Episode 18 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 18

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures. Paul Laidlaw and Thomas Plant start in Birmingham before ending up at an auction in Stamford, Lincolnshire.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

-All right, viewers?

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal -

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to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire! Yes!

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Sold! Going, going, gone.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it is no mean feat.

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50p!

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Tricep dips.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-Oh!

-Ah, it's going to be a good one.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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This week's venture through antiquity is turning

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into a clash of the titans, as our two auctioneers go head-to-head.

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-Here we go.

-Yes, this is the start of a new leg.

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Halfway through their trip and Thomas Plant is trailing

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in second place, but he is keeping his eye peeled

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for a bargain, his nose to the grindstone

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and isn't giving up the fight.

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I'll be back!

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Where are you hiding?

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But the current leader of this path is Paul Laidlaw.

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With a passion for militaria,

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he is bringing all he knows to this battle.

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And it is getting emotional.

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I'm in love.

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-So, how much have you got now, Rockefeller?

-Big bucks. Just over...

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I think a pound over 500 quid.

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-Get in there!

-You're back in black, though.

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-Yes, yes, yes, I've moved back up.

-Trending the right way.

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Trending the right way. A small blip last time.

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But I think I have done quite well to sort of add on an extra 40 quid.

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He has indeed.

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Thomas started with £200 and, after two trips to auction,

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he has made a small profit, giving him £227.74 to spend today.

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Also beginning with £200, rival Paul has pulled ahead.

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With the help of a Susie Cooper coffee set,

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he now has an impressive £501.64.

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Do you know, I could find a Susie Cooper tea set like you.

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I could find my nirvana in it,

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my piece de resistance this leg, like you did.

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I didn't peak there, big man!

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These two confident warriors started this antique voyage

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in the Lancaster town of Morecambe.

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And clocking up around 600 miles,

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they will end the week in the county town of Bedford.

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Today, their mission is based in the Midlands, starting in Birmingham

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and heading west toward the auction in Stamford, Lincolnshire.

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# We're going the wrong way We're going the wrong way

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# We are going the wrong way on the ring road. #

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Not off to a great start in their Sunbeam Alpine,

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but with the treasures of Birmingham spread at their feet,

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they will soon be back on track.

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I'm always excited about the first buy day.

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I'm always disappointed at the end of the first buy day,

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when you think, "Why did I buy that?"

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But actually, it's concentration, concentration, concentration.

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-It turns on a penny, doesn't it?

-It does turn on a penny.

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So, what pennies can Birmingham throw up today?

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It has been described as the first manufacturing town in the world,

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but can our experts reap the benefits of its rich history?

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There are striking out on their own to find their fortunes,

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and Paul's first punt is in Mosby Emporium

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with the help of owner Maurice.

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-If you see anything, give me a shout and I'll bring it up to date.

-Great!

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But I'll tell you what, if it was Professor Plum

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in the library, these would do the trick.

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He's got his mind set on making a killing. Ha!

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Cat got your tongue, Paul?

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I'm not really fond of cats.

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HE LAUGHS

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OK, so, that's what, a third of the nation alienated there?

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Um...

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But I quite like that one.

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Well, it might not be purr-fect,

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but this Art Deco style cat is quick to jump out at him.

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The cat. I tend not to buy too many.

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-Poole Pottery.

-It is Poole.

-Yeah.

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-I like him.

-Yeah. 65.

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I'm not a cat lover, but the rest of the world is, apparently.

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So that is, I think... It's got wider appeal.

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If I'm pitching and saying "I want that for 30 quid,"

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you're going to say, "No."

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Of course, that's fine, but what are you going to bounce back at?

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40 quid.

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-Well, you know what I'm going to say now, don't you?

-35.

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That's a start. And I'm going to buy more than that here, yeah?

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Good man.

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He has picked up the Poole Pottery cat for £35.

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And in the depths of the cellar,

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has found something to bury his rival in.

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Or just cut him down to size.

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That is a seriously good push mower.

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They would look amazing if you had

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a big, Victorian-tiled bathroom.

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Clearly, I weigh something.

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I weigh more than eight stone, but I am delighted to say,

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less than 16 stone.

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It's all there.

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Interesting.

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He is tempted, but the future of these early 20th-century

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platform scales Haynes in the balance.

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Over to Maurice.

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In the basement, you've set your Avery scales.

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-They are not priced up, are they?

-No.

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I think there was about 45 there.

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30 quid, you could buy them. That would be the best.

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If 20 quid is any use, I will take them away,

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but if it's not, that's fine, I respect that and I'm happy.

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-You can actually take them away for that.

-Well, that's a deal. Good man.

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-Two things. Sweet. Thanks very much for that.

-OK, you're welcome.

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I'll give you some money.

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Two items for a grand total of £55.

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-Happy lady.

-See you.

-All the best.

-Bye.

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Paul is happy with his wares from Birmingham's Antiques.

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Time now for Thomas to delve deeper into the city's past.

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And he is about to be acquainted with one of Birmingham's most

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inspirational forefathers - Matthew Boulton.

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Now, he may not be a household name,

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yet his life's work influenced many aspects of our modern lives.

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In the 18th century,

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Boulton was at the very heart of the Industrial Revolution.

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He struck up a partnership with Scottish engineer James Watt.

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Together, they developed and patented a steam engine

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so efficient that it went on to power industry around the world.

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His business was so groundbreaking that his impressive Georgian

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home, Soho House,

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became an essential stop for visiting dignitaries,

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including Horatio Nelson and US President Benjamin Franklin.

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Today, the house is owned by Birmingham Museums and will be

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graced by yet another gentleman of note - Mr Thomas Plant.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Thomas.

-Hello, I'm Oliver Buckley.

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Welcome to Soho House.

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-I noticed there is a portrait, is that of the man himself?

