Episode 3 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 3

Antiques experts Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson travel from the south London district of Bermondsey into the heart of the capital, before ending up at auction in Greenwich.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-All right, viewers?

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal -

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to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire. Yes!

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Sold. Going, going, gone.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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50p!

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-Ooh! Ooh!

-Ow!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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'TIME IS TIGHT' BY BOOKER T AND THE MG'S PLAYS

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It's the third leg of their road trip

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for our experts Charles Hanson and Philip Serrell.

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As they navigate the streets of South London,

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they seem to have gone all Cockney on us, like.

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Phil, we're not far from Peckham.

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Mickey P, Del Boy, Rodney, you and me.

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-Don't call me Grandad, Charlie.

-Got a pony in your pocket.

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Grandad. Grandad.

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I'm Rodney, you'll be Grandad, OK?

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-You are a bit of a plonker.

-Yeah, Rodney.

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At least you're not driving a yellow three-wheeler, chaps.

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Charles is an auctioneer and valuer with over 14 years' experience.

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Looking good, Charles.

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Philip's a seasoned auctioneer and antique expert,

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and after falling behind in the last leg the alarm bells are ringing.

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BELL RINGS

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Our experts began their journey with £200 each,

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and two auctions later the gap is widening

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with just over £80 separating the pair.

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Charles made a winning start to the road trip,

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triumphing in the first two auctions,

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giving him a very pleasing £335.38 to spend today.

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While Phil, the only person to have beaten Charles Hanson

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on the Road Trip before,

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is trailing this time round, amassing only £254.20 so far.

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Slow down. Slow down! Slow down. Just slow down, slow down.

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Charles is at the wheel as they bump their way through

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the streets of Greater London in a 1969 Triumph GT6 convertible.

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Watch out for those sleeping policemen.

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Do you know what, Charlie? I'm feeling carsick at the minute.

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Charlie, these sleeping policemen, they have a design.

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It's actually meant to slow you down when you take them.

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-Don't take them at 50.

-Oh, no wakey-wakey.

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Let's go, guys, you're road-tripping. Wakey-wakey.

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Wakey-wakey indeed.

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Our road trip covers a massive 900 miles

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from the north-west of England, at Southport,

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winding down into Wales,

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across to London before finally reaching Cirencester

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in the Cotswolds.

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This leg takes us from the South London district of Bermondsey

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into the heart of the capital before ending up at auction in Greenwich.

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Bermondsey lies close to Tower Bridge

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on the South Bank of the River Thames.

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In 1952, the bridge opened

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while a double-decker bus was still crossing.

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Driver Albert Gunter made a heroic three-foot leap

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onto the north bascule

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and was later given £10 by the City Corporation

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to honour his act of bravery.

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Our brave boys, though, are starting their shopping expedition

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underneath the arches, at Tower Bridge Antiques.

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If they can get out of the car.

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We both know what is an antique, and this is the big time, Phil.

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This is London. Let's do it.

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I don't know what he's talking about half of the time.

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Someone's been watching The Apprentice again.

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Can you tell? Look at the way he walks.

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-After you.

-Cheers. Thank you.

-My pleasure.

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Oh hand to help is dealer Jed.

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-Good to see you. Jed?

-Jed.

-Good to see you, Jed.

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-Charles Hanson.

-Charles.

-What a great emporium you have of antiques.

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What's the plan, Phil?

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You keep him talking, I'll go and have a look.

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He's ahead of me, I've got to try and beat him.

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With Phil trailing,

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he seems to be on a mission to find something quickly.

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This is a brand-new Chinese pot.

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What on earth do I want a brand-new Chinese pot for?

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But that old is worth thousands.

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It's decorated with carp.

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Which is very emblematical for the Chinese.

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It is brand-new

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but it's decorative and it's sort of 30 or 40 quid.

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I think it would make quite a cool table lamp.

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But it just doesn't want to be any more than that.

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Sounds like you're not sure if it can turn a profit at auction.

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Maybe you should just browse on, then.

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Oh, look, there's loads of them.

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Double rubble trouble.

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-Charlie!

-Philip.

-Charlie!

-Philip.

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I've got just the thing for you.

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Oh, Phil, it's my missing lady.

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Charlie bought the three seasons out in the last sale

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-and was missing the fourth season.

-Right. Yeah.

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They have a certain weathered look about them.

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They're not very old, they're 20 or so years old.

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They've got a few knocks.

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-By jolly.

-What's she made of? Is she a painted metal or is she a stone?

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She's concrete, Charlie, like the other ones were.

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Rubble. Absolute rubble.

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But, Phil, they make money. And what's the name of the game, Jed?

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-Making money.

-Exactly. Listen to the man, OK?

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Resisting her charms this time round,

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Charles has decided there's nothing for him here and is moving on.

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Back inside, Phil's been drawn to the vase again.

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It has a ticket price of £50.

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Perhaps there's a discount to be had.

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-I think I'm going to make between 40 and 60 quid at auction.

-Right. OK.

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-So I've got to buy them at, like, 30, 35 quid.

-Yeah.

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-30 quid.

-30 quid.

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Gentleman. Ooh-hoo. You're a gentleman.

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Let me just give you some money.

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Meanwhile, Charles has headed over the Thames to Bethnal Green,

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hoping to find some bargains north of the river.

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Le Grenier specialises in vintage pieces

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which, for an antiques man like our Charles,

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could be out of his comfort zone.

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But he'll need to get with it.

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Vintage and retro are booming these days.

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It's vintage, it's retro and it's "Get forward-thinking, hey, Charles?

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"Get with the times, Hanson."

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You know, you've got to start looking at this market, because to me it's amazing. Wow.

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Glad to see you're embracing it, Charles.

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Sweet Mila is on hand to help with all your vintage needs.

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I suppose I've got to delve into the unknown. That's quite sweet.

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What's in there?

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That's quite nice. Isn't that cute?

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Isn't that nice? A little cruet set. Oops.

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There we are. That's just quite...

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Wobbly?

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-..colourful, isn't it?

-Mm-hm.

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The reason I like this is it's a Melmac or a Bakelite...

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-Oops!

-..cruet set, and it's just striking.

