Episode 1 Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 1

Antiques experts Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson start their road trip in the seaside town of Southport, ending up at Wrexham in Wales for the first auction of the week.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 1. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

-All right, viewers?

0:00:020:00:05

..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal -

0:00:050:00:08

to scour Britain for antiques.

0:00:080:00:10

I'm on fire!

0:00:100:00:12

-Sold! Going, going, gone!

-The aim?

0:00:120:00:14

-To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

-50p!

0:00:140:00:19

There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

0:00:190:00:23

So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

0:00:230:00:27

Ooh!

0:00:270:00:29

Aw!

0:00:290:00:31

This is the Antiques Road Trip.

0:00:310:00:33

Yeah!

0:00:330:00:35

It's a brand-new Road Trip with our latest

0:00:370:00:40

pair of pursuers of timeworn classics, Charles Hanson

0:00:400:00:44

and Philip Serrell, who are about to embark on an antique adventure.

0:00:440:00:48

-Welcome back, big boy.

-Good to see you, Carlos.

-Welcome back.

0:00:480:00:51

-I can't believe it.

-It's good fun, isn't it?

0:00:510:00:54

-Yeah!

-Really good fun. We're going to have a blast on this, Charlie.

-Yeah!

0:00:540:00:57

Positive thinking - I like it.

0:00:570:01:00

-Charles Hanson knows a thing or two about antiques.

-It's rustic... Ohh!

0:01:000:01:05

With over 14 years in the trade, he knows what he's doing.

0:01:050:01:09

I'm going downstairs. I'm going downstairs.

0:01:090:01:11

Told you!

0:01:110:01:13

Seasoned expert Philip Serrell has worn many hats in his career,

0:01:150:01:19

but this antiques game's a tough one.

0:01:190:01:22

Ooh!

0:01:220:01:24

Urgh!

0:01:240:01:25

Philip's got his eyes on the road

0:01:250:01:28

and his hands upon the wheel of a 1969 Triumph GT6 Convertible,

0:01:280:01:32

as our experts set off with high hopes and £200 each to spend.

0:01:320:01:38

Both have a great track record on the Road Trip.

0:01:380:01:41

-The only ever trip I lost was against a man called Philip Serrell.

-Ha-ha!

0:01:410:01:47

So it promises to be a real contest.

0:01:470:01:51

Our trip begins in the northwest of England, at Southport,

0:01:520:01:56

before winding its way down into Wales, across to London,

0:01:560:01:59

before finally reaching Cirencester in the Cotswolds.

0:01:590:02:02

This leg takes us from the seaside town of Southport,

0:02:040:02:07

meandering south through Merseyside, Staffordshire, Cheshire,

0:02:070:02:11

before heading to Wrexham in Wales for the first auction.

0:02:110:02:15

Racehorse owner Ginger McCain famously trained

0:02:170:02:20

Red Rum on Southport beach, where the three times National

0:02:200:02:23

winner would prepare for the event by galloping through the sea water.

0:02:230:02:28

Phil's parking his steed right opposite his first shop,

0:02:280:02:32

The Antiques Man, as our pair begin their quest to find the best

0:02:320:02:36

treasure Southport has to offer.

0:02:360:02:38

-Make sure your mum gets her hat back!

-It's a Mecca of antiques.

0:02:380:02:42

You're in the Mecca. Enjoy yourself. What's your tactics?

0:02:420:02:45

I'm going to get a hat like that.

0:02:450:02:47

-That's my tactic. God bless, Charlie.

-You, too. All the best.

0:02:470:02:51

It looks like Charlie's right.

0:02:520:02:54

Phil's not even got in the shop and already he's fallen in lurve.

0:02:540:02:59

That's a fabulous thing, that is.

0:02:590:03:01

It's going to be a lot of money as well.

0:03:010:03:04

-I'll go in. Ah, John. Philip. How are you?

-Hello, Philip. How are you?

0:03:060:03:10

-Good to see you.

-Yes.

0:03:100:03:11

-Isn't that fantastic?

-It is, absolutely unbelievable, that.

0:03:110:03:15

Yes.

0:03:150:03:17

This model of a coal tender was probably

0:03:170:03:19

used as an advertising gimmick in the mid 20th century,

0:03:190:03:22

though at £295, it's a bit out of your league, Phil.

0:03:220:03:26

Can I take that in? I might be able to talk to you about that.

0:03:260:03:30

OK.

0:03:300:03:32

Crikey! He's not letting it go. Let's see what else lies within.

0:03:320:03:36

This is a child's parasol.

0:03:360:03:38

And the person who would buy this today would be a doll collector.

0:03:380:03:42

-And that's 25 squid.

-25 quid.

0:03:420:03:44

What a gentleman.

0:03:440:03:46

That seems a little more in your price range.

0:03:460:03:49

-How much are your little clogs?

-They vary. They're the least expensive.

0:03:570:04:01

£10.

0:04:010:04:03

Those two are £30.

0:04:050:04:08

-Those are quite sweet.

-They are.

0:04:080:04:11

Decisions, decisions, eh, Phil?

0:04:110:04:13

But wouldn't you know it?

0:04:130:04:15

He's still got his heart set on the coal tender.

0:04:150:04:19

Well, you don't get if you don't ask.

0:04:190:04:22

This is the item you really want to buy.

0:04:220:04:24

This is the one you've fallen in love with. This is the one you want.

0:04:240:04:27

This is... When I came through the door, this is what I loved.

0:04:270:04:30

-I absolutely love it. Can I give you £125 for the three?

-No.

0:04:300:04:36

Blimey! Talk about going in low!

0:04:360:04:38

I think you'll need to try again, mate.

0:04:380:04:41

£140 and I'll have them. I'll shake your hand now.

0:04:410:04:44

You can't. You're holding it.

0:04:440:04:46

John, you're a gentleman.

0:04:480:04:50

Can I just say, you've been really, really generous to me.

0:04:500:04:53

He may have been really generous, but at £30 for the parasol

0:04:530:04:56

and clogs and an incredible bargain of £110 for the model coal tender,

0:04:560:05:01

that's nearly three-quarters of your budget gone in your first shop.

0:05:010:05:05

-Brave boy! Now, what's Charles up to?

-Good morning.

-How are you?

0:05:050:05:09

-I'm fine.

-On this very sunny day.

-I know.

0:05:090:05:12

He's in Market Street Antiques with the lovely Theresa.

0:05:120:05:16

-If only this was an oil. That's quite nice.

-It is nice.

0:05:160:05:21

Nice quality. Oh, yes!

0:05:210:05:23

Look at the ceiling as well.

0:05:230:05:25

Try and focus, Charles, eh?

0:05:250:05:28

These are nice vases. Tell me about them.

0:05:280:05:32

-Um...

-They're a pair, aren't they?

-They are a pair, yes.

0:05:320:05:35

Yes. Um...

0:05:350:05:37

-I like these because they are what were called Japanese...

-Yeah.

0:05:370:05:42

..and they are...Kutani.

0:05:420:05:44

You had to think for a second there, didn't you, Charles?