-Yes, indeed.

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-This is a portrait of Matthew Boulton.

-And what was he famous for?

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Well, he is famous as an industrial entrepreneur.

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And his big achievement was to come out here to what were then

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the green fields of Soho and build his amazing manufactory,

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a huge industrial wonder of the age that could employ

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up to 1,000 workers

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in a time when factories were really just craftsmen's workshops.

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His Soho manufactory produced a wide range of beautiful

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and ornate objects,

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but it was Boulton's passion in perfecting the latest mechanical

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processes that have become his biggest contribution to history.

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His proudest achievement was using these cutting-edge techniques

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to transform the minting of coins in one of the first

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examples of mass production.

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He developed a production line of machines allowing him to strike

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millions of pieces accurately, that won him

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the first official contract to supply the Royal Mint.

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These are the cartwheel pennies, so-called

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because they have this thick rim around the outside.

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So, what was revolutionary about the way these were minted here?

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He boasted that the smallest size, it would

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-go right down to little tiny coins.

-Farthings.

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Yes. He could make 920 per minute.

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Once he got the contract to, you know, make the coins,

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it was a sign of real assurance of the quality of the things

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he was able to make here.

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But Boulton did not just oversee a production line.

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In all his business projects,

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he applied his own knowledge to make each

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venture as successful as the last.

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How involved do you think he got in items?

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Well, I think he was pretty hands-on, actually.

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There's actually 250,000 drawings of steam engine parts

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in our archives.

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And many of those have his individual handwriting on them.

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-So we know he was pretty hands-on.

-Really? Gosh!

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He was involved in the inventing process.

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And to celebrate this groundbreaking entrepreneur,

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the Bank of England have put Boulton and Watt on their most

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prestigious note, giving him the recognition he so richly deserves.

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I've got a new appreciation of Matthew Boulton

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and his total skill, his qualities.

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If an ounce of it rubs off on me, I will be very happy.

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-But it has been a real pleasure. Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Whilst Thomas is hoping to achieve a few notes up

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and down the country, Paul has been putting the pedal to the metal.

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He has been driving towards Litchfield, in Staffordshire,

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a cathedral city famed for its beautifully preserved

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historical centre.

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And Paul is paying a visit to the aptly named

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Lichfield Antiques Centre.

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There are over 60 different vendors here,

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including Paul and owner Madeleine.

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So, can they tempt our expert to part with more cash?

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Oh, that is impressive, Paul.

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Makassar ebony veneer.

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Profusely and exquisitely inlaid in

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brass, gilt metal,

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mother-of-pearl, abalone.

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-That is...that is divine, isn't it?

-It is lovely.

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It's sumptuous.

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This Victorian writing box certainly catches the eye,

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but quality like this will cost you.

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So, it is a writing slope at... Holy Moses, it is priced up at £500.

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Which I could just about afford, is the truth of the matter.

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I'm giving too much away, perhaps. But what a joy of a box, yeah?

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-Lovely.

-You just...

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I mean, seriously, you're going to go a long way to trump that.

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This is more...more appropriate.

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Fatally flawed, I suspect, but nevertheless,

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if you forgive it that, a little charmer.

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From the £35 Edwardian novelty purse, sporting a bit of damage,

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to the £495 box,

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both objects are owned by an absentee owner,

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so this negotiation has to happen on the phone.

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First up, the purse.

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He is saying somewhat south of 20.

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It's decadent, it's fun,

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it's utterly charming...

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It's broken. Uh-uh.

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This is my problem, which is why I want a knockdown price.

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There's a part two to this as well.

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Which is the large box that you have down there for 495.

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-The writing slope.

-The box...

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That's where I want to be.

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That... It's just fantastic!

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He has fallen for the box, but will Paul come back bearing good news?

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-Hi.

-How are we doing?

-We're good, I think. He is a very generous man.

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-He will give you that for 18.

-Oh, he is a good man.

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And he is willing to go to 350.

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It's not going to be for me. I can't go there, that's going to be daft.

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What a good thing, though. I think I have to buy that, but...

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..I want to buy more.

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A punt on the purse, but at £350,

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the box is left on the shelf.

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We have a mid-20th century enamelled silver gilt prize medallion

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presented by the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

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I reckon I could squeeze a little bit off the asking price

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and make a little profit.

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And you know what? It's easy and it's dull.

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Who cares?

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The box, on the other hand, would be a meaty purchase,

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and I may lose my lead on the back of it,

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because of arithmetic in the market. So, am I a gambler?

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See, I would disappoint myself buying this.

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My head says, "Crazy fool, buy it!

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"Take the money and run!"

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My heart's saying,

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"No, too easy, buy that just...

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"wow, flamboyant object."

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So, will he follow his heart and take a risk on the lead?

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Please don't mind me doing this,

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but I am going to come back at you on the box.

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There's 200 quid on the table.

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-I don't mind you saying, "Look, it's too big an ask."

-I'll try.

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-But it is a big ask.

-It is a huge ask.

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As long as he doesn't take offence to it. I'm going to keep looking.

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Cheers.

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He's going for the gamble, so it's round two on the writing box.

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And box number two as well, by the look of things.

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Yes.

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Oh, they don't turn up like that, do they?

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That's very smart.

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This one is a Victorian tea caddy

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with the lower ticket price of £175.

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And as luck would have it,

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it belongs to the same vendor as the writing box.

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Um...

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Oh, now there is an offer! Ah!

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Would you be interested in both of them?

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395 for both.

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320, the two.

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330?

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-We have a deal.

-Thanks very much.

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What have I done? Thank you very much.

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I've waded in deep,

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but I am delighted to have bought things that really fire me up.

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That's a whopping £340 discount for the two boxes.

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How exciting to see him take such a big risk!

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I hope he doesn't regret it when it comes to auction.

