Episode 2 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 2

Antiques experts Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson begin the second leg of their road trip in Stafford. They head through the Midlands before crossing the Welsh border.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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All right, viewers?

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With £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire. Yes!

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Sold. Going, going, gone.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it is no mean feat.

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-Oh!

-50p!

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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Ow!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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On this Road Trip we are catching a lift with two smooth operators -

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Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson.

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-It's quite leafy, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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-I think that's got something to do with the trees, Charlie.

-Yes, yeah.

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Fine art and antiques expert

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Philip has an eye for the finer things in life.

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"First class only."

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That means Hanson wouldn't be allowed to sit on this.

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Ooh! Whilst auctioneer Charles likes to think of himself as a man

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-of the people.

-Would you be open to an offer on the whole lot?

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I'll listen, but I won't accept.

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Oh, no. Don, I'm your mate.

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They're cruising the countryside in a 1969 Triumph GT6 convertible

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and whilst Philip's at the wheel,

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Charles is providing the music.

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# Do, a deer, a female deer

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# Re, a drop of golden sun. #

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Oh, lordy. But he has got plenty to sing about.

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As on the last leg, Charles did very well indeed.

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I'm spinning. My head is spinning.

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But Philip isn't prepared to take defeat lying down.

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-Well done.

-What a great result.

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Both of our daring duos started the Road Trip with £200,

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but after the first auction, Philip saw his cash dwindle

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to just £166.46.

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Poor old love.

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But Charles invested wisely and now has £221.40,

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putting him nearly £55 in front.

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But on this leg Charles will be shopping in Philip's hometown.

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I phoned them all up.

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I said to them all, "Charlie Hanson

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"is coming here tomorrow, kipper him."

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That's what I told them. "Absolutely kipper him."

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Now, now, Philip. Play nice.

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On this trip they began in the north-west of England

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at Southport before winding their way through Wales, across to London

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before finally reaching Cirencester in the Cotswolds.

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On this second leg of the trip,

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they begin their shopping in Stafford in Staffordshire

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before crossing the Welsh border for auction in Brecon in Powys.

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In the 1800s, Stafford had a thriving shoemaking industry.

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Shoes made here were highly sought-after

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and exported around the world.

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An apt place for Philip to begin his shopping

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as he is as tough as old boots when it comes to finding a bargain. Ha!

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-Hi, I'm Philip. How are you?

-Fine, thanks, Phil. How are you? Ian.

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-Ian, good to see you.

-Nice to meet you.

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You've got some interesting things here by the looks of things.

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He has indeed.

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Surely enough to inspire your first purchase of the day.

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Let me have a look at this thing that I saw in the window.

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That, I do like.

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I don't know what it's worth and I don't know what it is.

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Maybe I can assist.

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HMS Essex was a Welsh-built armoured cruiser launched in 1900.

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She served for over 20 years,

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surviving action in the First World War.

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What I think it is, and this is a guess,

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is that it is a gift given to someone leaving ship

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so maybe the chief engineer, stoker, maybe even the captain.

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-But is the price tag a gift too?

-Give me the ticket price.

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The ticket price is £110.

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-£110, OK. Has it been in here long?

-A couple of weeks.

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-Three or four weeks.

-OK, so it's been in a year then, really.

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Phil knows your game, Ian.

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But with this place packed with all sorts of goodies,

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I'm sure he'll find something that will turn a profit.

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-What's that?

-That's a pencil sharpener.

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So you would basically put your pencil in the radiator

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of the car, then press the spare tyre at the back like that

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and it's just a little pencil sharpener.

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How sweet is that?

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-And what's the ticket price on that?

-£20.

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-That might be an option, mightn't it?

-A nice little thing.

-OK.

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One to consider and definitely in Philip's price range. As is this.

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Oh, that's quite sweet, isn't it?

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This could almost be Del Trotter's because we've got London, Paris.

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We haven't got Peckham, but we've got New York, so it could be.

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This is a Del Trotter ladies' needle case. Or not needle case.

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The ticket price is £20.

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He who dares, Philip. He who dares.

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So we've got some tweezers, some scissors,

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some wax out your ear-hole things,

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which never strikes me as being very savoury,

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a nail file and another wax out your ear-hole job.

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Yeah, I think I'd probably rather a doctor do that, wouldn't you?

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Probably for the best.

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So far Phil has amassed three possible items,

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but he's not finished yet.

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What's nice about this, it's a little Tri-ang toy cart

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made by the Tri-ang toy company.

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It looks like it's scratched but it's actually really nice to

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have that little label on a wooden toy.

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There is just a nice attention to detail. Lovely wheels, look.

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All I need now is to find an avid toy collector

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in mid Wales.

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This cart with horse might be more Steptoe than Del Boy,

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but at £55, could it be too upmarket for Phil?

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So, be honest, you're not really going to ever

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lose any money on it, are you?

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Let me tell you.

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I have done this programme for long enough to know I am capable

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of disappearing up my own backside without any help from anybody here.

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That's not savoury. Phil's four items come to £205.

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That's £50 more than he's got.

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I was trying to get it for under 100 quid.

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-Under £100?

-Yeah.

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So you twitched there. I hate it when people twitch on me.

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-Did you feel any pain at all then?

-Yeah, I did, actually. Yeah.

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-You could have it for £110. Death.

-100 quid, death?

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This is always good, this bit. I like this bit.

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Two, four, six, eight, ten.

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-How does that look, then?

-It doesn't normally work.

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-This doesn't normally work. You do realise that.

-You're a gentleman.

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-But as it's you...

-Thank you very much.

-It's OK.

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You have been very, very kind to me.

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Philip has spent most of his budget in the first shop -

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exactly what he did at the start of the last leg,

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where he ended up making a loss. I hope he's not being too hasty here.

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Charles, meanwhile, has headed over to Moseley Old Hall in Wolverhampton,

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an atmospheric Elizabethan farmhouse that saved a king

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and played a key role in royal history.

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He is meeting Malcolm Astley, who will be showing him around.

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-Good morning. How are you? I'm Charles Hanson.

-Malcolm.

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Malcolm, good to see you.

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-Malcolm, what a wonderful building.

-Beautiful.

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In the mid-1600s, Parliament had becoming increasingly distrustful

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of King Charles I, especially

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since his marriage to a Roman Catholic.

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In 1642, civil war broke out

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led by MP Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army.

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The King's forces were crushed and England was declared a republic.

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Persecution of Catholics was widespread.

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Moseley Hall was home to Thomas Whitgreave

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who was not only Catholic but staunchly royalist.

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-This round here was in fact known as Little Rome.

-Really?