0:05:440:05:47

Kutani is both an area in Japan and a type of porcelain

0:05:470:05:51

known for its multiple colours, usually orange.

0:05:510:05:54

In perfect condition, they could be very valuable.

0:05:540:05:57

But these are priced at only £40.

0:05:570:05:59

On this side, you've got these wonderful birds in blossom,

0:05:590:06:03

on the reverse, we've got the wonderful Japanese Geisha girls.

0:06:030:06:06

You could almost be one yourself with that dark hair.

0:06:060:06:09

Theresa, I could put you alongside them in your eastern look.

0:06:090:06:14

But what really knocks them for six is the fact that we've got

0:06:140:06:17

-this restoration on the rim there.

-I know.

-What a shame.

0:06:170:06:21

I think that's the only thing that's wrong with it, really.

0:06:210:06:25

So if I said to you, Theresa, just today, one price only,

0:06:250:06:30

one price only...

0:06:300:06:32

What's your very best price? I shall walk away.

0:06:320:06:35

-Think about it.

-35?

0:06:350:06:37

-Whisper again?

-35.

0:06:370:06:39

-Whisper again?

-35.

0:06:390:06:41

35, OK. OK. That's your one price only.

0:06:410:06:44

That's a real bargain. But what just sadly...

0:06:440:06:47

-That's it, yeah.

-..will affect, I think,

0:06:470:06:49

my prestigious standing with Philip Serrell is if he sees that knock.

0:06:490:06:54

I shall think about it. It's a really nice discount.

0:06:540:06:57

So, unconvinced, Charles moves on.

0:06:570:07:00

Good morning.

0:07:000:07:01

And heads just along the road to Southport Antiques to meet John,

0:07:010:07:05

who is keeping an eye on his daughter-in-law's shop.

0:07:050:07:08

Are you a local man?

0:07:080:07:10

Yeah, born and bred.

0:07:100:07:11

John was a greengrocer, so he knows his onions,

0:07:110:07:14

but Charles knows his antiques.

0:07:140:07:17

So here you've got a wonderful sarcophagus tea caddy

0:07:170:07:19

in mahogany, in rosewood,

0:07:190:07:22

in almost satinwood as well, and that caddy would date to around 1820.

0:07:220:07:29

-John, there's no price on this, is there?

-Let's say £1,000.

-£1,000.

0:07:290:07:34

I'm out. I'm out. Thanks, John. £1,000. I'm out.

0:07:360:07:40

-A bit too much. Thanks, John. I'll leave that one.

-Oh, gosh.

0:07:400:07:44

Maybe it's just his sense of humour, Charles. Let's try something else.

0:07:440:07:48

Lovely cabinet there. Chinoiserie.

0:07:480:07:50

John, there's no guide price on this, on the cabinet.

0:07:500:07:54

Beautifully lacquered with this Far Eastern influence, 1920s.

0:07:540:07:59

-Let me guess, John, £1,000?

-OK.

0:07:590:08:03

£1,000. No, I'm going to say no, I'm out. OK?

0:08:030:08:08

-What's the best price?

-You got me all excited there.

0:08:080:08:11

Surely not everything in here is £1,000?

0:08:110:08:15

-John, there's one thing I've seen outside here, may I show you?

-Right.

0:08:150:08:19

-I quite like your bust, John.

-I beg your pardon?

-I call that your bust.

0:08:190:08:24

-Oh, the bust, yes.

-Because...

-And there's a price on it. Great.

0:08:240:08:30

John, you're in luck.

0:08:300:08:31

She's quite nice. John, do you like her?

0:08:350:08:38

-It's a good bust.

-A bit ugly, I think.

-Do you think so?

0:08:410:08:45

I'd like her a lot more if you bought her.

0:08:450:08:48

It seems John is keen to part with this French earthenware bust.

0:08:490:08:52

-Priced at £75, it's one to consider.

-Let's go back inside.

0:08:520:08:57

Come on, mate.

0:08:570:08:58

Charles has also spotted this pair of watercolours,

0:08:590:09:02

dated 1922 and priced at £55.

0:09:020:09:05

What I love about history, John, is they're unique.

0:09:060:09:10

Nobody has reproduced them and they capture a time, don't they,

0:09:100:09:15

they capture the 1920s. And they're just very nice, in their oak frames.

0:09:150:09:19

They're not overly well painted.

0:09:190:09:21

The artist, I don't know who it is at all, but they're just decorative.

0:09:210:09:25

-Yeah.

-How much are they worth to you, then, Charles?

0:09:250:09:28

I would want to, John, frankly, pay probably about 30

0:09:280:09:33

for the watercolours and I'll probably want to pay

0:09:330:09:37

about 50 for your bust.

0:09:370:09:40

Which would make £80 in cash.

0:09:400:09:43

Look at me.

0:09:440:09:46

90 and it's a deal.

0:09:470:09:48

-Make it 85, and it's a deal. Look at me.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

0:09:510:09:55

But before they can shake on it, Charles wants one last crack

0:09:570:10:01

at the £1,000 caddy with the more realistic offer of...

0:10:010:10:04

-80?

-Round figure, 100.

0:10:040:10:07

-I'm taking a chance.

-Meet me halfway at 90.

0:10:120:10:15

-OK.

-John, that's great.

0:10:160:10:18

-So, I've bought three items.

-Hmm-mm.

0:10:180:10:21

-Which makes...

-175.

-Correct.

0:10:210:10:25

Oh, my goodness. That means I've only got £25 left. What have I done?

0:10:250:10:30

Not to be outdone on the spending stakes,

0:10:310:10:34

Charles has also blown a big part of his budget at the first opportunity.

0:10:340:10:38

This should make for an interesting trip.

0:10:380:10:41

With their pockets substantially lightened, our experts are

0:10:410:10:44

heading south towards Aintree, where Philip's "orf to the gee-gees".

0:10:440:10:48

Giddy up!

0:10:480:10:49

-At a canter, Phil, slow down.

-Over the top!

0:10:490:10:52

-Over, Charlie, over, over!

-Whoa, boys, steady up!

0:10:520:10:57

They're both getting out of the car here,

0:10:590:11:01

but Charles has more shopping on his mind.

0:11:010:11:04

Phil, at a canter, at a gallop, I'm off, enjoy yourself.

0:11:040:11:09

-Enjoy that toy.

-What a place.

-See you soon.

-Bye.

0:11:090:11:11

He's swapping the Triumph for the time-honoured shanks pony.

0:11:110:11:16

Meanwhile, at a more leisurely pace,

0:11:160:11:18

Phil's going to explore the famous Aintree racecourse,

0:11:180:11:21

home to the great British institution, the Grand National.

0:11:210:11:25

The first official Grand National was held in 1839

0:11:250:11:29

with the aptly-named Lottery declared the winner.

0:11:290:11:33

The event was the brainchild of William Lynn,

0:11:330:11:35

established to rival a race in St Albans.

0:11:350:11:39

Believing he could do it better,

0:11:390:11:40

he set out to create the greatest steeplechase in the world.