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Thanks very much.

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And eager to take advantage of any mistake Paul might have made

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is rival Thomas, who has travelled to the market town of Coleshill.

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Sitting on the river Cole, in the Warwickshire countryside,

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this market town boasts an impressive 13th-century church,

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complete with its own 52-metre steeple.

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Thomas has come for a snoop around Kim's establishment.

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Hello, Thomas, pleased to meet you. I'm Kim.

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Half sewing, half antiques

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and packed full of promise for our underdog.

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Paul has raced away,

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tremendously raced away,

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And I need to claw that back,

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definitely claw that back.

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But I'm going to have a good look around here and see what I can buy.

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Yeah, a good rummage around can throw up all sorts of surprises.

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Boom, boom! That's what he said, didn't he? Boom, boom.

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Paul has taken a serious gamble, but Thomas is still larking around.

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I do like that necessaire there.

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The little box with the mother-of-pearl...

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It's not matching, though, that's the problem. I might have a look at it.

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Oh, I like that Stanhope as well.

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Well, that is a bit more like it - a lady's sewing box for £86,

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very fitting for this place -

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and a £38, 19th-century Stanhope letter opener.

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So, what you've got is you've got a letter opener.

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For opening your letter.

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And then you need to reply to the letter you have opened,

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so you unscrew this bit here and you have an ink pen,

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a little dip pen.

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In it goes dip, dip, dip. In here is a little lens.

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On the little lens...

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..is a little picture.

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And that picture will tell you where it is.

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Named after the Stanhope lens, this technique for viewing pictures

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in miniature was developed in the mid-19th century.

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It is a clever bit of kit...if it works.

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I think it's either Yarmouth or Blackpool, I'm not 100%.

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But I can't seem to get it focused when I look at it myself.

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-What is the best on that?

-30.

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-I'll think about that one, thank you very much.

-That's fine.

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-It's just the difficulty in reading that.

-Yes.

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He is dithering somewhat.

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It is a late 19th-century lady's sewing and dressing table

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accoutrement, which would travel with her.

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This is for cleaning your ear.

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And then...

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tweezers for your...eyebrows.

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Ah, but can it pluck out some profits for you, Thomas?

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What is the best on this one?

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70.

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-If that helps you.

-Thank you.

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70, I just can't see it making me a profit.

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-At all. But it is a lovely thing.

-What were you thinking?

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Well, you know, it's quite offensive, really.

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-I personally rate the box at £40.

-OK.

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And I rate that Stanhope at 15.

0:18:200:18:23

-So, we're looking at 55.

-55.

-Yes, I think...

0:18:230:18:26

-You going to be all right?

-I'll be all right with that.

0:18:260:18:28

-You don't mind?

-No, no.

0:18:280:18:29

-No, I'll be happy with that.

-My dear, thank you very much.

0:18:290:18:32

-You're very welcome.

-That's very good. I better give you some money.

0:18:320:18:35

Both items for less than half price,

0:18:350:18:38

and much more shopping ahead of him tomorrow.

0:18:380:18:40

But for now, it is time to bid farewell to day one on the road.

0:18:400:18:44

Sleep well, you chaps.

0:18:440:18:47

Morning has arrived, and with it...

0:18:480:18:50

-MOTOR STUTTERS

-..comes...

0:18:500:18:52

-MOTOR STALLS

-..a spot of car trouble.

0:18:520:18:55

MOTOR STUTTERS AND STARTS

0:18:550:18:57

Oh, that's good.

0:18:590:19:00

And the reliable Alpine gets them on the road once again.

0:19:000:19:04

-Thomas, I have good news for you.

-Have you?

0:19:040:19:07

HE LAUGHS

0:19:070:19:09

-Boy, have I got good news for you.

-What?

0:19:090:19:11

-Well, you know how I could have played it safe?

-Yes.

0:19:110:19:14

I went the other way.

0:19:140:19:16

Yeah, but if you spend big, then of course the risks are bigger.

0:19:160:19:20

-Yeah, of course.

-I've blown the money.

0:19:200:19:22

Not quite, Paul,

0:19:220:19:23

but yesterday he did blow £403 on the Art Deco pottery cat,

0:19:230:19:28

the large scales, the novelty purse, the Victorian tea caddy

0:19:280:19:33

and the risky writing box...

0:19:330:19:35

It's just fantastic!

0:19:350:19:38

..leaving him with £98.64.

0:19:380:19:41

Thomas parted with a more conservative £55,

0:19:420:19:45

picking up a Stanhope letter opener

0:19:450:19:48

and the lady's sewing box,

0:19:480:19:50

so he has £172.74 to spend today.

0:19:500:19:53

Here's a braw day.

0:19:550:19:56

This morning, they are starting in Shenton, in Leicestershire.

0:19:580:20:02

Shenton is part of a conservation area and our experts' first

0:20:020:20:06

stop can fittingly be found in a Grade 2 listed farmhouse.

0:20:060:20:10

How lovely.

0:20:100:20:12

-Here we are!

-Oh, this is gorgeous.

0:20:120:20:15

Yeah, look at that. Right.

0:20:150:20:18

I'll see you in about an hour.

0:20:180:20:20

Cartwheel penny.

0:20:270:20:29

Hopefully, a lucky penny, Thomas.

0:20:290:20:32

A mole does a pretty blind run... And then get snapped. Ow!

0:20:360:20:40

I'm dressing up again. I fancy being a fireman today.

0:20:420:20:45

On the last leg, he was a soldier. Today, a fireman.

0:20:450:20:48

A man about town.

0:20:480:20:49

Maybe tomorrow he will come as an antiques expert.

0:20:490:20:52

Stop mucking about, Thomas.

0:20:520:20:55

It seems both experts have their minds elsewhere.

