Episode 4 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 4

Antiques experts Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson begin the fourth day of their road trip in Cambridge, before passing through Peterborough and heading towards Suffolk.


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-NARRATOR:

-It's the nation's favourite antique experts...

-All right, viewers?

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..with £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire! Yes!

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Sold. Going, going, gone.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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50p!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Ooh! Ooh!

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Ow!

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This is the Antique Road Trip!

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Yeah.

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This week we're on the road with the dashing duo.

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PHILIP SERRELL: Charlie, it's a lovely day and I'm in the lead.

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HE LAUGHS

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-CHARLES HANSON:

-How's it feel?

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Well, it just feels like the natural order's been resumed really, Charlie.

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I've got it in me to come back.

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That's worrying, that is.

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Hyperactive auctioneer Charles Hanson

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lost his lead at the last auction.

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Well done.

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So now he's falling over himself to claw it back.

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That's exciting.

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I'm the older one who buys this sort of stuff, stupid things.

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His rival auctioneer, Philip Serrell...

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..who's trying hard not to let success cloud his judgment.

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What the hell have I done?

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They've been together now in a small car for three days

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and Charles's little quirks...

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Woof! Woof!

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HE HOWLS

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-Good morning!

-Absolutely bonkers.

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CHARLES LAUGHS

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..are starting to light Phil's very short fuse.

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-Do you sleep in pyjamas?

-Oh, for God's sake, Charlie!

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How many more days have we got of this?

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Well, Phil, you're over halfway through the trip.

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And after three outings at auction,

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Charles has turned a starting budget of £200 into £284.54.

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Phil, though, has pulled ahead, turning £200 into £327.56.

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-Phil, although I'm losing...

-What was that?

-I'm losing...

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-What was that, sorry?

-I am losing.

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These squabbling gents are cavorting round the country

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in a 1969 Triumph GT6 convertible

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and they're covering some distance.

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Beginning in Southport in Merseyside,

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they're clocking up over 800 miles,

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weaving towards their final destination in Cirencester

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in the Cotswolds.

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On this leg, they're starting in the county town of Cambridge

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before ambling towards auction in Glemsford, Suffolk.

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Sitting on the River Cam with some exquisite architecture,

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Cambridge is celebrated for its 780-year-old university.

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Phil, don't you feel like Harry Potter?

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-What?

-Of that magical presence of academia.

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Don't you feel high intellectual when you walk right down here?

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Actually, I've never felt high intellectual in my life.

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Enough of your nonsense, Hanson. It's time to get serious.

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This morning you've got two shops side by side to get you started.

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-Snap.

-Which one do you want, Charlie?

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That one or that one?

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Hanson's on a mission here. He's off.

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-Phil, I'm quite happy to go in this one first of all.

-In there?

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You know, I'm playing catch-up now.

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Well, don't try and steal the march on me, will you? I mean, don't...

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What's going on?

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You just got left behind, Phil.

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Charles has buzzed off into the hive.

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I'm thinking about Suffolk and what I'm doing in Suffolk

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and the fact Suffolk is just...well...

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..it's quite oaky and, also, it's not far from Holland.

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There are about 200 miles and the North Sea separating them, Charles.

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He's on another planet sometimes, that boy.

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Shake, rattle and roll, Phil. I'm coming to get you, OK?

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Lordy. Bang any harder and Phil will hear you next door.

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-> MAN:

-Morning, Mr Serrell.

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-So how are you? All right?

-I'm well, thank you. What about you?

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Yeah, really, really good.

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What have you got for me?

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Oh, I've got some bits and bobs out in the car

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that I haven't brought in yet today, so...

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Oh, well, you go and get those bits and bobs

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and let me have a look around.

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-Bits and bobs.

-Oh, this is what we like.

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Might find something of interest. Haven't unloaded them today yet.

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Ah, new box filled with old treasures.

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Bits and bobs, bits and bobs.

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Will something in here tempt Phil to part with his £327?

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Well, that's nice, isn't it?

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I like that.

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That's got Charlie's name written all over it. It's masons.

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-And how old is that?

-I don't know.

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I can't even read the mark on the back. Can you see it?

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How much is that?

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That's got to be £35, best.

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This is Sunderland Lustre

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and it's called Sunderland Lustre cos it was made up there.

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And the lustre is this sort of pink, almost like luminescent, colour here.

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He's after this masonic plaque. Owner Stephen wants £35 for it.

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-I think that I might have a go at that for you.

-OK.

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-But I was going to offer you 15 quid.

-£20 and we'll deal.

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-I think it probably is old, isn't it?

-£30.

-Although it might be new.

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No, I'll give you 20 quid for it.

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And I think, genuinely, I think it's got a chance of being an old one.

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He may not know its age, but he's taking a punt on the plate

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and now the world's his oyster.

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How old do you think this globe is, Stephen?

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I think it's got the old Russian states on it, hasn't it?

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-It's the USSR, isn't it?

-USSR, yeah.

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It also boasts a double axis with a ticket price of £39.

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-I can go a bit lower, Phil.

-Could you do 20 quid for me?

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Uh... Yeah, of course I can.

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-Can I ask you to do me a favour? Can you keep it by for me?

-OK.

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-Until about four o'clock this afternoon?

-Yep.

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-Could you do that?

-By all means.

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Phil's almost bought two items, but Charles is still empty handed.

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I'm going next door now.

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Phil, you're still here. Isn't it changeover time now?

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-It's a good shop, Charlie.

-I know it is, I know it is.

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-You mean you're throwing me out?

-I might do, yes.

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-If that's OK with you.

-Oh, you.

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Phil, the going is getting tough, OK?

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And when the going gets tough...

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-The tough gets going.

-See you, Charlie.

-See you, Phil. Good luck.

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Get cracking, Charles.

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You've got the shop to yourself and over £280 to spend.

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I want to acquire objects which impress me,

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which I take to auction, like my yellow and red chairs,

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which just give me a heartbeat.

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And, Philip, that's one thing which you must get away from -

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don't buy knobbly knick-knacks - buy to impress, buy real antiques, Phil.

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That's the way forward.

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Actually, Charles, Phil's not doing too badly.

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That's quite nice, the little compass. That's silver, isn't it?

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-Oh, it is. It's got a hallmark.

-1898. That's quite sweet.

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Could this late-Victorian silver compass

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help Charles get back on track?

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What would the Suffolk line compass have to be?