0:11:400:11:43

At one time, 66 runners and riders entered the Grand National

0:11:430:11:47

and they would have all started here in the old Weighing Room,

0:11:470:11:51

where Phil's meeting historian Jane Clarke.

0:11:510:11:54

This is the old Weighing Room.

0:11:540:11:56

Up until 2005, all the jockeys would change here

0:11:560:11:59

before they rode in the Grand National

0:11:590:12:01

and all the other races at Aintree.

0:12:010:12:03

This is where the nerves would jangle.

0:12:030:12:05

Mine would jangle before I sat on that thing! You haven't got enough weights there.

0:12:050:12:09

-Would you like a go?

-Absolutely not. Some things are classified.

0:12:090:12:12

The National is the most valuable jump race in Europe, proving popular

0:12:120:12:17

with royalty and many people who like to have the occasional flutter.

0:12:170:12:21

It's 4.5 miles long, 30 fences, and even in the very early days,

0:12:210:12:26

there were 29 fences for them to jump,

0:12:260:12:29

but they were all natural fences.

0:12:290:12:31

Many of these fences, including Becher's Brook,

0:12:310:12:33

have become famous in their own right.

0:12:330:12:36

The fence took its name from Captain Martin Becher

0:12:360:12:39

who fell off his horse there in the first National

0:12:390:12:42

and took shelter in the brook to avoid injury.

0:12:420:12:45

I think this is really atmospheric here, but if you want to come

0:12:450:12:49

to Aintree, you've got to soak up the course, haven't you?

0:12:490:12:51

-You've got to get out there on the turf.

-Show me, show me.

0:12:510:12:54

THEME MUSIC FROM "Black Beauty"

0:12:540:12:57

-Wow. That's incredible, isn't it?

-What do you think of that?

0:13:000:13:05

And so where do we start?

0:13:060:13:08

A good place to start is perhaps the finishing line,

0:13:080:13:11

just in front of us, the lollipoppers, they call it.

0:13:110:13:14

That's after one of the longest run-ins in British racing,

0:13:140:13:18

-or anywhere, really.

-And anything could win, couldn't it?

0:13:180:13:21

Well, it's unpredictable.

0:13:210:13:22

The fairy tale aspect, and you can start off in the small print,

0:13:220:13:26

you can end up in the headlines. Anybody can win.

0:13:260:13:28

The favourite can be beaten by the no-hoper, and it often happens,

0:13:280:13:32

and that's what makes it so magical.

0:13:320:13:34

The Antiques Road Trip's a bit like that.

0:13:340:13:36

Many horses have experienced the sweet taste of victory on this course,

0:13:360:13:40

taking their place in the history books,

0:13:400:13:42

but one name in particular leaps out from the page.

0:13:420:13:45

Out of all the horses that have raced here, in my eyes,

0:13:450:13:47

there's one that stands head and shoulders above the others

0:13:470:13:50

as being the icon, the Grand National icon, Red Rum.

0:13:500:13:54

Everyone's heard of Red Rum.

0:13:540:13:55

He's a very big part of Aintree's history.

0:13:550:13:58

-He's buried out here on the course.

-Here?

0:13:580:14:00

Would you like to come and see his grave?

0:14:000:14:02

That would be quite moving, yeah, honestly, thank you.

0:14:020:14:04

Red Rum is the only horse to have won the National three times.

0:14:040:14:09

He died in 1995, aged 30,

0:14:090:14:10

with his death making the national news headlines.

0:14:100:14:14

We're at the winning line now.

0:14:160:14:18

This is the very point that you pass if you win the Grand National.

0:14:180:14:21

-Right next to it is Red Rum's grave.

-That's special, isn't it?

0:14:210:14:25

-Isn't that nice?

-You could almost get quite emotional, couldn't you?

0:14:250:14:28

Because you talk of sporting icons of the 20th century,

0:14:280:14:33

like Muhammad Ali, Pele,

0:14:330:14:35

and Red Rum has got to be up there, hasn't he?

0:14:350:14:38

He has, and this is where he belongs. This is his special place.

0:14:380:14:42

He always pricked up his ears when they unloaded him at Aintree.

0:14:420:14:45

He knew this place was special. He lit up when he was here.

0:14:450:14:50

Jane, I've absolutely loved this. It's been fantastic,

0:14:500:14:53

because Red Rum was a sporting hero of mine. Is that the finishing post?

0:14:530:14:57

Just come and help me get past Hansen before he gets there. Come on.

0:14:580:15:01

And trying to get his nose in front,

0:15:060:15:09

Charles has meanwhile made his way to the centre

0:15:090:15:12

of Liverpool to see how far his remaining £25 will stretch.

0:15:120:15:16

He's heading for Wayne Colquhoun Antiques,

0:15:170:15:21

-if he can stop waving to his adoring public, that is.

-Bye!

0:15:210:15:24

Once inside, Charles is having regrets about splashing his cash so early.

0:15:280:15:33

If only I hadn't succumbed earlier

0:15:340:15:37

-and bought three objects in one shop. I've got £25.

-How much?

-£25.

-£25.

0:15:370:15:42

-We'll sort something out for £25.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:15:420:15:46

Has Charles found a little something that fits the bill?

0:15:500:15:53

-It's a turkey.

-I have a reprint of the original Sabino catalogue.

0:15:530:15:59

Yes, Charles, this is no ordinary turkey. This is a Sabino turkey.

0:16:000:16:05

Sabino glass was made in the 1920s and '30s in Paris.

0:16:050:16:09

The firm was noted for Art Deco ornaments and figurines

0:16:090:16:12

in clear and coloured glass.

0:16:120:16:14

What's the best that could be, Wayne?

0:16:150:16:18

-How much have you got?

-£25.

-£30.

0:16:180:16:21

-Oh, golly!

-£25 to you.

-Are you sure?

0:16:210:16:24

Crikey! That would leave Charles without a penny

0:16:240:16:27

after only his second shop.

0:16:270:16:29

So to soften the blow, Wayne's offered his own personalised

0:16:290:16:33

-Dali-esque spectacle stand.

-So you're going to throw in your...

0:16:330:16:39

-I'll sell you the both of them for £20.

-Really?

0:16:390:16:42

That leaves you a fiver tomorrow.

0:16:420:16:44

A very generous offer indeed.

0:16:440:16:46

So that's £19 for the Art Deco turkey,

0:16:460:16:48

one pound for Wayne's modern art pottery stand.

0:16:480:16:52

-I'd shake on that if I were you, Charles.

-It's there! Taken.

0:16:520:16:56

Sold! Going, going, gone. We've done a great deal, I'm over the moon.

0:16:560:16:59

£1, and £19 for my dong-dong turkey.

0:16:590:17:03

Back together, it's been a busy day for our antiquarians,

0:17:050:17:09

but will their risky strategy of spending so much money

0:17:090:17:11

so quickly leave them with regrets?

0:17:110:17:14

Time to get your heads down, for tomorrow's another day!

0:17:140:17:18

Nighty-night!

0:17:180:17:19

Ah! The Great British countryside,

0:17:240:17:26

a chance to breathe in the fresh air

0:17:260:17:28

and let whatever comes to mind out into the open.