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There were more Roman Catholics around here at that time than

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many other counties.

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After his father's death, Charles II fought to restore the monarchy,

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but after another defeat, he went on the run,

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sought shelter in an oak tree

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before seeking refuge at Moseley Hall.

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When Charles arrives,

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he comes through a gate in the wall over there, comes across what

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-was then the orchard, through here and that is the very door.

-Really?

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That is the door.

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-That is the door.

-That is the door that Charles came through.

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So Charles I beheaded, Charles II came through that door.

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-Yes, he did indeed.

-Can I be Charles III

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-and take a wander through that door as well?

-Yeah.

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-Of course.

-I'll follow your lead, Malcolm.

-Come on, then. Let's go.

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Thomas Whitgreave was already helping a local priest who was

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-hiding at Moseley Hall at the time.

-So, Malcolm, where are we going?

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We are going into the priest's bedroom. Father John Huddleston.

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-Yes.

-He was the resident priest here,

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but, of course, he gave up his room.

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The priest said, "You have my bedroom."

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-So this is the room...

-This is the room Charles used.

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..that our future King Charles II

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stayed in when he was being chased by Cromwell.

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Being chased by Cromwell's Parliamentarians.

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-And this bed here?

-That's the original bed.

-That is the bed.

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-That is the bed Charles used.

-That's amazing.

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Charles lived here, confined to two rooms, living under fear

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that Cromwell's troops could come knocking at any time.

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What would've happened if Cromwell's army had come knocking

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-here on the door, looking for the King?

-Actually, they did.

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They came here hammering at the door and of course Thomas Whitgreave

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immediately thought, "Goodness me, they've come for the King."

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Whitgreave ushered the King through a secret passageway

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and down a priest's hole to hide him from the potential captors.

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-So the priest hole is here.

-Yes. Down there.

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Down there, that is the priest's hole down there. Get down!

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-OK, I'm going down.

-Down.

-So down I go, Malcolm.

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So, I go all the way in. So, back in 1651, this is how Charles II...

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And I would hide a trap door over it.

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-Over there. No candles, nothing.

-I'm going down, Malcolm.

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-There's no mice, are there?

-No.

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-Are you sure? No rats, no rodents?

-No.

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It's so moving that this priest hole was so pivotal to English history.

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It really was. A matter of a few hours and a whole thing changes.

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Our whole history is based on those few hours down there.

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-Have they gone yet?

-They've gone, come on. You're OK.

-Can I come out?

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-You're OK.

-Thank you, Mr Whitgreave.

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Charles knew he couldn't stay at Moseley Hall indefinitely.

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He departed for nearby Bentley Hall, where he met Jane Lane.

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She helped him flee England to France.

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It was something Charles never forgot

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and wrote to her after his restoration to the throne.

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Remarkable there, it reads, I can see,

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"For it is impossible I can ever forget the great debt I owe you,

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"which I hope I shall live to pay in the degree that is worthy of me.

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-"Your most affectionate friend..."

-"Charles II."

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Thank you so much, Malcolm.

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It has been a revelation to sit in that hidey hole

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and to play King Charles II is one thing I won't forget.

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-And I am so grateful.

-It's a wonderful place.

-Thank you, Malcolm.

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It is, but not for too long.

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After hearing an inspiring story fit for a king,

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Philip's picked up Charles and they're off to Shifnal in Shropshire

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and there's only one thing on their mind.

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# It's not about the money, money, money

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-# It's not about the money, money, money...

-#

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-JESSIE J:

-# We just wanna make the world dance

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# Forget about the price tag. #

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Gosh, they seem like they're in a jolly good mood.

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THEY LAUGH

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It must be all that cash in their pockets.

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CHARLES LAUGHS

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Get out, Charlie. Get out.

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-Charlie, you're leaning all over me.

-Sorry!

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I can't get out the car.

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-There we are.

-Get out!

-I'm going.

-Get out!

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Behave, you two.

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-Go, go, go.

-See you later.

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What are they like?

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Mad, mad, mad, mad, mad.

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First stop for Charles is a place called TwoJays.

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This place has only been open a week so maybe owner Jacqui has

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something that can make a profit at the Brecon auction.

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So you want something Welsh?

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Welsh, which might just salute the auction house we're going to.

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-I've got the perfect things.

-Have you really?

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The perfect things? That's quite the statement, Jacqui.

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-I've got a plan.

-Good.

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I've got a plan.

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What often works well at auction, particularly in Wales,

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is when you try and buy a collection of copper lustre

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because Welsh collectors,

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they like copper lustre and these bits here are very Welsh inspired.

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Going to Wales, going to Powys,

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I suspect this sort of copper lustre could actually cause a stir.

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It looks like Jacqui was right.

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The perfect item for a Welsh auction and at £40 for eight pieces,

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well within the budget of our man with the plan, Charles.

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Jacqui, is there much outside at all?

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-There's some garden furniture outside.

-Could I have a look?

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-Would you mind?

-No.

-Thank you.

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Eh? Garden furniture? I thought you had found the perfect item.

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-Jacqui, what are these figures made of? These ladies.

-Concrete.

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-I think they are just cast concrete.

-Yeah, they are.

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Not copper lustre then? Do the Welsh love concrete too?

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They have a certain weathered look about them.

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They're not very old, they're 20 or so years old.

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They've got a few knocks,

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they've been really quite cheaply put together.

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Great hidden in the garden. Under a tree or in a flower bed.

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So, they're damaged, they're cheaply put together

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and they're not that old.

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Why do I feel an offer coming on?

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How much are they, Jacqui? What is your best price on them?

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-£100.

-For all three? That isn't bad, is it? I mean...

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-For you, £100.

-Really? £100 for them.

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What I've also seen on the subject of garden ornaments

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are the pair of lions over here.

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What was that you said earlier about buying for the Welsh auction?

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These are hardly Welsh. HE ROARS

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They look wonderful at the edges of drives, don't they?

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People have that grandeur and that distinction having a pair of lions.

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But you can see the problem is with these,

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sadly this right-hand side of the lion,

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he has had all of his legs detached from the base.

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-So transport must be very careful.

-Yes, very careful.

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Yes, these lions are badly damaged.

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At least they will go well with the three statues.

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What is the best price, Jacqui? Between friends.

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-£50.

-£50. OK.

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I'll give it some thought.

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Yes, that's a lot to think about, Charles.

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£150 for two lots of crumbling garden ornaments

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and £40 for the Welsh inspired copper lustre.

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I have a bad feeling about all this.

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THUNDER RUMBLES

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You can hear the thunder outside, can't you?