0:20:550:20:58

Last night, at the hotel, because I've no life and I can't

0:20:580:21:01

switch off from this, I did some research about the Poole cat.

0:21:010:21:05

Nothing. The thing doesn't exist.

0:21:050:21:09

Now, I don't think I'm getting carried away.

0:21:090:21:12

This suggests to me, I've got the only one, a one of a tiny number.

0:21:120:21:18

And if that's the case,

0:21:180:21:20

I may have something more exciting than the coffee set.

0:21:200:21:24

Luck seems to be with Laidlaw on this trip,

0:21:240:21:26

but Thomas still has some hard graft to do.

0:21:260:21:30

I'm trying to find things to beat the Laidlaw with.

0:21:330:21:37

They haven't got it, that is what's annoyed me.

0:21:370:21:40

-They just haven't got it.

-Totally chilled. Totally chilled.

0:21:400:21:44

Come on, Thomas, with five objects in the bag, your rival is done with

0:21:440:21:47

shopping, so there is an opportunity to find a hidden treasure in here.

0:21:470:21:51

Go for it!

0:21:510:21:52

-Instead of binoculars, it's just the one.

-For a one-horse race.

0:21:520:21:55

For a one-horse race, Margaret. How much is it? Let's see.

0:21:550:22:00

Dah-dah-dah!

0:22:000:22:01

£22, look at that.

0:22:010:22:03

Things are looking up with this Barr and Stroud monocular.

0:22:030:22:06

The Scottish company were pioneers of modern optics

0:22:060:22:09

and were a key supplier to the Armed Forces in the 20th century.

0:22:090:22:13

It has got pedigree, but can he spy a profit?

0:22:130:22:17

-Can we do a deal on these?

-What were you thinking?

0:22:170:22:20

You always say, "Go on, you tell me, you tell me."

0:22:200:22:22

What do you think I was going to say?

0:22:220:22:25

-A fiver.

-Well, that is quite harsh.

0:22:250:22:27

I wouldn't say a fiver, I'm not that much of a bad man, am I?

0:22:270:22:32

You'll never went with that strategy, Thomas.

0:22:320:22:35

-OK, £15.

-15.

0:22:350:22:37

-£15 and I will take them off your hands.

-All right, OK.

0:22:370:22:41

-Is that all right?

-Yes, yes.

-Let me give you some money.

0:22:410:22:43

Success at last with the monocular for £15.

0:22:430:22:47

And back in the Sunbeam, the chaps travel through the beautiful

0:22:470:22:50

Leicestershire countryside.

0:22:500:22:52

But it hasn't always been so peaceful in these parts.

0:22:550:22:57

And our experts are en route to the site of a major battle,

0:22:570:23:00

one that changed the course of British history.

0:23:000:23:03

-Ah, ah, ah, ah!

-This is adventure.

0:23:040:23:07

-Thomas Plant!

-If I were the sort, I would bang it against my chest.

0:23:070:23:12

In the 15th century, a vicious civil war raged for decades.

0:23:140:23:19

The War of the Roses was one of Britain's bloodiest

0:23:190:23:22

and thousands were killed in the fight for the English throne.

0:23:220:23:25

Then, in 1485, came the Battle of Bosworth.

0:23:260:23:30

The reigning king, Richard III, lost his life on the field

0:23:300:23:33

and his crown to challenger Henry VII, giving rise

0:23:330:23:37

to the Tudor dynasty, who ruled England for over a century.

0:23:370:23:41

This decisive battle is of such significance that historians

0:23:430:23:46

and experts have fought for centuries over what exactly

0:23:460:23:49

happened and where.

0:23:490:23:51

But over the last few years, the facts surrounding

0:23:510:23:54

one of Britain's lost battlefields are being discovered.

0:23:540:23:57

And military mad Paul is keen to find out what

0:23:570:24:00

they have unearthed, so he has come

0:24:000:24:03

to Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Centre

0:24:030:24:05

to meet Heritage officer Richard Mackinder.

0:24:050:24:08

-Richard. Paul.

-Welcome, hi.

-Good to see you.

0:24:080:24:12

-Well, here we are at... Bosworth Field?

-Yes, that's correct.

0:24:120:24:16

Well, that rings like Hastings and Culloden in British history,

0:24:160:24:19

doesn't it?

0:24:190:24:20

When and what's the significance of Bosworth?

0:24:200:24:23

Well, Bosworth is one of those major turning points in British history.

0:24:230:24:26

It was the end of the medieval period,

0:24:260:24:28

with Richard Plantagenet, Richard III,

0:24:280:24:31

the last British king to go into battle alive,

0:24:310:24:34

and unfortunately get killed on British soil.

0:24:340:24:36

At the time of the battle,

0:24:360:24:38

King Richard III had been on the throne for just two years,

0:24:380:24:41

yet he was immortalized by Shakespeare and, more recently,

0:24:410:24:45

made headlines when his remains

0:24:450:24:47

were discovered under a Leicester car park.

0:24:470:24:50

The facts of Richard's death are slowly coming to light,

0:24:500:24:53

as are the mysteries surrounding this incredible battle site.

0:24:530:24:58

Since 2005, a team of archaeologists and some experts have been

0:24:580:25:02

painstakingly scouring the area for evidence.

0:25:020:25:05

Answers have appeared with each new object they've found,

0:25:050:25:09

much of which can now be seen in the centre's museum.

0:25:090:25:13

But it wasn't until they discovered clusters of lead and stone round

0:25:130:25:17

shot fired from small cannons that they knew they had a break through.

0:25:170:25:21

So, we have got a number of different lead spheres,

0:25:210:25:26

round shot, and they are fired round shot.

0:25:260:25:29

And they are found within this scatter,

0:25:290:25:32

and that's what makes it a battle site.

0:25:320:25:34

Individual items on their own are not enough.