0:17:280:17:31

So, Phil, impress me. Entertain me.

0:17:310:17:34

Let the past wax lyrical and for you to just invest heavily, deeply,

0:17:340:17:38

passionately, and love the object.

0:17:380:17:40

Don't buy knobbly knick-knacks, please.

0:17:400:17:43

Because I love you.

0:17:430:17:45

Oh, dear. Looks like someone's had a little bit too much sun.

0:17:450:17:48

To be fair, Charles has invested heavily,

0:17:500:17:53

deeply and passionately in his four lots,

0:17:530:17:56

spending a whopping £195 of his budget on a tea caddy,

0:17:560:17:59

a pair of watercolours,

0:17:590:18:01

an earthenware bust and a glass turkey and spectacle stand combo.

0:18:010:18:06

That leaves him with just £5 to spend on his final item.

0:18:060:18:09

Philip has also pushed the boat out,

0:18:110:18:12

spending a mighty £140 on two lots so far -

0:18:120:18:15

a miniature parasol and clogs and a model of a coal tender,

0:18:150:18:19

leaving him with a healthy £60 still to spend.

0:18:190:18:23

-I could almost buy a leek.

-Sorry?

0:18:230:18:27

-I could almost buy a leek.

-No, they're a penny a go, Charlie.

0:18:270:18:30

-Do you like leeks? L-E-E-K?

-Charlie, where is this going?

0:18:300:18:34

Because we're going to Leek!

0:18:340:18:35

That's where we're going. We're going to Leek.

0:18:350:18:38

Ha! Charles is rather excited about it,

0:18:380:18:40

but that is exactly where he's taking you, Phil -

0:18:400:18:43

58 miles south-east to the town of Leek in Staffordshire.

0:18:430:18:47

This busy market town is known as the Queen Of The Moorlands

0:18:500:18:54

and has a large selection of antique shops.

0:18:540:18:56

-Go on, in you go.

-After you.

-No, no, no, age before beauty.

0:18:570:19:00

Including Phil Masters Antiques.

0:19:000:19:03

Good morning!

0:19:030:19:04

He's the one in the spiffing red jacket.

0:19:040:19:07

-This is a proper shop, isn't it?

-Fantastic!

0:19:070:19:10

Our experts are going head-to-head here.

0:19:100:19:13

Charles is dashing straight upstairs, hoping that's where

0:19:130:19:16

they put the cheap stuff, with his £5 note.

0:19:160:19:19

I don't even dare advise the dealer I've got £5, because actually,

0:19:190:19:23

I don't think there's anything here for £5. I'll go hunting.

0:19:230:19:28

So Charles is struggling,

0:19:300:19:31

but how's Phil faring with the £60 in his pocket?

0:19:310:19:34

-What is that on the end of that shelf there?

-This?

0:19:340:19:38

Yeah, what's that?

0:19:380:19:39

It came out of a pub, and I could do that for 30 quid.

0:19:400:19:45

-I think that's a bit of fun, isn't it?

-It's fun, yeah.

0:19:450:19:49

So what we've got is just a bit of, almost like an orange box,

0:19:490:19:54

-isn't it, just a bit of timber, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:19:540:19:57

That someone's painted in the 1950s,

0:19:570:20:00

but we don't know where the pub is. Oh, it's the Shoulder Of Mutton.

0:20:000:20:04

But they've also done it in a....

0:20:050:20:07

Like, tried to create a 3-D effect

0:20:070:20:09

by fretting out the shape of the pub.

0:20:090:20:12

I've got to buy three things

0:20:140:20:15

and I've got 60 quid.

0:20:150:20:17

Can I give you 20 quid for it?

0:20:170:20:19

That's my best shot.

0:20:190:20:21

-OK.

-Are you sure?

-Yes, we'll do that. Yeah.

-You're a gentleman.

0:20:210:20:25

-I think that's really quite fun.

-Yeah.

0:20:250:20:28

What's he up to with that picture, and where's he going?

0:20:280:20:32

Charlie, how you doing?

0:20:320:20:34

-I'm OK. Are you OK?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:20:340:20:36

-Yeah, nothing for me here, Charlie.

-No?

-No.

0:20:360:20:40

-Are you enjoying it?

-Yeah, it's quite nice.

-What's behind your back?

0:20:400:20:43

-Where?

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:20:430:20:45

-I told you!

-There's nothing behind my back.

-That looks very nice.

0:20:450:20:47

What?

0:20:470:20:49

HE LAUGHS

0:20:490:20:51

-Anyway, enjoy.

-I will enjoy.

0:20:510:20:52

My back, it's killing me. It really is.

0:20:520:20:54

Phil, you're good with your hands, aren't you?

0:20:540:20:56

-What?

-You're good with your hands.

0:20:560:20:58

-You could be a magician, the way you sort of...

-What?

0:20:580:21:01

What?! It's my back.

0:21:010:21:03

Honestly, just here. It's just been... I think it's your driving.

0:21:030:21:08

-Anyway, I'll see you, mate.

-Yeah.

0:21:080:21:10

-Cheers, buddy.

-That was quite clever, where's it gone?

0:21:100:21:13

Our Philip's ready to move on,

0:21:130:21:15

leaving a thoroughly confused Charles

0:21:150:21:17

to get himself out of a pickle.

0:21:170:21:19

He's enlisted owner Phil's help

0:21:190:21:21

to pick out some of his inexpensive items.

0:21:210:21:25

Pewter mug can be a fiver,

0:21:250:21:26

-but, you know, it's quite a nice shape.

-It is.

0:21:260:21:28

-But you might find that it's nothing rare.

-Uh-huh.

0:21:280:21:31

I think these are undervalued, these ships in bottles,

0:21:310:21:34

First World War, quite a lot of them,

0:21:340:21:36

you can have it for a fiver.

0:21:360:21:38

I can see you're also looking at a Staffordshire lady playing her...

0:21:380:21:43

Is that a harpsichord or... It's some sort of little...

0:21:430:21:47

It is a harpsichord, or a Welsh harp.

0:21:470:21:50

That's a harp if I ever saw one...

0:21:500:21:52

Yeah, there she is, playing a Welsh harp

0:21:520:21:55

and, obviously, the auction is in Wales,

0:21:550:21:57

and she's quite tempting actually.

0:21:570:21:59

-Ah... Yes.

-What can her best price be, Phil?

0:21:590:22:02

I thought perhaps £10?

0:22:020:22:04

Phil, could she, would she happily be...

0:22:040:22:09

It sounds better if I say 500...

0:22:090:22:13

pence.

0:22:130:22:14

Oh. Right!

0:22:140:22:17

-Oh, go on, then.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

0:22:170:22:19

Well, I never. Charles, hats off to you.

0:22:190:22:22

You pulled it out of the bag

0:22:220:22:24

and got a cracking little item to finish your shopping.

0:22:240:22:26

Well done.

0:22:260:22:27

The boys are back on the road and heading 17 miles west to Wheelock,

0:22:290:22:34

where Charles is dropping Phil off at his last shop.