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And if we're going to Greenwich, it's just got a real look about it.

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The salt and pepper shakers look original

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but the yellow one should be a mustard pot,

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not another salt cellar, as the ticket points out.

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I'm getting quite desperate. I've bought nothing yet, Mila.

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You know, give me a smile, Mila. Smile, Mila, hey?

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-What's the best price on that?

-Um...£6.

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Yeah. I was going to offer £5 for it.

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-Could that be a sale?

-OK.

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First item bagged

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but Charles seems to be struggling to get his head out of the 1900s.

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What we're seeing at the moment on our trip so far

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is either expensive antiques which are too traditional

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or I'm seeing things that really are just very, very vintage,

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and I need to buy.

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A frock?

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Ooh.

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That's quite nice, Mila.

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I suspect it's probably, I don't know, I mean, it could be 1980s,

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it could be '60s, but the summer is here.

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Oh, crikey, what's he doing, eh?

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That may be far out, Charlie,

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far out from what you should be looking at.

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Whatever it is, it has flower power, and Philip will go berserk

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if he sees me buying a frock,

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but, actually, when needs must you've got to dig deep

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for the cause of making a profit.

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What's best price, Mila? Come on, let me see if it suits you.

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Does it?

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-Um...£8.

-£8.

-I like this colour.

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Do you like... Well, I'm pleased you like the colour, yeah.

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Yeah. I'll take £5 for it.

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-5?

-£5.

-Yes, OK.

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Hmm. Meanwhile, Phil's made his way west to Kennington.

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Kennington is the location of famous cricket ground the Oval,

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but Phil's heading just along the road to the Cinema Museum.

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Devoted to keeping alive the spirit of cinema's halcyon days,

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the museum houses a unique collection of memorabilia

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and equipment from the 1890s to the present day.

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-So, I'm Martin.

-Martin.

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-This brings back memories, doesn't it?

-Well, it would do, I think, yes.

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Blimey.

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The building was originally the Lambeth Workhouse,

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offering shelter and employment to the poor.

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Thousands of Londoners were helped out of destitution here,

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including a certain cinema legend.

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In 1898, with an absent father and his mother confined to an asylum,

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the young Charlie Chaplin was brought to stay.

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Charlie Chaplin came here, with his mother and half-brother Sydney.

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Hannah was unable to earn a living so she had no choice

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but to go into the workhouse,

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as she knew the boys would be looked after and educated.

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Within 20 years, his meteoric rise

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had made him one of the most famous men in the world.

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This was the birth of the golden age of cinema.

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It became a special event

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and theatres were designed to reflect that.

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With smartly dressed staff,

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you could even be greeted by the house manager.

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Well, it's a great social experience, the cinema.

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I can remember, I don't know what it would cost to go to a cinema today but 5p to go and see a film.

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5p, yeah.

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And this is like a trigger for all sorts of different things,

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because, like, I used to have to go to school on Saturday

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but I know lots of children didn't go to school on Saturdays...

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They used to go to the Saturday morning picture club.

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-Very popular.

-All sorts of different things they'd see.

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With tiny numbers of televisions in homes in the 1950s,

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Saturday morning movies became a staple for kids,

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giving the parents a rest

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as the local cinema screened popular cartoons and Westerns.

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At that time, audiences young and old

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were often shown to their seats by uniformed usherettes.

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The usherettes always seemed to be

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almost dressed like waitresses, didn't they?

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Well, they had uniforms.

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They varied according to the cinema circuit and so on,

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and the cinema owners wanted the staff to look smart and presentable.

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So, come with me and I'll show you our uniform exhibition.

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-Oh, really? Which way are we going?

-That way.

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And unforgettably they weren't just responsible for seating arrangements

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but provided a much-loved treat as well.

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And there's the lady I'll hold in my...

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-Oh, the Eldorado ice cream.

-Yeah. Have you got any of those?

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There's an ice cream tray down there.

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How does that work? Does it literally just fit?

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Can I try it?

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-So, that would just fit on there.

-Right. Yeah, round there.

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Then you'd just have your tray of ice creams. And what was that?

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-That's a light.

-So you'd have a light in there, would you?

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There'd be a light, yes.

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-So, it would be ice creams, chocolate...

-Peanuts. Yeah.

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I can just remember going to the cinema,

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as, like, an eight- and nine-year-old,

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and the lady would come down, and there was the anticipation.

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-Particularly if it was a bit of a dull film.

-Yes.

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That you're going to get an ice cream at half-time.

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-There's no half-time now.

-There's no half-time.

-There's no trays.

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-No.

-The world's a sadder place, for that.

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Sadder and not so sweet.

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-Thank you, Martin.

-Thank you, Phil.

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Listen, this has been really special. I've really enjoyed it.

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Cinema may have lost some of its grandeur

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but it still remains a hugely popular pastime in Britain today.

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But how's Charles getting on?

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He's off to hipster central, Brick Lane Market.

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Once more famous for curry restaurants,

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it's now become a busy destination for locals and out-of-towners

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in search of retro clothing, vintage furniture and bric-a-brac.

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Feeling a little out of place,

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Charles is hoping Eddie will keep him right.

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It's great to be on Brick Lane. I can't believe I'm first time here.

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-First time?

-And the culture, the ambience.

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-Don't know what you're missing.

-I can't believe it.

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-It's got a je ne sais quoi element.

-It has. And you sell antiques?

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Oh, this is definitely up your street. Definitely.

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-It is up my street, definitely.

-Let me show you some interesting objects.

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These OMK stacking chairs

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were designed in the '70s by Rodney Kinsman.

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In good condition, they could fetch up to £150 each.

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However, these have seen better days.

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25, 50, 75, £100

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and you might be going, going, going...

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How about £120?

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I've got to go £100. I can't go...

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It's such a gamble for me because, you know what?

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Life is a gamble and these, in their condition, a huge gamble.

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How about if we buy something else as well?

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That could be an option.

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Yeah.

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So, you might let these go at £100 if I can find something else?

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-Yeah, find something else...

-OK.

-..and then we can do a...

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Do a deal.

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Steady Eddie's no pushover, Charles.