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The thunder is rumbling, saying, "Come on, Hanson, you know.

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"You've got to make a decision now."

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God, this is exciting.

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As the clouds gather, it is make-your-mind-up time, Charles.

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I think what I want to do is buy something substantial

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that is going to just be my curtain raiser on this

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shopping trip and in that regard,

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and I know Philip likes the female form,

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I quite like your three Graces.

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And the lions. And they are the two I would like to buy.

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If I bought that whole lot together, what is the best price?

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-£80.

-It is so tempting.

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Because they're modern and haphazard, I'd pay about £50.

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Mmm.

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-£80 would be better.

-Yeah.

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This lot might be damaged,

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but you can't argue with a £70 discount, can you?

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-Yeah, I'll take them.

-Yeah?

-Yeah, thanks, Jacqui.

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Let's give it a go at auction.

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-Good luck.

-Thank you, Jacqui.

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Looks like he might need it.

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But for now it's time to call it a day. So night-night, you two birds.

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It is the start of a new day

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and Charles is feeling inspired by the scenery.

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Look at these trees here.

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You could just be in the middle of a rainforest. You could be in Brazil.

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They could have given me anybody on this Road Trip,

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but I end up with him.

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Yesterday, Charles spent £80 on three figures and the two lions,

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leaving his pockets still bulging with £141.40.

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God, this is exciting.

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Philip spent a bit more.

0:16:140:16:16

£100 on a Navy medal, horse and cart,

0:16:160:16:18

pencil sharpener and manicure set.

0:16:180:16:21

That leaves him just £66.46.

0:16:210:16:24

You have been very, very kind to me.

0:16:240:16:27

And having lost the first auction, he is eager to make it count.

0:16:270:16:30

Charlie, let me just tell you,

0:16:300:16:32

it genuinely doesn't matter who wins, as long as I do.

0:16:320:16:35

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

-Honestly.

0:16:350:16:37

Yeah, right.

0:16:370:16:38

They're making their way to the market town of Ludlow in Shropshire.

0:16:380:16:42

Charles's first shop of the day is Bayliss Antiques.

0:16:420:16:45

-Morning.

-How are you?

-Very well, thanks.

0:16:460:16:48

-I recognise your face.

-Yes, you do, yes.

0:16:480:16:50

-I've been here before.

-You have, yes.

-It must be, what?

0:16:500:16:53

-Two years ago?

-Two years, something like that.

-Yeah.

0:16:530:16:55

Oh, well, you will have no trouble

0:16:550:16:57

finding your way around Don's shop, then.

0:16:570:16:59

Some nice silver.

0:16:590:17:01

You've got a little bottle stopper of a gent here smoking a pipe

0:17:010:17:06

with his parasol in his right hand.

0:17:060:17:09

And this one, you have a very neat man

0:17:090:17:12

waving, in his left hand, his hat.

0:17:120:17:16

They remind me of Charles and Philip, actually.

0:17:160:17:18

HE CHUCKLES Speaking of Philip...

0:17:180:17:20

..he's made his way to Leominster in Herefordshire

0:17:220:17:25

and is popping into the Secondhand Warehouse & Antique Centre.

0:17:250:17:29

Well, I've been to this shop many times

0:17:300:17:32

and I know the people that run it.

0:17:320:17:34

I just hope they don't hold that against me.

0:17:340:17:36

Philip is like a man on a mission. A lean, mean, shopping machine.

0:17:370:17:41

One thing is for sure, I have got £66 and 46 new pennies.

0:17:410:17:48

I am going to spend £66 and 46 new pennies.

0:17:480:17:52

Every last one is going. Hmm!

0:17:520:17:54

I'm sure dealer Stan will be glad to hear that.

0:17:540:17:57

This place has over 12,000 square feet of stock

0:17:570:18:00

and I'm sure Philip can find something here to float his boat.

0:18:000:18:04

Oh, I think that's a cool thing, isn't it? That is a lovely thing.

0:18:040:18:08

That really is an age gone by.

0:18:080:18:11

And you've got this - "First class only."

0:18:110:18:13

That means Hanson wouldn't be allowed to sit on this.

0:18:130:18:16

But that is just a really cool thing.

0:18:160:18:17

It is a liner chair and there's a bit of a thing coming up here

0:18:170:18:21

because at the minute, that look is absolutely fantastic.

0:18:210:18:25

That's the sort of look that people want.

0:18:250:18:27

Do they want that in Brecon, though?

0:18:290:18:30

Good question. It is priced at £68, so you are £1.64 short.

0:18:300:18:36

I think that is a really cool thing.

0:18:360:18:38

You've got £68 on that, Stan. What is the best on that?

0:18:380:18:42

Well, we could make it £58.

0:18:420:18:44

This is what we call...

0:18:480:18:50

In the trade, Stan, this is what we call an embarrassing silence now

0:18:500:18:52

that is going to ensue.

0:18:520:18:53

So let's just practise this embarrassing silence bit.

0:18:530:18:56

OK, you be quiet and I'll think of something else.

0:18:560:18:58

Uh...£50.

0:18:580:19:00

WIND BLOWS

0:19:000:19:02

You're still silent. Ooh.

0:19:020:19:04

£45.

0:19:050:19:06

Oh, dear. This is embarrassing.

0:19:090:19:11

WIND BLOWS ON

0:19:110:19:13

Did you say £40?

0:19:130:19:14

-£45.

-£45 for it. What could you do?

0:19:140:19:18

I tell you what, you're lovely people here.

0:19:180:19:20

Just give me your best shot.

0:19:200:19:22

I'm giving you my silence at the moment.

0:19:220:19:23

Oh, is it my turn to say something, then?

0:19:230:19:26

What is the very best you can do?

0:19:260:19:28

-The very best.

-Yeah.

-And don't ask for any more.

0:19:280:19:31

No, I won't go any further than this at all.

0:19:310:19:33

-£30.

-£30!

-£30.

0:19:330:19:35

-Quick, I'll get shot.

-You're a gentleman.

0:19:360:19:38

Honestly, I'm really delighted with that.

0:19:380:19:40

Let's hope it doesn't sink at auction.

0:19:410:19:43

Philip has got £36.46 left

0:19:430:19:46

and is determined to find something that will help him beat Charles.

0:19:460:19:50

I should be buying this, really.

0:19:500:19:52

Then whenever Hanson bursts into song,

0:19:520:19:54

I can whack him round the back of the head with it.

0:19:540:19:57

That'll slow him down a bit.

0:19:570:19:58

Hey, that's not quite what I had in mind. Huh!

0:19:580:20:01

Charles, meanwhile, is still over at Bayliss Antiques

0:20:020:20:05

and it looks like Don has unearthed a candidate for his £120.