0:22:340:22:37

Phil, this place is amazing.

0:22:370:22:38

-I'm looking forward to this shop.

-Hidden Treasures, Phil.

0:22:380:22:41

-Hidden Treasures.

-CAR BANGS

0:22:410:22:43

-Oh, Lord, what are you doing?!

-What's that?

0:22:430:22:46

-That was our exhaust, Charlie.

-Oh, Charles.

0:22:460:22:49

Hidden Treasures lives up to its name,

0:22:490:22:53

you never know what you might find amongst all this lot -

0:22:530:22:56

maybe even a new exhaust.

0:22:560:22:57

Surely Richard has some serious antiques

0:22:570:23:00

for Philip to get his head around.

0:23:000:23:02

Oh. Ow...

0:23:020:23:04

Ohh...

0:23:040:23:06

-Ow, try that again, Philip.

-That's made your eyes water.

0:23:060:23:09

Yeah, I might... Was it Mr Hodges out of Dad's Army?

0:23:090:23:13

"Put that light out!"

0:23:130:23:15

-He was the ARP warden, wasn't he? Was it ARP?

-Yeah.

0:23:150:23:18

This is a warden's helmet,

0:23:180:23:21

which is, what, Second World War, 39-45.

0:23:210:23:24

Today there is a well-established market for collecting militaria.

0:23:240:23:29

Priced up at £39, that could be a possibility.

0:23:290:23:32

Quite like that, Richard.

0:23:340:23:36

That's a piece of coloured, leaded light glass, isn't it?

0:23:380:23:42

-It is, yeah.

-Dates to about the 1920s,

0:23:420:23:44

-cos it's in a steel casement, isn't it?

-Yep.

-So it's sort of...

0:23:440:23:48

It's a bit Art Deco rather than Art Nouveau, isn't it?

0:23:480:23:50

That's right, yeah.

0:23:500:23:51

That's a lot of questions you seem to know the answer to, Phil,

0:23:510:23:55

but how about the all-important one?

0:23:550:23:56

-How much is that?

-That is £25.

0:23:560:23:59

Secular leaded lights like this,

0:23:590:24:02

as opposed to the more ornate stained-glass windows

0:24:020:24:05

found in churches,

0:24:050:24:07

were popular in the early part of the 20th century.

0:24:070:24:10

-Can we perhaps put that by?

-Yeah, no problem.

0:24:100:24:13

Still on the prowl,

0:24:130:24:14

are there any other hidden treasures for Phil?

0:24:140:24:17

That brings back memories for me.

0:24:170:24:19

One of the best moments of my television career

0:24:190:24:24

was on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:24:240:24:26

and I got to sit in a Lancaster bomber.

0:24:260:24:29

Just absolutely fantastic.

0:24:290:24:32

MUSIC: The Dam Busters' March

0:24:320:24:35

Let me put that back down.

0:24:430:24:45

Yes. We do look after you on the Road Trip.

0:24:450:24:48

Good memories, eh?

0:24:480:24:50

But it's time to make a decision on those items you looked at.

0:24:500:24:53

So we've got the leaded light, steel-case window,

0:24:530:24:56

that was priced at, what, £25?

0:24:560:24:58

Yeah.

0:24:580:24:59

And this warden's helmet,

0:24:590:25:01

-which was priced at thirty...?

-£39.

-£39.

0:25:010:25:04

Right, I'm going to be really cheeky here.

0:25:040:25:06

Richard, this is all I've got, right, there is no more,

0:25:060:25:09

it's not much.

0:25:090:25:11

-That is me, every last penny spent - £40.

-Right.

0:25:110:25:15

£20 apiece, any good to you?

0:25:150:25:17

Well...

0:25:180:25:19

Since you've got no more and you're buying the two,

0:25:200:25:22

-I'll do it.

-You're a gentleman, thank you ever so much.

0:25:220:25:24

Look at that.

0:25:240:25:26

So, both our experts are all shopped out and all spent out.

0:25:260:25:29

Jolly handsome.

0:25:310:25:32

Get to the auction, you're going to bomb.

0:25:330:25:36

Well, you'll have to wait a little longer for that auction, Phil.

0:25:370:25:40

While you've been busy shopping...

0:25:400:25:42

Charles has headed south

0:25:420:25:44

to Englesea Brook Chapel.

0:25:440:25:47

He has come to discover

0:25:470:25:48

how a small village on the Cheshire-Staffordshire border

0:25:480:25:52

had a huge impact on the world

0:25:520:25:54

as the birthplace of a movement

0:25:540:25:56

that was seen as a threat to the fabric of British society.

0:25:560:25:59

In the aftermath of the American and French Revolutions,

0:25:590:26:03

Britain introduced oppressive laws to quell domestic dissent.

0:26:030:26:07

Battling to be heard

0:26:070:26:09

was a religious splinter group called Primitive Methodism,

0:26:090:26:13

which played a major role

0:26:130:26:15

in changing the political landscape of 19th-century Britain.

0:26:150:26:20

This museum celebrates its history.

0:26:200:26:23

Good afternoon. It feels like going back to my primary school.

0:26:230:26:26

-Oh, does it!

-All over again. Charles Hanson.

-All right, welcome.

0:26:260:26:29

I'm Jill Barber, I'm the director of the museum here at Englesea Brook.

0:26:290:26:32

-Fantastic, may we go in?

-Yes, please do.

-Thank you very much.

0:26:320:26:35

Primitive Methodism was a working-class movement

0:26:360:26:40

which began in Mow Cop

0:26:400:26:42

in Staffordshire at the beginning of the 19th century.

0:26:420:26:45

Because of my ignorance, Jill, first of all,

0:26:450:26:47

I'm a very simple man from Derbyshire, when you say Primitive...

0:26:470:26:50

-Yeah.

-..Methodism. Just give a simple man a bit of a background.

0:26:500:26:53

OK, let's get rid of the Primitive first of all,

0:26:530:26:56

because that just sounds terrible. Primitive means "early",

0:26:560:26:59

so, back to basics.

0:26:590:27:00

So it's about going back to

0:27:000:27:02

the early form of Methodism under John Wesley.

0:27:020:27:04

John Wesley founded the Methodist movement in the mid-18th century

0:27:040:27:09

which focused on helping the poor

0:27:090:27:11

and, ultimately, they split from the Anglican Church.

0:27:110:27:15

And what happens after John Wesley's death,

0:27:150:27:18

all the things that he stood for

0:27:180:27:20

about reaching out to the poor, that sort of stopped a bit.

0:27:200:27:23

There were some who felt the Methodist Church

0:27:230:27:26

had lost sight of his legacy.

0:27:260:27:28

And others like them felt, actually,

0:27:280:27:31

the good news was about going out and preaching to the poor,

0:27:310:27:34

and they were influenced by an American called Lorenzo Dow,

0:27:340:27:37

who was a bit crazy, looked a bit like a 1960s hippy.

0:27:370:27:40

And he came and preached in this area

0:27:400:27:43

and he was telling them about the camp meetings they have in America,

0:27:430:27:46

they were going, "Wow! That sounds just what we need to do."

