Episode 5 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 5

Antiques experts Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson begin the final day of their road trip in Buckinghamshire, before taking a trip around the Midlands and heading to Cirencester.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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All right, viewers?

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..with £200 each, a classic car,

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire! Yes!

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Sold! Going, going, gone.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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50p!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh! Oh!

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Ow!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's the final leg of our tussle in a Triumph GT6...

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..with Charles Hanson and Philip Serrell.

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Auctioneers and best chums.

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-I'm a bit wet sometimes, aren't I?

-No, you're not.

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-You're lovely, Charlie.

-Thanks, mate.

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Phil's a Worcester man...

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..and some say he has an affinity with dumb creatures.

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You see, that's really nice...

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..but it's a little dear.

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HE LAUGHS

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Our Charles from Derbyshire is equally intuitive.

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They say he can actually talk to antiques.

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How much are you?

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Are you really?

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Where were you made?

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Were you really?

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Charles certainly acquired a fan club last time.

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£240.

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I think I'm just going to pack my car and go, Charlie.

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I'll see you later.

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He bought 30 fans

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and made over £900 profit at the auction.

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They're selling at £480 for the fans.

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F-A-N-S, what does it spell?

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Ah, it's like a recurring nightmare, Charlie.

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Phil began with £200 and, after four trips to auction,

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he's managed to increase it to a respectable £357.50.

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But he's overshadowed by rival Charles,

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who's turned his starting £200

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into a mighty £1191.44.

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Shall I lend you a fiver?

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-Oh, shut up!

-No, shall I?

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Our boys set out from Southport in the north west of England

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and have covered over 800 miles as they weave their way towards

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Cirencester in the county of Gloucestershire.

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Today, they begin in Bucks at Old Wolverton

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and then take a trip round the Midlands before heading

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southwest for the deciding auction at Cirencester.

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Now part of Milton Keynes, Old Wolverton dates back to

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medieval times.

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Sounds like Wolverhampton!

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That was earlier in the trip, Charles.

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The town's quite a transport hub too.

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Once boasting a repair shop for the London to Birmingham railway

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and then there's the Grand Union Canal which also passes through.

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-And there is my shop.

-Take care.

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I'm going to get him! Hold up!

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Steady on, Phil.

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With Charles safely inside,

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it seems that Grandad's Collectibles features vintage, retro

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and reproduction with the occasional antique just waiting to be spotted.

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If that is rococo, it's worth maybe £300 or £400. It's priced at 65.

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I have a feeling it's probably a reproduction.

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And I've a feeling you might be right,

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but there's enough of a mix here to get him excited.

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METAL CLATTERS Sorry about that!

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I suggest you move to another part of the shop, Charles, smartish!

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That's nice. This is good.

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Hidden in the corner...

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Oh, that's nice. That's pretty. Look at that. Oops. Up she goes.

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Art Nouveau, with these nice bronzed coopered mounts,

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it ought to be a log bin or a coal box.

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Circa 1890, a splendid Arts and Crafts oak-lined copper box

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and it is really nice

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and it's priced at £98. It's lovely.

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I'm quite tempted with this, so I'll give it some thought.

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So, while Charles ponders still further...

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Phil's heading west. Quite appropriate, really!

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Making his way from Old Wolverton to Sulgrave,

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and the ancestral home of George Washington.

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-Simon, Philip, how are you?

-Philip, welcome to Sulgrave Manor.

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Yeah, it's lovely. This is a house and a half, isn't it?

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It's a lovely house.

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The manor was built on the site of an old

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priory in the mid-16th century by Lawrence Washington,

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a wealthy farmer and wool trader

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who was the great-great-great- great-great-grandfather

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of the first president of the USA.

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So, this is 1550 and George Washington is when?

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Eh, 1732 he was born, so we're talking 200-odd years before...

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Well, there's all sorts going on here, isn't it?

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-I mean, the first thing, we've got our flag...

-Yes.

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-..and then we've got the stars and stripes.

-Yes.

-But you've got...?

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-Yes, you've got the...

-Three stars and two stripes!

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-Indeed, yes, on the front of the house.

-Yeah.

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This is the Washington family coat of arms and it was awarded

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to the family at the Battle of Crecy in 1346.

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Is that where the stars and stripes comes from?

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-Well...many people say it is.

-Yeah.

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When George Washington became president of this new country,

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a lady called Betsy Ross was given the task of designing and making

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a flag for this new country,

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and apparently it was Martha Washington, George's wife,

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had a little word in Betsy's shell-like and said,

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"My husband's first president,

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-you should base the flag on his coat of arms."

-Oh, really?

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I'm not sure what the Americans will make of the idea

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that their flag is based upon English spurs

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and rivers of French blood, but as the ancestral home of

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the first president, it really is a must-see.

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Not only do they have several portraits

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and even items of clothing once belonging to George Washington,

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but, in the great hall, they even have it in writing.

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Our first known Washington,

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a gentleman called William de Hertburn,

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he was Lord of the Manor of Hertburn in northeast England,

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had his manor confiscated from him,

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really, by the Bishop of Durham,

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but the bishop rather kindly gave him another one called

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the Manor of Wessyngton, so he had to move with his family

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-to Wessyngton...

-Wessyngton, Washington,

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-Wessyngton, Washington...

-That's what it evolved into, exactly, yeah,

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and, if that hadn't happened,

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the president of the United States would now be living in Hertburn DC.

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George's most influential forebear was his great-grandfather,

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John, who emigrated to Virginia in 1657, becoming a tobacco planter

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and subsequently, a captain of the local armed militia.

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George followed in his footsteps and when the War of Independence

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began in 1775, Washington was appointed commander in chief.

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-Gilbert Stuart painted this...

-Yeah.

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This is an original Gilbert Stuart, but it's not THE original.

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Washington only sat for Stuart once and from that one sitting, Stuart

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produced a very famous portrait called the Athenaeum portrait.

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-Right.

-And the story goes that someone was visiting Stuart's studio

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one day, saw the Athenaeum portrait and said to Stuart,

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"I rather like that. Will you do one for me?"

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And Stuart said, "Give me 100 and I'll do it."

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-And, reportedly, Stuart did this about 130 times.

-Lord above!

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He effectively made his living out of painting the same portrait

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again and again and again.

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A production line.

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The Athenaeum original remained unfinished,

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but Stuart's famous image of the first president's face was to

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be reproduced about a squillion more times and counting.

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-It's on the dollar bill.

-Is it?

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And this is supposedly one of the great mistakes of history.

