

0:20:050:20:08

Well, let's go and have a word with George. Did you see that? That was a stroke of luck!

0:20:080:20:12

So the gauntlet has been thrown down.

0:20:120:20:15

Will is all spent out, and he's not going to let Mark forget it!

0:20:150:20:19

-I've spent out.

-You've spent it, did you?

-I spent every last penny.

0:20:190:20:23

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

-It's not a little lie?

-It's not a lie.

0:20:230:20:25

-There's no trickery.

-I have zero pence left,

0:20:250:20:28

-and I just wanted to show you that if you don't spend out...

-Yes?

0:20:280:20:31

..That is where you will find yourself... On the naughty step!

0:20:310:20:36

-Go on, then.

-Thank you. Naughty step, indeed!

0:20:360:20:39

-I don't think those shoes are your size.

-Thank you! They're not my height either!

0:20:390:20:43

Oh!

0:20:450:20:47

So with that, Mark focuses his attention on a large glass bowl.

0:20:470:20:52

It's got quite nice decoration going around it,

0:20:520:20:55

a sort of diamond-y upper border.

0:20:550:20:58

I mean, it's really... it's a huge piece of glass.

0:20:580:21:00

But with £161 left in your pocket and £50 on the ticket,

0:21:020:21:05

what are you going to offer Georgina for it?

0:21:050:21:10

£20?

0:21:110:21:13

You're doing it again, Mark!

0:21:130:21:14

Am I being naughty? Do I get another slap?

0:21:140:21:16

Indeed!

0:21:160:21:18

Could you meet me at 25, Mark?

0:21:180:21:20

-Yes, I could. Thank you, George.

-Done.

-Thank you very much.

0:21:200:21:23

A big purchase, Mark, but for a small price.

0:21:230:21:26

Are you sure you're going to honour your end of the bargain?

0:21:260:21:30

Will, on the other hand, has not a penny to his name,

0:21:300:21:33

and after going out with a bang, it's fitting that he's off to visit a gunpowder mill.

0:21:330:21:38

Will's heading back to Essex

0:21:390:21:41

to the fantastically named Secret Island in Waltham Abbey.

0:21:410:21:45

Secret Island was one of the three Royal Gunpowder Mills in the UK,

0:21:470:21:51

but the only site to have survived virtually intact.

0:21:510:21:55

Of course, it was not so secret to the locals over the 350 years it produced explosives.

0:21:550:22:02

The mill began as a commercial venture in the 17th century,

0:22:020:22:06

but went on to supply ammunition for the Crimean War and the First World War.

0:22:060:22:10

It gained its secretive name around the end of the Second World War

0:22:120:22:16

when it became an important site for research and development

0:22:160:22:20

with workers made to sign the Official Secrets Act.

0:22:200:22:23

But Will is meeting tour guide Michael to find out about its origins as a gunpowder mill.

0:22:240:22:30

Is that literally like we would imagine a mill next to a river with the waterwheel and so on,

0:22:300:22:36

-being powered by the water?

-Absolutely.

-Was gunpowder produced like that?

0:22:360:22:39

It absolutely was. Yes, in the early days, it was water-powered.

0:22:390:22:43

-The site that we have here, this was the site of the earliest gunpowder mills.

-Right.

0:22:430:22:49

-And, as you can see, it's on a canal here.

-Yes.

-This in fact was Millhead Stream,

0:22:490:22:54

which provided the power to drive the waterwheel.

0:22:540:22:58

Gunpowder was originally discovered by the Chinese in the 9th century,

0:22:580:23:02

the constituents of which are sulphur, carbon and saltpetre.

0:23:020:23:06

Time now for Will's science lesson.

0:23:060:23:09

As a layman, what is saltpetre?

0:23:090:23:12

-Not very romantic, I'm afraid. It is excrement, animal or human excrement.

-Really?

-Indeed.

0:23:120:23:19

Go on! Have a sniff!

0:23:190:23:20

Thankfully it doesn't smell as such still.

0:23:200:23:23

Oh, that's disappointing.

0:23:230:23:25

Let's have a look what it looks like.