0:20:050:20:09

What are they? Pens? They match your jacket, don't they?

0:20:100:20:13

Don is quite sharp because I never saw these pens

0:20:130:20:17

and if there's one aspect of the antiques market,

0:20:170:20:19

of the collectors market, that is quite bullish,

0:20:190:20:22

it is a market for old vintage pens, isn't it?

0:20:220:20:25

That is a Conway Stewart pen with lovely Bakelite type of marbled...

0:20:250:20:30

This marbling is lovely. 1920s pen.

0:20:300:20:33

Conway Stewart are a luxury pen manufacturer founded in 1905.

0:20:330:20:39

Their pens can be quite collectable.

0:20:390:20:41

Don has also brought over a few more of a similar age

0:20:410:20:45

along with a box of assorted silverware.

0:20:450:20:48

Here, you've got a tin with just bits and pieces,

0:20:480:20:50

an old Victorian florin

0:20:500:20:52

Here you've got a lovely collection of silver

0:20:520:20:55

and the coinage, it's silver.

0:20:550:20:56

The coins are probably worth £30 or so.

0:20:560:20:59

-Even that stamp's silver.

-Yeah, that stamp's silver as well.

0:20:590:21:02

Don misses nothing. There we are.

0:21:020:21:05

Could this mixed lot of pens and silver items

0:21:050:21:08

put a shine on Charles's fortunes?

0:21:080:21:11

Don, the coins aren't...

0:21:110:21:13

aren't mega. The pens are pretty standard.

0:21:130:21:17

Would you be open to an offer on the whole lot?

0:21:170:21:18

Well, I'll listen, but I won't accept.

0:21:180:21:21

Oh, no. Don, I'm your mate, Don. Don, I'm your mate.

0:21:210:21:25

Yes. Until you make an offer.

0:21:250:21:27

There is no price on the pens and silver,

0:21:270:21:30

but Don won't let them go cheaply.

0:21:300:21:32

For a profit for you, Don, if I bought the whole lot -

0:21:320:21:35

the tin, the coins and the pens - what is the best price?

0:21:350:21:38

£75. God knows what it's worth, those bits of silver.

0:21:380:21:42

If I said to you, Don, £60.

0:21:420:21:45

£65, it's yours.

0:21:450:21:47

Why don't we go in at £62.50 and meet halfway?

0:21:470:21:52

Yeah.

0:21:520:21:53

So, I will give you an extra £2.50 for good luck.

0:21:530:21:55

-Thanks, mate.

-Ooh!

-Thanks, Don.

0:21:550:21:57

We'll cross fingers and hope for some good luck.

0:21:570:21:59

OK. Thanks, Don. That's great.

0:21:590:22:02

Luck? I thought this was all skill, Charles.

0:22:020:22:04

Philip, meanwhile,

0:22:040:22:05

is looking out for something that will appeal to the Brecon auction.

0:22:050:22:10

I quite like this porthole.

0:22:100:22:11

It's quite nice. Look, it's got the maker's mark here, which is Simpson.

0:22:130:22:17

Oh, Simpson Lawrence of Glasgow.

0:22:170:22:20

That is fairly local to Brecon, isn't it? If you sort of...

0:22:200:22:23

take the long road.

0:22:230:22:25

Yeah. Via the scenic route, maybe.

0:22:250:22:27

I think this has come off a small yacht

0:22:270:22:29

rather than anything that is overly big.

0:22:290:22:31

I quite like that. I'm going to have a good look round

0:22:310:22:34

and I'll ask Stan if he can put this by for me.

0:22:340:22:36

The porthole is priced at £42,

0:22:360:22:38

which is more than is left in Phil's pocket.

0:22:380:22:42

That doesn't stop him eyeing up more goodies, though.

0:22:420:22:45

So, this is a little vegetable ivory.

0:22:450:22:48

Vegetable ivory is a root, isn't it?

0:22:480:22:49

It's not ivory at all, but it's made to look like it.

0:22:490:22:51

Not anything to do with elephants, no.

0:22:510:22:53

No, it's got nothing to do with that at all.

0:22:530:22:55

The case is actually made from an Amazonian nut.

0:22:550:22:59

The thimble could be the work of Charles Horner.

0:22:590:23:02

It's got a ticket price of £20.

0:23:020:23:05

Lovely.

0:23:050:23:07

If you're going to buy a silver thimble,

0:23:070:23:09

Charles Horner is the man, isn't he?

0:23:090:23:11

Most of his were...

0:23:110:23:13

Yes, Chester. Because most of his stuff was assayed in Chester.

0:23:130:23:17

So, that might be a possibility.

0:23:170:23:19

So, that just fits into there

0:23:190:23:21

and then we've got its little case like that.

0:23:210:23:23

Right. I think it is time to make your mind up, Philip.

0:23:230:23:26

Now, sensibly, going to landlocked Brecon...

0:23:260:23:30

so far, I've bought a naval medal, I bought a deckchair

0:23:300:23:33

and I think a porthole might be stretching the theme a bit too much.

0:23:330:23:36

If I can mention this, Mr Serrell,

0:23:360:23:38

I would say that that would look wonderful on a narrow boat

0:23:380:23:41

on the Brecon and Monmouth canal.

0:23:410:23:43

Jeez, what a salesman, eh?

0:23:430:23:44

I want to spend every last penny. This is every last penny, look.

0:23:440:23:48

There is £36.

0:23:480:23:51

£34, £35, £36.

0:23:510:23:54

That is still £26 short of Stan's ticket prices.

0:23:540:23:57

Let's hope he is in a good mood.

0:23:570:23:59

Well, we could let you have that for your £36.

0:23:590:24:02

I'm over the moon with that.

0:24:020:24:04

Before I change my mind, shake my hand and let me walk off.

0:24:040:24:06

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:24:060:24:08

-You've been really kind to me. Good to see you. Bye.

-Bye.

0:24:080:24:11

And with that, he's spent every last penny.

0:24:120:24:15

Charles, meanwhile, has made his way over to Worcester in Worcestershire.

0:24:160:24:20

He is on the hunt for more goodies to complete his haul.

0:24:200:24:23

-Afternoon.

-Hello.

-What a wonderful shop exterior you have.

0:24:240:24:27

-Thank you so much.

-I'm Charles Hanson.

-Hi, I'm Gabrielle.

0:24:270:24:29

Gabrielle, good to see you.

0:24:290:24:31

This family-owned business has been established over 100 years.

0:24:330:24:36

Can Charles find something timeless here that delivers him a profit?