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Back then, when you printed something, it was reversed

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and the printers had to re-reverse it to get it the right way round.

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Well, apparently, they forgot to re-reverse

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the portrait of George Washington.

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So, the dollar bill has the same face on it as you see here, but...

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-The other way round.

-..it's the other way around.

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-And he's still there now.

-And he's still there now to this very day.

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-Tell me, does your canteen accept these?

-Uh, we will from you, Phil.

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Come on, let's go for a cup of tea.

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This has been fantastic. I really enjoyed it...

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Now, talking of hard cash, any news on Charles' first shop?

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How did you get on this morning, Charlie? Did you spend some money?

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It was a really nice shop, it was a new...

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-CHARLIE YAWNS

-..place.

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-Tired!

-Am I boring you?

-Sorry, Phil!

-Am I boring you?

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Actually, Phil, he didn't part with as much as a penny,

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which should add a little spice to your trip to Brackley.

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Just down the road from Silverstone, Brackley, is the home of the

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Mercedes Formula 1 Grand Prix team and some fine Georgian architecture.

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The Antique Cellar is huge.

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Plenty of room and enough choice to, hopefully,

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get our two revved up and off the grid.

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These are nice... No, not really!

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Lordy! It's turning into one of those days, but,

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with his comfortable lead, Charles can dilly-dally as much as he likes.

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The pressure is very much on Phil.

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(I am not going to catch him up by spending)

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(30 quid here and 40 quid there.)

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(I've got to spend every last penny I've got.)

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And speaking of Penny...

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-Hi, Penny, you've got the key. Brilliant.

-Yeah,

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-what would you like to look at?

-Penny, I'm going to look at

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-that man in armour.

-Ooh!

-I like a knight in shining armour.

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-There's nothing like a man in armour.

-Exactly.

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Well, Phil's around somewhere, you know. Phil's around on the prowl.

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-Now, what age is that?

-I can't imagine there's a great age to it.

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A novelty cigar lighter, priced £25.

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-That's quite nice, isn't it?

-That's rather nice, isn't it?

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Yeah, it's just missing something, isn't it? What's it missing?

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A sword.

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Yeah. It is quite novel.

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-It's quirky, isn't it?

-It is quirky.

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Is there much room for manoeuvre in that price? What's your best?

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-Not an awful lot, I'm afraid.

-Penny, whisper to me. Penny, whisper to me.

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-£22.50.

-Say it again.

-£22.50.

-£22.50, yeah.

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-The protocol in your big emporium is 10%, isn't it?

-Yes, it is, yeah.

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And that's good. You know where you are, there's no hidden sort of...

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£15? No, no. Take 15? No.

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Because it's all about 10% in here, so you've got to be fair.

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Close, but no cigar, Charles.

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-Now, what's Phil got his eye on?

-Those are quite fun, aren't they?

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I think they're quite nice, I mean, you know, they're...

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no great age, probably 1920s.

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But they're quite decorative things,

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just made a little bit out of the ordinary by all this lot here.

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This is mahogany, his is probably stained beech or something.

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Well, he did buy a rudder on an earlier leg.

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And as I'm so far behind,

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Charlie, I do appear to be up the creek without a paddle.

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This might do the job, mightn't they? Look at that.

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We could perhaps have a go at those.

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Nice, but at a £30 ticket price,

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they're hardly the make or break gamble he had in mind.

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Time to have a word with Penny.

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-You just need a boat now.

-Absolutely.

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A boat? Please don't tempt him.

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They're nice!

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-Yeah, well, they're a bit of fun, aren't they?

-Yeah.

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I think they're probably painted, aren't they?

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Rather than actually inlaid.

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Looks like they're painted.

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Ah, I think he's after a bit more than 10% by the sound of it.

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(Can we do those for 20 quid?)

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-What's on them?

-30.

-OK.

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Phew! First buy at the very end of the day.

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Now, how's he going to keep those hidden?

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Better get an early night, chaps,

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there's an awful lot of shopping to do tomorrow.

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-Shall we pick some blackberries?

-I am not going blackberrying...

-Why not?

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-..with you.

-Why not?

-People will talk. There's cars behind us.

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Good grief, eh? Nighty-night.

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-Next day, things are a trifle soggy.

-Charlie, why are we up the hedge?

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Sorry, I can't see a thing out the window.

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Well, I hope they can find their way to the next shop...

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because the £20 that Phil lavished on a pair of paddles was, for

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whatever reason, the sum total of their purchasing efforts yesterday.

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I charge like a wounded rhino in here.

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So, he's got to play a blinder today

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and hope that Charles takes his eye off the ball,

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because, with time running out, Phil's still over £800 behind.

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Later, they'll be making for that

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Cotswolds climax in Cirencester,

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but the next stop is in

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Northamptonshire at Weedon Bec...

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birthplace of Leo G Carroll...

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..Mr Waverley in TV's The Man From UNCLE.

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-What are you doing?

-I'm trying to help you out.

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With a friend like you, I don't need any help... Argh!

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Charlie! Charlie! Charlie!

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Now, pull yourself up! What's up?

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THEY LAUGH Sorry! Sorry, Phil!

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I'm sorry! LAUGHTER CONTINUES

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So much for our agents being undercover.

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Right, you go in that way and I'll go this way.

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Um, why don't we think about it? Why don't I go that way?

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No, no, because I want to go this way.

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-OK, I'll see you.

-Bye-bye, Charlie.

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TIM LAUGHS

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Let's hope for Phil's sake, he's off in the right direction,

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but there's plenty to choose from here at Shires Antique Centre.

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Let the games commence, eh?

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-There we go.

-That's the one.

-Just like that.

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Charles, of course, has still got an awful lot of cash

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burning a hole in his pocket.

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Any really, really interesting bits of big silver that might

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cost me £400? I can afford it!

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Blimey, Charles!

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Now, we know you're very fond of those.

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-What's the best price?

-That can be...

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-..today, 2,000.

-Could it, really?

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-Look at that. You see...

-< Charge him more!

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He's got plenty! Add some on!

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Helpful, Phil(!)

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Don't take it off! He's got thousands.

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Get out of here!

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If you don't ask the question, you never know. It's a wonderful thing.

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I can't quite afford it. If it could go maybe a bit less, I could do.

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A serious, serious work of art. I love it.

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OK, let's forget the suit of armour. Even Moneybags here can't buy that.

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Now, from top dollar to bargain basement.

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It's a pine, probably late 18th century, pine box.

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Quite sweet, you can use it for your shoes or for

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whatever purpose you may find and then you've just got

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some quite attractive Hornby bits and pieces in here, which is quite nice.