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Between two English lions.

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-You were the bigger roar.

-Welsh.

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Oh, I'm sorry, you're Welsh. I'm sorry.

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He sure knows how to turn on the charm, eh?

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-Tenner.

-Tenner? That's not...

-You've got to buy it for a tenner.

-Yeah.

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-That's quite nice, isn't it?

-It's nice, yes.

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-That came in with the same lot this morning.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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I think what gives it a certain attraction is the fact that this man

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appears to be dressed in military costume,

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so I can almost put that unknown, unidentified sitter,

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who probably fought for the great cause 1914-18,

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put it with the compass

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to almost give a life to the compass about where it's travelled.

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If I bought the two together, what's your best price?

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£20. Best price. No arguments. You've got a bargain.

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You know you've got a bargain. Show me the money.

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-Meet me halfway at £15.

-Oh, please.

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My final offer - and this is so I do get a profit - is £16.

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For 1,600 pence, I'll say 'sold'. Do you do change?

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-Uh... We can change it into a fiver for you.

-Thank you very much.

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-There you go.

-Oh, really?!

-Thank you very much.

-That's great.

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-So into a fiver.

-Yeah.

-That means it's £15.

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Stephen's a very generous chap.

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-Are you sure?

-Well...

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

-But you said £16 to me.

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You've got such a sad look on your face sometimes, Charles,

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how can I possibly not?

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Those boyish good looks land him another £1 discount.

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One thing I perhaps ought to have picked up - I've left behind

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and sometimes you think they ought to belong together -

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is the actual fob watch chain.

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-I forgot about it.

-You want to put them together?

-I forgot.

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-This is hallmarked.

-Yeah, it is solid silver.

-Final offer...

-Yes.

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-OK?

-Yeah.

-£15.

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£15 plus £15 means this would owe me £30 pounds at auction,

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which means I would owe you an extra £15 now.

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-You're good at sums, aren't you?

-Thanks.

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Indeed, there's no end to his talents.

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That's quite a haul for £30.

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I wonder if Philip's having as much success next door.

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How much is the death plaque?

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What's he spotted?

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So, basically, this is a plaque, isn't it, that's, um...

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-It's known as a death penny, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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Given to the family of each soldier that passed in World War I.

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Commonly known as 'dead man's penny'

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because it looks similar to the coin.

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They were issued to the families of fallen British soldiers.

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This one has a price tag of £85 on it.

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Not much for a life.

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-See, I think...I think it IS going to make £40 to £60.

-Yeah.

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-I've got to try and buy it off you for £30.

-Yeah.

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That's the bottom line for me.

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If you can go £35, I'll have it.

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-Since it's you, yeah.

-All right. You're a gentleman.

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-Thank you very, very much, indeed.

-No problem.

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Another item and a generous discount of £50.

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Ooh! This shopping lark does look exhausting.

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Charlie, what are you doing?

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-Sorry. It's the heat. It's lovely. Sorry.

-The heat?

-The heat.

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You see, mental exhaustion...

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-We're in England in September, Charlie.

-I know. It's wonderful.

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-Go in the car. What have you bought?

-Um...

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Easy, Phil, that's Charles's little secret.

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Now play nice in the car, boys.

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-Phil, if you saw me now on a bike...

-I wouldn't love you.

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..would you think I was a Cambridge student?

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No. Cos most of them have got hair.

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A bit harsh, Phil. But fear not, Charles.

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You may not fit in at King's College, but whilst Phil's shopping,

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there's another Cambridge tradition you'd be perfect for.

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Look out.

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You must be Philip.

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-I am Phil.

-Charles Hanson.

-Charles, very good to meet you.

-Good to see you.

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-My father is a Philip.

-He is?

-He was at Cambridge.

-Yep.

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And he always told me how enjoyable it was to go punting.

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I'm very glad you've come.

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And I can't believe I'm following in his footsteps. It's wonderful.

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Dreams CAN come true, Charles.

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As a way of navigating these shallow waterways,

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punting's been around for centuries.

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But in 1903,

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local man and boat maker Jack Scudamore helped transform

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punting from the practical to the pleasure pastime we know today.

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Clearly it took off under Scudamore,

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this art and passion for punting in Cambridge.

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Was he a marketeer or was he just...

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Steady there, Charles!

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-Almost went then. Was it something that just took off?

-I think it did.

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He started off with rowing boats and things

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and realised that the punt was a very peculiar mode of transport that

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was particular to this part of the world,

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so he sort of made it an image which is always associated with Cambridge.

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Yes.

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Like strawberries and Wimbledon, punting's become synonymous with

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Cambridge, although it's definitely more dangerous.

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-Now duck, do we?

-We should probably duck here. Adjust very quickly.

-OK.

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You get used to this with all the bridges.

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-I feel like Indiana Jones. It's good, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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Indiana Jones? More Frank Spencer, I'd say.

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Sorry. Right, yes.

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Oh, Charles...

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Oh, I think late 19th century.

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..you and water were made to go together.

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Yeah, Phil, I think the landscape now suggests I ought to have a go.

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-Are you feeling ready?

-Yeah, I think so. I'm a fairly strong guy.

-OK.

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-Let's go for it then.

-Yeah, I've got big arms, so...

-All right.

-Yeah, OK.

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-Should we swap places?

-Sure thing. So here's the pole.

-OK.

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I don't think I'd like to be on board much.

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-So, Phil, all I do, I hold it like that.

-Yep.

-In the ground it goes.

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Drop it through your hands, let it slide through your hands.

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-And push straight back.

-I've got you.

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And this is the tricky part now - leave it in the water behind you...

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-Yeah?

-..and if you want to turn right slightly,

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drag the pole towards the right bank.

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There you go - perfect.

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Now. Oh, dear.

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To the left a bit.

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Would you travel with Charles Hanson in a punt?

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I feel almost...

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Phil, if I sort of do that and then almost hold on to it

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and hold on to it, I'm a pole-vaulter.

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Charles! Get a grip!

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I think you've got the basic principles.

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Sorry.

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Look out! Oh, my God! You've hit somebody, Charles!

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Sorry, sir.

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Oh, no, he's hit the bank.

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Oh, Charles.

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HE LAUGHS

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What a shambles.

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HE MOCK-LAUGHS

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-Over to you. Thank you.

-Thank you. Congratulations.

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It's been immense. And do you know what?