0:24:360:24:41

What I love about this antiques shop is, forget the word vintage,

0:24:410:24:46

forget the word retro -

0:24:460:24:48

this is real antiques.

0:24:480:24:49

If you can't succeed here at buying quality, you never will.

0:24:490:24:53

It's that good.

0:24:530:24:54

But with less than £80 in your pocket,

0:24:550:24:58

might they just be out of reach?

0:24:580:25:00

-Charles, you ought to have a look at this.

-Oh, yes.

0:25:000:25:02

-It's...

-I saw that in the cabinet. Yes.

-Glad you've got your tartan on.

0:25:020:25:05

-Have a look at that.

-Oh, yeah. Oh, quite right, quite right.

0:25:050:25:09

Oh, how nice. Well, that's interesting.

0:25:090:25:11

It reads,

0:25:110:25:13

"Lindsay's Mercantile Academy of Glasgow of the year 1856."

0:25:130:25:18

And on the reverse, you've got the inscription,

0:25:180:25:21

"For the first prize for the best specimen or penmanship."

0:25:210:25:25

And the winner is George Buchanan.

0:25:250:25:27

It is hallmarked silver and whilst the Academy has long since gone,

0:25:290:25:33

this medal is in perfect condition.

0:25:330:25:36

And at £65, it is within Charles's budget.

0:25:360:25:39

And it is all there. And it is a real work of art. It really is.

0:25:390:25:44

I would probably want to really buy it for about £55

0:25:440:25:46

if that obviously left you with a profit and it was worthwhile.

0:25:460:25:49

It is a fair price and it is a reasonable offer.

0:25:490:25:52

-Give me £55.

-Thank you so much.

0:25:520:25:54

Now, Philip will go berserk

0:25:540:25:56

if I don't spend my entire budget in my last job.

0:25:560:25:59

Is there anything?

0:25:590:26:01

-Just have a look at this.

-Anything which could be £20?

0:26:010:26:04

You've actually got £23.90, Charles,

0:26:040:26:07

and I'm sure Gabrielle will be able to help you part with that.

0:26:070:26:11

Gabrielle, what is that?

0:26:110:26:12

-An RAF flag.

-Age?

0:26:120:26:15

Um...

0:26:150:26:17

I don't know. But it is nicely made.

0:26:170:26:19

-This is a sewn one, it's not a printed one.

-Yes.

0:26:190:26:22

So, with my £23.90, what I could do is viably buy this flag.

0:26:220:26:26

-It ought to make £25, surely.

-Yeah.

0:26:260:26:28

-Do you think so?

-I would have thought so, yeah.

0:26:280:26:30

-It is probably...

-It's got a bit of age to it.

0:26:300:26:32

Could I call it World War II interest, do you think?

0:26:320:26:34

Or is that going a bit too far?

0:26:340:26:36

Could it be Second World War in period?

0:26:360:26:37

-It's certainly vintage, isn't it?

-Vintage, I like your style.

0:26:370:26:40

-HE CHUCKLES

-I will take it for £23.90.

0:26:400:26:43

That is my entire budget blown away and Philip will be delighted.

0:26:430:26:46

-Well done.

-I'll take it all.

0:26:460:26:47

With a flag and a medal for £78.90,

0:26:470:26:50

it looks like Charles is ready to do battle at the auction.

0:26:500:26:53

Off he hares.

0:26:540:26:55

Philip has completed his shopping

0:26:550:26:57

and is making his way to

0:26:570:26:59

Gotherington in Gloucestershire.

0:26:590:27:01

He is visiting

0:27:010:27:03

Prescott Speed Hill Climb, which is home to the Bugatti Owners' Club.

0:27:030:27:07

But it's not the classic Italian race car itself Philip is here to see.

0:27:070:27:11

He's here to find out about a man who, in the 1920s and '30s,

0:27:110:27:15

drove these cars into the record books

0:27:150:27:17

and became one of the world's most successful racing drivers.

0:27:170:27:21

He is meeting Ian Paton from the club to find out more.

0:27:210:27:25

-Hi, Ian. How are you?

-Hi, Phil.

0:27:250:27:26

William Grover-Williams was an extraordinary racing driver.

0:27:300:27:34

Son of a well-to-do English horse breeder,

0:27:340:27:37

he had an early fascination for automobiles.

0:27:370:27:41

At just 26, he entered the inaugural Monaco Grand Prix

0:27:410:27:44

driving a Bugatti and won.

0:27:440:27:46

If you look closely at these early photographs,

0:27:480:27:50

you can just see the thousands of people peering over watching,

0:27:500:27:53

all the way up to the casino, watching the race.

0:27:530:27:56

And remember, this is not like today, that we do two hours' racing.

0:27:560:28:00

It was a 100-lapper.

0:28:000:28:03

This race lasted 3 hours 52 minutes.

0:28:030:28:05

You look at that photograph and these guys are sat there

0:28:050:28:08

with either a leather or, at best, a cork helmet.

0:28:080:28:11

Williams raced in a cloth cap.

0:28:110:28:14

But wasn't the fear with these guys that if the car did go over,

0:28:140:28:17

you got thrown clear?

0:28:170:28:18

-That was the idea.

-Yeah, that sounds a bit risky in my book.

0:28:180:28:21

By 1933, Williams had seven Grand Prix wins under his belt,

0:28:220:28:26

cementing his position as one of racing's true greats.

0:28:260:28:30

But by the end of the decade, he had retired from racing

0:28:300:28:34

and with the outbreak of the Second World War,

0:28:340:28:36

he joined the Royal Army Service Corps to help the French Resistance.

0:28:360:28:41

And eventually, the Gestapo found out about them.

0:28:410:28:43

That led to Williams being caught

0:28:430:28:47

and he spent quite a long time in Gestapo headquarters in Paris.

0:28:470:28:51

We know he never gave anything away

0:28:510:28:53

because that part of the resistance group that he was part of

0:28:530:28:57

was never betrayed.

0:28:570:28:58

Eventually, they got fed up with him

0:28:580:29:00

and they transferred him to a concentration camp in Germany.

0:29:000:29:04

And he was shot in the early part of March 1945.

0:29:040:29:10

That's awful, isn't it?

0:29:100:29:11

Which is even more awful

0:29:110:29:13

when you think it was six weeks before the end of the war.

0:29:130:29:16

The actual trophy he won at the 1929 Grand Prix

0:29:170:29:20

is held by the Bugatti Owners' Club.

0:29:200:29:23

It was donated to them by Williams's widow, Yvonne, in the 1960s

0:29:230:29:28

and is now the centrepiece of their annual Williams Trophy race.