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That's one way of describing them.

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The market is pretty buoyant for such tin plate toys from the 1940s, '50s.

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Here, you've got a Portland, plus circle, cement mixer

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and this would be probably date again to the early '50s.

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Yeah, I just feel... What's the best price on this?

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Erm, we've got 10 on that. We could do that at 5.

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Yeah, OK, I'll have that. Thanks very much. That's my first buy.

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I'm a rocket today. I've got to get going. So, a fiver...

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-Thanks very much, I'll take it.

-No problem.

-Lovely.

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Right, I'll keep on going.

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Thanks to John, Charles has finally got started.

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His travelling companion's got his eye on a box too.

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In the late 18th century, 19th century, before you went to bed,

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you got a candle to put in your chamber stick

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and went up the stairs and off you went, and the candles were

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kept in a box at the bottom of the stairs and that's it.

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It's called a candle box and that's just a really sweet thing.

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It's going to make at auction £80 to £120, but...

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(I think the dealer's missed a trick here,)

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(because he said this is Victorian oak.)

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(I actually think that's probably elm.

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(Elm's a little bit more sought-after.)

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'OK, I'm going to ask what the best they can do is,

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'and perhaps see if we can put it by.'

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I wonder what Alison can do on it?

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The ticket price is £149. Wow.

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-That belongs to our restorer. We're selling it for him.

-Right.

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Um, the best on that is 120 on it, so...

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-OK, can you hang onto that for me?

-Yeah, all right.

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I think he'll be back. Charles, meanwhile,

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has tracked down a cabinet with some very nice silver.

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This is a lovely, what you call a George III silver helmet-shaped cream jug.

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This is 1769, nine years after that madman came on the throne,

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-who was...?

-1769...

-Which king was that?

0:16:070:16:11

-In France or in England? George the II.

-George the III.

0:16:110:16:14

-III?

-That's OK. Thanks for coming! It was George III and...

0:16:140:16:17

-I'm very much up on my French history!

-Yeah, good man, good man.

0:16:170:16:21

Not so hot on his British monarchs,

0:16:210:16:24

but Allan does have some good things.

0:16:240:16:27

Um, I like that.

0:16:270:16:29

-Just because...

-It's cheap as well.

-This...well.

-It is for what it is.

0:16:290:16:33

It's a pretty silver, neoclassical style sifter.

0:16:330:16:37

-What is it, Allan?

-It's a salter, I would imagine.

0:16:370:16:40

It is a salter, because you'll see here, when it's been cleaned

0:16:400:16:43

-on this cover, the holes have been filled in...

-With the cleaner.

0:16:430:16:45

-..by the cleaner...

-That wasn't me.

0:16:450:16:47

No, so, actually, now, if you were to use it, you wouldn't have any salt

0:16:470:16:51

come out, because the cleaning agent has, obviously, filled in the holes.

0:16:510:16:55

The ticket price on the sifter is £65, but the jug's a hefty £260.

0:16:550:17:00

What's the absolute best on that? To give me a life!

0:17:000:17:04

-I need to eat as well.

-Of course you do, absolutely.

0:17:040:17:07

(50 quid for that.)

0:17:070:17:09

It's pretty. £30?

0:17:100:17:12

-Make it 35 and we'll do it.

-Yeah, go on, I'll do it. Good man.

0:17:120:17:16

Thanks, Allan. And now, if I said to you...

0:17:160:17:19

what's the best on that?

0:17:190:17:21

85.

0:17:210:17:23

£80 to you.

0:17:230:17:25

Blimey, that's a big discount.

0:17:250:17:26

-It's 18th century. How often can you buy a bit of 18th century silver?

-Yeah, exactly.

0:17:260:17:31

-And what other piece of 18th century have you found...?

-Take 60, take 60!

0:17:310:17:34

-I'll do 65.

-Oh, don't say that!

0:17:340:17:36

I'll tell you what, call it 100 for the two.

0:17:360:17:39

-So, that will be 40 and that will be 60.

-Yeah.

0:17:390:17:42

-I'll take it. Thanks, mate.

-There you go, then.

-That's two down.

0:17:420:17:45

-OK, look, when the going gets tough...

-You've got to do it.

0:17:450:17:47

Well done. I think he's mad about that bargain bit of Georgian.

0:17:470:17:51

This is George III...

0:17:510:17:53

-1769, isn't it?

-Yes, cos it's hallmarked.

-Who was king of England?

0:17:530:17:59

-George the II.

-No, it was George the III!

0:17:590:18:01

Go on. Let's take you through it. Who was king of England?

0:18:010:18:04

-George III.

-Good lad. Put it there. That's a deal.

0:18:040:18:07

And they said HE was a bit eccentric!

0:18:070:18:10

Ah! Phil's got his eye on some of his beloved Worcester.

0:18:110:18:15

That was painted probably about 80 yards from my office,

0:18:150:18:18

and it's called "Painted Fruit" and people who painted fruit...

0:18:180:18:22

The greatest fruit painter there ever was, was a man called

0:18:220:18:25

Richard Sebright, and that plate was painted by Richard Sebright.

0:18:250:18:29

The ticket price is £190.

0:18:290:18:32

I just want to check there's no damage to it, and what's interesting

0:18:320:18:35

here...look, this is made in Worcester

0:18:350:18:37

and you can date it by counting up these...

0:18:370:18:39

That star there, I don't know if you can see that star,

0:18:390:18:41

they started putting that on in 1916 and then, each year after,

0:18:410:18:45

they added a dot.

0:18:450:18:46

So, you've got 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920,

0:18:460:18:50

1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925.

0:18:500:18:54

So, is that what the ticket says?

0:18:540:18:56

-1925.

-I should have read that in the first place.

0:18:560:18:59

Not so much fun though.

0:18:590:19:00

And then we want to look for restoration and the problem

0:19:000:19:03

with it is, you can see here, look, there's cut marks there, there...

0:19:030:19:06

..there and there. Now, that was to be 120 to 180 quid.

0:19:070:19:12

How are we fixed on that one?

0:19:120:19:14

Um, I can do...

0:19:150:19:17

-£150 on that plate.

-It's getting there.

0:19:170:19:20

If I bought the two, do you think you could do me a deal?

0:19:200:19:22

This and the candle box.

0:19:220:19:24

Could you really help me out?

0:19:240:19:26

£240 would be the best on the two.

0:19:260:19:28

When you only have £337.50, that is quite a sum,

0:19:290:19:33

albeit for a nice couple of things.