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Philip Serrell, if you were here - I wish you were here...but not really,

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because this, Phil, is the life.

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Ah, the sun has just come out.

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It's a miracle you're still dry, Charles.

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Time for a little lie-down, old fruit. I think you've earned it.

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How's rival Phil getting on?

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He's off taking his next punt on a purchase.

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-Hi. You must be Warren. < MAN:

-Yeah.

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-Warren, I'm Philip. How are you?

-Welcome, Philip.

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-You've got a bit of everything in here.

-Yeah.

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I don't want to be picky at all, but I think your choice of model actually

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doesn't sell that too much, really.

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It's sure as hell not Drew Barrymore, is it?

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Right, let's go have a look at something.

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That's enough flattery, Phil.

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What about checking out some antiques, eh?

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I do like that one. What's that? It looks like half a drainpipe.

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Came from a local garage. It took four of us to lift it in here.

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I can sort of feel myself warming to the task, yeah.

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Mmm - a large yard of antiques and Phil's attracted to this great lump.

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Oh, I love that.

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It appears to be a water feature

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but may have had some kind of commercial or industrial use.

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Warren wants £250 for it.

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So it's probably 1960s, isn't it?

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It's made of reconstituted concrete but it looks a bit like granite.

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I think it will make a fun garden feature.

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What do I think that's going to make at auction?

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I think that's likely to make 120-180 quid, that's what I think.

0:15:050:15:09

-I think that's optimistic.

-What's the best you could do it for?

-£150?

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Tell you what, just hold your hand out, Warren,

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let's just see if this makes it feel better.

0:15:160:15:19

-There's 20. There's 40...

-Got some mind tricks on the go here, Philip?

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There's 80.

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There's 100 and there's 20 quid and I've got my train fare home.

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What about another 10?

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I'm gonna give you that cos I just think it's a fun, fun thing.

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What the hell have I done?

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You've paid £130 for half a ton of concrete

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and some plants, as far as I can tell.

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And he's not done yet.

0:15:530:15:55

He's decided to head back to Cam's Antiques to have another

0:15:550:15:59

-look at that globe.

-Do you know, I used to teach geography...

0:15:590:16:04

-I think I did know that.

-..albeit not very well.

0:16:040:16:07

Well, sir, does it look any better on a second viewing?

0:16:070:16:10

-I think I'm gonna have that off you. It's 20, wasn't it?

-It was 20, yeah.

0:16:100:16:13

-That's what we agreed.

-You're a gentleman.

0:16:130:16:15

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you very much, yeah.

0:16:150:16:19

-That's fun, isn't it?

-Just like that, he's four items up and £205 down.

0:16:190:16:25

As day one draws to a close,

0:16:250:16:27

he rejoins Charles in the Triumph to relax for the night.

0:16:270:16:31

HE SINGS GRUFFLY # I want to be a part of it. #

0:16:310:16:34

If Charles ever calms down, that is.

0:16:340:16:37

It's a beautiful morning, perfect to enjoy with some good company.

0:16:400:16:44

-Let's play a game. I spy...

-Charlie wants to play a game.

0:16:450:16:48

-..with my little eye, something beginning with G.

-Gooseberries.

0:16:480:16:53

-Close. Not quite.

-Give up.

0:16:530:16:56

-Green.

-Charlie, you can't...

0:16:560:16:58

-I saw green.

-What sort of idiot are you?

0:16:580:17:01

-It's green!

-You can't say, "Oh, there's a green."

0:17:010:17:04

-"Oh, look. That's not the sky up there, it's a blue!"

-It is blue.

0:17:040:17:08

-You worry me sometimes.

-Why?

-You do. You worry me.

0:17:090:17:12

Come on, Phil. Who doesn't like a classic game of I-spy?

0:17:120:17:16

When you were a youngster back in Worcestershire

0:17:160:17:18

did they have the old shire horses working the fields?

0:17:180:17:21

When I was young, they did not have shire horses.

0:17:210:17:24

But Worcestershire is a very traditional county.

0:17:240:17:26

-You kept the agricultural...

-It's not backward, Charlie.

-Poor Charles.

0:17:260:17:30

-Phil's fuse seems even shorter today.

-You know what, Charlie?

0:17:300:17:33

It's 9.15 and you've worn me out already.

0:17:330:17:35

Well, he did have a good day yesterday, spending £205

0:17:370:17:41

on the 19th-century masonic plaque, the First World War memorial plaque,

0:17:410:17:46

the large concrete water feature and the 20th-century double axis globe,

0:17:460:17:50

leaving him with £122.56 to spend today.

0:17:500:17:54

Charles parted with just £30,

0:17:570:17:59

picking up a Victorian fob and silver chain

0:17:590:18:02

and the photo frame with the image of a First World War soldier.

0:18:020:18:05

-He has £254.54 to play with today.

-Bye.

0:18:050:18:10

On the horizon over there somewhere is the big one that will make us

0:18:100:18:14

-thousands of pounds.

-Do you ever stop to draw breath?

0:18:140:18:17

-I want to dream, Phil.

-Really?

-I had a dream.

-Really?

0:18:170:18:20

I had a dream that in this car you and I found the big one.

0:18:200:18:23

Will Charles's dreams come true?

0:18:230:18:27

They're starting in the small town

0:18:270:18:29

of Oundle in Northamptonshire.

0:18:290:18:31

With a history going back over 1,000 years,

0:18:320:18:35

this pretty market town boasts many ancient buildings.

0:18:350:18:38

So it's perhaps the perfect place to find your treasure, Charles.

0:18:380:18:43

-Today, Phil, I feel really fertile.

-Pardon?

-The sap is rising.

0:18:430:18:47

-I'm glad I'm getting out of the car.

-The sap is rising, Phil.

0:18:470:18:50

What is he on about?

0:18:500:18:52

Because if I'm not fertile today and I don't bring back the goods,

0:18:520:18:56

I'm in trouble.

0:18:560:18:58

Let me tell you, if you're fertile and the sap's rising,

0:18:580:19:00

you go to the antique shop,

0:19:000:19:01

I'm going to have a wander around Oundle cos I think it's lovely here.

0:19:010:19:05

-OK.

-That alright?

-Yeah, fine.

-Good luck, mate. See you later.

0:19:050:19:08

-See ya, Phil.

-So as Phil soaks in the sights, Charles hits Harpers.

0:19:080:19:13

-Good morning.