0:23:250:23:27

-OK.

-It's quite grainy, isn't it?

-Yeah. So almost like a sort of salt consistency, isn't it?

0:23:290:23:33

It is, really. Yes, absolutely. Absolutely.

0:23:330:23:36

And the next one was sulphur.

0:23:360:23:38

-Right. And that's what we've got in here, is it?

-It is, yes.

0:23:380:23:41

-I did pay some attention at chemistry lessons at school.

-Right, good!

0:23:410:23:44

-And I can recognise the yellow colour of sulphur.

-Absolutely.

0:23:440:23:46

Oh, a full-bodied vintage, eh? Hints of citrus, perhaps?

0:23:460:23:51

Well, I think it smells of sort of spent fireworks.

0:23:510:23:54

-OK.

-For obvious reasons, probably.

-Could well be.

0:23:540:23:56

Honestly, Jilly Goolden, eat your heart out!

0:23:560:23:58

I feel like I'm on Blue Peter here, but maybe an adult version of it.

0:23:580:24:02

Wow! Look at that. What a great colour!

0:24:020:24:04

-And then the final ingredient...

-Is charcoal.

0:24:040:24:07

Let's have a look at that. Oh, look at that!

0:24:070:24:09

This, of course, is produced from wood.

0:24:090:24:12

The elements were mixed together before being ground and incorporated using the millstones

0:24:120:24:18

to produce what was then known as black powder.

0:24:180:24:21

Gunpowder suffered from several weaknesses,

0:24:210:24:23

not least of which was the fact that smoke emanating from the gun

0:24:230:24:27

gave away the position of the shooter,

0:24:270:24:29

and so gunpowder was eventually phased out in preference to chemical-based explosives.

0:24:290:24:35

Were they as dangerous to produce as gunpowder?

0:24:350:24:39

They certainly were very volatile indeed, needing very careful handling.

0:24:390:24:45

Nitro-glycerine was even more so in that it needed to be produced within a very tight temperature range.

0:24:450:24:52

-Right.

-If it went above 22 degrees centigrade, the whole of the plant would have gone up.

-Oh, blimey!

0:24:520:24:59

In order to avoid meltdown, workers were required to watch temperature gauges for hours on end,

0:24:590:25:05

dreary work indeed.

0:25:050:25:06

As you can imagine, very sleep-inducing too.

0:25:060:25:10

So to prevent any catastrophic catnaps, they invented this, the one-legged stool.

0:25:100:25:16

-If you would like to sit on the one-legged stool...

-Let's see how I would have done.

0:25:160:25:20

-So, I would have been sat here...

-You would have been looking at these gauges...

-Staring at the gauges.

0:25:200:25:24

And I would have felt my eyelids starting to go... I'm feeling a bit sleepy anyway, it's been a long day!

0:25:240:25:28

-Me eyelids are starting to go and I would have just...

-Start to nod off.

0:25:280:25:31

-Oh!

-That's it, absolutely! BELL RINGS

0:25:310:25:32

-It works.

-It works. You cannot sleep on a one-legged stool. It is impossible.

0:25:320:25:37

Following on from its time producing explosives and its top-secret research and development days,

0:25:370:25:44

the site was opened to the public as a visitors' attraction.

0:25:440:25:48

-I bet they do a great fireworks display!

-BOOM!

0:25:480:25:51

Now, while Will has been entertained by explosives,

0:25:510:25:55

Mark has made his way to Hertford, the county town of Hertfordshire,

0:25:550:25:59

where, in 1563, the English Parliament met because of an outbreak of the plague in London.

0:25:590:26:05

But with time running out, Mark's heading straight to his last shop of the trip to see Bonnie

0:26:050:26:12

at the sweetly named Honey Lane Antiques.

0:26:120:26:14

-Bonnie, that's amazing, isn't it?

-It's beautiful.

0:26:140:26:16

-I tell you what, that would look stunning if you had a big mansion, wouldn't it?

-Yeah.

0:26:170:26:21

-Nice and big.

-In your downstairs cloakroom!