0:19:330:19:36

Can I give you £200 for the two?

0:19:360:19:39

I can't, unfortunately.

0:19:390:19:40

Can we split the two down the middle? Can we go 220 for the two?

0:19:400:19:43

And then I'll definitely have them both.

0:19:430:19:45

What am I doing here? What am I doing?

0:19:450:19:47

Gambling, Phil. You'll need to, if you want to catch him.

0:19:470:19:50

I really can't, I'm sorry.

0:19:500:19:51

-Put them by for me, I'll be back in a minute.

-OK.

0:19:510:19:54

Time for Alison to call the dealer.

0:19:550:19:56

Now, what's Charles getting excited about?

0:19:560:19:59

First, Worcester and now Derby. I think they're both feeling

0:19:590:20:02

a bit homesick.

0:20:020:20:04

It's a very sweet dog. Isn't that nice?

0:20:040:20:06

What's the best price on that? Could it be like...?

0:20:060:20:08

Could it be like £15, do you think?

0:20:080:20:10

I don't think we could do that far, but I think this dealer would

0:20:100:20:13

-probably go to 25 on that, at the best.

-OK.

0:20:130:20:15

Why I like this, it's obviously from my home town,

0:20:150:20:18

a nice Royal Crown Derby paperweight,

0:20:180:20:20

has its gold stopper, it's called The Spaniel.

0:20:200:20:23

Um, and it's just quite a nice object.

0:20:230:20:26

There are lots of dog lovers out there, it's posy...

0:20:260:20:29

Do you think she'd go 20 for it?

0:20:300:20:31

-Em...

-Is it worth a call?

-I think she'd do 20 on that.

-You sure?

0:20:330:20:36

-For you.

-It's a modern day collectible.

0:20:360:20:39

Put it there and say sold for £20. I like it.

0:20:390:20:43

Woof! Woof!

0:20:430:20:44

Yet another buy for Charles,

0:20:440:20:46

but how about Phil's double deal for the candle box and the plate?

0:20:460:20:50

All right, can we do it, my love?

0:20:500:20:52

-Yes...

-Oh, you're an angel!

-..deal's done.

0:20:520:20:54

He appreciates that's going to affect the value of it.

0:20:540:20:57

Yeah, yeah, yeah. That's lovely. Thank you very much indeed.

0:20:570:21:00

Phil, having bagged that brace for £220, is off to pastures new.

0:21:000:21:05

But Charles just can't stop buying this morning.

0:21:060:21:10

-John, is this your squeeze-box?

-Yeah.

0:21:100:21:12

I just...the market at the moment is quite bullish for instruments,

0:21:120:21:18

be it violins, be it concertinas, which this one is and,

0:21:180:21:21

of course, this one's made by quite a good maker in Lachenal, London

0:21:210:21:25

marked, and if you have an auction which is vibrantly online,

0:21:250:21:29

these can do quite well, and, importantly,

0:21:290:21:32

what's really important to collectors, obviously,

0:21:320:21:35

when it comes to restoration, there's no holes in the actual squeeze-box.

0:21:350:21:39

There's a restored, I think, maybe hole on the corner here.

0:21:390:21:43

There's a couple of tears in the hexagonal

0:21:430:21:47

corners of the squeeze-box, but it's just a great thing and I can't

0:21:470:21:52

play them, but, you know, I wish I could do, because it's just folk art.

0:21:520:21:56

What's the best price on this? It's not priced, I don't think, is it?

0:21:560:21:59

We've got 120 on it. We could do that for 90 for you.

0:21:590:22:02

You wouldn't go a bit less, would you, at all?

0:22:020:22:04

-I was going to offer maybe £60 cash for it.

-I couldn't do 60 on it.

0:22:040:22:10

We could go to 80, but that would be the death on it.

0:22:100:22:14

But I think we're really close...

0:22:140:22:17

-..but I'll leave it for the time being.

-OK.

-I'll leave it.

0:22:190:22:22

Fair enough! He's already spent an awful lot, after all.

0:22:220:22:26

Time to settle up.

0:22:260:22:27

That's cost me 125.

0:22:270:22:29

I could almost make it up to a round £200...which would mean I'd

0:22:290:22:35

pay you £75 for the squeeze-box.

0:22:350:22:38

The man's nodding over there. That's a done deal then.

0:22:380:22:41

Well, if the boss accords!

0:22:410:22:43

-Thank you. Sure?

-Absolutely.

0:22:430:22:45

Guys, thanks ever so much.

0:22:450:22:47

Phew! That was some shop, with those two splashing out

0:22:470:22:51

over £400 between them and now Phil's after more...

0:22:510:22:55

..stepping a little further into the centre of Weedon Bec to visit

0:22:560:23:00

Helios & Co.

0:23:000:23:02

-Good morning, how are you?

-Not too bad.

-Philip.

0:23:020:23:06

-Hello, I'm Barry.

-This looks a shop and a half!

0:23:060:23:08

Yeah, impressive, isn't it?

0:23:100:23:12

Phil probably wishes he had a bit more than just over £100...

0:23:120:23:16

..but, with Barry's help, I'm sure a little something can be rustled up.

0:23:180:23:22

I mean, that's quite a nice piece. It's interesting.

0:23:230:23:26

I mean, it's well-made. Probably make a half-decent sort of...

0:23:260:23:30

-you know, wastepaper basket or something.

-A very good one.

0:23:300:23:33

Or you could describe it as a coopered jardiniere.

0:23:330:23:35

-And what would be the best you could do on that?

-70, is that good?

0:23:360:23:40

I quite like that.

0:23:400:23:41

I quite like that.

0:23:420:23:44

Yeah, this could go down well in Cirencester, Phil.

0:23:450:23:48

Now, what's he got there?

0:23:490:23:50

This is great. I love this. This is a lazy Suzy.

0:23:510:23:55

I'm not quite sure where it gets the nickname from.

0:23:550:23:58

But it's called a lazy Suzy, cos you would

0:23:580:24:02

sit at the dining table...

0:24:020:24:03

..and if you wanted your neighbour to have that...

0:24:050:24:07

..you spun it round to him like that.

0:24:100:24:12

The origins of the lazy Susan are hazy,

0:24:130:24:17

but they were said to be popular with car pioneer Henry Ford.

0:24:170:24:21

Some claim it's a German innovation,

0:24:210:24:23

but modern versions are often found at Chinese buffets.

0:24:230:24:27

I like that. It's very simplistic.

0:24:290:24:32

The price is £145, but Barry's come up with a third object to ponder.