0:27:460:27:49

It was this enthusiasm for Dow's radical preaching

0:27:490:27:53

from revolutionary America

0:27:530:27:55

that made the Primitive Methodists

0:27:550:27:57

seem such a danger to the British government.

0:27:570:28:00

But it was this new style of outdoor teaching

0:28:000:28:03

that proved so popular with the working class.

0:28:030:28:05

And as a result of that, the Methodist Church said,

0:28:050:28:08

"Wow, this is not respectable.

0:28:080:28:10

"Anybody that does open-air preaching,

0:28:100:28:13

"goes to a camp meeting,

0:28:130:28:14

"is out of the Methodist Church."

0:28:140:28:16

It really just met the needs of the age,

0:28:160:28:20

because what it did, it empowered ordinary working people.

0:28:200:28:23

The followers learned skills in leadership and public speaking,

0:28:240:28:28

making them the perfect candidates

0:28:280:28:31

for a burgeoning trade union movement.

0:28:310:28:33

Most of the early trade union leaders were Methodists,

0:28:330:28:36

and particularly Primitive Methodists,

0:28:360:28:39

because they were working people

0:28:390:28:41

who'd developed the skills through the chapel.

0:28:410:28:43

And what Primitive Methodism did, it gave them a voice,

0:28:430:28:46

it gave them a means, and possibly, arguably,

0:28:460:28:49

averted a French Revolution happening here.

0:28:490:28:52

This forward-thinking movement

0:28:520:28:55

was also ahead of its time

0:28:550:28:56

by actively encouraging women to preach.

0:28:560:28:59

What Hugh Bourne did, he was a real man of vision,

0:28:590:29:02

I admire him because it's hard to go against the ideas of your age,

0:29:020:29:06

and that's what he did.

0:29:060:29:07

And he not only encouraged girls,

0:29:070:29:11

young girls to preach,

0:29:110:29:14

go out as local preachers,

0:29:140:29:16

but he even paid them as travelling ministers.

0:29:160:29:20

While Primitive Methodism

0:29:200:29:22

merged with mainstream Methodism

0:29:220:29:24

in the early 20th century,

0:29:240:29:26

it had been at the vanguard

0:29:260:29:28

of the fledgling democracy in Britain

0:29:280:29:30

that gave working-class people a voice and a vote.

0:29:300:29:34

So, after that enlightening visit,

0:29:340:29:37

our two treasure-seekers are meeting up for the grand unveiling.

0:29:370:29:41

-Three, two, one - Phil, reveal all.

-Oh, Lord.

-Hello.

0:29:410:29:46

There's my little bits, Charlie.

0:29:460:29:47

-I like them.

-Do you?

-Do you know what, I really, really do.

0:29:470:29:51

-You're just saying that.

-No, I'm being serious, Phil. What I love...

0:29:510:29:54

No, I'm being serious, Phil. You've got a lovely lot of clobber,

0:29:540:29:57

-but the biggest and best piece of clobber you've got...

-Clobber?!

0:29:570:30:00

-No, clobber, for the auction. I love this.

-It's nice, isn't it?

0:30:000:30:03

-Phil, that could fly.

-Who knows? That was £110.

-Yes.

0:30:030:30:06

I love this. You were there when I was sneaking out with this.

0:30:060:30:09

-Absolutely.

-20 quid.

-Yeah.

0:30:090:30:10

-20 quid.

-What's its history?

0:30:100:30:12

Well, it's dated 1939, so it's Second World War.

0:30:120:30:15

Do you remember Dad's Army? "Put that light out!"

0:30:150:30:18

-Yes. Yes, I do.

-It's him, isn't it?

-Yeah, I like it.

0:30:180:30:20

-Yeah?

-I like it.

-That little lot was 30 quid.

0:30:200:30:23

-Tell me about your little kinky boots.

-I thought they were your size.

0:30:230:30:26

They're not my size!

0:30:260:30:28

Are they old, because you've gone for National Coal Board

0:30:280:30:31

-and then this reflects...

-I'm going for a working man's ethic.

0:30:310:30:35

I think you are. I like your style.

0:30:350:30:37

I bought this leaded light window here,

0:30:370:30:39

-and I thought I'd got two shots with this.

-That's nice.

-Because...

0:30:390:30:42

Take the leaded glass out and you've got a nice industrial steel frame

0:30:420:30:47

-to stand down and put a mirror in.

-Absolutely.

-Double whammy.

0:30:470:30:49

But also, it's in that lovely Art Nouveau taste, isn't it, as well?

0:30:490:30:53

-It's a bit later than that, I think.

-Is it?

-£200 all gone.

0:30:530:30:55

Now for Charles' £200 worth.

0:30:550:30:58

Phil, prepare to be intrigued, I think,

0:30:580:31:01

by my first batch of items just for you.

0:31:010:31:04

Right.

0:31:040:31:05

-I like your box, Charlie.

-Do you really?

0:31:070:31:09

That's got to be your top lot.

0:31:090:31:11

I bought this off a greengrocer,

0:31:110:31:13

and if you want a wonderful 1820s-1830s tea caddy, this is it.

0:31:130:31:16

It is missing its mixing bowl, but look at that inlay on the back,

0:31:160:31:19

look at the top.

0:31:190:31:20

It's a gorgeous tea caddy, big and bulky.

0:31:200:31:23

Yeah, that's a good lot, Charlie.

0:31:230:31:25

But 20 years ago it would have fetched far more.

0:31:250:31:28

20 years ago that was 250 quid.

0:31:280:31:30

Now, if you have a good day, it might make you 150-160.

0:31:300:31:33

-That's what I thought. Exactly, Phil.

-What's this all about, Charlie?

0:31:330:31:36

Well, Phil, I know you like the female form

0:31:360:31:39

and I know you like a bit of organic feel in a lady

0:31:390:31:43

and this lady represents the Art Nouveau.

0:31:430:31:46

-I think she's a good decorative lot, actually.

-Seriously?

0:31:460:31:49

Yeah, I do, honestly. What did you pay for that?

0:31:490:31:51

-£55.

-Well done, John.

0:31:510:31:53

That's fantastic. Well done.

0:31:530:31:55

Here is a Welsh girl playing the harpsichord.

0:31:550:31:58

I'm hoping, Phil, she's Staffordshire pottery, she's 1860,

0:31:580:32:02

she might play sweet music in Wales.

0:32:020:32:04

She might do, Charles, but not on a harpsichord -

0:32:040:32:07

once again, that's a harp. Oh, boy...

0:32:070:32:09

And this is the last lot, is it, these watercolours?

0:32:090:32:13

-I know that artist.

-Do you really?

-Yeah, I do.

0:32:130:32:16

-I can't remember, but I've sold work by him before.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:32:160:32:19

I think you've done really, really well.

0:32:190:32:22

And off they go.

0:32:220:32:24

It's time to get back on the road and head to auction.