-Good morning, Charles. How are you?

0:19:130:19:15

A family business of antiques and jewellery run by jeweller Nigel.

0:19:150:19:19

I'm on a mission today. I'm behind in the Antique Road Trip stakes.

0:19:190:19:23

Philip's taken the lead and he's pretty confident today.

0:19:230:19:27

He's having a wander around town.

0:19:270:19:28

He said, "Hanson, you take the first shop.

0:19:280:19:30

"I'm quite content just wading around this great market town."

0:19:300:19:34

I'm looking for something that will be of memory at auction which might

0:19:340:19:37

be a wow factor for Phil to say, "Good man, Charles.

0:19:370:19:40

-"You've done quite well today."

-OK.

0:19:400:19:41

-Let's hope we can find you something.

-Brilliant.

0:19:410:19:44

-No pressure, then, Nigel.

-Well, coming down in price is a good sign.

0:19:440:19:47

Sweet fan.

0:19:570:19:59

-I think this fan dates to about 1810.

-Ah.

0:20:000:20:04

With an image of George III's coronation,

0:20:040:20:06

it may be even earlier than that. Priced at £50.

0:20:060:20:10

-It's an interesting lot, isn't it?

-I've got lots.

-Lots of?

-Fans.

0:20:100:20:15

-Have you got any more out the back, then?

-Yeah.

0:20:150:20:17

-Can I have a look at some?

-Yeah.

-I'll come look at them with you. Thanks.

0:20:170:20:21

Charles is sticking with traditional antique shops,

0:20:210:20:24

but not for the first time, Phil's taken an unconventional turn.

0:20:240:20:28

Are you after flowers or is it just the old crates?

0:20:310:20:34

-Hi there. How are you? I'm Phil.

-I'm Phil.

-I'm Phil.

-Nice to meet you.

0:20:340:20:38

-That's a good omen, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:20:380:20:40

Well, it's not an unusual name, boys.

0:20:400:20:42

The other Phil owns the greengrocers

0:20:420:20:43

but what does our Phil want from the other Phil?

0:20:430:20:46

I saw those there, those fruit boxes. They're quite trendy, aren't they?

0:20:460:20:49

-Yeah.

-And these are yours as well?

-These are mine.

0:20:490:20:52

-Would you be interested in selling these?

-Oh, yeah.

-How old are these?

0:20:520:20:56

So these date back from the 1950s and 1960s.

0:20:560:21:01

Well, I suppose they do have some age to them.

0:21:010:21:05

If I gave you £20, would that be a deal, do you reckon?

0:21:050:21:09

-25 and we've got a deal.

-Go on. Thank you very much.

-No, thank you.

0:21:090:21:16

Seven vintage fruit crates for £25.

0:21:160:21:20

As ever, our Phil's gathering an eclectic mix of items,

0:21:200:21:23

but back in Harpers, Charles is still playing catch-up

0:21:230:21:26

and he's very interested in Nigel's box of fans.

0:21:260:21:31

How much is the collection worth?

0:21:310:21:33

The collection for the boxful, I want £250 for.

0:21:330:21:37

Well, Charles, you HAVE still got £254.

0:21:370:21:42

The box contains many more,

0:21:420:21:43

possibly dating to the Victorian period or earlier.

0:21:430:21:47

Some are made from mother-of-pearl.

0:21:470:21:49

There's even a Chinese carved ivory fan.

0:21:490:21:51

Not everyone's choice of material but potentially valuable.

0:21:510:21:55

They're decorative. It's just what knocks them is their condition.

0:21:550:21:59

Absolutely.

0:21:590:22:01

-Oh, dear. What a shame. What's your best price on those fans?

-200.

0:22:010:22:07

-You won't take £100? What's your best price, Nigel? Last price?

-Last price.

0:22:090:22:14

-I can close my hand...

-I know you're gonna do the deal with me.

0:22:140:22:17

-Go on, do it.

-Including the fan you found over there.

-Which fan?

0:22:170:22:20

-Oh, yes.

-150 quid, the lot.

0:22:200:22:23

If you don't buy them for that, what can I say?

0:22:240:22:27

-Do you know, Nigel, I said 100. Would you meet me at 125?

-Go on.

-Sold.

0:22:270:22:31

I'll take them. Thanks, Nigel. Good man.

0:22:310:22:34

-Charles may well have struck gold with this find.

-Thanks, Nigel.

0:22:340:22:38

-Many thanks.

-It's a pleasure.

0:22:380:22:40

I'm really excited because it's a private collection.

0:22:400:22:45

They could make 50 at the wrong sale.

0:22:450:22:48

They could make 400 at the right sale. That's exciting.

0:22:480:22:52

This lot may give Phil something to really worry about,

0:22:520:22:56

but right now I don't think he's got a care in the world.

0:22:560:22:58

HE WHISTLES

0:22:580:23:01

He's steering the Triumph

0:23:010:23:03

towards Peterborough,

0:23:030:23:04

the largest city in Cambridgeshire.

0:23:040:23:06

It's so peaceful without that boy in the car, singing, talking,

0:23:060:23:11

asking questions all the time.

0:23:110:23:14

It's actually really quite nice.

0:23:140:23:17

With the car finally to himself, Phil's getting into holiday mode,

0:23:180:23:22

fitting as he's visiting the Thomas Cook archives

0:23:220:23:25

at the company's headquarters.

0:23:250:23:26

He's here to find out how the modern holiday evolved

0:23:280:23:31

with archivist Paul Smith as his guide.

0:23:310:23:33

Hi. Pleased to meet you.

0:23:330:23:34

Every year, we spend over £30 billion

0:23:380:23:41

taking around 65 million holidays.

0:23:410:23:43

But this is a modern luxury.

0:23:450:23:47

Even 160 years ago, you were unlikely to travel far,

0:23:470:23:51

let alone to another country, unless you belonged to the upper classes.

0:23:510:23:55

But one man changed that forever

0:23:560:23:58

-and his name is still synonymous with travel.

-Is that the man?

0:23:580:24:02

-That's the man himself. That is Thomas Cook.

-Thomas Cook.

0:24:020:24:04

-So when was he born?

-Born in 1808.

-What was his...

0:24:040:24:08

-How did he come to travel?

-He wasn't a great traveller himself.

0:24:080:24:13

He became a temperance supporter

0:24:130:24:15

and that was what really changed his life. That was in the 1830s.