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-That's quite nice, Eddie.

-Yeah.

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-That's got great style, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

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Handkerchief vases were popular from the late 1950s,

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made from crimped glass and often in vibrant colours.

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Eddie, if I bought those three there, handkerchief vases, would you take...

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-Charles.

-..100 for the chairs

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and would you take 30 for the vases?

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It would be £130 cold cash.

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100... Let's say 140.

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Are you happy with that? And I have no idea about those chairs.

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Charles, you're the man and I want you to win, right?

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So, at the end of the day, if I can give you a bargain, why not?

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Yeah. Let's do it, Eddie.

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-Sold.

-That's right.

-I'll do it. Thank you very much.

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At £140, he'll either be weeping into his vases

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or sitting on a profit with these items.

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The boys are now back together, ready to get some rest,

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so nighty-night.

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Rise and shine, chaps.

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Your capital adventure continues, but what's this?

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Has Phil been taking fashion lessons from Charles?

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Phil, what's made you follow the Hanson lead?

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Well, I just think, Charlie, you're a man of style.

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And I've always thought, actually, most of it's not very good.

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But I just feel that that hat, I think it's the way forward.

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Hats off to you, chaps.

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You might look like a pair of twits but you're our pair of twits.

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And we love you for it.

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Charles has gone on a bit of a retro tangent,

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spending £150 of his budget

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on a set of four chairs, a green dress and a cruet set and vases,

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leaving him with £185.38 still to spend.

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Philip has only bought one item so far,

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the 18th-century Chinese-style vase for £30,

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leaving him with a lot to do and £224.20.

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The boys are making their way to Crystal Palace,

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where Charles is being dropped off, hoping to find something

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that is actually antique.

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Phil, listen, give me some hope and belief.

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-Get out of here. See you, Charlie.

-See you. Bye.

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Looks like he's back on familiar ground here.

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And there's a gorgeous box on here.

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It's a porcelain box with a lady and gentleman,

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and if I'm not mistaken this box and cover here,

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you've got a gentleman in a pink frock jacket looking quite colourful,

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a lady in a really rich crinoline dress.

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And I suspect this box...

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..it's being described as 19th-century,

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just possibly it could be 18th-century.

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And, if it is, it could be quite valuable.

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On display at £165, it's time to get dealer Nick involved.

0:16:500:16:54

This little box here.

0:16:550:16:58

-Right.

-Can I look at it?

0:16:580:17:00

OK. Yeah. That...can be 140 on that.

0:17:000:17:03

Yeah. Nick, I think it's a wonderful box because it's a marvel of history,

0:17:030:17:06

and I'll take it for 140.

0:17:060:17:08

-Fantastic.

-That's one purchase done. I love it.

0:17:080:17:10

Brilliant. OK.

0:17:100:17:12

That was quick. No haggle, then, Charles?

0:17:120:17:14

He must be confident it will turn a profit.

0:17:140:17:16

Nicholas, I bought the box. I would like to buy one more thing.

0:17:160:17:20

This clock on the back here, the only reason I like it is because,

0:17:200:17:24

number one, it's coated in the exotic.

0:17:240:17:28

It's coated in the tropical jazz snakeskin.

0:17:280:17:33

I love these ivory discs here.

0:17:330:17:36

Really capture the exotic, which is all about the Art Deco.

0:17:360:17:39

And you've got this really wonderfully clear dial that really

0:17:390:17:43

oozes style, what, from the 1930s?

0:17:430:17:46

-I think so, yes.

-Great clock.

0:17:460:17:48

Mmm. Not everyone will be as keen on snakeskin and ivory.

0:17:480:17:52

But it pre-dates 1947, so it's legal to buy and sell.

0:17:520:17:56

Charles only has £45.38 left, so Nick's checking to see

0:17:580:18:03

if a deal can be done.

0:18:030:18:04

OK, I'll have a look upstairs and see what I can find out.

0:18:040:18:07

All right. Thanks.

0:18:070:18:08

I've got nothing left.

0:18:080:18:10

That's my entire budget blown if Nicholas will take...

0:18:100:18:15

Going, going...

0:18:150:18:17

Will it be a yes or will it be a flat no?

0:18:170:18:19

-I think it's going, going, gone.

-Gone, sold. Brilliant. Are you sure?

0:18:190:18:22

Yes, it's all good.

0:18:220:18:24

This is becoming a habit, Charles.

0:18:240:18:27

But spending every penny hasn't failed you yet, boy.

0:18:270:18:30

Meanwhile, having only spent £30 so far,

0:18:310:18:34

Philip's back in Bermondsey.

0:18:340:18:36

He's made his way to a studio

0:18:380:18:40

belonging to a couple with peculiar names.

0:18:400:18:42

-Hello? Hello?

-Hello.

0:18:420:18:45

-Hi. How are you?

-Hi. How are you doing?

-I'm Phil.

0:18:450:18:48

That's Dustbin and that's lovely Bones beside him.

0:18:480:18:52

Together, they're Dustbin and Bones,

0:18:520:18:54

and their shop is the epitome of vintage and retro.

0:18:540:18:57

-This is an artillery case, isn't it?

-That's correct, yes.

0:18:590:19:02

-It's very hard to find one this size.

-What's your price on that?

0:19:020:19:05

That one is... That would probably be about 250 to 300.

0:19:050:19:09

I shall put that back quickly.

0:19:090:19:11

And what about this cartwheel? How much is that?

0:19:170:19:20

Oh, that one can go for 80.

0:19:200:19:22

There might be a bit of scope to do something with that.

0:19:220:19:24

Definitely. Yes, yes.

0:19:240:19:25

That, at auction, I think that's going to make between 50 and 80 quid.

0:19:250:19:28

-Yeah.

-That's where I'm at. So let's put that back.

0:19:280:19:31

Now, let's go outside. Is all this your out here?

0:19:320:19:35

Yeah. It's a bit of a mess.

0:19:350:19:37

It's all right. I like your easel.

0:19:370:19:40

Is that yours or is that a...

0:19:400:19:42

That, actually, I found here many years ago.

0:19:420:19:45

You found here, so it's free stock.