0:26:210:26:24

Cloakroom?

0:26:240:26:25

Wherever it hangs, this late-19th century beaten-brass charger is priced at £150.

0:26:250:26:33

We could do that for 130.

0:26:330:26:36

-Can I put...can I reserve it?

-You certainly can.

-Can I put it down there?

-Yes.

0:26:370:26:41

Looks like you're hooked, Mark!

0:26:410:26:43

And Bonnie's not finished trying to get all of your remaining £136!

0:26:430:26:48

What about if I threw a cannon in?

0:26:480:26:50

-A cannon?

-A nice cast-iron and brass cannon.

-Oh, that's quite...

-For £136 for the two.

0:26:500:26:56

-I think it's great fun and it goes well with our sort of armorial theme.

-Indeed.

0:26:560:27:02

Come on, Mark, the clock's ticking. It's time you made your mind up.

0:27:020:27:06

-Life's a gamble, isn't it?

-It is.

0:27:070:27:10

-The choice is yours.

-I know.

0:27:100:27:12

-But I don't...I'm not good with choices.

-You see...

0:27:120:27:15

I can see Tim now going, "Oh, Mark's dithering again!"

0:27:150:27:19

Oh, good grief! No wonder! Stop dithering, man!

0:27:190:27:22

-This...oh!

-Oh, careful, dear!

-Some kind of a mythical sea horse with the...

0:27:230:27:29

It's called a hippocanthus.

0:27:290:27:31

Ah, Bonnie's trying to see if another lump of metal will add weight to the deal.

0:27:310:27:34

It's a decorative pierced brass dish, probably early-20th century.

0:27:340:27:38

-So the cannons, this...

-That.

-And the charger.

-And the charger.

0:27:380:27:41

-Well, they kind of fit, I suppose.

-They do.

0:27:410:27:44

-Because they'd make a nice interesting lot, wouldn't they?

-Indeed.

0:27:440:27:47

-Shall we do that?

-Yes.

0:27:470:27:48

-I think you couldn't possibly go wrong.

-Bonnie, come and give me a hug.

0:27:480:27:51

Because I think they'll... I don't care if they make any money.

0:27:510:27:55

-It was a pleasure meeting you.

-You too.

-And we've had a bit of fun, haven't we?

0:27:550:27:58

We have. It's been great.

0:27:580:27:59

So, Mark has managed to spend up, but maybe the pressure to blow the lot has backfired.

0:27:590:28:05

Has Mark been rather rash in spending £136 on these three items?

0:28:050:28:09

Only time will tell. So, let's reveal what they bought.

0:28:090:28:13

-Show me yours.

-I'll show you mine in due course.

0:28:130:28:16

Well, let's have a look. Where am I? Here we go.

0:28:160:28:18

Well, well, well! Gosh!

0:28:200:28:22

You and your job lots!

0:28:220:28:24

What do you mean, my job lots? I got one job lot.

0:28:240:28:27

-And then this piece which is bronze, rather stylish, and I think it is of the period.

-Yes.

0:28:270:28:34

Mmm, suitably underwhelmed, Mark!

0:28:340:28:36

-I like this little lot.

-This lot here?

-Yeah.

0:28:360:28:38

A nice rummer, has got one or two little nibbles...

0:28:380:28:41

-and then I found an 18th-century... bottle...

-Bottle.

-Yeah.

0:28:410:28:45

-And an 18th-century...

-What I liked about this was that deep...

-It's lovely, isn't it?

0:28:450:28:48

-Very nice, very pushed in.

-Exactly. But it wasn't a lot of money.

0:28:480:28:51

It's a nice little honest 18th-century lot.

0:28:510:28:53

-That's what I thought. You know, for a study collection.

-And Staffordshire figures.

0:28:530:28:57

Do you know what? I kind of regretted them after I bought them.

0:28:570:29:00

Do you know...? I absolutely adore Staffordshire figures.

0:29:000:29:03

-I think they're great.

-I think they're wonderful. I love the colours.

-Look at his face.

0:29:030:29:07

-I like the naivety...