0:24:150:24:19

And for temperance supporters, alcohol was the root of all evil

0:24:190:24:24

and they believed that if people did more worthwhile things with

0:24:240:24:28

their time and money, other than drink, then society would improve.

0:24:280:24:32

And Thomas's idea was,

0:24:320:24:35

"Why don't we make use of these newfangled railways

0:24:350:24:37

"to somehow promote temperance?"

0:24:370:24:41

This selfless social enterprise soon became a commercial one.

0:24:410:24:45

Thomas became the world's first travel agent,

0:24:450:24:48

negotiating discounted tickets with different rail companies,

0:24:480:24:51

offering customers a package deal at a knocked down price.

0:24:510:24:55

He even published a handbook to their journey,

0:24:550:24:58

the precursor to the modern holiday brochure.

0:24:580:25:01

This is actually Thomas Cook's first travel-related publication

0:25:010:25:05

-and this was a handbook of his trip to Liverpool.

-So what year's this?

0:25:050:25:09

-That's 1845.

-1845.

-That was Thomas Cook's first commercial venture.

0:25:090:25:15

It's almost quite visionary in a way,

0:25:150:25:17

-because was anyone else doing this in the 1840s and '50s?

-No.

0:25:170:25:20

This actually involved three different railway companies.

0:25:200:25:23

Thomas had to go to them each individually

0:25:230:25:25

and negotiate a fare for that whole trip.

0:25:250:25:29

Thomas's business increasingly targeted the middle

0:25:290:25:32

and upper classes with trips firstly to Europe then further afield.

0:25:320:25:37

Striking deals with local companies, including hotels,

0:25:370:25:40

Thomas made international travel more accessible,

0:25:400:25:43

revolutionising the way we explore the globe.

0:25:430:25:46

But things really took off when Thomas's business-minded son John

0:25:480:25:52

joined the family firm.

0:25:520:25:53

He helped grow a business that dominated world travel

0:25:530:25:56

during the early 20th century.

0:25:560:25:58

When did it cease to be a family business?

0:25:590:26:03

The family business stops in 1928.

0:26:030:26:06

What you've got is Thomas, then John. John has three sons.

0:26:060:26:10

They go into the business,

0:26:100:26:11

-and the two surviving sons actually sell the business in 1928.

-OK.

0:26:110:26:16

Really mercenary question here. How much did they sell it for?

0:26:160:26:20

They sold it for just over £3.5 million in 1928.

0:26:200:26:25

-In today's terms, that's...

-The best part of 120 million.

0:26:250:26:30

Right. On that note, come let me plan a holiday.

0:26:300:26:34

I wouldn't put your feet up yet, Phil,

0:26:340:26:35

because Charles's collection of potentially valuable fans may well

0:26:350:26:39

end your time basking in the top spot.

0:26:390:26:42

Charles is hoping that by splitting them up,

0:26:420:26:44

he can really maximise his profits.

0:26:440:26:46

What I've done is I've split the collection into four lots.

0:26:460:26:51

The reason I've done that is

0:26:510:26:52

they'll be collectors of different periods, different styles.

0:26:520:26:56

Let's go oriental flavour firstly. This is Chinese/Cantonese, 1880s.

0:26:560:26:59

Beautifully carved. It's ivory

0:26:590:27:01

and of course we know that legislation, it's pre-'47.

0:27:010:27:04

We can sell it. I'm really excited about that one.

0:27:040:27:07

This is my regency collection here. Late 18th century, early 19th.

0:27:070:27:11

That's a great collection.

0:27:110:27:13

This is my great collection of Victoriana fans from the period 1850,

0:27:130:27:19

1890. They're pretty big and not overly valuable.

0:27:190:27:23

And then finally my fourth lot is the collection I've been able to box

0:27:230:27:28

together, and these are fans made by the leading London, Parisian

0:27:280:27:33

retailers and manufacturers.

0:27:330:27:34

Philip, I was behind but now with these fans

0:27:340:27:39

and these two lovebirds, I could be back in business.

0:27:390:27:45

With Charles's stroke of genius fan the flames of Phil's demise?

0:27:450:27:49

Brace yourselves, boys, for the big reveal.

0:27:490:27:52

Well, I seem to be quite nervous now.

0:27:520:27:54

Having fallen behind,

0:27:540:27:55

this is the first reveal where actually I've fallen behind.

0:27:550:27:58

-So I'm all set.

-You're twitching, aren't you?

0:27:580:28:00

Yeah, I am, but it's to get myself hopefully pumped up for the auction

0:28:000:28:03

to come, and I hope you like my wares.

0:28:030:28:05

-You going to show me your wares?

-Shall I go first?

-Yeah, why not?

0:28:050:28:07

Hopefully fantastic.

0:28:070:28:10

-Get it? Fan-tastic in my opinion.

-Getting excited, aren't you?

0:28:100:28:15

-I'm just wafting. Sorry. OK.

-Do me a favour.

-Yes.

0:28:150:28:17

-Put your hands in your pockets.

-OK.

-Right. Now leave 'em there.

0:28:170:28:20

Hands in pockets. I got really excited because a while ago,

0:28:200:28:24

I sold a collection of fans and...like scent bottles,

0:28:240:28:27

fans tell a great story about the history of France

0:28:270:28:33

and Paris in the 1740s.

0:28:330:28:34

-And also, Phil, my best fan is that one there.

-Ah!

0:28:340:28:37

-HE LAUGHS

-You got 'em out!

-That's my best fan.

0:28:370:28:40

That's my best fan. I love it, Phil - because the craftsmanship.

0:28:400:28:44

And I think, Phil, at the moment, these are quite hot. Are you nervous?

0:28:440:28:48

-Yeah.

-Do you feel that... Why are you nervous?

0:28:480:28:51

I'll tell you why I'm nervous, because I think that's a good thing.

0:28:510:28:54

If you pick up on the net, that could make...

0:28:540:28:57

-Why are you looking like that?

-I'm waiting for your answer, Phil.

-Right.

0:28:570:29:01

-Will you just mind...?

-Sorry.

-Give me my space. I think...

0:29:010:29:05

-You're doing it again.

-OK, sorry.

-That could be £200 to £300.

0:29:050:29:08

-Being serious?

-Yeah, I do.

-The whole lot cost me £225.

0:29:080:29:11

-For all the fans.

-No, it didn't.

-No, it didn't. £125.