0:19:450:19:47

Free stock. Did you hear that? Free stock. He's got free stock.

0:19:470:19:51

Nice try, Phil, but they're looking for £20 for this artist's easel.

0:19:510:19:55

OK.

0:19:550:19:57

We can buy something here.

0:19:580:20:00

Cos I'd quite like to buy this off you.

0:20:000:20:02

-And the easel.

-Yeah.

0:20:030:20:06

But I'm going to be mean. I'm going to be mean, I'll tell you that now.

0:20:060:20:09

Don't scare them, Philip. You've still got to get them to agree.

0:20:090:20:12

Tell you what, I'll give you 50 for the two, that's my best shot.

0:20:120:20:15

-I'd be happy with 50.

-OK.

0:20:150:20:18

You'll definitely make a profit.

0:20:180:20:20

I think you could be right.

0:20:200:20:22

At £40 for the wheel and £10 for the easel,

0:20:220:20:25

that's a great deal, Philip.

0:20:250:20:26

But you've still got shopping to do, mate.

0:20:270:20:30

With no such worries on his mind,

0:20:300:20:32

Charles has headed over to the district of Lambeth.

0:20:320:20:35

He's going to learn the full story of the lady with the lamp,

0:20:350:20:39

Florence Nightingale.

0:20:390:20:41

A Derbyshire girl, this museum details her life

0:20:410:20:44

from Victorian childhood to the Crimean War and beyond,

0:20:440:20:47

based here in St Thomas' Hospital.

0:20:470:20:50

-Nice to meet you.

-Nice to see you as well.

-I'm Charles Hanson.

0:20:500:20:52

-I'm a Derbyshire man. Need I say more?

-No, absolutely not.

0:20:520:20:57

I know Florence Nightingale is held in very, very high regard

0:20:570:21:00

in Derbyshire, and her family home was there.

0:21:000:21:02

And she always saw herself as a daughter of Derbyshire.

0:21:020:21:05

Florence was actually born in the Italian city of Florence,

0:21:070:21:10

hence the name.

0:21:100:21:11

The family moved back to Derbyshire where life was tough

0:21:110:21:14

for most children in Victorian Britain,

0:21:140:21:16

but Florence had a privileged upbringing,

0:21:160:21:19

making her choice of career even more surprising.

0:21:190:21:23

What we need to understand is that Nightingale's life,

0:21:230:21:26

although she was very privileged, was very,

0:21:260:21:28

very narrow and the expectations on her were very clear.

0:21:280:21:32

She would have been expected to marry a nice, respectable older man,

0:21:320:21:38

but she certainly wouldn't have been expected to work for her living.

0:21:380:21:42

Nursing back in the 19th century, it wasn't an upmarket girl thing to do,

0:21:420:21:47

like the police force. I mean, it wasn't for that affluent class,

0:21:470:21:51

so how did she go against the grain?

0:21:510:21:54

She was a very serious, a very studious

0:21:540:21:57

but also a very religious girl and young woman,

0:21:570:22:00

and she felt very, very strongly

0:22:000:22:02

that she'd been called by God to serve her fellow man.

0:22:020:22:06

So, really from this sort of graceful, I suppose,

0:22:060:22:09

youth and her direction through her religion

0:22:090:22:12

and through her desire to be a nurse, of course,

0:22:120:22:14

what I know as being Florence, what made her so important was the Crimea.

0:22:140:22:19

-Yep.

-Wasn't it?

-Yes.

0:22:190:22:21

I mean, in that it is her work in the Crimean War

0:22:210:22:23

that is the reason why Florence Nightingale is so well known today.

0:22:230:22:29

In the 19th century, Britain and its allies

0:22:290:22:31

were engaged in a conflict with Russia, the Crimean War.

0:22:310:22:35

In 1854, Florence and 38 volunteer nurses were sent to the front line.

0:22:350:22:41

New communication systems meant that British press

0:22:410:22:44

could report daily as events unfolded.

0:22:440:22:46

So, this is one of my favourite objects in the entire museum.

0:22:460:22:51

-This here?

-Yeah.

0:22:510:22:52

This is Nightingale's own personal chest

0:22:520:22:56

that she actually took to the Crimean War.

0:22:560:22:58

That's incredible.

0:22:580:23:00

This, for me, has such a strong connection to Florence Nightingale,

0:23:000:23:05

that I think it really does pack a big emotional punch.

0:23:050:23:08

Initially, the conditions at the barracks hospital were so bad,

0:23:100:23:14

in that first winter Nightingale and her nurses were just firefighting.

0:23:140:23:20

They were doing what they could in really appalling circumstances.

0:23:200:23:24

When I ever think of Florence Nightingale,

0:23:260:23:29

across Derbyshire we romanticise and think it's the lady with the lamp.

0:23:290:23:34

Is the lamp here?

0:23:340:23:35

We do have the lamp itself in the museum, yes, we do.

0:23:350:23:38

-The real lamp?

-Yes.

-Really?

0:23:380:23:40

-Would you like to see it?

-I'd love to.

0:23:400:23:42

So, here we have Nightingale's very own lamp.

0:23:440:23:48

-Is that the lamp?

-This is her lamp.

-I've always thought the lamp...

0:23:480:23:51

You know, you sort of had to rub it and the genie would come out. But it's not, is it?

0:23:510:23:55

No, a lot of people do have that... That's an imaginary vision.

0:23:550:23:58

-With a handle, yes.

-And, yes, absolutely.

0:23:580:24:00

-The brass Aladdin's lamp.

-Exactly.

0:24:000:24:02

But, actually, this is a Turkish workingman's lamp,

0:24:020:24:07

and it's much more practical because you can carry it around,

0:24:070:24:12

hook it up and it casts a nice light all around it.

0:24:120:24:16

But, equally, when you're not using it, it concertinas up.

0:24:160:24:21

The idea of 'the lady with the lamp' is, of course, incredibly symbolic

0:24:220:24:27

because she was seen as casting light and creating order,

0:24:270:24:32

but also somehow being quite a sort of angelic person.

0:24:320:24:36

When the war ended, Nightingale, in her 30s,

0:24:360:24:39

suffered recurrent ill health.

