Episode 19 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 19

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures. Paul Laidlaw and Thomas Plant kick off in Cromer and make their way through Holt and Norwich to the auction at Colchester.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-All right, viewers?

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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I'm on fire! Yes!

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Sold. Going, going, gone!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction but it's no mean feat.

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-50p.

-There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Tricep dips.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-Oh! Oh!

-Should be a good one.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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This week's road trip is proving to be a particularly profitable one

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and our two auctioneers are basking in success.

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We're totally up for it.

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Both have come away with profits in the last auction. It's all ahead.

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The sun's shining, cool car, we're suited, booted, feeling good.

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As you should.

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Paul Laidlaw is comfortably in the lead

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but he's remaining vigilant and is taking it all very seriously.

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I'm a disappointment to myself.

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-Challenger, Thomas Plant, is playing catch up.

-Whoa!

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And he's gaining ground, coming out guns blazing.

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Gunslinger plan.

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Every auction is like going into the ring with Laidlaw.

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There are these little nips I do.

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I'm gently doing it but, oh, no...

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You keep punching me in the shins, that's the problem.

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There's a sucker punch.

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Those little hits are adding up, Thomas,

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as after three rounds at auction

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he's turned £200 into the £399.08 he's got to spend today.

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Not bad.

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But Paul's thrown some killer blows,

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converting his initial £200 into the huge budget for today of £899.78.

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Unfortunately, these financial differences are starting to

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strain relations in the old Sunbeam Alpine.

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-Just drive, OK!

-Sorry, sorry, sorry, have you got this air of...?

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It's gone to my head!

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£900 in your back pocket.

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I could have been killed for that kind of money!

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-What are you...?

-You're still talking.

-I know.

-Lordy!

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These two sparring partners started this trip

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in Morecambe, Lancashire, and will end the week

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in the county town of Bedford, covering around 600 miles.

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Today, they're savouring the delights of East Anglia,

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kicking off in Cromer, Norfolk,

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and making their way to the auction in Colchester, Essex.

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-We're near the coast.

-Yes.

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-Do we get to see the sea at any stage?

-I think I get to see the sea.

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-Where are you off to?

-Cromer.

-Cromer. Crabs.

-Crabs.

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Cromer is indeed the place to come for its famous crab

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and seaside holidays.

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First popularised by the Victorians

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and still an important part of the local area's economy.

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Cromer is also Thomas' first shopping destination

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at Brisbane Antiques.

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-Hello, I'm Thomas.

-Hi, Thomas, nice to meet you. I'm Phillip.

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Hi, Phillip, nice to meet you. Where do you buy most of your stuff?

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-Well, if I told you that I'd have to kill you.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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Careful, Thomas, Phillip designed ejector seats for military aircraft

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before getting into antiques, so he's a well connected man.

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Got to that stage in the week where it's even more pressure

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because you've only got two more auctions left, you don't want to

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lose the money you've gained, and you want to buy with a definite profit.

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There's so much pressure right now. You don't want to make a mistake.

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He's sure feeling the strain but with just under £400 in the pot,

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Thomas, there could be opportunity aplenty here.

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-That's quite a nice thing really, isn't it?

-I like the sunken handles on the side.

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I like the rawness of it.

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This 19th century sewing box with mahogany veneer is showing some

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signs of age and no ticket price but Thomas is tempted.

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We've done all right with boxes this trip, haven't we?

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Maybe the box is coming back.

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On the last leg, both experts made profits with boxes they bought.

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Man, what a sale!

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So, he could be on to something here.

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-What's that extraordinary number there?

-That's nice, that is.

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That's got Cornish serpentine in it. It's silver.

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They're supposed to be running out of that serpentine,

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-aren't they, down in Cornwall?

-I didn't know that.

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Cornish serpentine is a hard stone that was championed

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by Prince Albert in the mid-19th century.

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This piece was made into a brooch about 100 years later.

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-That's not bad. What have you got on that? 48.

-48.

-Not unattractive.

-No.

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I quite like the way it moves. It's well made, it's got a look to it

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but whether it's going to make anything at auction, that's another matter altogether.

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Thomas is wavering on the serpentine

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but Phillip has a wide selection of brooches

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he could pin his hopes on including those made in memory of a loved one.

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Very popular with the Victorians.

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What I like about memento mori jewellery is the complete

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and utter devotion and love that's gone into this one piece.

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Somebody's died, they've left money to... All the family have paid

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for their hair to be taken and plaited, mounted in a gold brooch.

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And on the back, on the reverse, instead of just knowing that it's

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you who know that this is Elizabeth's hair, no, they've gone and inscribed

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it and dated it and given the date of her death, and the age she was.

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21 years old.

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So, Phillip's dangling the two brooches and the box.

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Will Thomas take the bait?

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-I've got 55 on that.

-Yeah.

-That can be a 50.

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I can squeeze a bit off that but at 48 there's not masses...

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-Not massive, no, no.

-I'll do you 40.

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-That box has got to be £50.

-Has it got to be 50?

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-It's got to be £50.

-Can't be 40?

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-No, definitely not.

-Why not?

-Because I'd be making a loss.

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-I don't want you making a loss, do I? Can it be 45?

-No.

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-Can it be 48?

-I'll do it for 48 for you.

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I like the four in front.

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48, 50 for that.

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No arguing with that, there's no point.

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This is my sticking point but to me that's worth £35.

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-I'll knock a tenner off, make it 38.

-Such awkward maths.

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Come on, Thomas, don't embarrass yourself.

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-98...

-I can add it up. 136.

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-All right...

-Do you want me to round it down? 135.

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-Because it makes life easier for me.

-OK, 135.

-135.

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-Three items, we're in.

-I knew you would.

-What?