0:24:320:24:38

Does that not interest you? That's rather fun, you know.

0:24:380:24:41

-A nice bit of 19th century...

-A little spinning wheel.

0:24:410:24:44

Yes, a spinning wheel. I'm not sure what for,

0:24:440:24:46

-cos it's not wool, is it? It's too small.

-No.

0:24:460:24:49

So, you'd put your foot on there, wouldn't you?

0:24:490:24:52

And then there should be a piece of twine

0:24:520:24:55

-that goes around there...

-Yeah.

0:24:550:24:57

..and then, as you treadle this...

0:24:570:24:58

But how could somebody work it with their foot, unless it was a child?

0:24:580:25:01

I think it's a child's spinning wheel.

0:25:010:25:04

It's a piece of decoration in its own right,

0:25:040:25:06

-so it would sit on a sideboard.

-On a sideboard, chest of drawers...

0:25:060:25:09

-Yeah, it would dress it.

-And it's a very interesting thing.

0:25:090:25:13

Quite, Barry. Now, there's really no messing about with these chaps.

0:25:130:25:17

All three items side by side and let the bargaining commence!

0:25:170:25:20

-I've got £117 and 50p to spend, that's my budget.

-Right.

0:25:210:25:26

He took that well, I thought.

0:25:260:25:28

The ticket price on that was 145.

0:25:280:25:31

The ticket price on that is 85 and the ticket price on that is 98.

0:25:310:25:35

You tell me what the best price is on each.

0:25:350:25:37

-Well, I mean, that one is going to be £90.

-OK.

0:25:370:25:40

-Those, I would do you 100 for the two, if it helps.

-100 for the two?

0:25:420:25:46

For the two, but that is the absolute bottom on them.

0:25:460:25:49

-I'm going to just shake you by the hand.

-Oh, all right then!

0:25:490:25:52

Yeah, that's wizard. I love those two.

0:25:520:25:55

So, with the spinning wheel and the wooden bucket, Phil's done.

0:25:550:25:59

-That's lovely.

-Brilliant.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:25:590:26:02

Now, then, let's see what Charles has been up to.

0:26:020:26:05

He's triumphantly tootling in the Triumph

0:26:050:26:08

from Weedon Bec to Coventry in the West Midlands

0:26:080:26:11

to hear the naked truth about one of its famous ancestors.

0:26:110:26:14

-Hi, Abby.

-Oh, I thought you were Lady Godiva!

-No, no, afraid not,

0:26:150:26:19

-but I can tell you about her.

-And I'm Charles Hanson, good to see you.

0:26:190:26:22

-Nice to see you. Let's go.

-Fantastic.

0:26:220:26:24

Holy Trinity Parish Church in the very heart of Coventry city centre

0:26:240:26:28

has been part of the city's story since the 12th century

0:26:280:26:32

when it once stood beside the priory, established by Leofric,

0:26:320:26:37

Earl of Mercia, and his famous wife, Godiva.

0:26:370:26:40

I think, somehow, the spin on Lady Godiva has just become

0:26:410:26:44

-known as this sort of topless lady...

-Absolutely.

0:26:440:26:46

..who floats many a male boat.

0:26:460:26:49

Well, she was a really committed Christian woman

0:26:490:26:52

and believed that God wanted justice for the meek.

0:26:520:26:56

Lady Godiva said she would do what she did to protest against her

0:26:560:26:59

husband's taxes, and the way we know she protested,

0:26:590:27:02

the myth is that she rode naked on the back of a horse

0:27:020:27:05

through the city, um,

0:27:050:27:07

but she asked the people of Coventry to look away out of respect.

0:27:070:27:10

Close their shutters.

0:27:100:27:12

Exactly, and, of course, the story goes that this man called Tom

0:27:120:27:16

found a way of looking, um, and got caught.

0:27:160:27:18

And so the legend of the Peeping Tom was born.

0:27:190:27:23

The people of Coventry did get their tax cut and there's even

0:27:230:27:26

a window in Holy Trinity honouring the famous protestor.

0:27:260:27:31

Do you ever recreate the Lady Godiva scene? Is it a tradition once a year?

0:27:310:27:35

-We have a Coventry Lady Godiva.

-Do you really?

0:27:350:27:37

-There's a lady who, kind of, is Lady Godiva.

-Yes, is she here today?

0:27:370:27:40

Not here today, I'm afraid, no.

0:27:400:27:42

The Benedictine Priory was destroyed by Henry VIII,

0:27:450:27:49

but Holy Trinity survived and was restored in the 17th century.

0:27:490:27:53

The Puritans, however, took exception to a significant work of

0:27:530:27:57

medieval art, the Coventry Doom, and whitewashed it over.

0:27:570:28:02

Thankfully, this too has now been restored.

0:28:020:28:05

What is so doomful about that?

0:28:060:28:08

It's about the Last Judgment, so when Jesus comes back to earth

0:28:080:28:11

and judges people on the choices they've made in their life.

0:28:110:28:15

-Yes!

-Absolutely.

0:28:150:28:17

And so the boat-like things are actually coffins, so their souls

0:28:170:28:21

are coming, rising up from their coffins, and to be judged by Jesus.

0:28:210:28:25

The Victorians rediscovered the painting, but coated it

0:28:270:28:30

in a varnish which became so dark, it was almost hidden again.

0:28:300:28:34

Coventry was to overcome much worse hardships in the subsequent century.

0:28:350:28:40

-Has someone spilt a pot of ink down there?

-Afraid not, no.

0:28:400:28:43

It's actually marks from the Blitz from incendiaries that

0:28:430:28:46

fell through into the building during the Blitz.

0:28:460:28:49

The whole of the city centre was hit.

0:28:490:28:50

Obviously, we're right in the middle of the city centre,

0:28:500:28:53

right next to the cathedral,

0:28:530:28:54

which, sort of, so famously was completely destroyed.

0:28:540:28:58

When the Second World War began,

0:28:580:29:00

car manufacturing Coventry was considered a prime target

0:29:000:29:03

for Luftwaffe bombing

0:29:030:29:05

and there had already been several raids before the terrible night of

0:29:050:29:09

14th of November 1940, when the nearby cathedral was destroyed,

0:29:090:29:14

along with much of the city's ancient centre.

0:29:140:29:16

We have a picture of the morning after that night.

0:29:160:29:19

So, you know, from what would have been a maze of

0:29:190:29:22

little medieval streets and buildings all around the church,

0:29:220:29:25

all that's left is the church.

0:29:250:29:28

But the apparently miraculous survival of Holy Trinity did

0:29:280:29:31

have quite a lot of human help.