0:24:390:24:41

However, she still campaigned constantly

0:24:410:24:44

for the development and improvement of nursing standards

0:24:440:24:46

across the world.

0:24:460:24:47

She believed passionately that the lessons that had been learned

0:24:470:24:52

from the Crimean War, should be applied.

0:24:520:24:56

So she was passionate about public health

0:24:560:24:59

and the health of the army.

0:24:590:25:01

And she believed that the two went hand-in-hand.

0:25:010:25:04

Recognised as one of the founders of modern nursing,

0:25:050:25:08

the current nurses' pledge, the 'Florence Pledge',

0:25:080:25:12

was named in her honour.

0:25:120:25:13

I'm so grateful, it's been a wonderful visit

0:25:150:25:17

and I won't forget this because she was a Derbyshire girl.

0:25:170:25:21

Florence died in 1910,

0:25:210:25:22

but her tireless campaigning and zeal for health reform

0:25:220:25:26

helped pave the way for what would become

0:25:260:25:29

the National Health Service.

0:25:290:25:30

A truly fitting legacy for this incredible woman.

0:25:300:25:33

Phil's headed to Greenwich, meantime... Ha!

0:25:360:25:40

..and with only three items bought, he's got his work cut out.

0:25:400:25:43

But in a junk shop, THE Junk Shop and Spreadeagle

0:25:440:25:48

is actually the longest established antique shop in the south of London.

0:25:480:25:53

Perfect for our Phil.

0:25:530:25:55

That's...a complete and utter piece of nonsense, isn't it?

0:26:090:26:13

Sounds about right for you, then.

0:26:130:26:15

Just ask Ian, eh?

0:26:150:26:17

-It's a rudder off a little dinghy, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:26:170:26:19

Well, Phil, we are auctioning in Greenwich,

0:26:190:26:22

which has a strong maritime history, so this could be a clever buy.

0:26:220:26:26

Now, me and my mate, we've been pretty much rudderless

0:26:260:26:28

for most of this trip.

0:26:280:26:30

How much is that, please?

0:26:300:26:32

Um, that I would have to phone up and I can find out for you.

0:26:320:26:36

A quick phone call to Toby, the owner, gives him his answer.

0:26:360:26:40

OK, Toby. Thank you.

0:26:400:26:41

Alright, see you soon. Bye now. Bye.

0:26:430:26:46

-So what did Toby have to say, then?

-£20.

0:26:460:26:49

20 squid?

0:26:490:26:51

What do I want to buy a rudder off a ship for?

0:26:510:26:54

-You might find a ship to go with it.

-Oh, yeah.

0:26:540:26:57

So while Phil ponders, owner Toby and his son Otto have arrived...

0:26:570:27:01

..and might have landed him the catch of the day -

0:27:020:27:05

a wicker laundry basket priced at £45.

0:27:050:27:07

I like that.

0:27:070:27:09

It's one of those, like, hotel laundry, I suppose.

0:27:090:27:12

I just think it's a cool, funky thing, that.

0:27:120:27:15

-Rather nice with the rope handles.

-I just love it all.

0:27:160:27:19

I tell you what, you've been really, really kind to me

0:27:190:27:21

but I am gonna make you an offer, 'cause I have to.

0:27:210:27:24

Can I give you 50 quid for that and the rudder?

0:27:240:27:26

I think that's fair, actually. You knocked me down on the rudder. I will go for that.

0:27:280:27:31

-Is that fair?

-Yeah.

0:27:310:27:32

So with the basket for £40 and the rudder for a tenner,

0:27:330:27:36

Phil's finally bought all his lots for £130 - half his starting budget.

0:27:360:27:42

This could make for an interesting auction.

0:27:420:27:45

But first, it's time for our experts' grand reveal.

0:27:450:27:49

-That's part one, Charlie.

-Oh, Phil, that's nice.

0:27:490:27:51

I like...oh, my goodness me, Phil.

0:27:510:27:53

That's almost part two, Charlie.

0:27:530:27:55

-Oh, Phil!

-Whoa! Look at this, Charlie.

0:27:550:27:57

Wowee! Oh, my goodness me, Phil.

0:27:570:28:00

It's just taking it all in in one go.

0:28:000:28:02

-One, two, three, four, five lots.

-Yes.

0:28:020:28:04

I love your easel, by the way.

0:28:040:28:05

I think that's really cool.

0:28:050:28:06

This was retrieved... this cost me a tenner.

0:28:060:28:10

-It wasn't £10!

-Yeah, it was a tenner.

0:28:100:28:12

And it's worth all day long between £50 and £70.

0:28:120:28:14

You'd hope so. And that was a tenner as well, Charlie.

0:28:140:28:17

-£10?!

-Well, I thought we were rudderless.

0:28:170:28:19

-Do you sail?

-Only close to the wind.

0:28:190:28:21

-No, I don't at all, Charlie.

-HE LAUGHS

0:28:210:28:23

And then I had two 40 quid lots.

0:28:230:28:25

The old laundry basket, country house laundry basket.

0:28:250:28:28

And one wheel on my wagon.

0:28:280:28:31

And the big wagon wheel is gonna roll, Phil.

0:28:310:28:33

-What I really want is a three-wheeled wagon.

-Ah!

0:28:330:28:35

And then that would be ideal.

0:28:350:28:37

Now it's Charles' turn. What's Phil going to make of those chairs?

0:28:370:28:41

Look at these, Phil. Aren't they just so, so stylish?

0:28:410:28:45

Look, Phil. Look at the chairs. Aren't they wonderful?

0:28:450:28:48

Look at the chairs, Phil.

0:28:480:28:49

They're a bit rusty, but it doesn't matter.

0:28:490:28:52

Uh-oh.

0:28:520:28:54

They're awful.

0:28:540:28:56

-What do you mean, they're awful?

-They're absolutely awful.

0:28:560:28:59

-You didn't buy those?

-I did buy them.

0:28:590:29:01

Charlie...how much did you pay for those?

0:29:010:29:04

£100.

0:29:040:29:05

-Anyway...

-They're wrecked.

0:29:050:29:07

I must admit, Phil, looking at them now in this light,

0:29:090:29:12

they are quite tired.