-I knew you would.

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I knew I'd get you!

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Hook, line and sinker, eh, Thomas?

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But a bold move parting with more than a third of your money

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in the first shop.

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-This is the first time I've gone big.

-Thank you very much.

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And rival Paul's on the road in the search for an equally

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thrilling experience in the market town of North Walsham.

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The town features a Grade I listed market cross

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that dates from the 17th century.

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But today, Paul's concern is a newer addition to the area.

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An attraction that charts the often mystifying art of magic.

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That Magic Kingdom is one of the largest collections of magic memorabilia in the world

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and the creation of the Davenport family,

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who have made magic their business for over 100 years.

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Paul's come to meet Roy to discover the tricks of the trade.

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-You must be Roy?

-Paul.

-Good to see you.

-Tremendous to see you.

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What a place! I mean I've just walked back in time into...

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-This is it.

-..into your ancestors' shop.

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It's an absolute replica of my great-grandfather, Lewis Davenport.

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He was the man who started it all off in my family.

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Born in 1881, Lewis Davenport entered the world of magic

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as a young boy.

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He started selling tricks from home before starting his own shop

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and becoming a noted performer.

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His lifelong passion for magic, which he passed on to his children,

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resulted in a spectacular collection now preserved in the museum.

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But the jewel in the family crown is a book thought to contain

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the first published material on conjuring.

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Written in 1584, at a time

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when women were persecuted for being witches,

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a time when being identified as a witch by those in power

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was the difference between life and death.

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The fine line between magic conjuring and witchcraft

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at that point, was very grey indeed.

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People assumed, oh, if you make something happen that

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I can't understand, you must be a witch.

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Then we come to Scot.

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He was appalled by all these goings on and so, what he did,

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he wrote the book.

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The majority of the book talks about herbal remedies,

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witchcraft in a good way and so on.

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And so, as a chapter, there was a chapter 13

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and chapter 13 was an actual description of magic tricks.

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Not so much as how to do it at home, it was more expose.

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It was like, this is how they do it.

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Against a backdrop of religious unrest, Scot's book was

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so revolutionary that King James I ordered all copies to be burnt,

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meaning this first edition is one of only a handful left in existence.

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And not just a relic of the past,

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this book influenced generations of magicians.

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But it wasn't until the 19th century that magic as we understand it today

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really took off and it all started

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when a French clockmaker took it off the streets and into the theatres.

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Here we are, Paul, at Eugene Robert-Houdin,

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Robert-Houdin was the surname.

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He's actually known within the magic world as the father of modern magic.

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Ah!

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In France, particularly,

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before him magicians were dressed in wizards' robes with pointy hats and...

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You know how magicians think it's up the sleeve?

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It comes from that time when they had sleeves this big

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and everything went up there, basically. Geese and everything.

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Then he was the man who went into modern garb.

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Now, he was famous for his mystery clocks.

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This is one of them.

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And the idea is you have the clock face

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and telling the correct time but there's no visible way it can work.

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That's glass but it does keep correct time, absolutely.

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-As if by magic!

-As if by magic.

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Robert-Houdin altered the landscape of magic dramatically.

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He inspired the young magician, Erik Weisz,

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better know later as the escapologist, Harry Houdini.

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This superstar once shared a stage with Roy's great-grandfather, Lewis,

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and luckily for Paul, four generations later,

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magic still courses through the veins of this family.

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-What are you going to show me, Roy?

-Well, the thing is,

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my passion is manipulation or sleight of hand and this is exactly

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where my great-grandfather started off all those years ago.

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We take a bit of magic and make a ball appear. There's the ball.

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Or we take some magic where you take the ball and it's gone again.

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Back in the hand. And a handkerchief, here we are.

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Take the ball, in it goes, in it goes.

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All I need you to do is to give a little blow. Blow.

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Ah! Well done. You've got the magic touch too.

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Have I got that wonderful assistant thing going on?

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-Fishnets, I can see you in them!

-Right, you've been amazing.

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-This is one of the best, I assure you.

-You're very welcome.

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Fishnets, eh?

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I imagine your driving companion would have something to say about that.

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And back in the Sunbeam, Paul's new-found magical prowess

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starts to show.

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-I do have one piece of magic to show you.

-Oh, yes, let me see!

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No, no, no! Let me guess.

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You're going to make my 399 into 100.

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PAUL LAUGHS

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Your 899 into 15,000!

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And it will involve no top hats or rabbits.

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They're en route to the market town of Holt.

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This once thriving medieval settlement was largely destroyed

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by a great fire in 1708 and was rebuilt in the Georgian style.

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Oh!

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This looks like a cracking place for an amble. It's great.

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It does. I hope it's not too expensive.

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Well, I'm not going to concur!

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-You'll forgive me that.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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-I've been here before so I know what it's like.

-Have a good one, big man.

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-I will, bye-bye.

-See you later.

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The nine rooms of Shirehall Plain Antiques are managed by Mandy.

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-Hello.

-Hello. How are you?

-Very good. How are you?

-Very well, thank you.

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Lots of different dealers here all renting a room.

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I think you have a good chance of finding something floating about.

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Chintzy cherub.

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There are some divine items in here.

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In nomine Padre.

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I don't think I'd make a very good vicar.

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Not a very good vicar, priest. Man of the cloth.

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There he goes, dressing up again.

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-I should really get on and buy some antiques.

-Not a bad idea, Thomas.

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This is pretty, a little clover leafed pendant.

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-Do you like that, Mandy?

-I think it's very sweet.

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-It's very pretty, isn't it?

-Yes.

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Oh, he likes this and it's only £5.

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These little marks here, I hate to tell you,

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spell out the one and the five and then a CT at the end of the lozenge.

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So that's 15 carat gold.