-That's all right.

0:29:110:29:16

-That's really, really good. Shall I show you mine now?

-I can't wait.

0:29:160:29:19

-Confused, Charles?

-What are they? They're crates, aren't they?

0:29:220:29:26

-Fruit and veg crates.

-So what would you use them for?

0:29:260:29:29

-Bananas, apples, pears?

-Yeah. The clue was when I said fruit and veg.

0:29:290:29:35

They're not my sort of thing. You know...they're dry, aren't they?

0:29:350:29:38

-So if someone didn't want them, they could...burn them.

-Yeah.

0:29:380:29:41

-Absolutely right.

-Watch yourself, Charles.

-Right.

0:29:410:29:46

-This, Charlie, is my favourite thing.

-Yeah.

0:29:460:29:48

I wasn't sure if it was a new one or an old one.

0:29:480:29:50

But having got it outside...it's an old one. By Dixon and Co.

0:29:500:29:54

Tell me it cost you three figures.

0:29:540:29:56

-HE SIGHS

-20 quid.

0:29:560:29:58

-That's a really, really good buy, Phil.

-That's how much it was.

-£20?

0:29:580:30:01

Yeah.

0:30:010:30:02

That was the sensible purchase, but there's one more, Charles,

0:30:020:30:06

and it's so big he couldn't even get it in the door.

0:30:060:30:08

Is that a toilet seat there?

0:30:080:30:09

-HE LAUGHS

-I didn't buy a toilet seat, Charlie.

0:30:090:30:11

It weighs about half a ton, and I would think that it was used

0:30:110:30:15

in a factory to...as almost like a degreaser, something like that.

0:30:150:30:19

-How much?

-It was 130 quid.

0:30:190:30:22

Do you know, Phil, if there's a saving grace for me,

0:30:220:30:24

it's these are all fantastic, but that could be your Achilles heel.

0:30:240:30:29

Charles is sounding more and more confident.

0:30:300:30:33

I know Philip's really keen to win.

0:30:330:30:34

He's determined to outgun me, and I think his plaque will.

0:30:340:30:39

But his other objects, no way.

0:30:390:30:41

I think Charlie's done really, really well.

0:30:410:30:43

Those fans, they really are fan-tastic.

0:30:430:30:46

I think the ivory one, which is Cantonese, could do really,

0:30:460:30:49

really well for him. That's the winner.

0:30:490:30:51

Well, his one big hang-up that really might win the day for me

0:30:510:30:54

is that really big, robust concrete planter.

0:30:540:30:58

Don't quite understand the mentality of Phil buying that.

0:30:580:31:01

I think that £130 buy could suddenly turn into a huge loss.

0:31:010:31:05

I don't know what I was doing, really, but...£130?

0:31:050:31:08

You know, I could lose 70 quid on that.

0:31:080:31:10

This could be a really interesting little auction.

0:31:120:31:15

If I was a gambling man, who's my money on? Me.

0:31:150:31:19

Well, Phil, your lead is under threat,

0:31:190:31:21

and now you've got to get back in the car with Charles.

0:31:210:31:25

I think, and I suspect, knowing you, it's unwittingly...

0:31:250:31:28

-Charlie, what you doing?

-Sorry. Go on. Yeah?

0:31:280:31:30

I think you've been quite clever, and I suspect that's unwittingly, knowing you, Charlie...

0:31:300:31:34

-Would you just concentrate while I'm talking to you?

-Sorry.

0:31:340:31:36

-Go on.

-I think you've been quite clever.

-Yeah?

0:31:360:31:39

-Unwittingly, I think you've been quite clever.

-What, about...?

0:31:390:31:43

Well, what you've done is you've managed to get a collection of fans,

0:31:430:31:46

right? So...

0:31:460:31:48

-Charlie, will you just concentrate while I'm talking to you?!

-Sorry. Go on.

0:31:480:31:51

-I'm trying to give you the benefit of my pearls, you're looking at the hedge.

-Sorry, sorry!

0:31:510:31:55

He's being driven round the bend - ha -

0:31:550:31:57

en route to their final destination

0:31:570:31:59

in the village of Glemsford.

0:31:590:32:01

Surrounded by the beautiful Suffolk countryside,

0:32:010:32:04

Glemsford still shows signs of its medieval past,

0:32:040:32:08

with the picture-postcard Church of St Mary dating back to

0:32:080:32:11

the early 14th century.

0:32:110:32:13

But today, our chaps are only concerned with

0:32:140:32:16

activities at Mander Auctioneers.

0:32:160:32:19

-That's my pot.

-It's not.

-It is!

0:32:190:32:22

How cool is that?

0:32:220:32:24

I mean, that is fantastic,

0:32:240:32:25

Phil - it's almost like a fixture of the auction house.

0:32:250:32:28

-There we are, Charlie. Door-to-door service.

-Oh, wonderful.

0:32:280:32:31

-Look at that.

-Serrell's Taxis at your pleasure.

-Wow.

0:32:310:32:35

Phil, remember - never have regrets, Phil, just dream.

0:32:360:32:40

Dream a thousand things, Phil.

0:32:400:32:41

Nightmare, not dreaming.

0:32:430:32:45

So, as Phil steals some quiet time,

0:32:450:32:48

we find out what auctioneer James Mander thinks of their lots.

0:32:480:32:51

I do actually rather like the Canton ivory fan,

0:32:510:32:55

which is one of the lots in the sale.

0:32:550:32:56

And...uh, the carving's really nice and the condition's good,

0:32:560:32:59

which is important with fans.

0:32:590:33:01

On the concrete, it was a bit of an effort for us to get it in.

0:33:010:33:04

Four of us had to try and lift it, and we failed,

0:33:040:33:07

and some people have asked us about delivery,

0:33:070:33:08

I think, after the auction, so, um...I'm not sure how we'll manage that,

0:33:080:33:12

but, uh...if you can move it, I guess it'll look really nice

0:33:120:33:15

in the garden, or a nice feature, so I'm sure it'll sell for that reason.

0:33:150:33:18

On this leg, Phil's hoping to stay in the lead with the help of five

0:33:200:33:23

lots that cost him £230.

0:33:230:33:26

Challenging for the top spot is Charles,

0:33:260:33:29

who's also offering up five lots at a total cost of £155.

0:33:290:33:34

So, with the auction in the room, on commission and online,

0:33:340:33:38

it's crunch time, boys.