-Fine 'tache! They're in very good condition.

0:29:070:29:10

But they just don't seem to be flavour of the month, do they?

0:29:100:29:13

Likey, but no likey!

0:29:130:29:15

-And you kept with your form of a Chinese!

-I did it for you. I thought...

-Oh!

0:29:150:29:19

-It's not terribly old, you know that.

-And it's not great quality. Lovely shape.

-It's all right.

0:29:190:29:24

Yeah, it's a gu vase.

0:29:240:29:26

Used for libation...

0:29:260:29:28

-Exactly!

-Look at you!

0:29:280:29:30

-Well, you know...

-Ooh! Will!

0:29:300:29:32

-Honestly, I'm beginning to think you might know something about antiques!

-No, I'm just guessing.

0:29:320:29:36

Now, I'm looking forward to seeing what you've bought.

0:29:360:29:39

-Are you really?

-Yes, of course I am!

-Are you ready for this?

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:29:390:29:42

It's quite different, Will.

0:29:420:29:44

Oh, look!

0:29:440:29:45

Because...because I've gone completely sort of bonkers, really.

0:29:450:29:50

Let's take these off so I can have a closer look.

0:29:500:29:52

-I found... Well, I found this in the...

-Skip?

-The Village.

0:29:520:29:55

-You might think that, actually!

-I'm joking.

0:29:560:29:58

It needs...it needs a heck of a lot of work, but it is a really nice period thing.

0:29:580:30:03

-It's a Regency...

-That's nice quality as well, isn't it?

0:30:030:30:06

I mean, it was marked up at £135, but I got it for 50.

0:30:060:30:09

That's a good discount.

0:30:090:30:11

I bought this amazing glass bowl!

0:30:110:30:13

-Great size.

-It's a wonderful size.

-Perfect condition.

0:30:130:30:16

-DEEP RING

-That's...

-It's interior design.

0:30:160:30:18

-That is a good bowl.

-And it was 25 quid.

-No?

0:30:180:30:22

You couldn't buy a plastic one for 25 quid!

0:30:220:30:24

-But then this is what really struck my eye, Will.

-Oh, there's something else at the fr...

0:30:240:30:27

-That!

-Oh!

0:30:270:30:29

-Oh, look! I'm going to put these back on!

-I think it's absolutely amazing, actually.

0:30:290:30:33

But, I mean, I paid far too much, Will. I paid far too much for all this.

0:30:330:30:37

-I bet you didn't. You're double-bluffing me.

-No, I'm not, £136.

0:30:370:30:41

-For that little group.

-Yeah. It's too much.

0:30:410:30:44

Listen, what better way to end the show, you know, with no money in our pockets,

0:30:440:30:50

a load of stuff in the sale? Let's see what happens.

0:30:500:30:53

So, what do our pair really think, then?

0:30:530:30:55

Can I just say how proud I am of my friend Mark,

0:30:550:30:59

because we agreed to spend out and spend out we have.

0:30:590:31:02

We're both on zero. It's all down to the wire for the last auction.

0:31:020:31:06

Will is desperate to find a Chinese piece.

0:31:060:31:09

We are going to the auction house that sold, reportedly sold

0:31:090:31:14

an 18th-century Imperial vase for £50 million.

0:31:140:31:19

That isn't going to make 50 million, I'll tell you.

0:31:190:31:22

50p more like!

0:31:220:31:24

So, with the storm clouds circling above, is this the sign of things to come

0:31:240:31:29

as our boys head to today's auction?

0:31:290:31:31

On the last leg of their Road Trip,

0:31:310:31:33

our seasoned experts have zigzagged their way

0:31:330:31:36

through Essex, Suffolk and Hertfordshire,

0:31:360:31:39

starting out in Gosfield

0:31:390:31:40

and ending up in Ruislip for the auction.

0:31:400:31:43

-Well, Mark...

-This is it.

-This is it.

0:31:430:31:45

-Our moment of judgment.

-The battle lines are drawn.

0:31:450:31:47

-Shall we go and find out?

-After you, sir.