0:29:120:29:13

What do you mean looking at them in this light?

0:29:130:29:15

Charlie, look at them. They're awful.

0:29:150:29:18

I don't think he likes them.

0:29:180:29:20

That's nice. I like that. How much was that?

0:29:200:29:23

It cost me £140, and to me, Phil...

0:29:230:29:25

-I like that.

-Thank you.

0:29:250:29:26

And I like that as well. That's really cool. How much was that?

0:29:260:29:29

I years ago had a pair of snakeskin shoes and feeling this finish...

0:29:290:29:33

-You had a what?!

-Pair of snakeskin shoes.

0:29:330:29:35

Why?

0:29:350:29:36

Because back in my heyday, Phil, I had a bit of a London look about me.

0:29:360:29:40

-Not now, I'm an old man.

-Alright, OK. How much was that?

0:29:400:29:43

-Phil, this was £45...38 pence.

-That's alright, that's profit.

0:29:430:29:47

It was my last bit of money left over. £45.38.

0:29:470:29:50

Don't sneeze, Phil, don't sneeze. You might miss them.

0:29:500:29:53

Aren't they great?

0:29:530:29:55

-Ah...

-Handkerchief vases.

0:29:550:29:57

Phil, we're mid-week through our Road Trip, I'm just going a bit wild,

0:29:570:30:00

I'm just taking a bit of time out from the normal...

0:30:000:30:02

-Let me ask a question.

-Yeah.

0:30:020:30:04

Have you been out in that sun without that hat on?

0:30:040:30:06

No, it's over there, my hat.

0:30:060:30:08

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:30:080:30:09

-Just come with me a minute.

-Yeah. That lot's...

0:30:090:30:12

As if we didn't already know, let's find out what they really think.

0:30:120:30:15

What on earth was he doing with those chairs?

0:30:150:30:19

I mean they are just, truly, remarkably, awful.

0:30:190:30:23

Phil...I take my hat off to you, it's gone.

0:30:230:30:26

You bought really, really well and...

0:30:260:30:28

..I think all your lots, the wagon wheel as well...

0:30:300:30:33

Yeah, I'm in trouble.

0:30:330:30:34

It's time to get back on the road and head to auction.

0:30:350:30:39

Charlie, there's a bus here, Charlie. Over that way.

0:30:400:30:43

No, back over this way now.

0:30:450:30:46

-Just try and keep it straight.

-Sorry, Phil.

0:30:460:30:49

If you just hold this wheelie thing here, like that,

0:30:490:30:51

it tends to go in a straight line.

0:30:510:30:53

-It's the pre-match nerves.

-Really?

0:30:530:30:55

Big auction, Phil.

0:30:550:30:57

Oh, sounds exciting.

0:30:570:30:59

It's been a cracking third leg,

0:30:590:31:02

kicking off in Bermondsey with stops on both banks of the River Thames

0:31:020:31:06

and ending in Greenwich for the big auction.

0:31:060:31:08

Phil, this is officially halfway.

0:31:100:31:12

-Are your chairs in there?

-And I think after halfway...

0:31:130:31:17

-Are they?

-..you'll be leading me.

0:31:170:31:19

Go and have a look and see if your chairs are in there.

0:31:190:31:23

-Come on.

-Now, now, Philip. Remember who's in the lead.

0:31:230:31:26

Our boys are at Greenwich Auctions.

0:31:270:31:30

Established in 1999,

0:31:310:31:33

and at its helm today is straight-talking Robert Dodd.

0:31:330:31:38

Let's see what he thinks of our experts' choices.

0:31:380:31:42

The artist's easel... it's a nice easel.

0:31:420:31:45

It's a nice one.

0:31:450:31:47

We tried to look for a signature,

0:31:470:31:49

perhaps it has been used by Lowry or Van Gogh,

0:31:490:31:51

but, unfortunately, there's no provenance.

0:31:510:31:55

I really like the chairs.

0:31:550:31:57

And we knew as soon as we saw the OMK Design on it and London

0:31:570:32:00

that they were quite important.

0:32:000:32:01

Ooh, very interesting.

0:32:010:32:03

But, ultimately, of course, it's up to the bidders.

0:32:030:32:07

Charles Hanson set out on this leg with £335.38

0:32:070:32:12

and spent every last penny on his five lots.

0:32:120:32:15

While Philip Serrell began this leg with £254.20

0:32:170:32:21

and only spent half of that,

0:32:210:32:23

parting with £130 on his five lots.

0:32:230:32:26

Listen up, it's time for the auction cry.

0:32:280:32:30

Good luck.

0:32:300:32:32

First up is Phil's Chinese 18th-century style vase.

0:32:330:32:37

Stunning lot, this.

0:32:370:32:39

Stunned?

0:32:390:32:42

And the bid's with me at only £15 on that.

0:32:420:32:44

Looking for 18. I've got 15, 18, 20 with me.

0:32:440:32:48

Looking for 22.

0:32:480:32:49

-It's profit.

-No, it's not.

0:32:490:32:51

No, that's lost money.

0:32:510:32:53

Are you really, really sure? The lid's worth that.

0:32:530:32:55

Are we all done?

0:32:550:32:57

-Profit, isn't it?

-No, no, no.

0:32:570:32:59

-At £20.

-Ouch!

0:32:590:33:01

A commission bid from someone not in the auction wins it.

0:33:010:33:04

But that's a loss to start for poor Phil.

0:33:040:33:07

Mind you, we've got your really nice chairs next, haven't we?

0:33:070:33:10

HE GAGS

0:33:100:33:12

Phil detests them, our auctioneer loves them.

0:33:120:33:15

But what will the bidders think of Charles' chairs?

0:33:150:33:18

These are iconic, and as far as we've been able to find out,

0:33:180:33:22

there's also one or two on permanent display

0:33:220:33:26

in the contemporary design section at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

0:33:260:33:29

Hear that? In the V&A.

0:33:290:33:32

I know what they say, you know, they talk about condition.

0:33:320:33:35

No, the condition's not that good.

0:33:350:33:37

But if you know anybody who sprays cars,

0:33:370:33:40

they'll be able to do these.