0:32:280:32:31

It's been a frenetic first leg

0:32:330:32:35

for our dynamic duo,

0:32:350:32:37

kicking off in Southport,

0:32:370:32:38

passing through Liverpool

0:32:380:32:39

before heading into the Cheshire countryside

0:32:390:32:42

and ending in Wrexham

0:32:420:32:43

for their first auction of the trip.

0:32:430:32:45

Wrexham is the largest town in North Wales

0:32:450:32:49

and claims to be the first place that lager was brewed in Britain.

0:32:490:32:52

Just park, Charlie, park.

0:32:530:32:55

-Just park, Charlie!

-Perfect.

-Charlie, stop, stop.

0:32:550:32:58

Stop, Charlie, stop.

0:32:580:32:59

-Phil, that is like a hand in a glove.

-What? Yeah...

0:32:590:33:03

At least he didn't hit the wall(!)

0:33:040:33:06

The first auction of the Road Trip for our boys is at Wingetts.

0:33:060:33:10

Established for over 50 years,

0:33:100:33:12

they hold a monthly antique, fine art and collectable sale

0:33:120:33:16

that is renowned.

0:33:160:33:17

-Are you going first, or shall I go in first?

-You go first, Charlie.

0:33:170:33:20

-Why?

-I want to just delay the pleasure for as long as possible.

0:33:200:33:23

Look, try hard not to break anything.

0:33:230:33:25

Ah, he knows you well, Charles.

0:33:250:33:28

The man with the gavel in his grasp is Richard Hughes.

0:33:290:33:33

Let's see what he thinks of our experts' choices.

0:33:330:33:36

Decorative piece.

0:33:360:33:37

I don't know whether you'd want to leave it in the garden too long,

0:33:370:33:40

but I'd be hoping to get towards £100 or so for that,

0:33:400:33:44

certainly getting there.

0:33:440:33:46

The railway cart, NCB, National Coal Board,

0:33:460:33:50

nice well-made model.

0:33:500:33:52

It looks like it's been either in a fire or a bit too close to a fire,

0:33:520:33:56

because the condition's a little bit blistered,

0:33:560:33:59

but £50, £60. All of that.

0:33:590:34:01

Sounds promising.

0:34:010:34:03

Phil and Charles both began this leg

0:34:030:34:06

with the Road Trip's bulging budget of £200

0:34:060:34:10

and both blew the lot.

0:34:100:34:12

That's the spirit.

0:34:120:34:13

Both bought true to form,

0:34:130:34:15

with Philip Serrell spending every last penny of his budget

0:34:150:34:18

on an eclectic mix of items to make up his five lots.

0:34:180:34:21

While Charles Hanson went down a more classical route

0:34:220:34:26

in choosing his five lots.

0:34:260:34:27

-It's a very tense auction.

-'All the jewellery, £5...'

0:34:310:34:34

Do you feel tense?

0:34:340:34:35

Yes, I've got a slight clenching feeling around the buttocks.

0:34:350:34:39

Too late for nerves, boys, the auction is about to begin.

0:34:400:34:43

First up is Charles' Staffordshire pottery figure.

0:34:450:34:49

Start me then, £5.

0:34:490:34:51

-£5?

-Oh...

0:34:510:34:53

£5 I've got on my right then, straight in with you, who'll say 8?

0:34:530:34:55

It's the maiden bid, 8. I'm bid 10. 10, madam? 12.

0:34:550:35:00

15?

0:35:000:35:02

18.

0:35:020:35:03

£15 lady's bid front.

0:35:030:35:07

Goes at 15.

0:35:070:35:08

A £10 profit, Charles. Steady...

0:35:100:35:12

but not much to harp about.

0:35:120:35:14

-That's a good start, isn't it?

-Yeah, it was.

0:35:140:35:17

OK, it's a good start.

0:35:170:35:19

Now, if anyone by chance came along

0:35:210:35:23

looking for a glass turkey

0:35:230:35:24

and spectacle stand,

0:35:240:35:26

then they're in luck.

0:35:260:35:27

Stand by.

0:35:270:35:29

Nice little group, those. £30 the two.

0:35:310:35:33

-Got to be that.

-Come on.

0:35:330:35:35

I've got £10 bid with me, then.

0:35:350:35:36

Big loss.

0:35:360:35:38

15, 18, 20, 22.

0:35:380:35:40

£22, the bid's in the room at £25.

0:35:400:35:44

A fresh bidder - 28.

0:35:440:35:47

£25, the bid's dead centre with you, sir, at 25.

0:35:470:35:50

You're out behind? All done.

0:35:500:35:53

Charlie, there's just no stopping you, is there?

0:35:530:35:55

-Isn't that a loss due to commission?

-No, no, no, no.

0:35:550:35:58

No, don't worry, Charles,

0:35:580:36:00

after commission that actually scraped a profit.

0:36:000:36:03

Next up is Phil's first lot,

0:36:040:36:06

the miniature clogs and the parasol.

0:36:060:36:10

10 to start, £10 I got, thank you, madam.

0:36:100:36:13

Again, now, is there 12 in the room?

0:36:130:36:15

It's the main bid, the lady's bid.

0:36:150:36:17

15, 18. 20.

0:36:170:36:18

20, sir, and 22. 25.

0:36:180:36:22

£22. 25.

0:36:220:36:24

A fresh bidder - 28.

0:36:240:36:26

28, sir.

0:36:260:36:28

30. It's only money. And 32.

0:36:280:36:32

£30 bid's in front.

0:36:320:36:35

Charlie, could you wipe that smile off your face, please?

0:36:360:36:40

He's probably just worked out

0:36:400:36:42

that that's a loss after commission, Phil.

0:36:420:36:45

But here's the warden's helmet

0:36:460:36:48

that you were confident would blow Charles away.

0:36:480:36:51

I've got £20 bids.

0:36:520:36:54

INAUDIBLE SPEECH

0:36:540:36:56

30. And 35, sir?

0:36:560:36:57

40. And 45?

0:36:570:36:59

45.

0:36:590:37:00

Well done, it's getting there.

0:37:000:37:02

I'll take 48 if you like it.

0:37:020:37:05

Sold at 45.

0:37:070:37:08

-That's a shock, Charlie.

-Well done. Well done.

-What a great result.

0:37:100:37:13

You called it, Phil - a healthy profit to edge you in front.

0:37:130:37:18

Now, can Charles combat it with this pair of watercolours?

0:37:180:37:23

These are nice, but they could crash.

0:37:230:37:25

HB Davis, 1922,

0:37:250:37:27

it's going to be £50 for them. For the pair.

0:37:270:37:29

Come on...

0:37:290:37:31

Nice frames as well.

0:37:310:37:33

£20 to start, then. £20 I've got, thank you.

0:37:330:37:36

-That's all right, Charles.

-Down 10.

0:37:360:37:38

Maiden bid at £20 with you, sir.

0:37:380:37:40

25 bid, 30.

0:37:400:37:42

£25 bid, I'll take 28 if it helps you now.

0:37:420:37:46

£25.

0:37:460:37:47

Is there 28?

0:37:470:37:49

Sold at £25.

0:37:490:37:53

That's cost you 8 quid, I think.