0:25:340:25:37

It is only when you put the whole story together that you start

0:25:370:25:40

to then say actually, yes, we can now say that at least

0:25:400:25:44

part of the major part of the fighting was here.

0:25:440:25:48

Five years into the project, they were able to piece together a large

0:25:480:25:52

amount of what happened in 1485, but this is just the beginning.

0:25:520:25:57

We've got a battle site, what next?

0:25:570:26:00

It would be lovely to try and find the full extent of the battle site.

0:26:000:26:03

We haven't actually found

0:26:030:26:07

big enough areas of no battle litter to say we are now outside it.

0:26:070:26:11

And of course, on top of that, what this project has given us

0:26:110:26:15

is the ability to try and understand a huge area of landscape,

0:26:150:26:19

not just the two and half hours of 1485,

0:26:190:26:22

but the landscape

0:26:220:26:24

and the history of man in that landscape from the very early

0:26:240:26:27

stage, from stone access right way through up to the modern history.

0:26:270:26:31

Well, you've whet my appetite, good luck to you.

0:26:310:26:33

-Many thanks, Richard.

-My pleasure. An absolute pleasure.

0:26:330:26:36

It has taken over 500 years to get this far, but with

0:26:360:26:39

so much left to find, the fight for knowledge rages on in Bosworth.

0:26:390:26:45

Our experts, however, are engaged in a power struggle of their own,

0:26:460:26:50

and Thomas is threatening all-out war.

0:26:500:26:53

I'd love to buy something that would project me

0:26:530:26:58

to the level of the Laidlaw. We can have a real battle, then.

0:26:580:27:02

This brave warrior is heading to the city of Leicester,

0:27:020:27:06

in East Midlands, and is hedging his bets of hidden treasures.

0:27:060:27:09

-Mac, nice to meet you. This is your shop?

-Yes, it is. Yeah.

0:27:090:27:13

-It is been open four weeks.

-Four weeks?!

-Four weeks.

0:27:130:27:15

So, I want to have a good goosy gander.

0:27:150:27:17

-Help yourself, yes, by all means.

-It looks exciting.

0:27:170:27:20

The innards are gone, the innards are gone.

0:27:220:27:25

You can't say he doesn't take a close look, now can you?

0:27:250:27:29

All the clocks are ticking away,

0:27:290:27:32

reminding me of how little time I've got left to beat the Paul,

0:27:320:27:36

to beat the Laidlaw with.

0:27:360:27:38

But there is always time for dressing up with this chap.

0:27:380:27:41

I'll be back!

0:27:410:27:43

Oh, do focus, Thomas.

0:27:430:27:45

Time is pressing on and shopping under pressure is no picnic.

0:27:460:27:50

So, this is a Braxton picnic set with china plates,

0:27:530:27:57

stainless steel knives and forks.

0:27:570:28:00

It's all there, isn't it?

0:28:000:28:02

-People do like these things, don't they?

-They do.

-They are quite fun.

0:28:020:28:05

This 1960s picnic set is priced at £60

0:28:050:28:08

and it would look great in the old Alpine on the way to auction.

0:28:080:28:12

-Mac, what is the best on this?

-I could probably go to...45 on that.

0:28:120:28:19

Is that your best, what do you think?

0:28:190:28:22

-35.

-OK, well, that's great. 35 for that.

0:28:230:28:27

That's definitely worth considering.

0:28:270:28:28

-It'd be nice if I try and find something else...

-Yep.

-..as well.

0:28:280:28:32

Thomas?

0:28:360:28:38

He's drifting off.

0:28:380:28:39

Maybe a man's best friend can help him out.

0:28:390:28:42

These are green onyx and spelter dogs, painted.

0:28:420:28:47

They are quite a sweet thing, really. Are they super cheap?

0:28:470:28:50

-They can be £8.

-£8?

-Yes.

0:28:500:28:55

That's my kind of money. It's £8, great.

0:28:550:28:57

Well, I think they are really good, then.

0:28:570:28:59

He sniffs out a bargain with these two Art Deco bookends.

0:28:590:29:03

You can't argue with £8, can you?

0:29:030:29:05

-Mac.

-Yes?

-Could I have this

0:29:050:29:09

and the dogs for 35?

0:29:090:29:11

That and the dogs for 35...

0:29:110:29:15

Would you do that for me?

0:29:150:29:16

-OK.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

0:29:160:29:19

Let me give you some money.

0:29:190:29:20

Lordy, another two items for the modest price of £35.

0:29:200:29:25

So, with ten items between them, it is time to bear all at the

0:29:250:29:29

rather grand Bosworth Hall Hotel in nearby Market Bosworth.

0:29:290:29:33

So, Paul... Let's have a look.

0:29:330:29:37

-Two stages to this.

-Right, OK, two stages.

0:29:370:29:40

That's numero uno. And...

0:29:400:29:42

-My!

-Thomas...

-My!

-Thomas...

0:29:420:29:46

Size does count, and that is a real-man-sized scale.

0:29:460:29:49

HE LAUGHS

0:29:490:29:53

-What a beautiful thing.

-I fell in love.

0:29:530:29:56

-Now, the pussycat.

-Yeah.

0:29:560:29:59

The pussycat.

0:29:590:30:00

-Oh, it is a Poole piece. So, was that really expensive?

-That was £35.

0:30:000:30:05

No! That's another Susie Cooper.

0:30:050:30:08

-I think it is.

-That's so rare!

-Go on, hit me with it.

0:30:080:30:12

Well, well... OK.

0:30:150:30:17

Um...

0:30:170:30:18

The bone paper knife, Stanhope in the terminal?

0:30:180:30:23

Stanhope, yeah, yeah.

0:30:230:30:24

-The view is of...?

-I can't see it cos it's dirty.