0:33:380:33:40

-Try and sit there. Put your hands down.

-£35. In the room.

0:33:400:33:45

-What were you like at school?

-I used to fidget a lot.

-Really?

0:33:450:33:48

-Pretty much nerves.

-Just sit there.

-It's like an exam.

0:33:480:33:52

It's like...the results will be spoken shortly by the auctioneer.

0:33:520:33:55

Right. Will you just sit...sit still?

0:33:550:33:57

Put your hands on your lap and just sit there just for a minute, all right? Try and behave.

0:33:570:34:01

You'd never guess Phil used to be a teacher, would you?

0:34:010:34:04

Right, first up are Phil's fruitcakes...I mean, crates. Ha.

0:34:040:34:07

-Maybe they can lighten his mood.

-Boxes up.

-Well spotted.

0:34:070:34:11

-You're sharp, aren't you?

-Lot 101.

0:34:110:34:14

Collection of seven vintage wooden fruit crates.

0:34:140:34:16

Showing outside...well, they were this morning.

0:34:160:34:19

I hope they're still there. AND, uh...£40 is bid.

0:34:190:34:21

I'll take £2 anywhere. That's £42. £45. £48. £50. £55. £60. £65. £70.

0:34:210:34:29

£75. £80. £85. In the doorway, and selling at £85.

0:34:290:34:35

Pretty good start, Phil, eh?

0:34:370:34:39

-Especially for something you picked up in a grocery shop.

-That's good.

0:34:390:34:42

I'm pleased with that.

0:34:420:34:43

Oh, my. He's actually happy.

0:34:430:34:46

But will Charles's first lot wipe that smile off his face?

0:34:460:34:49

There's interest here at £30. I'll take £2 anywhere. £32.

0:34:490:34:54

Back of the room. My bid's out. £35. £38. £40. £42. £45. £48. £48.

0:34:540:35:02

-It's the gentleman's bid. £50, a new place.

-One more.

-£55, a new place.

0:35:020:35:07

-No, it's £55. Gentleman's bid. Next door. And selling at £55.

-Pounds.

0:35:070:35:12

It's a good start for Charles with that £25 profit.

0:35:140:35:18

-Give me high five.

-No.

-Don't push it, Charles.

0:35:180:35:21

-His globe's about to go under the hammer.

-Terrestrial globe.

0:35:210:35:25

There it is, as described. And there's interest here.

0:35:250:35:28

-We start straight in with bids at £20.

-Great.

-I'll take £2 anywhere.

0:35:280:35:32

-Is that profit?

-Not yet it isn't, no.

-On commission, and selling for £20.

0:35:320:35:36

-Is that profit?

-No.

-£22. £25.

-Now profit.

-Yeah.

-£28. £30. £30 is bid.

0:35:360:35:43

-And selling.

-Well done.

-Shut up.

-HE LAUGHS

0:35:430:35:45

Charlie, I'm going to punch you.

0:35:450:35:46

Bit by bit, the money's mounting up here, Philip.

0:35:460:35:50

It's a small profit, isn't it? It's, like, um...it's like a fiver.

0:35:500:35:54

-It's like go round the world.

-Oh, Charlie...

-For £5 worth.

0:35:540:35:58

Pay attention, chaps. The first few fans are up now.

0:36:000:36:03

These are Regency and Coronation fans

0:36:030:36:05

around the end of the 18th and early part of the 19th century.

0:36:050:36:08

We have interest here at £20.

0:36:080:36:10

And I'll take £2. £22. £25. £28. £30. £32. £35. £38. £40. £42. £45.

0:36:100:36:20

-They're proving popular online.

-It's going on its own on the internet.

0:36:200:36:23

£55. £60, I'm afraid. Still on the internet at £60. £65. £70. £75.

0:36:230:36:30

Your bid at the back. £80 on the internet. £85. £90. £95. £100.

0:36:300:36:35

-I think I'll pack my car, Charlie.

-£120. £130. £140.

0:36:350:36:38

-On the internet here.

-Keep going.

-£140.

0:36:380:36:41

Crikey, Charles - with just one lot, you've taken the lead.

0:36:430:36:46

It's not bad, is it?

0:36:460:36:47

-It's really disappointing, as it's only 100-quid profit for you.

-HE LAUGHS

0:36:470:36:51

Don't fret, Phil - your masonic plaque could turn things round.

0:36:520:36:55

There's bids here. So we have to open the bidding at £60.

0:36:550:36:58

I'll take £5. £60 is bid for the plaque. £65. £70.

0:36:580:37:02

-It's going to roll, Phil.

-£75. £80.

-Going well.

-£85, £90.

0:37:020:37:06

-Another online hit.

-£110. £120. We all done with the plaque? It's £120.

0:37:060:37:13

A cool £100 profit puts them neck-and-neck.

0:37:160:37:19

-That's a £100 profit.

-Yeah, that's all right.

0:37:190:37:23

Phil's risky buy is up next.

0:37:250:37:26

Is he going to regret spotting this large lump?

0:37:260:37:29

-£40 is bid.

-Ouch.

-I'll take £2 anywhere. £40 is bid. £42. £45. £48.

0:37:290:37:36

£50. It's my bid here. And selling on the sheets at £50.

0:37:360:37:41

I don't think that was a surprise to anyone, Phil,

0:37:430:37:46

and it's given Charles the upper hand.

0:37:460:37:48

-Have you ever heard the expression "bad loser"?

-Yeah.

-How do you do?

0:37:480:37:51

Lovely to see you.

0:37:510:37:53

This could be a long auction for Phil as the rest of Charles's fans

0:37:550:37:58

come up. This time, it's the 19th-century collection.

0:37:580:38:02

There's lots of interest here.

0:38:020:38:03

I have to open the bidding...straight in at £60.

0:38:030:38:06

And I'll take £5 anywhere. £60 is bid. £65. £70. £75. £80. £85. £90.

0:38:060:38:14

-£95. £100.

-Well done, Charlie.

-£110. £120. £130.

-They're flying.

0:38:140:38:20

You're off to the races, mate.

0:38:200:38:21

-£150. £160.

-Happy days, Phil.

-Yeah.

-£170. £180.

0:38:210:38:25

-Depends on your perspective, Charlie.

-Happy days.

-£190. £200.

0:38:250:38:28

-Rock'n'roll, baby.

-And £10. £220. £230. £240.