0:29:280:29:32

-Now, are your hands clean?

-Oh, that's just fantastic, isn't it?

0:29:320:29:35

-Just imagine...

-There are certain things in your life that make

0:29:350:29:38

the hair on the back of your neck stand on end

0:29:380:29:40

and being able to hold that is one of them, really.

0:29:400:29:43

Just imagine you've done 100 laps, four hours in a Grand Prix car,

0:29:430:29:47

and the Prince of Monaco hands you the trophy.

0:29:470:29:50

-You would be so pleased with that, wouldn't you?

-Wouldn't you just?

0:29:500:29:53

Look at that. That is just fantastic.

0:29:530:29:55

And if that doesn't inspire Philip to win the Road Trip,

0:29:550:29:58

I don't know what will.

0:29:580:30:00

His competition has arrived, though, so it is time to reveal all.

0:30:000:30:03

-I like the waistcoat, Charlie.

-Thanks, Phil.

0:30:030:30:05

-We're going to Wales, not Scotland.

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:30:050:30:07

I'm going to start here, Phil.

0:30:070:30:09

And go - voila!

0:30:090:30:10

Do you like them?

0:30:120:30:14

-No.

-Not the best start.

0:30:140:30:16

Charlie, those are hideous.

0:30:160:30:17

Phil, don't you feel when you live in a big house,

0:30:170:30:20

you see lots of people who have these big lions

0:30:200:30:22

to inject a bit of pace into their pedigree

0:30:220:30:25

and I thought these big lions,

0:30:250:30:27

they will roar outside someone's drive in Wales.

0:30:270:30:30

I think you're insulting the Welsh.

0:30:300:30:32

I think you're insulting Charles, so that makes it even, then.

0:30:320:30:34

-They are broken.

-The only reason I bought them was because...

0:30:340:30:37

Charlie, they're broken everywhere.

0:30:370:30:38

Yeah, they are. They're a bit tired, Phil.

0:30:380:30:40

But you know, they're like you and I.

0:30:400:30:42

They're a pair of well-worn lions.

0:30:420:30:43

Charlie, they are smashed. They are rubble.

0:30:430:30:46

Yeah. What are they worth?

0:30:460:30:47

-I'd rather not go down that road, Charlie.

-Really?

0:30:470:30:50

I don't want to go down that road because I don't want to upset you.

0:30:500:30:52

You're my mate. How much did you pay for them?

0:30:520:30:54

-£20.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:30:540:30:56

-You were robbed.

-Do you think so?

-Yeah.

0:30:560:30:58

That went well, then.

0:30:580:30:59

My next ensemble, Phil, is there.

0:30:590:31:02

Voila! Take your pick.

0:31:020:31:04

Charles's three figures,

0:31:040:31:06

who I presume were too busy to make it today.

0:31:060:31:09

On the screen, I acquired three concrete ladies,

0:31:090:31:14

about 4'5" high, and they probably depict the seasons or the Muses.

0:31:140:31:18

They're neoclassical, they are...

0:31:180:31:20

-Sorry, can I just stop you just for one minute?

-Yes.

0:31:200:31:23

-You bought three of them?

-Yeah.

0:31:230:31:24

I don't want to be really picky here but are there not four seasons?

0:31:240:31:28

Well, I was with them, they say...

0:31:280:31:31

-Um, yes, there are really, Phil.

-I thought there probably was, yeah.

0:31:310:31:34

-Um...

-So, you've bought three of the four seasons?

-Correct.

0:31:340:31:37

-Right, OK.

-Correct.

-Fine. Why did you not buy four?

0:31:370:31:41

There was only three available.

0:31:410:31:42

All right. So, what have we missed? Autumn? Winter?

0:31:420:31:44

-Probably winter, I think.

-Spring or summer?

-Probably winter.

0:31:440:31:47

-Winter is a good one to miss, isn't it?

-You think so?

0:31:470:31:49

-Cold, wet, miserable.

-Exactly.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:31:490:31:52

It was a bit of a frosty response from Philip,

0:31:520:31:55

but what will Charles think of his goodies?

0:31:550:31:57

Your turn now.

0:31:570:31:58

Make yourself big, puff your chest out,

0:31:580:32:00

make a name for yourself.

0:32:000:32:02

I do worry about him sometimes, honestly.

0:32:030:32:05

Whoa! Oh, Phil. Goodness me.

0:32:060:32:09

Oh, wow. What is this here?

0:32:090:32:11

HMS Essex. Tell me about that.

0:32:110:32:13

I can't really because I don't know anything at all about it.

0:32:130:32:15

But it's got Captain Green, dated 1912 around the rim,

0:32:150:32:18

and then these bars here.

0:32:180:32:20

I have absolutely no idea what it's for.

0:32:200:32:22

-Not a clue.

-That's quite coincidental.

0:32:220:32:23

You go from a 1912-style deckchair, First Class, Titanic,

0:32:230:32:27

to the year Titanic sunk

0:32:270:32:28

and a real object, which is just pre-First World War.

0:32:280:32:32

That is really interesting, Phil.

0:32:320:32:34

That is really interesting and if you can do some homework

0:32:340:32:37

and maybe substantiate what those clasps

0:32:370:32:39

and this captain was all about,

0:32:390:32:41

that could be quite a rare thing.

0:32:410:32:43

There's a real maritime feel, isn't it?

0:32:430:32:44

You've got that, that, and this porthole, which is nice.

0:32:440:32:48

-Is it old?

-Sorry?

-Is it old?

0:32:480:32:49

I wasn't sure if you were going to stop to draw breath.

0:32:490:32:51

I think you've done really well.

0:32:510:32:53

Charles likes what he sees, but I can't say the same for Phil.

0:32:530:32:56

Those lions, they're smashed to pieces.

0:32:560:32:59

And knowing Charlie, they might go and make £30.

0:32:590:33:02

But dear me, they are awful.

0:33:020:33:04

He's bought objects which are quite cheap.

0:33:040:33:07

I do like his porthole, I like his deckchair as well

0:33:070:33:09

and I think all the objects will make small profits.

0:33:090:33:12

But he is really keen, he's eager, he's determined

0:33:120:33:14

and it really is game on now.

0:33:140:33:16

He wants to catch me up.

0:33:160:33:17

Feeling quite smug with myself now.

0:33:170:33:19

That's normally when it all goes wrong, isn't it?

0:33:200:33:22

We'll soon find out as it's time

0:33:240:33:25

to cross the Welsh border for auction

0:33:250:33:27

in the market town of Brecon

0:33:270:33:28

in Powys.