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And that's....

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15 carat gold stopped production, we stopped hallmarking 15 carat gold

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or making items of 15 carat gold, in 1932.

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I will buy that for £5. I'm not going to haggle at all.

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I'm buying it. It's not going to make a huge amount

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but there's definitely a good profit in there.

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And it's pretty as hell. That is dead sweet.

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So, a Victorian pendant.

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This has turned out to be a lucky find.

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It's gold, 15 carat gold.

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A fiver! Yes!

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It's not going to make hundreds

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but it's going to make a good profit so I'm really pleased.

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Things are looking good for Thomas.

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But without an object to his name,

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Paul is pressing on in search of his own four leafed clover.

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He's making the short journey to nearby Fakenham.

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This market town boasts a parish church

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that dates from the 14th century.

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So, it seems fitting that Paul's first shopping opportunity

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today is housed in a former church.

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-Hello.

-Hello there. I'm Paul.

-I'm David.

-It's good to see you.

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Anything you want to know about or any help you need, ask.

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That's great. That's tremendous of you, David. Thanks very much.

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Best case scenario, as always, my eyes alight on something that

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I feel strongly about.

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It has a great story that I can enjoy.

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It has no issues and it's got a profit in it.

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I don't care whether that's £20 or £800,

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if it ticks those boxes, no problem.

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And I won't be shy in spending the money.

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So, the hunt is on for the perfect piece.

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I'm polishing off too many of these rooms too quick.

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£900 could go a long way in here

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but Paul just can't seem to get past all this glass

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although that shouldn't pose a problem to such a lover of the stuff.

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It's a great form.

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Almost a teardrop.

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It's delicious, it's good quality glass

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and it's cut with that rather snazzy looking hound.

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I think it's great fun. I love Orrefors glass.

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This vase is by the Swedish company, Orrefors, dating from the 1960s.

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It has a ticket price of £48 but the owner, Colin, isn't here right now.

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I would buy the Orrefors vase at 30.

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It's a bit off, I know.

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I think it's a long way off but I can always ring him and see.

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No harm in asking.

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He's sniffed out that something he likes

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but can he get it for the right price?

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Paul, I have spoken to Colin.

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He's not very happy and said could you manage another

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couple of pounds so that he can deal with you?

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If it's a couple of pounds,

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I'm not falling out with anybody over a couple of pounds.

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-Got a deal at 32.

-We've got a deal at 32.

-Thanks very much.

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Thanks for your efforts and say thanks to Colin, yeah?

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-That's fair enough.

-Thank you.

-An extra two pounds?

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I think you can afford that, Paul.

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So, with his £32 vase, he's off the mark

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and just in time as day one of the road trip draws to a close.

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Nighty-night, chaps.

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Morning has arrived along with some fresh enthusiasm

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for yesterday's purchases.

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The last thing I bought was brilliant.

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It was something I knew about, they didn't.

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-You know, it's just one of those things.

-It's a banker.

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-A banker, banker, banker.

-Is there a profit in it?

-Oh, yeah.

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Don't say, "oh, yeah," like that. What happened to confidence?

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It'll quadruple.

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Wait a minute, pull over.

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Are you having a heart attack?

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-Is it coming out of your left arm?

-It's coming for you!

-What?

0:18:310:18:35

That £5 gold clover pendant is already creating quite a stir

0:18:380:18:42

and it's not all Thomas picked up yesterday.

0:18:420:18:45

There's also the sewing box and the two brooches.

0:18:450:18:48

In total, he spent £140 which means he has £259.08 to spend today.

0:18:480:18:54

-This is the first time I've gone big.

-Thank you very much.

0:18:550:18:59

Paul only parted with £32 for the glass vase.

0:18:590:19:03

So, armed with £867.78 he's got his sights on the shops.

0:19:030:19:09

This morning they're starting in Norwich, the county town of Norfolk.

0:19:110:19:14

Once the largest city in England after London

0:19:160:19:18

and with much of its medieval past intact,

0:19:180:19:22

Norwich is steeped in history. If you can get there of course.

0:19:220:19:26

-Where are we going?

-Have you got that feeling that I could be lost?

0:19:260:19:29

PAUL LAUGHS

0:19:290:19:31

What are we going to give this before we ask someone?

0:19:310:19:34

-Never ask anybody!

-I mean, maybe after an hour.

0:19:340:19:38

Come on, chaps, get it together.

0:19:390:19:41

Thankfully they do find a place to park

0:19:410:19:45

but it's not exactly in the right spot.

0:19:450:19:47

-Come on.

-Why are you looking at that wall?

-Because there's the shop.

0:19:480:19:52

-Yeah, and there's the pavement.

-Come on, Paul.

-What are you doing?

0:19:520:19:56

Whoa! Did you get shorter or is there a big drop behind there?

0:19:560:20:00

There is a drop! I didn't expect it!

0:20:000:20:03

This is how a gentleman does it. Ah! I'm in the void!

0:20:030:20:06

-Come on.

-That's one way to do it, chaps.

0:20:060:20:10

Their destiny awaits at Aladdin's Cave.

0:20:100:20:13

16,000 square feet of antiques.

0:20:130:20:15

Basically, I haven't grown up. Have that, Laidlaw!

0:20:200:20:23

Four items down. Four items.

0:20:250:20:27

What have you got? One. Cos I was quick!

0:20:280:20:31

'Do you know, I hate being in the same shop'

0:20:340:20:37

as my compadre because all I can hear is him muttering.

0:20:370:20:41

Yes. Thomas, do behave! You're even distracting your rival.

0:20:410:20:45

Something's got to change, I've got to get my game head on.

0:20:450:20:48

I've got to think.