0:38:280:38:34

-This is brilliant, Charles!

-Done on the internet.

0:38:340:38:36

It's a commission bid now at £240.

0:38:360:38:40

Charles is away! A massive £210 profit.

0:38:410:38:45

I think I'm just going to pack my car and go, Charlie.

0:38:450:38:47

I'll see you later.

0:38:470:38:49

Do stay, Phil. You've got one more lot left.

0:38:500:38:52

We have the World War I bronze memorial plaque,

0:38:520:38:56

as described in your catalogue there, at £20 to start, please.

0:38:560:38:59

At £20... Nobody wants it. £20. Right in the back. £22.

0:38:590:39:04

-Going round now, Phil.

-£25. £28. £30. £32. £32 in the corner.

0:39:040:39:11

-We all done at £32?

-I'm absolutely flabbergasted by that - are you?

0:39:110:39:14

It's got a lot of sentimental value, but no profit for Phil.

0:39:160:39:19

Just two lots left, and they're both fans.

0:39:210:39:23

This next collection are particularly good quality,

0:39:230:39:26

and many are even boxed.

0:39:260:39:28

F-A-N-S. What does it spell?

0:39:280:39:30

Ah, it's like a recurring nightmare, Charles.

0:39:300:39:32

I'm afraid we have to open the bidding straight in at £180.

0:39:320:39:37

-Fantastic.

-Ouch, Charlie.

-£190 is bid. £200.

0:39:370:39:39

-Online bidders are out in force again.

-£220.

0:39:390:39:42

-Charlie, you've had a hell of a day.

-HE LAUGHS

0:39:420:39:44

-£230. £240.

-Keep going.

-£250.

-Keep going.

0:39:440:39:46

£260. £270. £280.

0:39:460:39:50

-£290. £300. And £20. £340. £360. £380.

-Come on, let's keep going.

0:39:510:39:58

-£400.

-Let's go.

-And £20.

-Let's go.

0:39:580:40:02

-£440. £460. £480 now.

-You've hit the jackpot here, Charles.

0:40:020:40:06

On the internet. We're selling at £480 for the fans.

0:40:060:40:11

His tactic of separating the fans has really paid off.

0:40:120:40:16

This is a profit to be proud of.

0:40:160:40:18

Start looking for other opportunities in television, I think.

0:40:180:40:21

THEY LAUGH

0:40:210:40:22

But last, not least, is the Chinese ivory fan.

0:40:230:40:26

-We have to open the bidding at £100.

-Let's go.

0:40:260:40:30

And I'll take £110 anywhere. £100. £110. £120. £130. £140. £150. £160.

0:40:300:40:37

-£170. £180. £190. £200. And £10.

-Good work, Charles.

-£230. £240.

0:40:370:40:45

£250 now. On the internet and selling. We're at £250. £260.

0:40:450:40:50

-Hello, China.

-£270.

-Hello, China. Come on. One more for the road.

0:40:500:40:53

LAUGHTER Thank you. It's been a great day.

0:40:530:40:56

-HE LAUGHS

-He seems all right, strangely.

0:40:560:40:58

-It's been a great day.

-£280.

-One more.

0:40:580:41:00

-£290.

-£300.

-£300. Great. Put it there.

-Haven't finished yet, Charlie.

0:41:000:41:04

On the telephone at £320. It's £340 if you want to bid on the internet.

0:41:040:41:07

-£340. £360.

-Yes.

-I want him to bid.

-Even Phil's excited.

0:41:070:41:13

Done on the telephone, we're done in the room at £380.

0:41:130:41:15

He wanted a comeback, and he got it! Yet another massive profit.

0:41:170:41:22

-Top job, Charlie.

-Thank you, Phil. Been a wonderful, wonderful day.

0:41:220:41:25

This has been a wonderful road trip memory, Phil.

0:41:250:41:27

If it's profit or loss, it doesn't matter. It's just a fun time, Phil.

0:41:270:41:30

So you've made the thick end of £1,000 out of those.

0:41:300:41:33

-Get out of here.

-You have.

0:41:330:41:35

What an amazing auction.

0:41:350:41:37

Phil started with £327.56,

0:41:370:41:41

and made profits of £29.94 after auction costs were deducted.

0:41:410:41:46

So, he's taking £357.50 on to the last leg.

0:41:460:41:51

But our new leader is the triumphant Charles Hanson,

0:41:530:41:57

who began with £284.54

0:41:570:42:00

and made an incredible profit of £906.90 after costs,

0:42:000:42:05

and so takes forward a whopping £1,191.44.

0:42:050:42:10

Come on.

0:42:100:42:12

All this success has done wonders for this blusterous relationship.

0:42:120:42:16

So let me open the door for you, Charles.

0:42:160:42:19

HE LAUGHS

0:42:190:42:20

I can't believe it, Phil! I can't believe it.

0:42:200:42:22

-I'm trying hard not to, Charlie.

-HE LAUGHS

0:42:220:42:25

Phil, I'm lost for words.

0:42:250:42:26

-Let me put the belt around you.

-Thank you very much.

0:42:260:42:28

Don't get it too tight round your neck, Charlie, will you?

0:42:280:42:31

Don't even mention it. Not a word.

0:42:310:42:33

But one more time I will say it's been a fantastic day, hasn't it?

0:42:330:42:36

Yeah, I've really enjoyed it, Charlie.

0:42:360:42:38

Phil, it's never over, though, until the fat lady sings.

0:42:380:42:40

-I told you earlier. There's still one more auction to go.

-Fantastic.

0:42:400:42:44

HE LAUGHS

0:42:440:42:45

Funny things can happen... Or fonny things, if you're from Derbyshire.

0:42:450:42:49

-Fonny? Funny?

-Brace yourself, Phil. Here he goes again.

0:42:490:42:52

Are there any treasure songs we can sing together?

0:42:520:42:54

Next time on Antiques Road Trip -

0:42:590:43:01

high roller Charles is living the high life.

0:43:010:43:04

Any interesting bits that might cost me £400. I can afford it.

0:43:040:43:07

-So the gloves are off for Phil.

-Charge him more. He's got plenty.

0:43:070:43:11

Add some on.

0:43:110:43:13

HE LAUGHS

0:43:130:43:14

Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson begin the fourth day of their road trip in the county town of Cambridge, before passing through Peterborough and heading towards auction in Glemsford, Suffolk.