0:33:400:33:41

AUDIENCE LAUGHS

0:33:410:33:43

-I've had a bit of interest in these.

-Oh, come on.

0:33:450:33:47

International bids, Isle of Dogs, Isle of Sheppey.

0:33:470:33:50

AUDIENCE LAUGHS

0:33:500:33:51

Is that really being serious?

0:33:510:33:53

I don't know. I think so.

0:33:530:33:54

I've gotta start these straight in with a bid of £45.

0:33:540:33:59

-OK.

-Looking for 50. 55. 60. 65 with me.

0:33:590:34:03

Looking for 70 anywhere.

0:34:030:34:05

-75 with me.

-Keep going.

-Looking for 80. This is cheap.

0:34:050:34:09

80. 85 with me. 90. £100 with me.

0:34:090:34:12

-I'm looking for 110...

-Keep going, keep going.

0:34:120:34:15

110 I need. 120 with me. Looking for 130.

0:34:150:34:18

-Charlie, how he's made those I don't know, Charlie.

-Keep going.

0:34:180:34:22

At £120.

0:34:220:34:24

-Give him a round of applause.

-Thank you very much.

0:34:240:34:27

See, Phil? You never can tell.

0:34:290:34:31

So much for being rude about the chairs.

0:34:310:34:33

Lesson learned, eh?

0:34:330:34:35

Now, how will the bidders react to your late-19th-century cartwheel?

0:34:350:34:40

The bid's with me on that cartwheel at £10 only. Looking for 12.

0:34:400:34:44

15, 18, 22, I'm out.

0:34:440:34:47

22, 25. 28 I want. 28 there, I've seen ya.

0:34:470:34:52

£30, 32, 35, 38.

0:34:520:34:55

£40 I want. £40 standing. 42. 45 I want.

0:34:550:34:59

No? Why not? You started it, you can't pull out.

0:34:590:35:02

I've got 42, looking for 45. We all done?

0:35:020:35:05

45 new player. See you all. 48. 50.

0:35:050:35:09

52, 55, 58.

0:35:090:35:12

58 there, looking for 60. It's only another couple of pound. All done?

0:35:120:35:16

60 there, then. 62 there. 65. 68. £70.

0:35:160:35:21

72, 75, 78. 80 I want. 78 there, then.

0:35:210:35:26

We all done this time?

0:35:260:35:28

At £78 on the cartwheel.

0:35:280:35:31

You do know your wood, Philip.

0:35:320:35:34

That's turned you a nice little profit.

0:35:340:35:36

Next up is Charles' green dress.

0:35:370:35:40

Will anyone fork out for this frock?

0:35:400:35:43

-You should have worn that, Charlie.

-It happened so fast.

0:35:430:35:45

Bid's with me at £8. £10 there, then.

0:35:450:35:48

I'm out. Looking for 12.

0:35:480:35:49

I've got £10, I'm looking for 12.

0:35:490:35:52

Where you gonna get another one?

0:35:520:35:54

-Why would you want another one?

-We all done at 10?

0:35:540:35:56

£12 on there... I can't do 50p, love.

0:35:560:35:59

I've got £10, I'm looking for 12. Are we all done this time?

0:36:000:36:04

At £10 only on the frock.

0:36:040:36:07

BANGS GAVEL

0:36:070:36:09

Well, who'd have thought it?

0:36:090:36:11

One very happy buyer and another profit.

0:36:110:36:13

Now, can Philip clean up with his large wicker laundry basket?

0:36:150:36:20

The bid's with me at only £22 on this.

0:36:200:36:22

Looking for 25. I've got 25. 28. 32...35...38. £40 I'm out.

0:36:220:36:29

Anywhere.

0:36:290:36:31

£40 there, then. I'm out. 42. 45. 48. 50.

0:36:310:36:37

Five I want. 50 there, looking for 55.

0:36:370:36:40

I have £50 in the middle of the room, are we all done?

0:36:400:36:43

Profit.

0:36:430:36:45

Last time at £50.

0:36:450:36:46

Nice work, Philip. This is starting to go very well.

0:36:460:36:50

It's another of Charles' vintage lots next.

0:36:500:36:53

He's paired his Melmac cruet set

0:36:530:36:56

with the selection of handkerchief vases.

0:36:560:36:58

They are good old English retro vases.

0:36:580:37:01

I think they're worth 8 quid - what did you pay for them?

0:37:010:37:03

-45.

-They'll make 400.

0:37:030:37:06

And it's gotta start with a bid with me straight in at £15.

0:37:060:37:09

Oh, 15. Oh, shame. I thought it was 50.

0:37:090:37:13

22 I want. 22. I'm out, looking for 25.

0:37:130:37:16

I've got 22 on this lot. Are we all done?

0:37:160:37:19

Last time. At £22!

0:37:190:37:22

Well, that represents a hefty loss, Charles.

0:37:220:37:25

Your retro gamble just isn't paying off.

0:37:250:37:28

Now, will there be interest in Phil's maritime lot?

0:37:280:37:31

The boat rudder.

0:37:310:37:33

No-one should be without a boat rudder.

0:37:330:37:35

And the bid's with me at only £10 on those.

0:37:350:37:39

Looking for 12, they're worth all of that.

0:37:390:37:41

Look great in the garden.

0:37:410:37:43

15 with me. 18. I'm out. Looking for 20.

0:37:430:37:46

I've got £18 on a boat rudder and a tiller. Are we all done?

0:37:460:37:51

£20 there at the back of the room, 22 you need.

0:37:510:37:54

22. Five I want. 25.

0:37:540:37:56

28 I want. 25 down there.

0:37:560:37:59

I'm still looking for £28 anywhere. Are we all done?

0:37:590:38:02

Down the back of the room at £25.

0:38:020:38:06

That's a profit and a healthy lead, Phil. So well done.

0:38:070:38:10

Next is Charles' big purchase.

0:38:120:38:14

He said it was a rare 18th-century porcelain box.

0:38:140:38:18

So can his antiques knowledge save him from his retro blunders?

0:38:180:38:21

And it's gotta start with a bid with me of £30 on that.

0:38:210:38:26

Looking for 32 anywhere.