0:29:310:29:34

The vicar, the Reverend Graham Clitheroe, he and his team

0:29:340:29:37

kept vigil, basically, night after night, in case of attack.

0:29:370:29:40

On the night itself, they did amazing things like kicking

0:29:400:29:43

incendiaries off the roof so they didn't take hold.

0:29:430:29:45

They were so determined that this building would not be destroyed

0:29:450:29:48

and it wasn't.

0:29:480:29:50

Time now in the grounds of this beautiful and historic church

0:29:510:29:55

for our boys to finally reveal their wares.

0:29:550:29:58

Which is your favourite bit, Charlie?

0:29:580:30:00

-I love the box.

-Yeah.

-That appears to be...what, elm?

-Yes.

0:30:000:30:03

-Late 18th century. Is it a candle box, Phil?

-A candle box, yeah.

0:30:030:30:06

Gorgeous, gorgeous box, which, I think, will do really, really well.

0:30:060:30:09

If that came into my saleroom tomorrow,

0:30:090:30:11

I'd say I love your elm candle box.

0:30:110:30:13

I love your patination, Phil, as well. Gorgeous patination!

0:30:130:30:16

-I think somebody's put a lot of polish into that.

-They have.

0:30:160:30:18

That's over many, many years. I think, Phil, that would fetch

0:30:180:30:21

probably at auction between 150 and 250. What did it cost you?

0:30:210:30:24

-That cost £100.

-Yeah, that's a really, really good buy.

0:30:240:30:27

My second favourite lot is probably...

0:30:270:30:29

-what's the plate down here, Phil?

-Worcester, Richard Sebright...

0:30:290:30:32

..just about the best fruit painter there was.

0:30:320:30:34

You are the authority when it comes to Royal Worcester.

0:30:340:30:36

-I don't know about that, Charlie.

-No, you are!

-1925.

0:30:360:30:39

-That cost me £120.

-It's got a puce mark as well. Gorgeous.

-Yeah.

0:30:390:30:44

-See, that could make 300 quid.

-It could.

0:30:440:30:46

-You've got some big margins here, potentially, Phil.

-Oh, I don't know.

0:30:460:30:49

You have.

0:30:490:30:50

Yeah, but those could go either way, Charles. Now your turn.

0:30:500:30:54

This is my collection.

0:30:540:30:56

-Oh, that squeeze-box looks good, Charlie.

-What do you think?

0:30:560:30:59

-Well, these things make money, don't they?

-Yeah.

-I mean, they do.

0:30:590:31:02

-Um, and is that like 100, 150 quid's worth?

-I hope so. It's a Lachenal.

0:31:020:31:06

It's a good name.

0:31:060:31:07

It has got a few condition issues which will effect value,

0:31:070:31:10

but it comes with its box. Uh, it's got a few holes in the squeezer.

0:31:100:31:13

Oh, just details, Charlie, details.

0:31:130:31:15

-Exactly.

-How much was that?

-It was £75.

0:31:150:31:17

Yeah, so, £100, well, it gets you your money back, doesn't it?

0:31:180:31:21

-Well, exactly.

-Yeah.

-Exactly, but, Phil, I've bought some history.

0:31:210:31:25

-You know I love history...

-Charlie...

-Yeah?

-What on earth is that?

0:31:250:31:28

Oh, Phil, after our road trip, I'm going back to Derby, you know?

0:31:280:31:31

I'm going back to where it all began for me, Derby,

0:31:310:31:33

and this is Royal Crown Derby from the year 1997.

0:31:330:31:36

What's really rare is Imari was

0:31:360:31:38

always the design used on paperweights,

0:31:380:31:41

very rarely did they use a posy.

0:31:410:31:43

That's a posy dog

0:31:430:31:44

and the dealer wasn't quite aware of its potential, I don't think.

0:31:440:31:46

Hmm...

0:31:480:31:49

But what did they really think?

0:31:500:31:52

I've looked really hard in Charlie's lots and, for the life of me,

0:31:520:31:55

I can't see £1,000 in there this time.

0:31:550:31:57

I don't quite understand that Derby paperweight,

0:31:570:32:00

but, you know, Charlie's a Derby expert and if he says

0:32:000:32:02

that's what it is, that's what it is.

0:32:020:32:04

I really think Phil has saved the best till last.

0:32:040:32:06

I love almost everything he's bought.

0:32:060:32:09

I think his star lot must be his elm candle box circa 1760.

0:32:090:32:13

It could do very, very well, so, who knows?

0:32:130:32:16

He could make a £300 or £400 profit.

0:32:160:32:18

Whilst I think I'm going to struggle to catch him up,

0:32:180:32:21

I'm hoping I might just win this leg.

0:32:210:32:23

He'll do very well, but he won't catch me.

0:32:230:32:26

After starting out in Old Wolverton, Bucks,

0:32:260:32:29

the final episode of our road trip will conclude at a deciding

0:32:290:32:33

auction in Cirencester, Gloucestershire.

0:32:330:32:35

# Antique road trip Antique road trip

0:32:370:32:40

# Make a profit Make a profit... #

0:32:400:32:43

-Were you annoying as a child?

-Yes, very annoying.

0:32:430:32:46

As the second largest town in the Roman province of

0:32:470:32:50

Britannia, Cirencester, or Corinium, must have been quite something.

0:32:500:32:56

Several hundred years later, it's now much,

0:32:560:32:58

much smaller than Londinium, but, none the less, no worse for that.

0:32:580:33:02

-Do you know what?

-Yes?

-Do you know how the loser always drives?

-Right.

0:33:030:33:07

I've been your chauffeur for a week!

0:33:070:33:10

Welcome to Moore Allen & Innocent, who've been doing this

0:33:100:33:13

sort of thing for so long they could have started out in an amphitheatre!

0:33:130:33:17

They didn't though. But what does auctioneer Philip Allwood

0:33:170:33:20

make of our two chaps' lots?

0:33:200:33:22

The Royal Worcester cabinet plate - pretty, well-painted,

0:33:230:33:27

lots of things going for it.

0:33:270:33:28

One downside, a little bit scratched,

0:33:280:33:31

so, 80 to 120, where, in good condition, it could be £200 or £300.

0:33:310:33:35

The concertina by one of the good makers, Louis Lachenal...

0:33:350:33:39

unfortunately, it's got a couple of little holes in the actual bag,

0:33:390:33:43

but still should be around the sort of £100, £150, around there.

0:33:430:33:47

Um, we shall see.