0:33:280:33:30

Brecon's lovely cathedral was originally formed as a monastery

0:33:310:33:35

and is the final resting place of Norman lords and Welsh princes.

0:33:350:33:39

Our own princes of the antique business

0:33:410:33:43

have arrived at the venue of today's auction showdown.

0:33:430:33:46

Whilst Charles works out how to get out of the car,

0:33:480:33:51

auctioneer Chris Jones has some thoughts

0:33:510:33:54

on what our discerning experts have bought.

0:33:540:33:56

Some mixed bag of items you've brought along.

0:33:560:34:00

You've brought some very nice statues.

0:34:000:34:02

They do remind us of the Weeping Angels from Doctor Who,

0:34:020:34:05

so we are hoping, as Doctor Who was filmed in Wales,

0:34:050:34:08

they will find a home in Wales.

0:34:080:34:09

Very interested in the medal you've got from HMS Essex, I believe.

0:34:090:34:14

It was originally from Wales,

0:34:140:34:16

so that'll be interesting to see how that goes.

0:34:160:34:18

Philip started this second leg of the Road Trip with just £166.46

0:34:190:34:25

and has spent every last penny on five auction lots.

0:34:250:34:29

Thank you very much. You've been really kind to me.

0:34:290:34:31

Charles started with a more impressive £221.40

0:34:310:34:35

and he too has parted with it all for five auction lots.

0:34:350:34:40

I'll take it all.

0:34:400:34:41

But although Charles won the last auction, Philip's feeling confident.

0:34:410:34:45

Have you ever lost one of these Road Trips?

0:34:450:34:47

I've lost one. To you.

0:34:470:34:49

-Oh, was that to me?

-Exactly, exactly.

0:34:490:34:52

First up, Charles's silver medallions and assorted silverware.

0:34:530:34:57

20 I've got, thank you.

0:34:570:34:59

At 20, 25, 30, 35,

0:34:590:35:01

40, 45, 50, 55.

0:35:010:35:03

-Go on.

-Go on.

-"Go on," he says.

0:35:030:35:06

At 55, 60. 60 I've got.

0:35:060:35:08

Try a little bit harder, sir.

0:35:080:35:09

At 62. 62, 65, 68, 70.

0:35:090:35:14

70 I've got. 72.

0:35:140:35:16

At 72, for anyone. I sell them, then...

0:35:160:35:19

-That gavel looks dangerous.

-..at £72.

0:35:190:35:23

I want you to know I am getting no pleasure from this, none at all.

0:35:230:35:28

Ouch.

0:35:280:35:29

Philip knows that opening loss for Charles could bode well for him.

0:35:290:35:33

How terribly sad. How awfully sad.

0:35:330:35:36

Time to see if Philip can fare better with his pencil sharpener,

0:35:380:35:41

manicure set and thimble.

0:35:410:35:43

30, 20. Let's have £10, kick it off.

0:35:430:35:47

Well, Charlie.

0:35:470:35:48

At 10 bid, 10 bid.

0:35:480:35:50

10, 15, 20, 25.

0:35:500:35:53

25, 30.

0:35:530:35:55

-A profit. Well done.

-It's not profit.

0:35:550:35:58

I sell it at the back, then, at £30.

0:35:580:36:01

That's just what we call one step forward, two back, Charlie.

0:36:010:36:05

It is another loss, but much less than managed by Charles,

0:36:050:36:09

which means the gap between the two is closing.

0:36:090:36:13

Next, is the writing on the wall for Charles's early fountain pens?

0:36:130:36:17

Do I hear something in the region of £50?

0:36:170:36:19

-Come on.

-25.

-25 I've got.

0:36:190:36:22

At 25, 30, 35, 40, 45.

0:36:220:36:26

-I'm flabbergasted.

-50 I've got.

0:36:260:36:29

52, 55, 58.

0:36:290:36:31

-Well done, you, Charlie.

-Not bad.

0:36:310:36:34

62, 65, 68. 68 I've got.

0:36:340:36:39

-Well done, Charlie.

-One more.

-"One more," he says.

0:36:390:36:41

68, 70, 72.

0:36:410:36:44

At £72, with a tin as well, at £72.

0:36:440:36:48

-That's good.

-Isn't it?

-I'm pleased.

0:36:480:36:50

And so you should be - a £42 profit is absolutely marvellous.

0:36:500:36:55

I'm just getting really anxious about the rubble now.

0:36:550:36:58

-Charlie, if they make profit...

-It's a funny old game, isn't it?

0:36:580:37:01

No, that won't be funny.

0:37:010:37:04

I think someone is feeling nervous.

0:37:040:37:05

But first, it is time to see

0:37:050:37:07

if there is a profit in Philip's bronze porthole.

0:37:070:37:10

£40 we've got. At £30 and selling.

0:37:100:37:13

40, 50, 55, 60, 65.

0:37:130:37:18

65, 70, 75. 75 I've got.

0:37:180:37:22

-At 75.

-That's helped, Charlie.

0:37:220:37:24

Selling at the back of the room.

0:37:240:37:25

78, anyone?

0:37:250:37:27

-He's doing a good job, isn't he?

-Yes, very good.

0:37:270:37:29

-That's a cracking return.

-Yes, it's good, isn't it?

0:37:290:37:31

At £75.

0:37:310:37:33

-Put it there, Phil. That is...

-That's about 40 quid profit.

0:37:330:37:36

That's a huge profit.

0:37:360:37:38

It is closer to £60 than £40 and it means Philip's really catching up.

0:37:380:37:42

Phil, I knew, with your expertise,

0:37:420:37:44

you would not be down for long, OK?

0:37:440:37:46

-And you are back in business.

-Just listen to this.

0:37:460:37:48

-You know, you are the Godfather of the Road Trip.

-Listen to this.

0:37:480:37:51

But before he climbs onto his high horse,

0:37:510:37:54

will his wooden toy horse and cart pull him into the lead?

0:37:540:37:57

15.

0:37:570:37:58

£20 somewhere, surely?

0:37:580:38:00

-25, 30...

-There's loads of hands.

0:38:000:38:02

..35, 40, 42,

0:38:020:38:06

45, 48, 50.

0:38:060:38:08

-Go on.

-Phil, you're flying.

0:38:080:38:10

55, 58, 60, 62, 65.

0:38:100:38:15

I love the way you wink.

0:38:150:38:16

-65...

-Not you, Philip.

0:38:160:38:18

..68, 70.

0:38:180:38:20

At 70 bid. Anybody else?

0:38:200:38:22

Two lots here together. At £70, cashed and done.

0:38:220:38:25

Going, going, gone. Well done.

0:38:250:38:28

I'm a little flushed now.