0:20:480:20:50

Here I am, I'm sauntering, I'm trying on hats,

0:20:500:20:54

cowboy holsters, pretending to shoot Paul.

0:20:540:20:58

I mean, honestly.

0:20:580:21:00

Next I'll be stalking him, behind him, doing a leopard crawl.

0:21:000:21:05

With four items already, he really is taking it easy today.

0:21:050:21:08

Can I have a look at this bowl in here, please?

0:21:100:21:14

Ah, something to buy and not try on at last.

0:21:150:21:19

Ha! Ticket price says £22.

0:21:190:21:21

It's quite a nice bowl for one's nuts.

0:21:230:21:25

What you've got is, you've got an Egyptian silver coin

0:21:250:21:28

and you've got the Egyptian sign there.

0:21:280:21:30

It would be, probably dates from, I don't know, the late 19th century,

0:21:300:21:34

I would say early 20th century.

0:21:340:21:37

What's the best on that, please?

0:21:370:21:39

Can probably do 18.

0:21:420:21:44

-15, because I like to keep figures nice and round and simple?

-I can ask.

0:21:440:21:49

-Is that all right?

-Leave that with me, I'll see what I can sort out.

0:21:490:21:52

I hope I can get it for 15, it just makes my head...

0:21:520:21:55

That means I will have spent £155

0:21:550:21:57

which I know is very mean but that's life.

0:21:570:21:59

-She will do that for 15 for you.

-Oh, really? Brilliant. OK. There is...

0:22:010:22:06

-Thank you very much.

-That's brilliant.

-I'll give you some change.

0:22:060:22:09

Yes! Done.

0:22:090:22:12

He's pretty pleased with himself but that's not new.

0:22:120:22:15

Paul's not faring too badly either

0:22:150:22:17

because he's stumbled across two military objects

0:22:170:22:19

and if there's one thing Paul knows about, it's militaria.

0:22:190:22:24

A propeller tip photograph frame, price is down as £8.

0:22:240:22:28

That's pretty fair retail, isn't it? That's a pair of early goggles.

0:22:280:22:32

So, he's fighting for a First World War RAF propeller tip

0:22:330:22:38

made into a photo frame and a set of goggles, also dating to the

0:22:380:22:42

First World Ward period but with a higher price of £55.

0:22:420:22:45

What's the story with the pair of them, then?

0:22:470:22:49

I need a bit off. They're a lot of money. This is fair but...

0:22:490:22:53

At auction...

0:22:530:22:55

..if you don't know, if they're just a set of goggles to you

0:22:560:23:00

they're worth £5-£15.

0:23:000:23:01

-That's where I've got the problem.

-I can do you a deal.

0:23:010:23:05

I'll do you £40 for the two.

0:23:050:23:07

You've just done the deal. Eddie, you're a good man. Easy, wasn't it?

0:23:090:23:14

Sweet as a nut.

0:23:140:23:16

Our military man's over the moon.

0:23:160:23:18

The photograph frame is as it is.

0:23:180:23:22

The goggles, on the other hand, are considered by many to be

0:23:220:23:27

the first pattern officially adopted by the Royal Flying Corps

0:23:270:23:31

during the Great War.

0:23:310:23:33

My problem is...

0:23:330:23:35

..not a lot of people know that.

0:23:360:23:39

You can sometimes be too clever for your own good

0:23:390:23:42

when you're taking to general auction.

0:23:420:23:45

So, a photo frame and a potentially valuable set of goggles for £40.

0:23:450:23:49

And Paul's choice of objects is particularly fitting

0:23:510:23:53

for an area that has such close ties with the RAF.

0:23:530:23:56

Norfolk and its RAF base, Neatishead,

0:24:010:24:03

have played a crucial role in Britain's air defences.

0:24:030:24:07

Starting out as part of our country's first radar system,

0:24:070:24:11

the base is one of the longest continually operational

0:24:110:24:14

radar stations in the country.

0:24:140:24:16

Radio Detection And Ranging, or RADAR,

0:24:160:24:20

became essential to defences by the Second World War.

0:24:200:24:24

To find out how tracking an enemy in the air

0:24:240:24:27

became one of our country's most significant military achievements,

0:24:270:24:31

Thomas has come to the Air Defence Radar Museum

0:24:310:24:34

to meet manager, Chris Morshead.

0:24:340:24:36

-Hello, I'm Thomas.

-Hello, I'm Chris.

0:24:360:24:39

Chris, nice to meet you. This looks fabulous, this place.

0:24:390:24:42

-Is this a radar station?

-Certainly is, yes, dating back to 1942.

0:24:420:24:47

As an island, the UK has historically relied on the Navy

0:24:490:24:52

for protection.

0:24:520:24:54

But with the development of military aircraft, air space

0:24:540:24:57

became a key area to defend and so a new response was needed.

0:24:570:25:01

From the 1920s, acoustic mirrors were used to harness

0:25:020:25:06

the sound of incoming plane engines giving an indication

0:25:060:25:09

of their location but their effectiveness

0:25:090:25:11

was limited especially as the speed of aircraft were increasing.

0:25:110:25:15

With the threat of invasion from Nazi Germany rising,

0:25:150:25:19

a top secret mission to control the new battlefield in the sky began.

0:25:190:25:23

The Air Ministry approached Robert Watson-Watt,

0:25:250:25:29

a scientist working with long-range radio waves at the Met Office,

0:25:290:25:33

to help develop an air detection system.

0:25:330:25:36

In February 1935, Watt and his colleague, Arnold Wilkins,

0:25:360:25:40

first put theory to the test.