0:38:260:38:29

32, 35, 38, £40.

0:38:290:38:31

Some interest on the phones for this one.

0:38:310:38:33

55. I'm out. 55 I'm out, I need £60.

0:38:330:38:39

65 on the second phone. £70...

0:38:390:38:41

A lot of interest.

0:38:410:38:43

I'm looking for 75. £80 I want.

0:38:430:38:47

80 I've got, 85 I need.

0:38:470:38:49

£85, Louis. 85...£90. £90 on the first phone. Yes.

0:38:490:38:55

I'd rather have this at 100 quid rather than your chairs, Charlie.

0:38:550:38:58

105. 110 I'll take.

0:38:580:39:01

110. 115 I'll take. 120 I need.

0:39:010:39:06

125 I'll take.

0:39:060:39:08

125 I've got. 130. 135 I need, Luke.

0:39:080:39:13

-Well done, Charlie.

-I've broken even, that's alright.

0:39:130:39:16

I'm happy now, it's broken even. The phones are flying.

0:39:160:39:19

£150 please, Louis.

0:39:190:39:21

150. I've got 145, I'm looking for £150. Are we all done at £145?

0:39:210:39:28

Selling this box at £145.

0:39:280:39:32

Nice piece, Charles.

0:39:320:39:33

But that was a lot of work for a £5 profit.

0:39:330:39:36

And that'll be a loss after auction costs, I'm afraid.

0:39:360:39:39

But it's cracked.

0:39:390:39:40

We've both got one lot left each.

0:39:400:39:42

Your artist's easel and my snakeskin mantel clock.

0:39:420:39:46

Exciting, isn't it?

0:39:460:39:47

Oh, I'm having a job to hold myself in, Charlie.

0:39:470:39:50

Come on, Phil, a bit more enthusiasm, please.

0:39:500:39:53

It's your artist's easel next.

0:39:530:39:55

It may not have been Van Gogh's,

0:39:550:39:57

but you'll swap provenance for a profit, I'm sure.

0:39:570:40:00

Straight in at £25 on that.

0:40:000:40:04

Well done.

0:40:040:40:05

Looking for 28. I've got 25 on it.

0:40:050:40:07

I'm looking for 28.

0:40:070:40:09

30 with me. 32, 35. 38 I need.

0:40:090:40:13

You gotta go for it, mate.

0:40:130:40:14

£38 I want. 38, 40. Two I want. 45, 48.

0:40:140:40:19

50, 55, 60 with me.

0:40:190:40:22

65. 70 with me. I've got 72. 75 with me.

0:40:220:40:26

I'll take £80. Are we all done?

0:40:260:40:29

Last time. At £75 on the easel.

0:40:290:40:33

-Give him a round of applause.

-Well done, Philip. Well done.

0:40:340:40:37

That's a great result. I mean that really is...fantastic.

0:40:370:40:41

Yeah, best profit of the day so far.

0:40:410:40:43

So well done, Philip.

0:40:430:40:44

It depends on the clock.

0:40:440:40:46

It's gonna be really, really close this one, Charlie.

0:40:460:40:49

All we can guarantee is an exciting finale.

0:40:490:40:52

Yeah.

0:40:520:40:54

To win today's auction,

0:40:540:40:56

they'll need to get really excited by your snakeskin clock, Charles.

0:40:560:41:00

Great-looking piece, this.

0:41:000:41:02

And it's gotta start with a bid with me of £25 only on that clock.

0:41:020:41:06

Looking for 28. It's worth all of that.

0:41:060:41:10

25, 28, £30.

0:41:100:41:12

Looking for 32 anywhere. 35 here.

0:41:120:41:14

Looking for 38. 38.

0:41:140:41:17

£40. I'm out at the back of the room looking for 42.

0:41:170:41:21

I've got 42 on the telephone.

0:41:210:41:23

Looking for 45. Are we all done at £42?

0:41:230:41:27

You won't see another one of these.

0:41:270:41:29

Are we all done at 42? Looking for 45?

0:41:290:41:31

At 42... £45 just in time, looking for 48.

0:41:310:41:37

48 on the telephone. Looking for 50, I've got.

0:41:370:41:40

I'll take 52, Luke.

0:41:400:41:42

52 I need. I've got £50, are we all done?

0:41:420:41:44

Last time. At £50 on the clock...

0:41:440:41:48

That is cheap.

0:41:480:41:49

Give 'em a round of applause. Thanks very much.

0:41:490:41:51

-Thank you very much. You tried.

-Thank you very much.

0:41:510:41:54

-I think they're cheap, Charlie.

-Yeah.

0:41:540:41:56

Sometimes the bidders just don't bite, Charlie. Bad luck.

0:41:580:42:02

-Well played, Phil.

-I think you might be driving.

0:42:040:42:06

And I think you might be winning. HE LAUGHS

0:42:060:42:09

So, Charles Hanson let his retro theme get the better of him

0:42:120:42:15

and, after auction costs, he made a loss of £50.84,

0:42:150:42:19

which means he starts next time with £284.54.

0:42:190:42:24

While Philip Serrell played it safe, starting this leg with £254.20

0:42:240:42:29

and making a tidy profit of £73.36.

0:42:290:42:33

Which means he's in the lead in the trip and takes forward £327.56

0:42:330:42:39

to spend next time.

0:42:390:42:40

The sun's come out, it's a happy day.

0:42:420:42:44

Happy day, Phil.

0:42:440:42:45

North-east, here we come. That way.

0:42:450:42:47

BOTH SING # The sun has got his hat on

0:42:470:42:50

# Hip, hip, hip, hooray!

0:42:500:42:51

# The sun has got his hat on... #

0:42:510:42:54

That's the right attitude, chaps. Stay bright.

0:42:540:42:56

-Next time on Antiques Road Trip...

-Ruff! Ruff!

0:42:560:42:59

..the pressure's getting to Phil.

0:42:590:43:02

What the hell have I done?

0:43:020:43:04

And Charles is pulling out all the stops to get back in the game.

0:43:040:43:08

They could make 400 in the right sale and that's exciting.

0:43:080:43:11

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:240:43:28

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:280:43:32