0:30:240:30:27

It's erotic?

0:30:270:30:30

-No, I wish!

-Oh, dirty in a nice way. OK, I get it. Fine.

0:30:300:30:34

Rate those, like those a lot.

0:30:340:30:36

How much do you think they were?

0:30:360:30:38

-120.

-They were very expensive.

-How much were they?

0:30:380:30:41

-They were £5.

-What?!

0:30:410:30:43

-No, no.

-What?! You... This is guaranteed nice little return.

0:30:430:30:48

Good ensemble. This is going to be another fun auction.

0:30:480:30:51

-Yeah.

-Good work!

-Good work. Come on.

0:30:510:30:53

They've gone for some high risks and potentially high rewards,

0:30:550:30:58

so who has got the edge this time round?

0:30:580:31:00

Laidlaw's inlaid box, the mother of pearl one,

0:31:010:31:05

is wonderful, such good quality.

0:31:050:31:08

Well done, him, for taking the plunge.

0:31:080:31:10

The dogs are the one to watch.

0:31:100:31:12

With dog lovers in the room, it could do really well.

0:31:120:31:15

Hopefully, these little nibbles, like little low punches, you know,

0:31:150:31:19

will just slowly eke, eke, eke back.

0:31:190:31:22

And then... The glory is all mine.

0:31:220:31:24

Another one gunning for glory.

0:31:260:31:28

So, onward they head to auction in Stamford.

0:31:280:31:31

With its beautifully preserved buildings,

0:31:310:31:33

this picturesque Lincolnshire town has been

0:31:330:31:36

immortalized in various silver screen outings,

0:31:360:31:39

including the 2005 adaptation of Pride And Prejudice.

0:31:390:31:44

-What a place! Isn't it beautiful?

-Georgian splendour.

0:31:440:31:47

It is, isn't it? It's splendid.

0:31:470:31:49

It's glorious!

0:31:490:31:51

Does that mean our lots are going to be splendidly

0:31:510:31:54

wonderful at the auction?

0:31:540:31:55

Today, they are heading for auction

0:31:550:31:57

at Bateman's Auctioneers And Valuers.

0:31:570:32:00

-Very good.

-Excited?

0:32:020:32:04

-Tinged with nerves?

-Oh, don't be so ridiculous!

0:32:040:32:07

Hey, I've spent the money, man.

0:32:070:32:09

-I know you spent the money.

-You can't lose.

0:32:090:32:12

And as our experts eagerly await their fate,

0:32:120:32:15

auctioneer David Palmer muses their offerings.

0:32:150:32:18

So, we have got the 20th-century bathroom scales,

0:32:190:32:22

which are as ugly as sin.

0:32:220:32:24

I mean, would you put those in your bathroom?

0:32:240:32:26

The little miniature travelling or sewing box,

0:32:260:32:29

many of the parts there don't match.

0:32:290:32:32

But I love that, I think it is brilliant, particularly

0:32:320:32:34

the ear wax spoon with the tweezers at the end.

0:32:340:32:38

That is so cool.

0:32:380:32:39

Paul is staking his lead on five items that cost him

0:32:390:32:44

a significant £403.

0:32:440:32:47

And nipping at his heels is Thomas,

0:32:470:32:49

who is also offering up five items at a total cost of £105.

0:32:490:32:54

So, is it money well spent?

0:32:550:32:58

Luckily for Thomas, there's a dog lover in here.

0:32:580:33:00

But will Paul be as fortunate?

0:33:000:33:02

18. At 18.

0:33:020:33:04

The time of reckoning has arrived and David is

0:33:040:33:06

kicking off proceedings in the room, on the phone and online.

0:33:060:33:11

First up, Paul's platform scales.

0:33:110:33:13

The auctioneer doesn't like them, but will the buyers?

0:33:130:33:16

It's all in the balance.

0:33:160:33:17

-Look good in any bathroom, probably.

-Yeah, as we said.

0:33:170:33:20

Um... I don't know, £20. Straight in at £20.

0:33:200:33:23

20 for these, the scales. 20.

0:33:230:33:25

Apparently not.

0:33:250:33:27

-No visible bidders.

-Don't all talk at once.

0:33:270:33:29

Tenner, then. £10, the scales. Anyone 10?

0:33:290:33:32

£10 for the bathroom scales.

0:33:320:33:35

Fiver for the bathroom scales.

0:33:350:33:38

Five I'm bid down here.

0:33:380:33:39

-Oh, lovely.

-Six on the net. Seven for you, sir? Seven.

0:33:390:33:43

At seven now. It goes at seven. Eight. Nine.

0:33:430:33:47

In the room at £9. I sell to the gent at 9. 10. 12.

0:33:470:33:51

Back down here 12.

0:33:510:33:52

I sell in the room at £12. Sell then at £12 in the room.

0:33:520:33:57

I guess nobody with a huge Victorian bathroom turned up today, Paul.

0:33:570:34:00

Not a great start, mate.

0:34:000:34:02

I've done my best with scales.

0:34:020:34:03

Scales are dead to me now. I've moved on. What scales?

0:34:030:34:07

Over to Thomas's first lot. Can it open up some profit?

0:34:090:34:12

Proper antique.

0:34:120:34:14

£20 for that. £20.

0:34:140:34:16

20. £20. On the phone at 20.

0:34:160:34:19

22 in the room. 22.

0:34:190:34:20

25 is actually the next bid. 25. Here at 25. 28. 28 there. 30.

0:34:200:34:26

It's gathering momentum.

0:34:260:34:28

30. At £30. 32. 35. Here at 35.

0:34:280:34:31

38. 40 now. Phone, go 40. Yes, 40.

0:34:310:34:34

-On the phone at 40.

-It's going.

-45 in the room. 50. He's at 50.

0:34:340:34:37

What is going on?