0:25:400:25:42

Robert Watson-Watt and Arnold Wilkins set themselves up

0:25:440:25:46

in a little van a few miles away,

0:25:460:25:48

borrowed a Heyford bomber from the RAF and they simply got that

0:25:480:25:52

to fly up and down through the radio beam

0:25:520:25:54

and from there they realised that, yes, they could detect this aircraft

0:25:540:25:58

when it approached them and they could detect it when it flew away again.

0:25:580:26:02

With this breakthrough, the government quickly developed

0:26:050:26:08

the technology and within 18 months had installed a series of radar

0:26:080:26:12

stations to monitor the skies around Britain including here at Neatishead.

0:26:120:26:17

By the outbreak of war in 1939,

0:26:190:26:21

this so-called Chain Home system was fully operational.

0:26:210:26:25

Chain Home. Why is it called Chain Home?

0:26:270:26:29

It simply provided a chain around the homeland

0:26:290:26:32

-so that's the depth of it really.

-And, so, what am I looking at here?

0:26:320:26:36

You're looking at basically the power transmitter

0:26:360:26:39

so the radar signal at very low power would have been fed

0:26:390:26:42

into this and this is basically a huge big amplifier before it

0:26:420:26:46

-goes up into the transmitting aerial.

-So, this is the boost.

0:26:460:26:48

It boosts it all up. What receives it then?

0:26:480:26:52

We then have a receiver which actually processes

0:26:520:26:54

the information and then displays it for the operator to actually

0:26:540:26:58

pick up any contacts coming in.

0:26:580:27:00

This technology became vital in 1940 during the Battle of Britain.

0:27:000:27:05

During air attacks, radar guided the brave RAF pilots

0:27:070:27:10

in their counter attack but even then the system wasn't perfect.

0:27:100:27:14

It had been rushed into service. We didn't have time to perfect it

0:27:160:27:19

and it had a number of problems associated with it.

0:27:190:27:22

It wasn't very accurate which is something we find difficult

0:27:220:27:25

to understand today talking about radar.

0:27:250:27:27

And so we needed to set up a, what we call,

0:27:270:27:29

a filter room to process the information to make it useable

0:27:290:27:33

and then pass it out to the operations rooms

0:27:330:27:36

and they then controlled the fighters that were

0:27:360:27:39

scrambled against the Luftwaffe raids.

0:27:390:27:41

It was in filter and operations rooms like these

0:27:420:27:45

that a predominantly female staff of operators played a

0:27:450:27:49

decisive role in victory for the Allies

0:27:490:27:51

ending Germany's plan to invade.

0:27:510:27:54

Do you think us having radar was one of the main factors in us

0:27:540:27:57

-winning the Battle for the Skies?

-Yes, it did.

0:27:570:27:59

It acted as, what we call, a false multiply.

0:27:590:28:02

It made the RAF seem bigger than it actually was

0:28:020:28:04

because we could keep the aircraft on the ground

0:28:040:28:07

until they were needed and then position them precisely

0:28:070:28:10

where they were needed in front of the oncoming raids.

0:28:100:28:13

But former alliances quickly descended into a new conflict

0:28:130:28:18

and the Cold War saw the British government reopen

0:28:180:28:21

improved computerised radar stations to match the threat.

0:28:210:28:25

Once again, RAF Neatishead played an important role

0:28:250:28:28

in protecting our shores.

0:28:280:28:29

And with such a passion for trying things on,

0:28:310:28:34

Thomas isn't leaving here without having a go.

0:28:340:28:37

Who would I be speaking to if I put these on, or listening to?

0:28:380:28:41

As a fighter controller you'd actually be talking to an aircraft.

0:28:410:28:45

-An aircraft?

-Carrying out interception missions.

0:28:450:28:47

Intercept, identify and report.

0:28:470:28:49

So you'd be guiding that aircraft into position where it would

0:28:510:28:54

then carry out an intercept on an unknown aircraft.

0:28:540:28:57

Roger, 280. Intercept, identify and report.

0:28:570:29:01

Wow, this room's unbelievably amazing. It's like a Bond set.

0:29:020:29:06

Well, he's been a fireman, a soldier and a cowboy on this trip

0:29:060:29:11

and now he fancies himself as James Bond.

0:29:110:29:13

I think it's best we leave it there, Thomas, and join Paul

0:29:130:29:17

back in Norwich who's visiting Looses Emporium for his final shop.

0:29:170:29:21

With over 60 dealers in one place these guys claim to be

0:29:230:29:26

the biggest antique centre in East Anglia and they could be right.

0:29:260:29:30

-I'm off the boil.

-Nothing taking your fancy, eh, Paul?

0:29:400:29:43

I'm a disappointment to myself.

0:29:430:29:46

Mm. A budget of more than £800 and he's still struggling.

0:29:510:29:56

Perhaps Patrick can help him out.

0:29:560:29:57

-Cherries in mouth!

-Yeah.

0:29:570:30:00

My kind of gal!

0:30:020:30:03

Well, this Art Nouveau bust sure has cheered him up!

0:30:050:30:08

-What would you ask for that?

-I'm asking 280 for it.

0:30:100:30:12

-No.

-No?

-No, unfortunately, but she's an interesting lassie.

0:30:150:30:21

She's too rich for his tastes.

0:30:210:30:23

-Your official constable's truncheon. Is that what it is?

-Yeah.

0:30:230:30:27

Rochdale Special Constabulary. Yes, somebody's long service.

0:30:270:30:31

I'll do that for £45.

0:30:310:30:34

What about the bust?

0:30:350:30:37

The price you've quoted, you must have slack in that?

0:30:370:30:39

-You wouldn't have waded in deep on that.

-250 for the two.

-No.

0:30:390:30:43

I'm going to offer you, it's real money, I'm backing it up.

0:30:460:30:49

-Yeah, I know.

-You're haggling over 15 quid.

0:30:490:30:52

A straight two and I'll get them and I'll walk out the door.