0:31:470:31:49

The final battlefield is at Bainbridges,

0:31:490:31:52

and, as Mark said, scene of the famous multimillion-pound Chinese porcelain vase sale

0:31:520:31:59

which made world headlines in 2010.

0:31:590:32:01

Presiding over our proceedings is auctioneer and owner Peter Bainbridge.

0:32:010:32:06

Let's see what he thinks of our experts' choices.

0:32:060:32:09

We've got a Boule standish to sell,

0:32:090:32:12

which is probably 19th century.

0:32:120:32:15

It's missing a top of one of the wells in the middle,

0:32:150:32:18

so that, plus all the repair that's necessary,

0:32:180:32:21

I would think it may only be worth £40-£60.

0:32:210:32:25

Also I'm afraid an item that was entered a Regency wineglass,

0:32:250:32:30

and it's definitely not Regency, it's 20th century, in my view,

0:32:300:32:33

and it comes with a little cordial glass which is down as 18th century, may well be.

0:32:330:32:38

But, in fact, it's got a damn big piece of metal in the bottom of it,

0:32:380:32:41

so I guess it's been repaired which completely negates its value.

0:32:410:32:45

Oh, dear! That doesn't bode well.

0:32:450:32:47

Will Axon set out on this leg with a meagre £251.86,

0:32:480:32:53

but kept to his promise, spending it all on his five lots.

0:32:530:32:58

Mark Stacey began this leg with £296 and also went for broke on his five lots.

0:32:580:33:04

Now, brace yourselves! Peter is a good old-fashioned auctioneer.

0:33:070:33:11

First up is Will's 19th-century ebony and ivory French watch box.

0:33:130:33:18

Let's have a bid. Will it be... who's going to give me £20?

0:33:180:33:21

-20 to go. 10 to go, then, please. Come on.

-Oh, come on!

0:33:210:33:23

For goodness' sake, it's unusual. Tenner bid. Thank you. 15 now.

0:33:230:33:26

I've got a bid at 10. 15. £20. £25? Thank you.

0:33:260:33:29

£30. 35 now. 35. 40.

0:33:290:33:31

40 I'm bid. Got a bid at 45 anywhere?

0:33:310:33:33

Got a bid at 40 at the back of the room. Any advance on £40?

0:33:350:33:37

-All done today at 40.

-Puh-puh-puh!

0:33:370:33:39

Selling at £40. Last time.

0:33:390:33:41

It was very close, Will.

0:33:420:33:44

Close is not good enough, I'm afraid. That's a loss, Will.

0:33:440:33:48

Next in line is Mark's Continental silver spill holder.

0:33:490:33:53

I'm opening the bidding here at £80. Do I hear 90 anywhere?

0:33:530:33:56

I've got a bid at £80. 90? My bid is £80. Take 90 now.

0:33:560:33:59

-Is it going to go up?

-Come along, let's see another bid!

0:33:590:34:02

Thank you. 90. 100 I'm bid. 110?

0:34:020:34:05

I would. 110.

0:34:050:34:07

120 now. £110. I've got a bid at 110.

0:34:070:34:09

120, I've got a bid. 130 now?

0:34:090:34:11

130 bid. Thank you. 140 anywhere?

0:34:110:34:13

140. Thank you. 150 now.

0:34:130:34:15

Are you all done at 140?

0:34:150:34:17

Well done, Mark. You've doubled your money. Good work.

0:34:170:34:21

-I need it, Will.

-OK...

0:34:210:34:23

Oh, he's never happy, that boy!

0:34:230:34:25

It's Will's glass rummer, cordial glass and wine bottle next.

0:34:270:34:32

Peter thinks this could be a flop. Let's see.

0:34:320:34:35

Opening bid, what say now, £20?

0:34:350:34:37

10 to go, then, please. Your starter for £10. 10 bid. 15 now.

0:34:370:34:40

We've got a bid at 10. Do I hear 15? I've got a bid at £10. 15.

0:34:400:34:42

-20 I'm bid. 25?

-It's going on a bit.

0:34:420:34:45

£30. 35 now. 40?