0:34:370:34:39

55. Go 55. 50 I sell on the phone, then. With the phone at 50...

0:34:390:34:44

Sell on the phone at £50...

0:34:440:34:45

He's more than trebled his money on that one.

0:34:470:34:50

Long may that continue, Thomas.

0:34:500:34:52

Back to Paul, hoping to rev up more interest in this offering.

0:34:520:34:56

Rather nice little piece, this. £30 for that. 30, 30 I'm bid.

0:34:560:34:59

30. Take 2 now.

0:34:590:35:00

On at 30, and 2, if you like. Is that it? At £30. 32. 35. 38.

0:35:000:35:04

-40. At 40. 45, sir, with you.

-It's going to make 60.

0:35:040:35:08

Don't be cheap. 42. 45.

0:35:080:35:10

Against you at £45. No-one else, then?

0:35:100:35:13

No-one else at 45?

0:35:130:35:15

That's motored him back into the black.

0:35:150:35:18

I covered it.

0:35:180:35:19

-Take that.

-Back in the game.

0:35:190:35:21

Thomas again and the first of three boxes these boys have bought.

0:35:210:35:26

Got a wonderful little ear wax pick with tweezers on it.

0:35:260:35:30

I mean, they are so seriously cool.

0:35:300:35:33

I've been using it all week, it's brilliant.

0:35:330:35:36

Start me at 50 quid. 50 I'm bid.

0:35:360:35:38

At 50. 55 now.

0:35:380:35:39

60. 65. 70.

0:35:390:35:41

75. 80. 85.

0:35:410:35:44

At 85.

0:35:440:35:45

At 85. Goes at 85. You bidding on the phone?

0:35:450:35:48

-90. The phone then at 90.

-Oh, my God, that's great!

0:35:490:35:51

I sell on the phone at £90.

0:35:510:35:53

-Back in at 95.

-What?

0:35:530:35:56

-What is going on?

-100.

0:35:560:35:58

At £100. Back on the phone then at 100. You're out in the room?

0:35:580:36:02

-All done at £100.

-I don't believe it.

0:36:020:36:05

-Have you got your mum on the phone?

-Yeah.

0:36:050:36:07

Believe it or not, Thomas,

0:36:070:36:08

you're getting some seriously good returns today.

0:36:080:36:11

Everything is cream.

0:36:110:36:13

Everything now is cream.

0:36:130:36:15

The pressure's on Paul with this lot, the first of his big risks.

0:36:150:36:20

Really rather an interesting one. Let's start at £100.

0:36:200:36:23

Straight in at 100.

0:36:230:36:24

100 I'm bid at the back. 100, 110. 120. 130.

0:36:240:36:27

-140. 150.

-There we are, profit.

0:36:270:36:30

-190.

-There you are, Laidlaw just raced ahead now.

-230. 240.

0:36:300:36:34

250. 260.

0:36:340:36:36

-270. 280.

-There you are.

0:36:360:36:37

-Put it there, my man.

-He's working it, it's all in the room.

0:36:370:36:40

It goes back at 290. Are you in at 300?

0:36:400:36:43

No? You're out? Definitely out? 290 at the back.

0:36:430:36:47

A cool £180 in the old bag without skipping a beat.

0:36:470:36:51

I just hope he can hang onto his profits when that other box pops up.

0:36:510:36:55

Put it there. Put it there.

0:36:550:36:58

Thomas has even more ground to make up now.

0:36:580:37:00

Can the monocular see him through?

0:37:000:37:02

Spy on your neighbours, see what they're doing.

0:37:020:37:05

At £10. 10 to start.

0:37:050:37:07

Anyone 10? £10 for it.

0:37:070:37:09

Sir, ten.

0:37:090:37:10

Tenner. With him at 10. See? I've got his measure. At 10. 12.

0:37:100:37:14

On the net at 12. 15?

0:37:140:37:16

At 12. Here on the net then at £12.

0:37:160:37:19

I sell to the net at £12.

0:37:190:37:22

Perhaps in a future sale, the other half of the binoculars will turn up.

0:37:220:37:25

Goes then at £12. All done at 12?

0:37:250:37:27

No-one else at 12?

0:37:270:37:30

Look out!

0:37:300:37:31

That's a disappointing loss.

0:37:310:37:33

-Tried.

-Tried, tried.

0:37:330:37:36

Ah, the rare Poole Pottery cat.

0:37:360:37:39

Have the buyers done their research just like Paul?

0:37:390:37:42

50 I'm bid. 55. 60. 65.

0:37:420:37:44

I have 65 now. I'll take 70.

0:37:440:37:46

Done then at 65.

0:37:460:37:48

-Nobody else in the room?

-70. 75. 80.

0:37:480:37:50

85. At 85 now. 90. Net at 90. 95.

0:37:500:37:53

-Get in there, well done.

-100. Net at 100.

0:37:530:37:56

THEY WHISPER

0:37:560:37:59

At 110. Goes at 110. 120.

0:37:590:38:02

At 120. At £120. 130.

0:38:020:38:05

-It's creeping up on the net still, isn't it?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:38:050:38:08

150. The phone at 150. This phone at 150.

0:38:080:38:11

At 150. 160. 170, phone.

0:38:110:38:14

170. At 170. 180. 190.

0:38:160:38:20

It's just one of those things, if you stop,

0:38:200:38:23

you might never get another chance.

0:38:230:38:24

-180.

-So don't stop. Don't stop!

-Goes with the net then at 180.

0:38:240:38:27

No, no, keep going.

0:38:270:38:28

-I want you to do more than this.

-At £180.

0:38:280:38:31

Are you coming in at 185?

0:38:310:38:33

185 I've got. At 185.

0:38:330:38:35

Phone at 185.