0:30:530:30:57

-Yeah, how's that grab you?

-All yours.

-Patrick, you're a good man.

0:30:570:31:01

The bronze bust and the late 1930s or early 1940s police truncheon

0:31:010:31:06

for a well discounted price.

0:31:060:31:08

That's given our boy a bit of a boost.

0:31:080:31:11

Look at that!

0:31:110:31:13

That's exceptional.

0:31:130:31:14

That's a craftsman. Look at that.

0:31:160:31:18

You said you wanted to buy things that fired you up, Paul,

0:31:200:31:23

and this 1940s child's chair seems to be doing the trick.

0:31:230:31:27

-That's got £38, what can it be?

-Er, 25 quid.

-15 quid.

0:31:270:31:31

-£20 and that is it.

-That is it.

-That is it. Done, done!

0:31:320:31:36

-Great. So I owe you 220.

-220.

0:31:380:31:40

With £220 spent, Paul has five items.

0:31:400:31:43

I think he's rather proud of them.

0:31:430:31:45

But what will they make of each other's purchases?

0:31:450:31:48

They're meeting in Coltishall for a big reveal.

0:31:480:31:51

-You ready? Me to reveal first.

-Yes, your turn.

0:31:530:31:56

-A silver bowl with an inset...?

-Egyptian coin.

0:31:580:32:01

That Egyptian coin is one of the rarest types of that coin.

0:32:010:32:05

-A very rare mint.

-You mean, it's a bowl for your mints?

-Yeah.

0:32:050:32:08

-Yeah, it's a very rare mint.

-Absolutely fantastic.

0:32:080:32:11

-What will that bowl do? £30 or 40?

-30 or 40.

-Mr Margin.

-Mr Margin.

0:32:110:32:16

-The little pendant.

-That's delightful, isn't it?

0:32:160:32:19

-It's marked as well.

-15 CT.

-That's delightful!

0:32:190:32:23

-What a sweet little pendant by any measure. I dropped...

-No, no, no!

0:32:230:32:28

-Oh, no!

-Don't do that!

0:32:280:32:30

-It should make 30/40.

-I do like...that.

0:32:300:32:35

-Some shrewd buying there.

-Shrewd buying.

-Shrewd buying.

0:32:350:32:38

You're looking very smug. You said you've had a very difficult time.

0:32:380:32:42

I've had a difficult time, Thomas

0:32:420:32:44

but I've pulled those rabbits out of the hat and that.

0:32:440:32:47

-It's a beautiful child's chair, isn't it?

-Glad you like that.

-Love that.

0:32:470:32:50

But it's hitty, missy.

0:32:500:32:52

Hitty, missy, eh? Is that a technical term, Paul?

0:32:520:32:56

Look at that.

0:32:560:32:57

-Foundry mark stamp to it.

-Yeah.

-Cherries in the mouth.

0:32:570:33:01

The nose is quite big, Laidlaw.

0:33:010:33:03

-Was that catalogued as spelter and you got that for £65?

-I so wish.

0:33:030:33:07

-No, I had to pay for that. Add a one at the beginning of that.

-165.

0:33:070:33:11

-I've paid the money for it.

-What are these? Flying goggles?

0:33:110:33:15

These, they are considered to be the first issue pattern

0:33:150:33:19

-of binocular to the Royal Flying Corps.

-Really?

-The first.

0:33:190:33:23

-Photographs bear it out.

-So, 19...?

-1914.

-1914?

-Yes!

0:33:230:33:29

-And how much were those?

-40.

0:33:300:33:33

-Oh, Laidlaw!

-But it's niche, it's so niche.

0:33:330:33:36

-They're great. You've got profits across the board.

-I hope so!

0:33:360:33:39

THEY LAUGH

0:33:390:33:40

Let's go.

0:33:400:33:42

Profits, possibly, but do their real opinions pack more of a punch?

0:33:420:33:47

My prediction is the bronze will be well met

0:33:470:33:51

and that I will make consistent profits

0:33:510:33:54

and Tom will have a few problem lots

0:33:540:33:57

and I'll come out on top again.

0:33:570:33:59

You know, I think we've both got really good lots.

0:33:590:34:01

It's going to be a really good auction.

0:34:010:34:04

God only knows what he thinks about my things

0:34:040:34:06

but I think he quite likes the box. He did say he liked the box.

0:34:060:34:10

The question is, will the buyers at the auction?

0:34:100:34:12

There's only one way to find out,

0:34:120:34:14

so back in the Sunbeam the boys face another impending battle.

0:34:140:34:18

To the auction...

0:34:180:34:20

THEY LAUGH

0:34:200:34:22

I haven't had...I don't hold out much hope.

0:34:220:34:25

-Why?

-I don't know!

0:34:250:34:27

-Five pound in gold.

-That's all right.

0:34:270:34:30

-There was that.

-There was that.

0:34:300:34:32

They are making their way to Colchester, in Essex.

0:34:320:34:36

Once the Roman capital of Britain,

0:34:360:34:39

Colchester claims to be the country's oldest town.

0:34:390:34:42

It's certainly brimming with history, including ancient city walls

0:34:420:34:45

and an impressive Norman castle.

0:34:450:34:48

-Antiques, pawn brokers?

-Not today.

0:34:480:34:51

-We are selling today.

-Selling.

0:34:510:34:54

Look at that, an old ruin.

0:34:540:34:56

-Look at that, they're city walls, surely.

-City walls, yeah.

0:34:560:34:59

Fantastic!

0:34:590:35:00

Well, I do hope their final destination at Reeman Dansie Auctioneer And Valuers

0:35:000:35:05

impresses just as much.

0:35:050:35:07

Thank you, driver, are you going to have both these parking places?