0:34:450:34:47

At £35. 40 anywhere? Got a bid at 35. Another bid, sir, at the back? £40?

0:34:470:34:51

-At £35. Any further bids? 40 I'm bid.

-Just... Go on!

0:34:510:34:54

Got a bid at 40 now. We're selling at £40 for the last time today.

0:34:540:34:56

At 40. Any further bidding? We're selling at £40 for the last time.

0:34:560:35:00

All done. 40.

0:35:000:35:02

231. Sold.

0:35:020:35:04

That look says it all. Another loss, Will.

0:35:040:35:07

Mark's rather large glass bowl is next.

0:35:100:35:13

Here it is. Have a look at the stage, then, please. Isn't that lovely?

0:35:130:35:16

It's so big, isn't it?

0:35:160:35:17

This comes probably from a wash set, ladies and gentlemen.

0:35:170:35:20

And, er... or you could use it as a footbath.

0:35:200:35:23

You could put fish in it, couldn't you? £20?

0:35:230:35:25

£20 to go. £10 to go, then, please.

0:35:250:35:27

At the back. 10 I'm bid. 15 now. 15 I'm bid. Thank you.

0:35:270:35:30

20 now, please. 20 I'm bid. 25? 25 bid. 30?

0:35:300:35:32

30 I'm bid. 35?

0:35:320:35:34

35 bid. 40.

0:35:340:35:35

40 I'm bid. 45?

0:35:350:35:37

I've got a bid at 40. Any further bids?

0:35:370:35:38

We are selling today at £40 for the last time.

0:35:380:35:40

Are you all out at 40, then?

0:35:400:35:43

Oh!

0:35:430:35:44

OK, big sighs, but that is another steady profit, Mark!

0:35:440:35:48

Can Will's stag finally turn him a profit?

0:35:500:35:54

£20 to go, then, please. Come on! Let's get a move on at £20.

0:35:540:35:56

Opening bid at £20, surely to goodness?

0:35:560:35:58

What's going wrong? 20 I'm bid. 25 now? The bid is £20.

0:35:580:36:01

25. Thank you. 30? 30 I'm bid. 35 now, please. 35. £40 now.

0:36:010:36:04

-I've got a bid at 35. 40 anywhere? 40, come on!

-Surely!

0:36:040:36:08

£35. Any further bids? I'm selling today at £35.

0:36:080:36:11

Any further bids? For the last time today, then, at £35.

0:36:110:36:15

So another crushing loss for Will.

0:36:170:36:20

I guess the bidders found it a bit "deer"!

0:36:200:36:23

Ha-ha! Never mind!

0:36:230:36:25

I think I'm going to have to write my letter of resignation!

0:36:250:36:28

Well, if you need a seconder...! Er...

0:36:290:36:32

A touching piece of moral support there, Mark!

0:36:320:36:36

Perhaps you're blinkered by your own success!

0:36:360:36:39

Very collectable, £20?

0:36:390:36:40

Quite collectable, £10?

0:36:400:36:42

Thank you. 10 I'm bid. 15 I'm bid. 20 now, please.

0:36:420:36:44

£20. 25. I've got a bid of £20 at the back of the room.

0:36:440:36:47

-Come on! They shouldn't...

-You're in profit.

0:36:470:36:49

Make it 25, will you? At £20. Come on, a bit of imagination!

0:36:490:36:53

25, thank you. £30. 35.

0:36:530:36:55

£40. 45?

0:36:550:36:57

Are you all done and finished at £40? Any further bids?

0:36:570:36:59

40 and selling to number 93.

0:36:590:37:02

-Thank you.

-£40.

-£40, that's all right.

0:37:020:37:05

That is all right, Mark!

0:37:050:37:07

There is no distraction for you in your pursuit of profit!

0:37:070:37:10

It's your pair of Staffordshire huntsmen up next, Will.

0:37:130:37:16

I figure these should yield you a return.

0:37:160:37:19

£20. £20, ladies and gentlemen, please, with a spaniel, remember.

0:37:190:37:23

So, anybody interested in dogs. £20.