0:38:350:38:38

190. I will take the five again.

0:38:380:38:40

195. Phone, 195.

0:38:400:38:43

Another fiver may be all-important.

0:38:430:38:47

-At 190. Sell then at 190...

-Good spot.

0:38:470:38:51

It seems the cat's out of the bag and Paul's profits continue to rise.

0:38:510:38:56

-The cat that got the cream.

-Yeah, the cat that got the cream.

0:38:560:38:59

Perhaps, Thomas' next offering will pack some much-needed profits.

0:38:590:39:04

£30 for it, 30 quid. The hamper. With £30.

0:39:040:39:08

£20. 30 here. On the phone at 30.

0:39:080:39:12

Sell on the phone at £30.

0:39:120:39:13

I sell at 30.

0:39:130:39:15

35. 40? 40. 45, sir?

0:39:150:39:18

At 40. Sell at 40. You're out in the room. Goes on the phone at 40.

0:39:180:39:21

It all counts, and that's another £10 in the bag.

0:39:230:39:26

-I think that's a good result.

-That is a great result.

0:39:260:39:29

Up next, his bookends. I hope these get some tails wagging.

0:39:290:39:34

So, you've sat here from the start of the sale until now.

0:39:340:39:37

I'm not going to bid for that.

0:39:370:39:39

Let's start at, I don't know, 30 quid. 30 on bid. 30. 32. 35. 38.

0:39:400:39:44

40. 40 now. At 40.

0:39:440:39:46

Done then at 40? 45. 50. 55. 60.

0:39:460:39:48

At 60. She lied to me!

0:39:480:39:50

At 60. 65. 70.

0:39:500:39:53

75. 80. New money at 80.

0:39:530:39:56

85. 90. 95.

0:39:560:39:58

-100.

-100.

-I'll take a five. 105.

0:39:580:40:01

105. 110. 120.

0:40:010:40:04

130. At 130.

0:40:040:40:06

Goes at 130. And 5 again.

0:40:060:40:08

-Try 135.

-Go on!

0:40:080:40:10

-135.

-All right.

-Down here at 135.

0:40:100:40:13

How can you be so cruel and bid against her?

0:40:130:40:16

135. I sell to the dog at 135.

0:40:160:40:19

Bunty is buying at 135.

0:40:190:40:23

All done at 135, nobody else?

0:40:230:40:25

Nothing new. Sell here at 135.

0:40:250:40:27

That is a huge mark-up.

0:40:290:40:31

With profits like that, Thomas is threatening Paul's

0:40:310:40:33

formidable lead.

0:40:330:40:35

-Man, what a sale!

-What a sale!

0:40:350:40:38

So, it all comes down to Paul's biggest risk.

0:40:380:40:41

Such a huge gamble on this one item.

0:40:410:40:44

Couple of hundred, straight in, 200.

0:40:440:40:46

100.

0:40:460:40:47

At 100.

0:40:470:40:49

Selling at 100. 10 on the phone? 110 on the phone. 110.

0:40:490:40:52

120? 120. 130? 130. 140? 140.

0:40:520:40:56

-150. 160.

-We're getting there.

0:40:560:41:00

170. 180. 190. 200.

0:41:000:41:04

220? 220. 240. 260.

0:41:040:41:08

-280? 280. 300.

-You're fine.

-We're at break even.

0:41:080:41:11

300. 320. 340.

0:41:110:41:14

-Straight back.

-340. 360. 380?

0:41:140:41:18

-380. 400.

-Well done.

-420.

0:41:180:41:21

Well done.

0:41:210:41:23

What does he mean no? 400, I sell in the room. 420, phone.

0:41:260:41:30

Phone, go 420. 400 in the room, then.

0:41:300:41:33

-I sell to the lady in the room. Is he going?

-410.

-410.

0:41:330:41:36

-420 to you. 420. 430 now.

-I'll take it.

-Yeah.

0:41:360:41:39

430. 440? 440. 450?

0:41:390:41:43

-440.

-That's good.

-The lady at 440.

-Well done.

0:41:450:41:48

That's £200 on top, give it there.

0:41:480:41:51

Nobody else?

0:41:510:41:52

He shoots, he scores, and he holds on to the lead with ease.

0:41:530:41:58

-It's in there.

-Midas and my mate. Come on, we better go.

0:41:580:42:02

That fantastic auction has seen profits soar on both sides.

0:42:030:42:08

Starting with £227.74,

0:42:080:42:10

Thomas has made some massive margins,

0:42:100:42:13

clocking up profits of £171.34 after auction house costs,

0:42:130:42:18

giving him £399.08 to spend on the next leg.

0:42:180:42:23

But still in front as Paul Laidlaw, who started with £501.64.

0:42:230:42:28

His big gamble paid off,

0:42:280:42:30

giving him £398.14 profits

0:42:300:42:34

after costs.

0:42:340:42:35

This means he now has £899.78

0:42:350:42:39

to spend on the next leg.

0:42:390:42:41

-Tom.

-What?

-You'll need to be driving yourself.

-Why?

0:42:410:42:44

I've got a helicopter booked.

0:42:440:42:46

Rocking! I mean, rocking!

0:42:460:42:49

You've doubled your money again.

0:42:490:42:52

You, Margin Man!

0:42:520:42:54

Look at this! Mr Margin!

0:42:540:42:57

Yes, yes, yes! We're out of here.

0:42:570:42:59

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:010:43:04

Thomas Plant is gunning for glory.

0:43:040:43:06

Have that, Laidlaw.

0:43:060:43:08

And Paul Laidlaw is taking it all very seriously.

0:43:080:43:11

I'm a disappointment to myself.

0:43:110:43:14

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures.

Paul Laidlaw and Thomas Plant start in Birmingham before travelling through Lichfield, Shenton and Leicester, ending up at an auction in Stamford, Lincolnshire.