0:33:470:33:50

Charles began today's leg with £1,191.44

0:33:500:33:55

and he's spent just £200 on five auction lots.

0:33:550:34:00

-Good man.

-Whilst Phil started out with £357.50,

0:34:000:34:05

and he's parted with £340, also on five lots.

0:34:050:34:09

-Yes.

-Oh, you're an angel, you're an angel.

0:34:090:34:12

Catching Charles is a long shot, but can Phil do it?

0:34:120:34:15

His paddles could get him started.

0:34:150:34:17

-£30. 30, I'm bid on that.

-Good lad.

-At £30...

-That's a profit.

-£30.

0:34:170:34:20

5 here. At £30 a bid. At £30. 5 anywhere? Oh, five! Thank you!

0:34:200:34:25

-Good lad!

-35...in the room now at £40.

-Well, I can't believe it.

0:34:250:34:30

That's £12 I've made.

0:34:300:34:32

You've doubled your money, you've doubled your money.

0:34:320:34:34

At £40, you all sure then at 40?

0:34:340:34:37

I'm absolutely...phew!

0:34:390:34:42

That little profit's just a drop in the ocean.

0:34:420:34:44

Next is Charles' George III jug.

0:34:450:34:48

Who'll start me? Is that 50 to get on? £50.

0:34:480:34:51

-Oh, no!

-30 to get on then. £30. Got to be 30, hasn't it?

0:34:510:34:54

-1769. Oh, God!

-At £20 a bid here, it's go to be cheap at £20 only.

0:34:540:35:00

-At £20, 5, 30. At 30...

-It's cheap!

-40, 5, 50, 5,

0:35:000:35:07

-60, 5, 70, 5. At 75 here...

-Keep going! Come on!

0:35:070:35:13

At £75 in the room now. £75, you all sure?

0:35:130:35:17

75 it is, and that's number...

0:35:180:35:20

It could have been a lot worse. That could have been...£25.

0:35:200:35:23

Well, it looked like he was going to sell it for less than scrap.

0:35:230:35:26

Frightening, isn't it?

0:35:260:35:28

Or encouraging, Phil. A tiny profit after costs.

0:35:280:35:32

-It's a hard game, Phil.

-So you want to swap?

-..number 207.

0:35:320:35:34

-Lot number 19...

-No, I'm OK.

0:35:340:35:37

Phil's jardiniere or wastepaper basket,

0:35:380:35:40

who cares, as long as Cirencester loves it.

0:35:400:35:43

£30.

0:35:430:35:45

20.

0:35:450:35:47

Got to be £20. A tenner then?

0:35:470:35:50

£10, a bid then at 10, at 12, 15, 18, 20, 5, 30, at £30,

0:35:500:35:57

-am I right here at £30? 35 anywhere now...

-It's moving.

0:35:570:36:00

£30 is on my right. Selling here then on my right.

0:36:000:36:02

You all done then at 30?

0:36:020:36:05

How much did it make? £30? Oh, jeez.

0:36:050:36:08

It's looking like profits will be few and far between.

0:36:080:36:11

Hand on heart, I think it's worth nearly £100.

0:36:110:36:14

-Now for Charles' other bit of silver.

-50.

-Come on!

0:36:140:36:17

£30 to get on.

0:36:170:36:18

-Stylish little piece. £30.

-It's heavy, it's heavy.

-20 then...

0:36:180:36:23

-Oh, I don't believe it.

-£20, a bid here at 20.

0:36:230:36:26

-£20, 5, 30, 5, 40, 5, 50. At £50...

-Come on, one more!

0:36:260:36:31

-That's good, Charlie, that's good.

-That's disappointing.

0:36:310:36:34

All done then at 50.

0:36:340:36:36

-CHARLES SIGHS

-But you're nurdling a good little

0:36:370:36:40

profit, I mean, a little profit...

0:36:400:36:41

I'm pleased, Phil, you know what? Just to come here...

0:36:410:36:44

It's a tough auction house.

0:36:440:36:46

Yet another close one, but it's not over yet.

0:36:460:36:49

I'm nibbling along, Phil. I'm nibbling.

0:36:490:36:51

This is the big one.

0:36:510:36:53

If Phil's fruity Worcester does well, he could be back in it.

0:36:530:36:57

-£30 I've been bid here on the net, at £30, 5 anywhere now...

-120.

0:36:570:37:02

At 30, 5, anyone in the house here?

0:37:020:37:03

At £30, 5, £35, 40 if you like now, at 45 it's in the room.

0:37:030:37:07

-The cheapest thing I've ever seen.

-At £40...5, thank you, madam.

0:37:070:37:10

-At 45, 50 now...

-It's moving, now it's moving.

-At £50, 5 if you like.

0:37:100:37:15

-5, at 55...

-Now it's moving, it's moving, it's moving...

0:37:150:37:19

At £55, 60, at 65, 70 now then. At 65...70 on the net.

0:37:190:37:25

-At £70 it's here.

-We're moving.

-At £70, you all sure?

0:37:250:37:28

Selling it on the net then at 70.

0:37:280:37:30

That's just 50 quid down the drain, Charlie!

0:37:310:37:34

Someone's got a really good thing for a really low price.

0:37:350:37:39

How do you feel?

0:37:390:37:41

Uh, like I've felt every other day on this road trip!

0:37:410:37:44

Look at me! I love you, mate!

0:37:440:37:46

Time for Charlie's floral pooch to have its day.

0:37:460:37:50

CHARLIE HOWLS

0:37:500:37:52

-It's howling, Charlie.

-I know, it's howling for a profit.

0:37:530:37:56

-It's £20...

-It's a rare thing.

0:37:560:37:58

-£20 here only.

-It's cheap, isn't it, Charlie?

-It's cheap. Keep going.

0:37:580:38:02

At 30, 5 now, still cheap at £30. 5 anywhere now?

0:38:020:38:06

-At 35, 40 if you like, sir.

-Go on!

-Go on, sir! It's a rare thing!

0:38:060:38:10

-It's a rare thing! One more for the road!

-At £35 it's here...40.

-Yes!

0:38:100:38:15

-5 to me now at £40.

-Charlie, I love you.

-One more!

0:38:150:38:18

At £40, a bid here, you all sure now at 40?

0:38:180:38:22

-Good lad, brilliant.

-Well done, Charlie.

-Thank you, sir.

0:38:220:38:26

He's doubled his money.

0:38:260:38:27

I can't complain, at least I haven't made a loss.

0:38:280:38:30

-Yeah, absolutely, and I have.

-Exactly.

0:38:300:38:34

Thanks, Charlie.