0:37:230:37:26

Ooh, 10 to go, then, please. Come on. Show me somewhere.

0:37:260:37:29

Tenner bid, thank you. 15 now? 15 I'm bid. 20 now. 20 I'm bid.

0:37:290:37:31

25? I think you should.

0:37:310:37:34

So does Will!

0:37:340:37:35

They're lovely! At £20. 25. That's better. £30, sir?

0:37:350:37:39

Oh, madam, and you're a horsey person!

0:37:390:37:41

Yeah, but it's a spaniel.

0:37:410:37:43

Oh, but look at that little goatee!

0:37:430:37:45

-£25. £25.

-That's enough. It's all right.

0:37:450:37:48

£25. Are we going to 30? We are selling at 25.

0:37:480:37:50

30. Thank you.

0:37:500:37:52

-35?

-Go on.

-I've got a bid of 30 at the back of the room.

-One more,

0:37:520:37:55

-to make me break even.

-30.

0:37:550:37:57

No. At £30. Any further bids? Selling at 30, then.

0:37:570:38:00

Last time today at £30.

0:38:000:38:02

-Sold for 30.

-Gosh, Will.

0:38:020:38:05

Gosh, indeed! It's really not been your day today!

0:38:050:38:08

But how will the bidders react to Mark's big blowout?

0:38:120:38:15

His large brass platter and brass accompaniments.

0:38:150:38:18

-Oh, I can't bear this!

-Here we go.

0:38:180:38:20

I think large is a bit of an understatement.

0:38:200:38:22

Look at the damn thing!

0:38:220:38:24

- It's huge. - It is huge, isn't it?

0:38:240:38:26

You could sublet it, madam!

0:38:260:38:29

And you also get with it a pierced brass dish over there,

0:38:290:38:32

-which is pretty dull...and a miniature cannon.

-It's not dull!

0:38:320:38:35

-It is.

-OK, for the lot, what are you going to give me, £20?

0:38:350:38:38

20 to go. Come on, it's been polished. You don't have to. £20.

0:38:380:38:41

Well, it's worth thinking about! 20 I'm bid. Do I hear 25 now?

0:38:410:38:45

25 at the back. At £30? £30, thank you. 35?

0:38:450:38:48

35, thank you. £40?

0:38:480:38:49

At £35. Another fiver?

0:38:490:38:51

-Go on!

-She's shaking her head.

0:38:510:38:54

35 at the back of the room. Any further bids on 35, then?

0:38:540:38:56

Selling at £35, all done.

0:38:560:38:59

-Gosh!

-35, 74. Well done.

0:38:590:39:01

Ouch! I bet you're brassed off with that!

0:39:010:39:05

That stonking great loss means Will could be back in with a chance,

0:39:050:39:08

if only he could make a healthy profit on his last lot,

0:39:080:39:12

his bargain buy, the gu vase.

0:39:120:39:14

Come on, somebody give me a £10 note. 10 I'm bid. 15. £20.

0:39:140:39:18

-It's going on, it's creeping up.

-£20. 25.

0:39:180:39:21

£30.

0:39:210:39:22

£30 I'm bid. 35 anywhere? 30 I'm bid. 35?

0:39:220:39:25

35. £40? 45.

0:39:250:39:28

£50?

0:39:280:39:29

Got a bid of 45. 50 anywhere? Got a bid of 45. Looking for 50 now.

0:39:290:39:33

£50.

0:39:330:39:34

55? Got a bid of 50. In the front row at £50. Be able to take 5 more.

0:39:340:39:38

We're selling at 50. A gu vase at 50. Any further bids?

0:39:380:39:41

All done. Gu and gone!

0:39:410:39:43

-"Gu and gone!"

-Gu and gone!

0:39:440:39:47

Huh! Gu and gone with your chance of victory, Will!

0:39:470:39:50

No beginner's luck here, then!

0:39:500:39:52

It's Mark's last lot.

0:39:530:39:55

The Boulework inkstand or pen stand.

0:39:550:39:58

Peter estimated £40-£60,

0:39:580:40:00

but can our Stacey go out as winner of this week's Road Trip on a high?