0:37:530:37:56

And your profit overall is sailing away from you.

0:37:580:38:01

But will Phil's stay on track

0:38:020:38:05

with his model of a coal tender?

0:38:050:38:07

Lovely quality, nicely made and put together. Lot 90.

0:38:070:38:10

-Give me 100 for it.

-Wow.

0:38:100:38:12

£100 I got.

0:38:120:38:13

Straight in. At £100, it's the lady's bid at the back of the room.

0:38:130:38:17

Who'll say 105 for it?

0:38:170:38:19

Maiden bid with you, madam, at £100.

0:38:190:38:22

Starting bid £100.

0:38:220:38:24

Sold for 100!

0:38:240:38:26

Wow.

0:38:260:38:28

Oh, dear. The face says it all.

0:38:280:38:30

I think Phil saw more than £100 on that.

0:38:300:38:33

You need two to tango, and she had no-one to tango with.

0:38:330:38:35

Best wait until your big purchase has been sold, Charles.

0:38:380:38:41

It's your large tea caddy up next.

0:38:410:38:43

It is too much, I love it.

0:38:430:38:45

No regrets. No regrets.

0:38:450:38:47

How much for it? Give me 50.

0:38:470:38:49

-Start me.

-Oh, it's a killer.

0:38:490:38:51

£50 I've got, straight in. 55 bid, 60. 65.

0:38:510:38:55

70, 75, 80, 85.

0:38:550:38:59

90, 95. 100.

0:38:590:39:02

-Go on, go on.

-95, madam.

0:39:020:39:05

Sold at £95.

0:39:050:39:09

That's great. I've lost money, but it was an object worth buying.

0:39:090:39:12

That's the spirit, Charles, you're right.

0:39:120:39:15

After auction costs that'll be a small loss,

0:39:150:39:18

but I'd say you were unlucky there.

0:39:180:39:20

Moving on, it's Phil's leaded light window.

0:39:200:39:23

He feels it's got more than one use

0:39:230:39:26

but will it have more than one bidder this time?

0:39:260:39:28

Window light. Give me £20 for that one.

0:39:280:39:30

£10. £10. 12 bid.

0:39:310:39:34

15, madam, 18, 20.

0:39:340:39:37

And 22. 25.

0:39:370:39:39

£22, seated right at the back...

0:39:390:39:43

That's a relief, Charles.

0:39:430:39:45

22 bid. All done.

0:39:450:39:48

That's another loss after the auction takes its commission.

0:39:490:39:52

Maybe buying their items so quickly is coming back to haunt them.

0:39:520:39:56

Come on, Charles, let's end with a profit on your last lot,

0:39:570:40:01

the earthenware bust of a lady.

0:40:010:40:03

Gosh, I'm quite nervous now.

0:40:030:40:04

-I've got 50 bid with me to start with, 50 bid.

-Good start.

0:40:040:40:07

50 bid. 55, 65, sir.

0:40:070:40:09

70, and 75.

0:40:090:40:11

£70, 75, 80. 85, madam?

0:40:110:40:14

90, 95. £95 and out now,

0:40:140:40:17

the bid's the lady's bid at the back of the room at £95.

0:40:170:40:21

I'll take 100 if you want.

0:40:210:40:22

100 bid, 110, madam.

0:40:220:40:25

105 if it helps you?

0:40:250:40:27

105 bid. 110.

0:40:270:40:28

115.

0:40:280:40:30

Bid's by me. Finished at 110.

0:40:300:40:33

I'll let you have a little smile, Charlie,

0:40:350:40:37

cos I know you'll break in your next two.

0:40:370:40:39

-That's really well done, you.

-I'm pleased, I'm really pleased, yeah.

0:40:390:40:42

A great way to finish off, Charles, well done.

0:40:420:40:45

That's brought some respectability back.

0:40:450:40:48

At last, but hopefully not least,

0:40:490:40:51

it's Phil's folk art panel painting of a pub.

0:40:510:40:55

A bit of fun. Give me £20 for it.

0:40:550:40:58

I'll take 10 to start, then.

0:40:580:41:00

Must be that, surely.

0:41:000:41:01

-Ouch.

-No bid for it.

0:41:010:41:04

£5. Needs a new home.

0:41:040:41:07

Nobody want it?

0:41:070:41:09

£2?

0:41:090:41:12

Oh, no, don't sell it for that!

0:41:120:41:15

Who'll say 4 in the room? That is for nothing, that.

0:41:150:41:17

The main bidder 2.

0:41:170:41:18

4, I'm bid, standing. 6, 8?

0:41:180:41:21

No? We tried.

0:41:210:41:23

Sold at 6, then.

0:41:230:41:25

That's hard.

0:41:250:41:27

Well, Phil, it's closing time on your first auction

0:41:280:41:32

and you've ended up with a loss.

0:41:320:41:34

-Do you want me to go?

-Yes, I do, I want you to leave the building.

0:41:340:41:38

CHARLES LAUGHS

0:41:380:41:39

I hate him. I really don't like him at all.

0:41:390:41:42

There's room for improvement, there, boys,

0:41:450:41:48

but onwards and upwards.

0:41:480:41:49

Both our experts started this leg with £200

0:41:490:41:52

and, after paying auction costs,

0:41:520:41:54

Phil has made a sorry loss of £33.54

0:41:540:41:58

that leaves him with £166.46 to carry forward.

0:41:580:42:02

That cheeky scamp Charles Hanson, on the other hand,

0:42:040:42:06

has triumphed today.

0:42:060:42:08

He's made a profit of £21.40,

0:42:080:42:10

which means he takes forward £221.40

0:42:100:42:14

to spend next time.

0:42:140:42:16

The way I look at it, you're up, I'm down,

0:42:160:42:19

but there is a bright side.

0:42:190:42:21

-I get to drive now.

-And also, Phil, this is only act one.

0:42:210:42:24

-There's four acts to go.

-Theatre, romance, drama,

0:42:240:42:27

but I do get to drive, don't I?

0:42:270:42:29

-Yes, you do.

-Thank the Lord for that.

0:42:290:42:31

Charlie, stop it. It's not big. I'm going to kick you.

0:42:310:42:35

No, don't kick me in the bottom. Ow!

0:42:350:42:39

-Oh! Ow.

-Get out. Go on.

-What was that for? That's not fair.

0:42:390:42:43

All the best!

0:42:430:42:44

Oh, do behave, Charles.

0:42:490:42:50

I'm sure you'll both bring the big guns out on the next leg.

0:42:500:42:54

Next time on Antiques Road Trip, Philip goes out on a limb.

0:42:550:42:58

I don't know what it's worth and I don't know what it is.

0:42:580:43:01

And Charles has the dealers wrapped around his finger.

0:43:010:43:04

Would you be open to an offer on the whole lot?

0:43:040:43:07

I'll listen, but I won't...

0:43:070:43:08

No! I'm your mate.

0:43:080:43:11

Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson start their road trip in the seaside town of Southport. They head through Merseyside, Staffordshire and Cheshire before ending up at Wrexham in Wales for the first auction.