0:35:070:35:10

Nice parking, Thomas.

0:35:100:35:12

Will you, please, honestly!

0:35:120:35:14

I think I parked rather quite well, actually.

0:35:140:35:16

Right, Laidlaw!

0:35:160:35:18

Let's make £1,000. Let's make £1,000.

0:35:180:35:22

-Oh, oh, oh.

-Like we did last auction.

-Yeah!

0:35:220:35:25

They're going in with high expectations.

0:35:250:35:28

So does auctioneer, Timothy Medhurst, share this enthusiasm?

0:35:280:35:32

Yeah, the picture frame, the propeller tip,

0:35:320:35:35

that's quite interesting.

0:35:350:35:36

The goggles, as well, a nice combined lot.

0:35:360:35:38

I'm sure they'll sell well. Probably £60 to £100 - hope for the higher estimate.

0:35:380:35:42

The Cornish serpentine brooch...

0:35:420:35:44

I'm not sure it's going to appeal to a lot of people, unfortunately.

0:35:440:35:47

People who like a bronze but, unfortunately,

0:35:470:35:50

she has berries, or something, in her mouth

0:35:500:35:52

and it looks like she's got a growth. That might play against it, I think.

0:35:520:35:56

Today Paul is offering up five lots at a total cost of £292.

0:35:560:36:01

Thomas also has five lots that cost him £155.

0:36:010:36:07

So, with everyone sitting comfortably,

0:36:070:36:09

take it away, Timothy! Great name!

0:36:090:36:12

Number 9, the Egyptian white metal bowl.

0:36:120:36:16

We're starting with Thomas and his Egyptian bowl.

0:36:160:36:18

Nice bowl this one and £30, start this one at £30.

0:36:180:36:21

It's worth 30. 30, 32 - new bidder.

0:36:210:36:23

Do you think... Do you think...

0:36:230:36:25

At 46.

0:36:250:36:27

Do pay attention, chaps.

0:36:270:36:28

No, it's not.

0:36:280:36:29

Yes, it is.

0:36:290:36:30

38, then. Selling then at £38.

0:36:300:36:33

All done.

0:36:330:36:34

That lot went right over his head.

0:36:340:36:37

-Is that it?

-It is!

0:36:370:36:39

But Thomas has got another £23 in the kitty.

0:36:390:36:42

Missing it!

0:36:420:36:44

Well, now we've got your attention,

0:36:440:36:46

let's see how Paul's glass vase fares.

0:36:460:36:48

£30 to start this one.

0:36:480:36:50

That's what we want.

0:36:500:36:51

30, straight in. Thank you, sir, at 30. 32, new place. 34.

0:36:510:36:55

At 34, 36.

0:36:550:36:56

38. At £38 down here now at 38.

0:36:560:36:59

40. At 40, 42.

0:36:590:37:01

Back in? No! 42 at the back.

0:37:010:37:03

With you, sir, at £42.

0:37:030:37:05

There's a bit of profit to that, Paul.

0:37:050:37:09

Phew! Good, good, good.

0:37:090:37:11

Now for Thomas's lucky little find, the gold pendant.

0:37:120:37:15

£40 start it, £40 the pendant. Pretty pendant here at £40.

0:37:150:37:19

-30 and away. 30 bid.

-Oh!

-Thank you.

0:37:190:37:21

Lady's bid at 30. 32, 34, 36.

0:37:210:37:25

-With you, sir...

-Take it.

-I will sell.

0:37:250:37:28

£36.

0:37:280:37:29

This margin man keeps getting stronger.

0:37:290:37:32

Your spend thus far, 20,

0:37:320:37:35

your hammer return, 74.

0:37:350:37:39

It's certainly impressive

0:37:390:37:40

but Paul's not taking this competition sitting down.

0:37:400:37:44

And £20 to start the chair here.

0:37:440:37:46

£20, for it. 15 then away. £15 for it.

0:37:460:37:49

15 bid, third row. The lady's bid of 15 now.

0:37:490:37:52

16, new bidder, now. 18,

0:37:520:37:53

20, 22. Lady's bid, third row, then.

0:37:530:37:56

With you, madam, seated then at £22.

0:37:560:37:59

It may have been a love at first sight

0:37:590:38:02

but it won't make him any money after costs.

0:38:020:38:04

Can the first of Thomas's two brooches do any better?

0:38:040:38:08

I think the mourning brooch is going to make the best one.

0:38:090:38:13

-It will...

-Tenner.

-..sink or swim.

0:38:130:38:15

-Tenner.

-No!

0:38:150:38:16

£20 to start the brooch.

0:38:160:38:18

£20 to start the brooch, here at £20. 15 and away.

0:38:180:38:21

15 bid, lady standing at 15.

0:38:210:38:24

-I told you.

-It's only a competition.

-No.

0:38:240:38:27

16, new bidder at 16. 18.

0:38:270:38:28

At 18 bid, 20.

0:38:280:38:30

£20, standing then at 20.

0:38:300:38:33

Mmm, a loss of £17 isn't helping anyone but it is hideous.

0:38:330:38:37

-I'd say I was feeling your pain.

-No. You don't care, do you?

0:38:370:38:40

You hate me.

0:38:400:38:42

That did hurt.

0:38:420:38:44

Is he about to feel the pain of Paul's truncheon, as well?

0:38:440:38:47

I have a commission bid, start with me on the book at £40.

0:38:470:38:50

-With me.

-40.

0:38:500:38:51

£40 for the truncheon, at 40 with me.

0:38:510:38:54

On the book 42, anywhere else?

0:38:540:38:56

The truncheon here now at 40. 42, new bidder.

0:38:560:38:58

44. At 44. 46, 48, 50, 55.

0:38:580:39:02

At 55, still with me now. 60 and I'm out.