0:38:280:38:30

That horse has bolted and returned a healthy profit,

0:38:300:38:34

as they are now neck-and-neck.

0:38:340:38:36

I'm not wearing a hat, but hats off to you, I mean it.

0:38:360:38:39

Philip's penultimate item is the Navy medal.

0:38:390:38:42

He needs to put clear blue water between him and Charles

0:38:420:38:45

if he's going to win this auction.

0:38:450:38:47

Let's have £20 to get it going.

0:38:470:38:49

10 I've got. 12, 15, 18.

0:38:490:38:52

It's going to run and run and run.

0:38:520:38:55

30, 32, 35, 38,

0:38:550:38:58

40, 42, 45, 50.

0:38:580:39:02

50 I've got.

0:39:020:39:04

-At 50 bid.

-It's going to run and run and run.

0:39:040:39:06

65, 70. At 70 bid.

0:39:060:39:09

One more. 75. 75.

0:39:090:39:11

-It goes.

-Going, going, gone. Well played.

0:39:110:39:15

He does a good job, doesn't he?

0:39:150:39:17

-Yeah, fantastic.

-He does a really good job.

0:39:170:39:19

And with that, Philip nudges way ahead of Charles.

0:39:190:39:22

Could he be on the verge of victory?

0:39:220:39:25

I'm happy as Larry. I'm happy as Larry.

0:39:250:39:27

I bet you are.

0:39:270:39:29

Auctioneer Richard Gwilliam has taken to the podium

0:39:290:39:32

as Charles's three figures, which Philip had a lot to say about,

0:39:320:39:35

take centre stage.

0:39:350:39:36

Bid 50, bid 50.

0:39:360:39:38

50, 60, 70, 80,

0:39:380:39:42

90, 100, 110.

0:39:420:39:44

110 all done. Sold at 110.

0:39:440:39:48

-That's jolly good, isn't it?

-The rubble has made £50.

0:39:480:39:51

-How has it done that?

-It made... I'm sorry, it's made £50.

0:39:510:39:55

To Philip's astonishment, the bidders loved Charles's stone figures

0:39:550:39:59

and it has given him a small lead.

0:39:590:40:01

Charlie, how you've got that for those stone anchors, I don't know.

0:40:010:40:06

-They're awful.

-I think they were cheap.

0:40:060:40:08

It all comes down to the last few items.

0:40:090:40:12

Will Charles's RAF flag fly him further into the lead?

0:40:120:40:16

Beautiful Air Force flag.

0:40:160:40:19

50. 20 to start it.

0:40:190:40:22

10. 10. Thank you, 10.

0:40:220:40:24

-Thanks.

-15, 20.

-Thank you.

0:40:240:40:26

25, 30, 35, 40.

0:40:260:40:29

40 bid, 45. 45, 50.

0:40:290:40:33

50 bid, 55...

0:40:330:40:34

Yeah, keep going, keep going.

0:40:340:40:38

For Queen and country.

0:40:380:40:39

65, 70. 70 bid, 72...

0:40:390:40:43

-Keep going, boss.

-..72, 75, 78...

0:40:430:40:46

-Charlie, you've whipped me again.

-Keep going, keep going.

0:40:460:40:49

-80, 82...

-Oh, no.

0:40:490:40:53

-How am I going to live this down?

-Keep going, boss.

0:40:530:40:55

88, two fat ladies.

0:40:550:40:57

85. Lady on the right, sold at £85.

0:40:570:41:00

-Brilliant.

-60 quid profit.

-Yes.

0:41:000:41:03

Well, about that.

0:41:030:41:04

Oh, that is a tremendous result for Charles

0:41:060:41:09

and an ocean opens between the two.

0:41:090:41:11

But can Philip close it with his first-class liner deckchair?

0:41:110:41:15

20. Thank you, 20 opening bid.

0:41:150:41:18

20, 30, 40, 50. 50 bid.

0:41:180:41:21

At 60. Is that 65? No. 60.

0:41:210:41:24

-Sold at 60.

-Brilliant.

0:41:240:41:26

-I'm pleased with that.

-Put it there.

-Thanks, Charlie.

0:41:270:41:30

A good profit for Philip, but is it enough to overtake Charles?

0:41:300:41:34

His final lot are the concrete lions.

0:41:340:41:38

The lions, as somewhat damaged.

0:41:380:41:40

Somewhat damaged? If you like Longleat, Charlie.

0:41:400:41:44

Bid 20 onto the lions.

0:41:440:41:46

20, 30, 40, 50.

0:41:460:41:49

50 bid the lions.

0:41:490:41:50

At 50, 60, 70.

0:41:500:41:53

I just don't believe this.

0:41:530:41:55

-I just don't believe this.

-Give me a roar, give me a roar.

0:41:560:41:59

Oh, growl.

0:41:590:42:01

70 I'm bid. Sold here at £70.

0:42:010:42:03

Charlie, you have absolutely whipped my behind, Charlie.

0:42:030:42:07

I think Philip is in shock.

0:42:070:42:09

The bidders loved Charles's lions and have given him a £50 profit.

0:42:090:42:14

-Go.

-OK, let's go.

-Just go.

0:42:140:42:16

-Let's go back to Blighty.

-Go, go, go, go, go.

0:42:160:42:18

After a dramatic auction, it is time to do the sums.

0:42:200:42:23

Philip started this second leg of the Road Trip with £166.46

0:42:250:42:29

and after a roller coaster of an auction,

0:42:290:42:32

made a respectable profit of £87.74 after costs,

0:42:320:42:36

ending this leg with a juicy £254.20.

0:42:360:42:41

Charles kicked off with £221.40 and, after costs,

0:42:430:42:47

coined in a thumping great profit of £113.98,

0:42:470:42:52

giving him a tremendous £335.38

0:42:520:42:56

and winning this leg of the Road Trip.

0:42:560:42:58

Well done, Charlie boy.

0:42:580:43:00

-Well, Charlie.

-Yes, Phil?

-Where to now?

0:43:000:43:02

Um...I think, Phil, Warwickshire.

0:43:020:43:05

-Back home.

-Back home, Phil. Up the M5, that's the way.

0:43:050:43:09

Next time on Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:100:43:12

..his name is Hanson, Charles Hanson,

0:43:130:43:16

and he has caught Phil's attention.

0:43:160:43:18

I love you, Charlie.

0:43:180:43:20

PHIL CHUCKLES

0:43:220:43:24

Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson begin the second leg of their road trip in Stafford, Staffordshire. They then travel through Wolverhampton and Worcester, before crossing the Welsh border for the auction in Brecon, Powys.