0:40:000:40:05

50 to go, then, please. Come on. 50 I'm bid.

0:40:050:40:07

60 now. I've got a bid of £50. 60 anywhere?

0:40:070:40:09

We've got a bid of £50. 60 anywhere now?

0:40:090:40:11

I've got a bid of £50. 60? Thank you. 70 now, please.

0:40:110:40:14

70 bid. Thank you. 80 now. 90?

0:40:140:40:16

100 on the book. 110.

0:40:160:40:18

-120.

-Oh!

0:40:180:40:20

-120. 130. 140.

-Oh, this is going very well!

0:40:200:40:23

-140. 150. 160.

-Ker-ching!

0:40:230:40:26

170.

0:40:260:40:27

180.

0:40:270:40:29

190.

0:40:290:40:30

-200.

-Gosh! It's good.

0:40:300:40:32

210. 220.

0:40:320:40:33

230. 240.

0:40:330:40:36

250.

0:40:360:40:38

-£240.

-Yeah, mate!

0:40:380:40:39

£240 now. Do I hear 250? We've got a bid at £240. Do I hear 250?

0:40:390:40:42

Another bid, 250?

0:40:420:40:44

250?

0:40:450:40:47

Selling at 240, then.

0:40:470:40:48

Here at 240. For the last time today at £240.

0:40:480:40:50

Are we all done at 240, then?

0:40:500:40:52

-Sold at 240.

-I can't believe it!

-£240!

0:40:520:40:56

-I cannot believe that, Will!

-Mark, you've got it, you've got it, mate!

0:41:010:41:04

-£240!

-Oh!

0:41:040:41:07

Top job, eh?

0:41:070:41:08

That's a cracking profit of £190 before costs, Mark,

0:41:080:41:12

and don't you look pleased with yourself?

0:41:120:41:14

Come on. Let's get some fresh air and a drink!

0:41:140:41:17

-A stiff drink!

-Come on.

0:41:170:41:19

So, Will Axon's debut turned into a disaster!

0:41:230:41:26

He kicked off this leg with £251.86,

0:41:260:41:29

but after auction costs made a dismal loss of £91.96,

0:41:290:41:34

and ends this Road Trip with just £159.90.

0:41:340:41:39

Mark Stacey started this final leg with £296.

0:41:400:41:44

He earned a fantastic £109.90 profit after auction costs,

0:41:440:41:50

making him not only today's winner,

0:41:500:41:52

but also the winner of this week's Road Trip!

0:41:520:41:55

He's left with a grand total of £405.90.

0:41:550:41:59

Well done, Mark! All profits go to Children In Need.

0:41:590:42:03

Oh, well, that was a tale of two halves, wasn't it?

0:42:030:42:05

A tale of two halves, I should say! Your half and mine!

0:42:050:42:08

-Sorry about that!

-Listen, it's all fair in love and war.

0:42:080:42:12

MUSIC: "It Takes Two" by Marvin Gaye and Kim Weston

0:42:120:42:15

Will, you're clear this side. Yes, go on. Go to it, Willie!

0:42:150:42:19

And what a trip it's been for our boys!

0:42:210:42:25

With experience triumphant over enthusiasm...

0:42:280:42:31

It's had its ups and downs.

0:42:330:42:35

Do you know, I'm beginning to absolutely hate antiques!

0:42:350:42:38

Will learned to develop a thick skin...

0:42:380:42:40

and a fetish for themes.

0:42:400:42:42

Alcohol theme.

0:42:420:42:43

Stag and deer theme.

0:42:430:42:45

My glass theme.

0:42:450:42:46

-And the master soon showed his class.

-Oh, lovely.

0:42:460:42:49

I'll come back here again!

0:42:490:42:51

And, above all, they formed an unbreakable bond.

0:42:510:42:54

Toodle-oo, chaps!

0:42:550:42:57

Will Axon and Mark Stacey begin the final leg of their journey in Gosfield, Essex. They travel through Finchingfield and St Albans, Hertfordshire, before finishing at auction in Ruislip.