0:39:020:39:04

60, you're up.

0:39:040:39:06

All done.

0:39:060:39:07

Another £25 bagged.

0:39:070:39:10

Profit is climbing slowly upwards.

0:39:100:39:12

We are heading towards that £1,000.

0:39:120:39:17

Next is Thomas's Victorian mourning brooch.

0:39:170:39:20

I hope this one does better than the last.

0:39:200:39:23

I have a commission bid to start with me at 20. At £20.

0:39:230:39:26

-Choice.

-Some girl's bid at 18.

0:39:260:39:28

At £20, 22, 24, 26 - I'm out.

0:39:280:39:31

28, new bidder. 30, 32, 34, 36.

0:39:310:39:35

At 36, come in now? At 36, 38, 40.

0:39:350:39:38

At £40.

0:39:380:39:40

At £40 furthest from me at 40.

0:39:400:39:42

I'll take two anywhere. 40 then, with you sir, standing at £40.

0:39:420:39:46

Oh, that means both brooches have made a loss, I'm afraid, Thomas.

0:39:460:39:50

I hope Paul's lovely lady fares better under the gavel.

0:39:520:39:56

I have a commission bid with me to start at £60.

0:39:560:39:58

Come on!

0:39:580:39:59

55, I'm out, down here. Gentleman's bid of 65.

0:39:590:40:04

65! Only 65.

0:40:040:40:05

5, 80, 5, 90...

0:40:050:40:08

-It's going to do it, it's a good find.

-95, 100.

-It'll be fine.

0:40:080:40:10

-110.

-It's a good stand.

-120, 130.

0:40:100:40:14

130. At 130. 140, 150.

0:40:140:40:17

No, on my right at 150. The gentleman's bid standing at...

0:40:170:40:21

160 back in now. At 160. 170.

0:40:210:40:24

Standing then, furthest from me, then, at £170.

0:40:240:40:28

That's a loss of over £25 once the costs are deducted.

0:40:280:40:32

He won't be happy with that!

0:40:320:40:33

-Oh, it's...

-It's not fair, is it, Laidlaw? It's not fair.

0:40:330:40:38

Thomas's last lot is the sewing box he bought in Cromer.

0:40:380:40:40

The two brooches he also bought from Philip in Cromer

0:40:400:40:43

haven't done brilliantly, so can this darn a hole

0:40:430:40:46

in his balance sheet?

0:40:460:40:48

This box here has to make back the money I've lost and more.

0:40:480:40:53

-This box owes you.

-It owes me, big style.

0:40:530:40:56

60? £60 for it. It's well worth £60. 60 bid.

0:40:560:41:00

-You're off.

-Good.

0:41:000:41:02

65, seated. 70, 5, 80, 85.

0:41:020:41:07

It feels good.

0:41:070:41:09

With you, sir, at 85, then. All done.

0:41:090:41:12

A decent profit, at last, but is it good enough to forgive Phillip?

0:41:120:41:17

Are you going to phone him and tell him?

0:41:170:41:19

I'll do more than phone him. I'll do more than phone him.

0:41:190:41:22

-He's getting a visit.

-I'm driving to Cromer.

-He's getting a visit.

0:41:220:41:26

Stop plotting, fellows, and turn your attention to the last lot.

0:41:260:41:29

It's Paul's frame, combined with his rare goggles

0:41:290:41:33

but do the buyers know just how special they really are?

0:41:330:41:36

A nice, little lot this one.

0:41:360:41:38

I have commissioned bids to start with me at 32.

0:41:380:41:41

At £32, 34, 36, 38 - I'm out, down here now.

0:41:410:41:44

40, new place. 42, 44, 46.

0:41:440:41:47

You've got some serious buyers here.

0:41:470:41:49

-65.

-There we are, 65.

0:41:490:41:51

Serious, doubled your money, 70.

0:41:510:41:53

-80.

-80's in profit.

0:41:530:41:56

90, 95...

0:41:560:41:58

-Well done.

-They know what they're buying.

0:41:580:41:59

100...

0:41:590:42:01

At 100, 110 back in.

0:42:010:42:03

120, 130. At 130.

0:42:030:42:07

At 130.

0:42:070:42:09

I'd say that's pretty good going. Another £90 profit for Paul.

0:42:090:42:13

Our work here, Thomas, is done. I think we both made profit.

0:42:150:42:18

I mean, I've lost a couple of profits and then made a couple of things.

0:42:180:42:21

So, you know, the margin game played.

0:42:210:42:23

Thomas started with £399.08

0:42:240:42:27

and after auction costs has made a profit

0:42:270:42:30

of £24.58 giving him

0:42:300:42:33

£423.66 to spend next time.

0:42:330:42:37

Paul had £899.78 to spend, adding a profit after costs

0:42:370:42:42

of £55.68, he goes forward with £955.46.

0:42:420:42:48

Will he be able to make 1,000?

0:42:480:42:51

-This is it, one more bite at the cherry.

-One bite at the cherry.

0:42:510:42:56

We've doubled our money!

0:42:560:42:59

-Come on!

-That would be lovely. More margins to be played!

0:42:590:43:02

Next time on Antiques Road Trip, Paul feels the pressure for buying for the last auction.

0:43:020:43:07

Don't occupy me, I'm busy. Can't you see I'm working?

0:43:070:43:10

And Thomas tries to take the glory in the final hour.

0:43:100:43:14

Nip it at the last with the help of the Masons!

0:43:140:43:17

Antiques experts travel the UK searching for treasures.

On the fourth day of their road trip Paul Laidlaw and Thomas Plant kick off in Cromer, Norfolk and make their way through Holt and Norwich to the auction at Colchester, Essex.