0:38:340:38:35

Phil's candle box... will it set the auction alight,

0:38:350:38:38

-or finally snuff out his hopes?

-£30?

0:38:380:38:41

20. At £20, a bid there, £20, 5, 30,

0:38:420:38:45

at £30 on my left now, £30, 5 anywhere now?

0:38:450:38:48

-5, 40 to me, madam, at 35 here...

-Come on.

-..at £35 it's on my left,

0:38:480:38:52

at £35 it's sitting on my left then at 35.

0:38:520:38:56

That's for nothing, isn't it? It really is for nothing.

0:38:580:39:02

Another big loss and another big bargain for someone.

0:39:020:39:05

-Phil, look at me.

-Mm-hm...?

0:39:050:39:08

Thank you, madam...

0:39:080:39:09

-It's not quite the finale, is it, we wanted?

-No.

0:39:090:39:11

Charles' toy box was so cheap it can't fail.

0:39:120:39:15

-£5, a bid there, 8, 10, 12...

-Come on, internet!

0:39:150:39:19

At £12.50 if you like, now at 12 here,

0:39:190:39:21

15, at 15, 18 if you like, now at 15. 18.

0:39:210:39:25

At 18, 20 if you like now, at 18, 20, at £20, 5 now, at £20,

0:39:250:39:30

-it's selling on the net then...

-Going.

-Selling here at £20.

0:39:300:39:33

-Look over there, Phil. Look over there.

-At 25, in the room now...

0:39:330:39:36

-Come on.

-Come on, my son.

-Go on! Keep going, keep going!

0:39:360:39:39

-At 25, 30 if you like now.

-Keep going.

0:39:390:39:41

-At £5, they can't see you on the net, at £25...

-I'm over here! Sorry!

0:39:410:39:45

-It's too late anyway.

-Go on!

-At 25.

0:39:450:39:48

-Well done. Very good, Phil. Put it there.

-Well done, matey.

0:39:490:39:52

It's all going the way of the winner in waiting.

0:39:520:39:56

So, Phil just needs his spinning wheel to make over £1,000.

0:39:560:40:00

Start me, 50, £30, pretty little wheel there, £30...

0:40:000:40:04

-20...

-I don't believe this.

-20. A tenner?

0:40:050:40:09

A £10 a bid here at 10, 12 now if you like. At £10 a bid here...

0:40:090:40:13

-I just think that's funny.

-It scares me, yeah.

0:40:130:40:15

-At £10 only, at £10, 12 if you like now, £10...

-Thanks for coming here.

0:40:150:40:20

-Yeah, I've really enjoyed this.

-Really?

0:40:200:40:22

-GAVEL FALLS

-£10...

0:40:240:40:25

THEY LAUGH

0:40:250:40:27

Oh, my Lord! That cannot be worth £10!

0:40:270:40:30

Give me a hug! Give me a hug!

0:40:300:40:31

Charlie, how is that worth a tenner?

0:40:310:40:34

Oh, dear. At times like these, it's best to see the funny side.

0:40:340:40:37

I had a dream just then that that made £10.

0:40:370:40:39

I've had a nightmare!

0:40:390:40:40

What can Charles squeeze out of this one, I wonder?

0:40:430:40:46

-Start me at 100...

-Come on!

-100 to get on.

0:40:460:40:49

50 then. At £50 a bid there at 50, 5, 60, 5, 70, 5, 80, 5, 90...

0:40:490:40:56

-Go on.

-100 and 5. 110. At 110...

0:40:560:41:01

-Come on!

-120 now.

-Internet, come on!

-130, at 130, you all sure?

0:41:010:41:08

One more...

0:41:080:41:09

-GAVEL FALLS

-130 it is.

0:41:090:41:11

Great! Delighted!

0:41:110:41:12

So you should be, Charles.

0:41:120:41:14

When you had theatre, drama and romance,

0:41:140:41:16

I had tragedy, tragedy and tragedy!

0:41:160:41:18

You had speculation, speculation...

0:41:200:41:23

-Another humiliation!

-Another humiliation!

0:41:230:41:25

So, a week that was once very much neck and neck

0:41:250:41:29

has turned into a one-horse race.

0:41:290:41:31

Charles wins by a country mile.

0:41:310:41:33

Phil started out with £357.50 and after paying auction costs,

0:41:330:41:38

he made a loss of

0:41:380:41:39

£188.30, leaving him with a final total of £169.20.

0:41:390:41:46

Not your best outing.

0:41:460:41:48

While Charles began with £1,191.44,

0:41:480:41:52

and after paying auction costs, he made a profit of

0:41:520:41:55

£62.40, which means Charles,

0:41:550:41:59

with £1,253.84 is this week's runaway winner!

0:41:590:42:05

Well done, boy.

0:42:050:42:06

All profits, of course, go to Children In Need.

0:42:080:42:10

Charlie, let me shake you by the hand.

0:42:100:42:13

Phil...it's been a wonderful time!

0:42:130:42:16

-I've really enjoyed it. Thanks.

-It's a week I will never forget.

0:42:160:42:19

-No, neither will I.

-I mean it!

0:42:190:42:20

# I'm gettin' bugged driving up and down this same old strip

0:42:200:42:24

# I gotta finda new place where the kids are hip... #

0:42:240:42:27

Huh!

0:42:270:42:28

Grandad! Grandad!

0:42:280:42:30

# My buddies and me are getting real well known

0:42:300:42:34

# Yeah, the bad guys know us and they leave us alone

0:42:340:42:37

# I get around... #

0:42:370:42:38

-Give me a roar!

-Growl!

0:42:380:42:40

-# From town to town

-Get around round round I get around

0:42:400:42:43

-# I'm a real cool head

-Get around round round I get...

0:42:430:42:46

# I'm making real good bread... #

0:42:460:42:48

That's exciting!

0:42:480:42:50

-# I get around, round

-Get around round round oooo... #

0:42:500:42:55

THEY LAUGH

0:42:550:42:56

# Wah wa ooo

0:42:560:42:59

# Wah wa ooo... #

0:42:590:43:01

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:050:43:07

we're full of national pride as Anita Manning pipes up for Scotland.

0:43:070:43:12

TUNELESS NOTE

0:43:120:43:13

And James Braxton hopes for some right royal bargains.

0:43:130:43:16

-The Queen might be at the sale.

-Unlikely, James, unlikely!

0:43:160:43:20

Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson begin the final day of their road trip at Old Wolverton in Buckinghamshire, before taking a trip around the Midlands and heading to auction in Cirencester.